UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Alumni Chronicle 1953

Item Metadata

Download

Media
alumchron-1.0224279.pdf
Metadata
JSON: alumchron-1.0224279.json
JSON-LD: alumchron-1.0224279-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): alumchron-1.0224279-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: alumchron-1.0224279-rdf.json
Turtle: alumchron-1.0224279-turtle.txt
N-Triples: alumchron-1.0224279-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: alumchron-1.0224279-source.json
Full Text
alumchron-1.0224279-fulltext.txt
Citation
alumchron-1.0224279.ris

Full Text

 1U fy. Ii. G. Aluntmi
WINTER, 1953
fEs
I*i# .Believe it or not, you'll likely earn
more than that during your working years.
So the big question is:
How much of this will still be yours
when you decide to retire?
Or have to?
You owe it to yourself to make sure
you keep enough.
Bank a regular amount from each
pay from now on... at the B of M.
And hold on to a worthwhile
share of the fortune you will earn.
TO A M/UM CAHAO/AMS
Bank of Montreal LwCHRONICLE
Published by the
Alumni Association of The University of British Columbia
Editor: Harry T. Logan, M.C, M.A.
Alumnae Editor: Leona Sherlock. B.A. '50
Board of Management
President   G. Dudley Darling, B.Com. '39
Past-President Douglas   Macdonald,   B.A. '30
First Vice-President  W. James Logie, B.A. '26
Treasurer Peter Sharp,  B.Com. '36
Second Vice-President Aileen  Mann,  B.A. '37
Third Vice-President Dean  Blythe  Eagles,   B.A. '22
Chronicle Editor Harry T. Logan, M.C, M.A.
Executive-Director..   Frank Turner, B.Com., B.A. '39
Degree Representatives: Agriculture, Jack Gray, B.S.A. '39;
Applied Science, Dr. J. Kania, B.A.Sc. '26; Architecture.
Harry Lee, B.Arch. 'SO; Arts, Isobel Bescoby, B.A. '32:
Commerce, Don Miller, B.Com. '47; Forestry, Bill Hancock,
B.S.F. '49; Home Fconomics, Audrey M. Dunlop, B.H.E.
'47; Law, Frank Lewis, B.A. '49, LL.B. 'SO; Medicine,
Dr. Arthur W. Bagnall, B.A. '32; Pharmacy. Robert
Thomson. B.S.P. '53; Physical Education, John McDiarmid.
B.P.E. '50;  Social Work^ Cy. Toren.  B.A. '48.
Members at Large: William H. Birmingham. R A. '33;
Dr. W. G. Black. B.A. '22; Harry Franklin, B.A. 49; Mrs.
Helen Harmer, B.A. '40; Mrs. H. A. (Rosemary) Hope,
B.A.  '40;  E.  G.  (Ernie)   Perrault, B.A. '48.
Senate Representatives: Dr. Earle Foerster, B.A. '21; Dr.
W. C. Gibson, B.A. '33; Dr. Harry V. Warren, B.A. '26,
B.A.Sc. '27.
Alma Mater Society Representatives: Ivan Feltham, Bill St.
John and Al Goldsmith.
Editorial Committee
Chairman  Dean  Blythe  Eagles
Advisory Members.. Dudley Darling (ex officio)
Ormonde J. Hall,  Past Editor
Undergraduate Representative.. Ted Lee
Harry T. Logan Frank Turner (ex officio)
Editorial Offices:
Business Office: 201 Brock Hall. U.B.C, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Editorial Office: 207 Brock Hall, U.B.C, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Published in Vancouver, B.C., andauthorizedas secondclass mail, Post Office Dept..Ottawa
DIRECTORY OF U.B.C. ALUMNI BRANCHES
Calgary—5. Aubrey  Kerr,  B.A.  '40.
Kamloops—Miss  Evelyn M.  Bradley,  B.A.  '44,  (Exec.  Member)
204   Seymour   St.,   Kamloops,   B.C.
Kelowna—Winston  A.   Shilvock,   B.A.   '31,
267  Bernard Ave.,  Kelowna,   B.C.
Kimberley—John  W.   Stewart,   B.A.Sc,   '39,   Box  632,   Kimberley,   B.C.
London, England—Lt.-Col.   H.  F.   E.  Smith,  '25,  B.C.  House,
1-3  Regent  St.,   London  S.W.I,   England.
Montreal—E.  A. Thompson,  B.A.Sc.  '42,  58  Belmont Ave.,  Valois,  Que.
Nanaimo—E.  D.  Strongitharm,   B.A.  '40,  4 Church St.,   Nanaimo,   B.C.
Northern  California—Albert   A.   Drennan,   B.A.   '23,
420 Market St., San  Francisco  11.
Ottawa—Dr. George F. Davidson, B.A. '28, Deputy Minister of Health and
Welfare,  Ottawa—Past President.
Penticton—J. Peter VanderHoop, B.A. '50.
Portland—Dave  B. Charlton,  B.A. '25,   1834 S.W. Vista,  Portland  1, Ore.
Regina—Rex L. Brown,  B.A.Sc. '27, 682 Wallace St., Regina Sask.
Seatt'e—Dr. Fred W. Laird, B.A. '22, Medical Centre, Summit at Madison,
Seattle 4, Wash.
Southern  California—Arnold M.  Ames,  B.A.Sc.  '37,
1000  South  Fremont Ave.,  Alhambra,  Calif.
Summerland—G.   Ewart  Woolliams,   B.A.  '25,  Summerland,   E..C.
Toronto—Roy V. Jackson,  B.A.   '43,  Apt.  38-48,  Glenview Ave.,
Toronto,  Ont.
Trai!—Dr. C. A.  H. Wright,  B.Sc.   '17,  306 Ritchie Ave., Trail,  B.C.
Victoria—Gil J. Smith, B.A. '49, Room 328, Pemberton Bldg.,
Victoria,  B.C.
(Except  in  the  case of  Kamloops  and  Ottawa,  the  Alumnus  named   is
President of the Branch.—Ed.)
VOLUME 7, NUMBER 4
WINTER, 1953
Contents Include
Page
Dr.   Lionel  Stevenson   — —,      3
Editorial         —    5
Branch News  ,    _  5-6
For Kathleen  Ferrier—John  M.  Reeves  ....  6
Convention of  Registrars—J. E.  A.  Parnell     6
Chancellor Adenaur and Pax Romana—Mary MacDougal     7
U.B.C. School of Commerce—E.  D. MacPhee  „    8
Meeting  of  Electrical  Engineers—Frank  Noakes    10
The President Reports—President MacKenzie    11
Student Registration, Session   1953-54      12
Autumn Congregation—The Editor   13
Alumnae—Leona Sherlock  .   14
Plans for Home Management Fund—Aileen Mann   . .  14
Fall   Plays—Peter   L.   Smith         15
In Ancient Athens—Homer A. Thompson               16
Great Trekker Award—W. Robbins and R. D. James—,   17
Fall  Sports—Bus  Phillips       18
Frankly   Speaking—Frank  Turner       19
Annual Report of the Executive Director—Frank Turner  20
Dudley Darling  New Alumni  President—The Editor  .    22
Alumni  Association   President's  Annual  Report—Douglas  Macdonald 24
The  Hon.  Mrs.  Tilly  Rolston—In  Memoriam—The  Editor .  25
Diamond Jubilee at Union College—The Editor    25
The  End of Vancouver—llico    26
News of Alumni—The Editor      27-8-9
Alumni  Help Blue  8. Gold  Revue—Dorothy Somerset  29
The Faculty—The Editor      30
The Campus—Bill St. John    31
The Higher Education—David  Brock         32
Blue  and  Gold   Revue—Ivan   Feltham    ,    33
New  Director of  Extension   ,     34
Indian Summer—Jane Banfield            35
List of Donors to Alumni-U.B.C.  Development  Fund   36-47
Allan  McLean Hurst—In  Memoriam—Paul  N. Whitley   48
Dr.  Douglas Gordon  Mathias—Dean   Eagles       49
Births — Marriages — Deaths   .   49
FRONT COVER
WALTER    H.   GAGE,    M.A.,    DEAN    OF   ADMINISTRATIVE   AND
INTER-FACULTY   AFFAIRS,   WHO   WAS   THIS   YEAR'S   CHOICE
FOR THE GREAT TREKKER AWARD, GIVEN ANNUALLY BY THE
ALMA MATER SOCIETY TO A DISTINGUISHED U.B.C. ALUMNUS.
SEE ARTICLE. PAGE
PHOTO   SY  U.B.C. VISUAL  EDUCATION  SERVICE
DR.  LIONEL STEVENSON
"The Ordeal of George Meredith" by Dr. Lionel
Stevenson, B.A. '22, M.A. (Toronto) '23, Ph.D.
(California) '25, B.Litt. (Oxon.) '35, Professor of
English at Southern California (U.C.L.A.), has had
excellent Press reviews.   The  Los Angeles Times
Continued on Page 26
Page 3 The Eskimo hunter had to devise
a light, fast craft that would be tough
and virtually unsinkable. Result...
his sealskin kayak, one of man's
most remarkable answers to the
challenge of his environment.
Imagination plus ingenuity
were the twin keys to the Eskimo's
problem. Here at the Royal Bank
we believe those same two qualities
to be important in the banking business:
imagination to plan for the future,
ingenuity to meet new conditions as
they arise. The result, a flexible
banking service, constantly expanded
and adjusted to meet the changing
needs of our customers.
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
Total assets exceed $2,675,000,000
Page 4 EDITORIAL
Once again history was made at U.B.C. when,
on November 19th, in Brock Hall, the members of
Convocation and the Alumni Association members
for the first time united on the occasion of their
respective annual meetings. That the rather complicated Agenda was carried through so smoothly
was due to the skilful direction of the respective
Chairmen. Chancellor Emeritus Hamber presided
over Convocation with his usual adroitness and despatch, and with welcome dashes of humour. Retiring
President Douglas Macdonald, and newly-elected
President Dudley Darling, despite the distractions
of good food and good company, put through the
Alumni Association business with no evident sign
of hurry or confusion. A word of admiration and
thanks is due to those responsible for arranging the
very successful dinner meeting, and especially to
Dr. YV. G. Black, hard-working committee chairman,
and to Executive-Director Frank Turner, for their
painstaking preparatory labours.
+        +
R. J. (Bus) Phillips, U.B.C. Co-ordinator of
Athletics, when asked recently his opinion on the
objectives and value of athletic activities in the life
of the University, said that, in his view, the essential aim of all forms of sport instruction was "to
help young people realize the necessity for keeping
fit, to teach them to play to win but to take a loss
without beefing, and to be a good sport always."
He added that, while he took a keen general interest
in all sports, he was especially interested in their
application to the improvement of our youth as
citizens. So long as this spirit and objective in
University sports is fostered and maintained most
of us would agree that athletic instruction and competition have a valuable place in the curriculum.
In the last issue there appeared two short poems
by John Reeves, formerly a member of the U.B.C.
Classics Department, now with the CBC, Toronto.
His program, "A Word in Your Ear" is heard on
Tuesday night and he frequently produces the Distinguished Artists Recital and other Wednesday
night programmes. In this issue is a poem by him
on Kathleen Ferrier, which has special poignancy
because of the death, in England, of this great
sinjrer since his verses were written.
All who heard Dr. Rhys Sale, President of the
Ford Motor Company of Canada, deliver the U.B.C.
Autumn Congregation address or who read his
words in the Press, could not fail to be deeply impressed by his keen analysis of the relations between
the University and industry and his clearly expressed views on the financial plight of Education
in Canada. His announcement of the twenty-one
scholarships to be given by his Company over the
next three years, together with a "direct grant of
$500 annually to the institution chosen by the
student" is certain to inspire other companies and
individuals to give attention to the problems of
higher education. To quote the words of Dr. Sale.
"We must have among parents an aroused consciousness of the glaring weakness of our educational system, a consciousness that will reflect itself
in the strongest demand for more adequate remuneration for the teaching profession, more inducements to young people to become teachers, and
better facilities for education. We need a fresh look
at the importance of education in the development of
our national life."
Branch News
Penticton
The annual meeting of the Penticton Branch
of the U.B.C. Alumni was held on Sunday evening,
October 18, 195,3, at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Hugh
Barr. Guests of honour were Dr. and Mrs. Norman
MacKenzie. Members of the Summerland Branch
were also present.
The President, Airs. Clyde McLeod, reported on
the year's activities. These included sponsoring a
performance of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet in January and the spring play "Shadow and Substance"
in May. Proceeds from these went to the local
Bursary Fund. The Royal Winnipeg Ballet are to
play a return engagement in May again sponsored
by the  Penticton Alumni.
The officers for the coming year are: President.
Peter VanderHoop; Vice-President, Don Kerr;
Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. H. B. Morley; Committee, Bill Gilmore, Bill Halcrow and Mrs. Chas.
Teeple.
Dr. MacKenzie addressed the meeting, stressing
the importance of the Alumni to the University and
telling of new developments at the University and
of future plans. His talk and visit was very much
appreciated by all present.
Mrs. C. MacLeod (nee Joan Isobel Bruce), B.A. '41, Past President Penticton Branch; President MacKenzie; David L. Mcintosh, Associate Plant
Pathologist, Summerland Experimental Station, Past President Summerland
Branch.
Montreal
A branch of the U.B.C. Alumni Association
was formed recently in Montreal when Frank Turner, Executive Director, was there in connection with
the Thunderbird-McGill football game in September. A pro-tem executive has been formed with E.
A. Thompson as president. Regarding the new
branch Mr. Thompson writes under date of November 5th as follows:
". . . Those interested in taking part in our
activities in Montreal should write to me at my
home address, giving me their home and business
addresses, and telephone number so that they may
be added to our mailing list.
"Pro-tem executive: H. Capozzi, 34 McTavish
St., Montreal. P.Q.; J. G. Light, 616 Algonquin
Ave., Town of Mt. Royal, P.Q.; Rex Merritt, 113
Page 5 Ferndale Crescent, Dorval, P.Q.; E. A. Thompson,
58 Belmont Ave., Valois, P.Q.; John N. Turner,
c/o Stikeman & Elliott, Bank of Canada Bldg., Victoria Square, Montreal,  P.Q.
"... I propose within the next two to three
weeks to have the pro-tem executive meet in my
office and we can then discuss possible future activities. My present intention is that we would have
a dinner meeting, or dance, early in the New Year,
since this is a relatively slack time for most people
and we would be likely to get better attendance."
Summerland
The Summerland Branch of the U.B.C. Alumni,
meeting last week at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. K. Mac-
leod, elected officers for the ensuing year as follows: President, Ewart Woolliams; vice-president, Mrs. A. K. Mac-
leod; secretary, Mrs. N. O. Solly; press and Chronicle representative, A. K. Macleod; refreshment committee convener, Miss M. Barraud.
The meeting was an interesting one and decided to urge
that the R. C. Palmer Memorial Scholarship fund be accepted as a U.B.C.  alumni  development fund.
The matter of reinvesting the Summerland Scholarship
fund so that more money would be realized from it was
discussed, and the executive was asked to look into the
matter.
The local alumni is concerned with the possibility of
bringing university speakers into the valley to talk on
special topics of community interest, such as community
planning, etc., and will try to act along these lines.
The advantage of a local representative of U.B.C. was
recognized and the Summerland branch will contact other
valley points in order to form a nominating committee
for this purpose.
A committee consisting of Dr. D. F. Fisher, Mrs. N. O.
Solly, and Mrs. A. K. Macleod, was formed to draw up a
resolution on the subject of equalizing opportunity for
town and country students at the provincial university, to
be forwarded to the coast.
A letter of appreciation will be sent from the branch
here to Mrs. R. C. Palmer for her contribution to alumni
work- —Penticton  Herald.
+        +
FOR KATHLEEN FERRIER
How many hearing in the alien earth
Or air this unambiguous music have said
As I gratefully Here is a friend, and hearing
Loved?   And hearing knew their worth
Altered for ever, as the dead
Are changed by easters of remembering.
Oh but before you shyness runs in rout;
The  insubstantial  cries  of wrong
Are still, and the peoples reach out
Their hands to touch the hem of your song.
Like children  whom  the silences  reprove;
And all our listening is love.
Orpheus again will weep
Upon the mountain of his loneliness,
And lost Lucretia dress
Her woe in  death to keep
Her faith alive; and others will proclaim
Christ on the winter air
Our hope and  harmony, and bear
Gerontius home with all his heart aflame.
But it will be for us to remember
How no one else can sing, who heard
And know: for here, in the very chamber
Of darkness,  like  a  secret word,
Light flew in at our ears
And searched the place of tears
With joy and clarified our years.
And we shall remember
How here, while we listened,
A terrible gladness fastened
Our hearts on you, and how
The spirit once again became
Lovable and even the most outlaw
Found in the alien air and earth a home.
CONVENTION OF REGISTRARS
By J. E. A. Parnell
(J. E. A. Parnell, B.A. '35, B.Ed. '48, M.A. (Toronto)
'48, is Associate Registrar at U.B.C.—Ed.)
The University of British Columbia was host to
the 27th Annual Meeting of the Pacific Coast Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions
Officers for the period November 8th to 11th. The
delegates spent one full day on the campus, centering their activities in the Brock Memorial Building.
A tour of the campus was made possible by the
generosity of some faculty members who provided
their cars and by members of the Teacher Training
class who acted as guides to visitors who had their
own cars. An informal tea in the Faculty Club
completed the day.
PHOTO  BY  VANCOUVER SUN
—John M. Reeves.
Page 6
Ronald  B.  Thompson,  President  of American  Association  of  Collegiate
Registrars and  Division Officers, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio;
Sister Margaret Rush, Holy  Names College, Spokane, Washington,  C. B.
Wood, Registrar, U.B.C.
Over one hundred delegates attended the convention—a most creditable attendance in view of
the fact that the majority of the two hundred institutions forming the Association are located in Oregon and California. This was the first time in the
history of the Association that the annual meeting
had been held outside of the United  States.
Addresses were given by Ronald H. Thompson,
President of the American Association of Collegiate
Registrars and Admissions Officers who is Registrar of Ohio State University; by Clyde Woman.
Director of Admissions, University of Michigan ; by
Ernest Whitworth, Director of Commission on Accreditation, American Council on Education, Washington, D.C, and by Lloyd S. Woodburne, Dean,
College of Arts and Sciences, University of Washington.
Dr. R. L. Haig-Brown spoke at the banquet of
his views on Canadian culture and the Canadian
character. Dr. K. F. Argue completed the story for
the visitors by speaking at the final session on "Patterns of Canadian Education".
Charles B. Wood, U.B.C. Registrar, was Chairman of the General Convention Committee.
Next year's meeting will be held at Phoenix,
Arizona, under the presidency of Dr. H. Hall, Registrar, Stanford University.
+ +
Don Smellie (B.Sc. Queen's, M.A.Sc. '51), winner of a Physics Scholarship last Session, has proceeded to the Australian National University at
Canberra where he will study for the next two
years. CHANCELLOR ADENAUER MEETS
PAX ROMANA LEADERS AT BONN
By Miss Mary McDougal (Arts '33)
(Miss McDougal is a Girls' Counsellor at Pt. Grey
Junior High School. Since her graduation she has had an
unusually varied career in business and the public service.
Six years in Banking and two years in the U.B.C. Registrar's Office were followed by ten years as Youth Employment Counsellor in the National Employment Service. In
1951-52 she was 2nd Vice-President of the U.B.C. Alumni
Association, is an active member of the University Women's
Club, and a charter member and Past-President of the
Vancouver Newman Alumni Association, which is affiliated
to Pax Romana through the Canadian Federation of Newman Clubs (C.F.N.C). Miss McDougal was a C.F.N.C.
delegate to the Pax Romana Assembly in Bonn, Germany,
during the past summer and was elected Canadian representative on the graduate council. Following is an extract
from a letter describing her experience in  Germany.—Ed.)
"One of the highlights of my trip to Europe
was a conference 1 attended at Bonn, Germany.
This conference was the meeting of the graduate
section of Pax Romana—Pax Romana is a world
federation of Catholic University students and
graduates, representing 48 countries. The governing council comprises 9 member countries on a
three-year-rotating basis. At present, I have the
honour to represent Canada as council member. In
this capacity I attended the Conference.
"The enclosed picture was taken at Bonn, when
members of the Council were received by Chancellor Conrad Adenauer. I am very thrilled to have
this picture and thought you might care to use it
in the Chronicle. I should be glad to have it back
when it has served your purpose.
"In the picture: Chancellor Adenauer, Sir Hugh
Taylor (President of P.R. and Dean of Graduate
Studies at Princeton University), myself, Prof.
Ramon Sugranyes de Franch (General Secretary
of P.R., lawyer and professor of Spanish Language
and Literature at the University of Fribourg,
Switzerland). The young lady standing, acted as
interpreter; she translated Mr. Adenauer's German
words into French. We were with him, around the
council table, for a half-hour—a considerable time
out of his busy days in August, when he was preparing for elections! Chancellor Adenauer has a
strong, kind face and spoke to us in a quiet, forceful manner; he did not look his 77 years."
+       +
A composition by Miss Barbara Pentland of the U.B.C.
Department of Music was given its premiere by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra on Sunday afternoon, November 15th.   The work is entitled "Ave atque Vale".
The man who came
with a problem I
When problems involving your financial affairs
arise in either your business or personal life,
there is one man you can always turn to for
sound, impartial advice.
He is your Dominion Bank manager. He has
a background of careful training and long
experience to call upon. He also has at his
command The Dominion Bank's coast-to-coast
facilities and broad understanding of finance.
You will find it a pleasure—helpful and constructive—to talk things over with your Dominion Bank manager. You are always welcome.
THE
OMINION
BANK
82 YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE CANADIAN PEOPLE
Seven Conveniently Located Branches Serving
the Vancouver Area.
Col.   The Honourable E.   W.   Hamber,   C.M.G.,
LL.D., Vancouver Director.
Page 7 U. B.C. SCHOOL OF COMMERCE
By E. D. MacPhee
(Professor E. D. MacPhee, M.M., M.A., B.Ed., Edinburgh, is Director of the School of Commerce, University
of British Columbia. A graduate of Acadia University and
Veteran of World War I, he did graduate work after the
war at the University of Edinburgh. He taught Psychology
at Acadia, Alberta, and Toronto Universities from 1920 to
1929. In 1929 he became Comptroller of the York Knitting
Mills. From 1930 to 1950 Professor MacPhee became involved in a variety of business and industrial activities in
Canada and England. He became Chairman, President,
or Managing Director of operating companies in textiles,
leather goods, aircraft and chemicals. He helped to form
and was Director of two firms of industrial consultants,
J. D. Woods Company (now J. D. Woods and Gordon
of Toronto) and Production Engineering of London, England. In 1950 he returned to Canada to become Director of
the School of Commerce and Honorary Bursar of the University of British  Columbia.—Ed.)
History
The introduction of Commerce courses, as university disciplines, has generally been initiated by
Departments of Economics, and the University of
British Columbia has followed this pattern. The
calendar of that Department for the year 1930
listed for the first time courses described as Accountancy 1, Accountancy 2, Accountancy 3, Marketing 19 and Commercial Law 1. The first graduate with this degree was Mr. James W. Home, B.A.,
in 1930, and it was indicated that students who
selected a particular grouping of undergraduate
courses would proceed to the degree of B.Com.
Graduates of the thirties will recall as Instructors,
Prof. J. Friend Day, Prof. Currie, Mr. Frederick
Field, Mr. Tupper and others who helped to define
a standard for these subject-matters equivalent to
those of other university courses.
In 1939 Mr. Ellis H. Morrow became the first
Head of a separate Department of Commerce. He
was forced, almost immediately, to condition his
plans by the outbreak of World War II and by
the departure of substantial numbers of young men
to join the armed forces. Despite the limitations of
staff, Professor Morrow set about developing a
program of courses which would keep his Department in line with the most progressive undergraduate schools in Canada. Successive calendars show
the addition of courses in foreign trade, production,
advertising, market research, auditing, and administrative practices. Special courses were provided
in drug-store marketing and management. Combined degrees or double-degrees, as they are called,
were developed with Agriculture and Arts.
Then came the autumn of 1945 and the great
flood of young men trying to fit themselves as
quickly as possible for positions in civil life. Commerce registrations jumped from 152 in 1944-45
to 796 in 1947-48. Mr. D. K. Bell was drawn from
private business to become a professor. Messrs.
J. E. Stark, C. N. Brennan and John Farris and
others were recruited as part-time lecturers. As
soon as graduates, who were prepared to teach,
could complete their post-graduate work they were
added to the faculty. Professors Wong, Gourlay
and Van Houten came to the staff in this manner.
Professor Taylor came from Ontario ; Saskatchewan
provided Professor Moynes; Professor Mahoney
came from Harvard; and, by one device or another,
the classes were taught.
E. D. MacPHEE, M.M., M.A., B.Ed.
In 1950 Professor Morrow retired, the Department was made a School, and Mr. E. D. MacPhee
returned from business to teaching to become the
Director. The course of instruction was again extended and reorganized, first year Arts was made
a prerequisite and provision was made for a Master's degree. The faculty now consists of thirteen
full-time and two part-time instructors, plus ten
honorary lecturers who give occasional classes.
Population
The pattern of growth of the B.Com. since 1950
should be of interest to commerce graduates. The
completion of their programs by veterans and the
introduction of a five-year program combined to
reduce the registration to 329 by 1950-51. This was
5 per cent of the total student body. It has increased steadily each year, and in the current session stands at 472, about 8.75 per cent of the total,
and 11 per cent of the male student group. The
number of women students continues to be small.
The rapidity of the rise in the School population,
as a percentage oi university registration, together
with the very substantial increase anticipated in
overall attendance at the university in the near
future raises important questions as to the staff and
facilities needed by the School in the next decade.
In 1940 the registration in U.S.A. schools of business was, like ours at present, about 9 per cent. By
1950 it became over 15 per cent. We do not expect
any such startling increase, but there is no sign of
the curve flattening out, and we are anticipating a
very substantial addition to the student population
in Commerce as the years go by.
Philosophy
Schools of Commerce, like all other professional
schools, are deeply divided on questions of goals,
curricula and teaching methods. Most schools have
undergraduate programs only; some serve graduates only; some, including this university, provide
for both. In some the curriculum has changed little
since  1930;  in  others a  wide range of courses is
Page 8 provided. Some prefer a general course with wide
freedom of choice left to the individual student as
to electives; others, including U.B.C, believe in a
closer control of the student's program.
In this University, the School of Commerce is
a professional faculty, engaged in training men
and women for a variety of professional and executive careers. It is our opinion that any professional
man or executive should have such intellectual and
cultural background as will enable him to deal constructively with the social, political and legal problems of his times and his environment. The B.Com.
program must, therefore, provide him with an opportunity to become aware of the cultural, political
geographic and economic factors which have
created that environment. Courses in economics,
geography, psychology, English, mathematics, are
therefore obligatory. He may study a foreign language for two or three years, or a science, but he must
carry any subject matter for at least two years.
B.Com. graduates are expected to have achieved
competence or skill in the basic principles and practices of modern business operations, and to have
some experience in the solution of business problems. To achieve this objective a core of required
courses is prescribed for all: two courses in accounting, and one in each of six other named subjects. The 'core' therefore comprises just over a
third of the total program.
A third principle which operates in curricula
organization and in the operation of the School is
that students should be required to concentrate in
one or other field of business during their two senior
years. These 'options' as they are called correspond
to majors in Arts, to Honours courses in Agriculture and to professional courses in Applied Science.
The options are fifteen in number, e.g., Accounting,
Marketing, Production, Finance, Teaching, Hospital Administration, and so on. The intent is to
allow the student to know well one field of business
or professional activity but the student is continually reminded that his choice of an option is a
choice of a training program, not a choice of a
career. These specialized courses comprise about
one-fourth of his four-year program.
It is the view of the School that its objective is
not to train men in the techniques of individual industries or services, but to develop critical and
analytic habits of thought and to establish sound
work habits. It is of primary importance that
B.Com. graduates have the outlook and intellectual
standards of college men, not the skills of a technician. Hence the emphasis must be on general principles and procedures, and on competent application
of these principles to varied business problems.
The responsibility of the School is not only in
the intellectual field. Through an organized counselling service all Commerce men and women are
required to maintain regular personal contact with
one professor during their stay in the school. These
obligatory interviews take place, but informal,
friendly, confidential and sometimes emergent visits
by students to their staff advisers are much more
frequent and important.
The School accepts responsibility for "extending" its program to the community. Business and
professional organizations have co-operated with
the School in organizing certificate and diploma
courses in accounting, marketing, advertising, sales
management, finance, banking, industrial organization, and in administrative practices. This year over
800 men and women are registered in lecture and
correspondence courses. These are not 'popular'
courses; texts are prescribed; homework, of 10 to
15 hours weekly, is assigned; examinations are
given and marked. The fact that the School has
many more demands than it can meet from professional and executive groups all over the province
indicates the extent of community demand and need.
A large unofficial new-graduate group of 'alumni'
is developing and it is a stimulating and welcome
addition to our ranks.
These men, as well as the B.Com. group, support
the School in every manner suggested to them.
As guest lecturers in their own special fields, as
employers, as contributors of bursaries and scholarships, as supporters of our annual banquet, as faculty sponsors in their associations and councils and
boards, and as persons who know from personal experience what the School of Commerce is teaching
its young people, the School is well repaid for its
assumption of this extra load.
The Present
The population of the School is once more
young, but they are very promising young people.
They do the same silly things as undergraduates
have always done; they have the same weaknesses
and foibles; but they have inherent strengths of
intellect and character and are fitting successors to
the 1400 who now hold the degree of B.Com. from
this University.
The School is still housed in huts, but the accommodation has been substantially improved with-
ing the last two years. Graduating classes in 1952
and 1953 donated furniture for a lounge. Laboratories are being equipped in marketing, advertising,
production, finance and accounting.
Alumni
Plans are now being made for the formation of
a Commerce Division within the Alumni Association. Class records are being compiled and class
representatives will soon be asking the Alumni to
help bring our records of each of you up to date as
to location, occupation, family and so on. Local
branches or clubs will be formed in the principal
cities.
Commerce Alumni are scattered over the whole
continent; are engaged in almost every branch of
industry and in various professional groups. As we
collect up to date informaiton we will publish it in
The Chronicle. Why wait to be asked? Send in particulars of yourselves to the Director.
(The faculty of the School, and the interim officers of
the Commerce Division of the Alumni, appreciate this opportunity to inform the Alumni of the progress being made in
the  School.) , ,
On My  Forty-third Birthday
I can see them warming up in the bull-pen,
The fitter and younger men.
And I can see them itching,
And it doesn't improve my pitching.
+
+
-B.A.  '30
Professor Colin C. Gourlay, B.Com. '47, of the
School of Commerce, was named president at the
Conference of Northwest Universities Business Administration held in October at the University of
Idaho.
Page 9 MEETING OF
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
By Frank   Noakes
(Dr. Frank Noakes is Professor of and Head of the
Department of Electrical Engineering in the University of
British Columbia. Graduating from the University of
Alberta in 1937, he proceeded to Iowa State College, where
he received the M.Sc. degree in 1938 and Ph.D. in 1940.
For three years, 1940-43, he lectured in Electrical Engineering, University of Toronto, and spent the three following
years as Assistant Research Engineer with the Ontario
Hydro-Electric Power Commission. In 1946 he joined the
U.B.C. staff as Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. He is Past Chairman of the Vancouver Section of the
American Institute of Electrical Engineers whose District
Conference he has described in this article.—Ed.)
The American Institute of Electrical Engineers was
founded May 13, 1884. Its objects are the advancement of
the theory and practice of electrical engineering and of the
allied arts and sciences, together with the maintenance of
high professional standing among its members.
Fro msmall beginnings at the dawn of the present
electrical age, the Institute has developed into one of the
major engineering organizations on the North American
Continent with a membership of 42,000. In order to conduct the affairs of the Institute effectively, the continent
has been divided into ten geographical districts, each under
a Vice-President. District 9 includes the Province of British Columia, Alaska, the States of Washington, Idaho,
Montana and Utah. The Vice-President of this District is
Mr. T. I. Ingledow, Vice-President and Chief Engineer of
the B.C. Electric.
District meetings are held once a year. Last September
1-4 the Vancouver Section members, numbering about 300,
sponsored the Pacific General Meeting. The Institute's
Board of Directors were also present and held a meeting
during the Conference. In the total registration of 783
there were representatives from all quarters of the United
States and from Eastern Canada.
J.   H.   Steede,  B.A.Sc.  '26,  Chairman   Pacific  General  Meeting.    Elgin   B.
Robertson (Dallas, Texas), President, Am. Inst, of Elec. Eng.   His Worship
Mayor  Hume.    T.   I.   Ingledow,  Vice-President,  District  9,  Am.   Inst,  of
Elec. Eng.
The many uses of electricity are reflected in the variety
of technical papers presented. Subjects treated included,
electric power generation, transmission and distribution;
land transportation; radio and wired communications, microwave-carrier communications; the uses of electricity in
the chemical, electrochemical, mining and metallurgical industries; electrical techniques in medicine and biology;
servo-mechanisms and differential analysers. The members
also had an opportunity to learn something of the latest
developments in the Province, particularly the Wahleach
Hydro-electric development of B.C. Electric and the electrical aspects of Alcan's Kemano-Kitimat Hydro-Electric
Project. In all, a total of 42 technical papers and 23 conference papers were presented.
The Institute has always had a keen interest in student
activities; thus, in addition to the main technical programme, there was a student conference and a district prize
competition for the best paper contributed. The Conference
included a luncheon for the students and the student counsellors. Professor S. C. Morgan is the student counsellor
of the U.B.C. Student Branch.
FRANK  NOAKES,  B.Sc,  M.Sc,  Ph.D.,  M.E.I.C,  Mem.  A.I.E.E.
The visiting members had the opportunity to see something of the industrial development in the Vancouver area.
Visits were made to the new Dal Grauer Sub-station, the
Wahleach Generating Station and the Canadian Western
Lumber Co. Other visits were made to the University of
British Columbia and the B.C.  Research Council.
Many wives attended the convention with their husbands and the Ladies' Committee, under the chairmanship
of Mrs. J. H. Steede. acted as hostess to the visitors. In
addition to a coffee hour each morning, sightseeing and
shopping tours were arranged.
On the lighter side a number of visitors and no doubt
some of the local membership, competed in a Salmon Fishing Derby.
The Convention has come and gone; the electric lights
still glow brightly and the telephones ring merrily, but the
Members once more failed to answer the question put by
an old lady, who, after being shown through a large hydroelectric power station, asked, "What do you do with the
water after you have taken the electricity out of it?"
The following alumni and members of the University
Faculty took an active part in organizing and conducting of
the Pacific General Meeting:
J. H. Steede, B.A.Sc. '26—Chairman; L. B. Stacey,
B.A.Sc. '24—Vice-Chairman; W. J. Lind, B.A.Sc. '32, M.A.
'35—Treasurer; J. B. Hedley, B.A.Sc. '33; H. J. MacLeod,
Dean Emeritus, Faculty of Applied Science; F. Noakes,
Department of Electrical Engineering; R. B. Carter, B.A.Sc.
'43; W. B. Coulthard, Department of Electrical Engineering; M. I. G. Bradwell, B.A.Sc. 'SO; W. M. Gray, B.A.Sc.
'49; H. G. Hawkins, B.A.Sc. '37; M. G. Sumpton, B.A.Sc.
'48; W. M. Walker, B.A.Sc. '45; D. S. Smith, B.A. '31,
B.A.Sc. '32, M.A.Sc. '33; E. T. Kirkpatrick, B.A.Sc. '47;
F. D. Bolton, B.A. '34, B.A.Sc. '36; Prof. S. C. Morgan,
Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Gordon H. Wfteatley,
B.A.Sc. '48; Douglas Turland, B.A.Sc. '49; Roy Bartholomew, B.A.Sc. '52; Armand P. Paris, B.A.Sc. '51; A. P.
Martinez, B.A.Sc. '50; D. R. West, B.A.Sc. '50.
J. T. Madill, Aluminum Co. Canada, Manager of Power Operations, B.C.
C. E. Woolgar, Northern Electric, District Manager, Vancouver. J. H.
Steede, B.C. Electric, Executive Assistant to Vice-President and Chief
Engineer. W. J. Lind, Canadian General Electric, Manager, Lamp and
Lighting  Division, Vancouver Office.
Page 10 THE PRESIDENT REPORTS-
Because of the continuing debate about education and about the function of the University and
of higher education, I thought it might be interesting and useful to repeat here what I said over the
air a few weeks ago.
"The University, as I understand it, exists to
serve the community in which we live—British
Columbia and Canada. It does this by educating
the young people who enrol, and by training them
for the professions in which they will later serve
the community. It also contributes to our welfare
through a great variety of direct community services of an interesting and important kind.
By "educating" our young people, I mean providing them with the opportunity to develop physically, mentally, morally and aesthetically to the
maximum of their capacities. I mean, too, the
stimulation of their interests, the arousing of their
curiosity, the training of their minds, enabling them
to think for themselves, to make choices between
the good and the less good, and to discriminate in
the midst of an increasingly difficult and complicated environment and world. We try to make
available to them the accumulated wisdom, knowledge, experience and history of the human race,
through the libraries that we acquire and through
the learning of the teaching staff; we try to encourage and assist them to explore the unknown and
to push back the frontiers of knowledge. This we
do in the expensive and complicated laboratories
which we possess and through the stimulation of
working with distinguished scholars of mature
years who are members of our staff. We introduce
them to the best in art, in literature, in music, in
architecture, in drama, in sculpture. We attempt
to provide them with standards of value on moral
issues, in their own lives, and in their relations with
other human beings. We hope that here at the
University they will come to understand themselves
and to understand the nature of the world and the
L. B. STACEY, (B.A. '24), Vice-Chairman, Pacific General  Meetii
universe in which they live. We try to impress
upon them the importance of their relationships
with others, and of so organizing themselves in
their communities and nation and in the world of
nations, that they may be able to live in this world
and in this nation with all sorts and kinds of people
of varying races, classes and creeds, without resorting to violent and destructive measures, such as war
and revolution, for achieving the ends that they
seek or for the satisfying of the desires which they
possess. In a word, we hope that when they leave
us, they will understand what it means to be educated men and women, and will continue to strive
to become and remain  educated.
Training for the professions — Law, Medicine,
Engineering, the Church, Education, and all the
others—is a fairly straightforward business and
one that most of you understand and accept. The
members of these professions provide you with
most of the services upon which you depend for the
orderly and efficient living of your lives and the
conduct of your affairs. The engineers build the
roads and the bridges, the trains, the motorcars, the
aeroplanes, and the steamships upon which you
travel; the doctors look after your health and welfare ; the scientists enable you to exploit our natural
resources and use these for your own maintenance,
comfort and well-being; the lawyers help to keep
you out of trouble and to organize your governmental and business affairs; the clergy attend to
your religious and moral needs, and help to provide
the standards and the disciplines so necessarry if
a society is to operate and human beings live together in peace and harmony.
A special word is needed about physical education, recreation and athletics. In this area our concern is for the physical and mental well-being of
every one of the students who come to us. Our
Department of Physical Education is concerned
with improving and maintaining the physical fitness of all students on the compus. We try to ensure that all students, when they graduate, will be
better able to remain fit and well than they otherwise would. W'e are also concerned with training
teachers of physical education, recreation, and athletics, so that they in turn may go out and contribute to the physical welfare of others throughout
the Province—and more particularly, the boys and
girls in the schools. We believe in the value and
the importance of pleasant and health-giving recreation and of the wise and satisfying use of such
leisure time as may be available to us. We are
interested in competitive athletics because of the
opportunities it provides for those who participate
and because of the thrill and satisfaction which the
rest of us, as spectators, gain from it. Our only
concern here is lest we lose our sense of proportion
about such matters and about the relative values
of competitive athletics. As in most other fields of
human activity, a great deal of harm can be done
by intemperance and over-emphasis in this."
Related to our athletic and physical education
programme is the construction of the Swimming
Pool which is being built on the campus for the
purpose of the British Empire Games to be held in
Vancouver next summer. This pool has been the
occasion for a great deal of unfortunate controversy
and publicity, for which we at the University had
no responsibility.   More than a year and a half ago
Continued on Page 12
Page 11 Continued from Page 11
we were approached by interested citizens and civic
officials to lend our support to the request that the
Games should be held in Vancouver in 1954. After
this decision had been made, we were asked to make
our facilities available to the Committee in charge
of the Games for the use of the visiting athletes and
for the staging of any events which it might be
desirable to arrange at University.
In reply to this request we stated that we would
do everything within our power, subject to the prior
claims of the University itself, to make all of our
facilities available at cost. These include our residences which can take care of between 800 and 1000
individuals, our dining rooms and food services,
our two gymnasiums, our track and playing fields,
our University health services, and a variety of
other facilities.
Wre were also asked to co-operate with the
Games Committee in the building, on the campus,
of a stadium to seat some 35,000 spectators, and a
very large swimming pool (165 by 50 feet, with a
depth suggested at that time of 21 feet). To both
of these requests we replied that, subject to certain
conditions made necessary in the long-term interests of the University, we would be glad to co-operate and to assist the Committee. Our architects
then proceeded to prepare preliminary plans for
both of these projects. However, due to the activity
of certain groups in the city, the City Council and
the B.E.G. Committee decided to construct the
stadium on the Exhibition Grounds and the swimming pool at Riley Park. Because of the difficulties
encountered in respect of Riley Park and the cost
of placing the swimming pool there the B.E.G.
Committee, with the approval of the City Council,
again approached us and asked, a second tiine, for
our help in building the pool on the University
campus. Again we assured them that we were only
interested in doing what was best for all concerned
and that if they felt it would help them to build the
pool at the University we would be glad to agree to
that proposal. Construction has already begun and
we expect that the pool will be completed by the
end of June, 1954.
After the Games have been concluded the University will take over the pool and it will become
University property and a University responsibility.
We hope we will be able to find the money to roof
it and to operate it. If we do, our policy in respect
of the pool will be in line with our policy with other
University facilities: that is, we will be glad to
allow proper individuals and groups under reasonable safeguards and at no cost to the University or
its students, to use our swimming facilities whenever this can be conveniently clone.
It should be remembered that the University
is and always has been of very great service to the
citizens of Vancouver in many ways, and that our
facilities are constantly being used by a great variety of individuals and organizations in Vancouver.
It also overlooks the fact that much of the money,
if not all of it, which will go into the construction
of the pool, has been provided by the Federal and
Provincial governments, by certain British Columbia municipalities and by private citizens and corporations. The city itself has contributed generously to the cost of staging the Games, but most if
not all of the money that they are making available
will be needed for the stadium, which is built within
the city.
The pool when completed will be one of the
largest (if not the largest) in Canada. It is much
larger than we would have built for University purposes and the costs of operating it are likely to be
correspondingly heavy. But because it is being
built on the campus, the students and others associated with the University will have a swimming
pool much sooner than would otherwise have been
possible. This fact, plus the desire to help the
Games Committee and the city of Vancouver in
staging the Games, were the principal reasons why
the Board agreed to assume the very considerable
responsibilities connected with the building and the
operating of the pool.
/VW)MA*U /^fyW^
Student Registration — Session  1953-54
Faculty
&
Faculty  &
Course
October 21,
1953
1952
Course        October 21,
1953
1952
Year Men Women
Total Total
Year
Men Women Total Total
ARTS  &
FORESTRY
SCIENCE
B.S.F.         1
33
33
31
B.A.
1
758
364
1122
1068
II
22
22
23
II
469
186
655
569
III
23
23
15
III
253
134
387
428
IV
15
15
23
IV
201
140
341
405
Total  in
Total
1681
824
2505
2470
Faculty
93
....
93
92
B.Com.
1
145
10
155
139
LAW
II
117
11
128
123
LL.B.          1
75
3
78
98
III
112
1
113
95
II
75
3
78
76
IV
70
6
76
82
III
65
5
70
63
Total
444
28
472
439
Total  in
Faculty
215
11
226
237
B.H.E.
1
35
35
54
II
47
47
39
PHARMACY
III
27
27
32
B.S.P.       11
39
9
48
47
IV
34
34
31
III
34
9
43
40
Total
143
143
156
IV
Total   in
31
7
38
47
B.P.E.
1
II
18
24
12
16
30
40
30
33
Faculty
104
25
129
134
III
*,
o
i s
31
MEDICINE
IV
25
6
31
22
M.D.          1
55
5
60
60
Total
73
43
116
115
II
III
54
50
4
7
58
57
56
60
T.T.C.
80
19
99
113
IV
55
2
57
B.Ed.
1
Total  in
B.S.W.
29
28
57
60
Faculty
214
18
232
176
M.S.W.
12
21
33
28
GRADUATE
STUDIES
Total in
M.A.
65
14
79
82
Faculty
2319
1106
3425
3382
M.Sc.
34
6
40
33
AGRICULTURE
M.Com.
3
3
3
B.S.A.
1
23
4
27
32
M.A.Sc.
14
14
15
II
36
3
39
35
M.S.A.
21
21
23
III
29
1
30
45
M.F.
7
7
6
IV
36
9
45
54
V
6
....
6
8
Ph.D.
42
3
45
40
Occ.
7
8
13
Planning
2
2
6
Total  ir
Not for
Faculty
137
18
155
186
Degree
41
10
51
48
APPLIED   SCIENCE
Total  in
B.A.Sc.
1
II
III
283
172
142
283
172
142
233
140
138
Faculty
GRAND
229
33
262
256
IV
132
132
162
TOTAL
4119
1344
5463
5317
Total
729
729
673
1953
B.S.N.
1
46
46
24
II
19
19
15
Total   Men
4119
75.4%
III
15
15
10
Total  Women
1344
24.6%
IV
11
11
12
v
10
10
9
Cert.
32
32
32
1952
Total
133
133
102
Total Men
4056
76.3%
Total  Women
1261
23.7%
B.Arch.
1
II
III
IV
v
27
17
13
13
9
--
27
17
13
13
9
23
15
15
12
13
Total
79
79
78
Total   in
There were
in addition
149 taking
Faculty
808
133
941
853
extra sessional courses.
Page 12 PHOTO   BY   U.B.C. VISUAL EDUCATION   SERVICE
Chancellor   Sherwood   Lett,   Lawrence   Guichon,   Most   Reverend   W.   M.   Duke,  D.D.,  Rhys M.  Sale,  Percy  R.  Bengough,  President  Norman   MacKenzie.
HONORARY DECREES AWARDED
AT AUTUMN CONGREGATION
Address given by Rhys M. Sale
The Twenty-seventh Autumn Congregation, held in the
old gymnasium on the evening of Friday, October 30th,
was a colourful ceremony of unusual interest. More than
250 students received degrees and were capped by Chancellor Sherwood Lett. Among the recipients were nine students  presented for  the degree of  Ph.D.
Honorary degrees were conferred on four distinguished
Canadians from widely different avenues of life. Percy R.
Bengough, President of the Trades and Labour Congress
of Canada, Most Reverend W. M. Duke, D.D., Roman
Catholic Archbishop of Vancouver, and Rhys M. Sale,
President of Ford Motor Company of Canada, were each
awarded the degree of Doctor of Laws; Lawrence Guichon,
Dean of British Columbia cattlemen, received the degree of
Doctor of Science. The citations for the degrees were read
by President MacKenzie. The distinguished guests of the
University included the Honourable Robert Bonner, Attorney-General and Minister of Education and Mr. Harold
Campbell, Deputy Minister of Education.
Dr. Rhys Sale was Congregation speaker, and addressed
his remarks primarily to the members of the graduating
class, for whom he prophesied a bright future in Canada.
The following paragraphs represent the highlights of this
speech.
Canada's Wealth
"Only those very close to the picture can grasp the
true dimensions of the strides that have been made in the
past quarter-century, but even so the development of our
country has just begun. Within the next 25 years, we will
take more ore from our rock, more oil from our wells,
more food from our fields, and more timber and pulp from
our forests, than we have in the past century. Moreover,
more goods will flow from Canadian factories than we have
produced in all the time since the first white man set foot
in our country."
Economic Plight of Education
"Canadians spend less on education than the)' do on
tobacco and candy.   They spend a great deal less on edu
cation than they do on motor cars. They spend well over
twice as much on movie tickets than on universities."
"We look upon teaching as a noble and vital profession.
We entrust our children's education to high-minded men
and women who devote themselves unselfishly to the task
of preparing our young people for useful, successful lives.
We expect these teachers not only to impart knowledge,
but to  build character.
"Yet we begrudge many of these highly-trained, high-
minded teachers a wage we would pay cheerfully to the
most menial worker. It is to the everlasting credit of
teachers everywhere that they perform their duties so well,
and keep their personal frustrations from tinging the lives
and minds of the young people they teach.
"We desperately need a new approach to education in
this country. We need more understanding of the problems and the requirements, not only by governments, but
among businessmen, thought-leaders, and all the people of
this country."
New Ford Scholarships
After announcing that his company would grant 21
scholarships over the next three years to sons and daughters
of Ford of Canada employees, providing tuition and academic fees, a substantial part of the student's living costs,
and direct grants to universities, for a four-year course.
Dr. Sale said:
"The intent of the program is to open the way to
higher education for at least a few promising young Canadians who might have no other means to go to university.
It is our desire to contribute to the pool of better educated
people in Canada."
Meaning  of  Graduation
"The hard fact is that the proud moment when a graduate receives his degree does not mark the end of his education, but perhaps only the beginning. His degree, instead
of being the extension ladder to the top of the tree, is no
more than a short step-ladder to help him get started on the
long climb."
Danger of Over-Specialization
"For some years past there has been an increasing
emphasis upon specialization. I see a danger that we are
overdoing it.
The result of over-emphasis on specialization is the
growing and truly serious lack of well-rounded, broadly-
trained and thoroughly alert men and women who can be
promoted into the highest echelons of management."
Page 13 ALUMNAE
Senator Nancy Hodges, LL.D.
by Leona Sherlock
PHOTO BY VANCOUVER PROVINCE
British Columbia
women — and many
of them are University of British Columbia graduates —
can claim a number
of "firsts". One of
the recent and most
commendable is the
appointment of Mrs.
Nancy Hodges,
LL.D., as B.C.'s first
woman Senator.
Mrs. Hodges has
been admired for
many years by all
who know of her,
not only for her brilliant political career,
but as an individual
and a homemaker.
As Speaker of the
House she claimed
another "first" being the only woman in Canada to
be given such an honour. The University shines
by reflected glory in the fact that the new Senator
is an Honorary graduate.
+       +
In nearly every issue of The Chronicle we have
a note on UBC graduates going off to far-away
places and this issue is no exception. Marion Foster,
B.S.W. '51, left recently for Surinam (Dutch
Guiana) for a three-year period as advisory staff
member of the YWCA.
Miss Foster, since graduation, has taken YWCA
jobs in B.C., Alberta and Ontario but her most exciting post to date is her new one. Before leaving
she was brushing up on the Dutch language.
+       +
South America will be the new home of Mrs.
Norman Stanley Kerr (Kathleen Margaret Kidd,
B.A. '30) whose husband will take a government
post there shortly. The Kerrs have been residing
in San Francisco.
Also planning to reside in South America are
two newly-weds, Timothy John Nichols and his
bride, the former Leona Frances Watts. They will
reside in Bogota, Colombia, after their honeymoon
in the U.S.
Chronicle readers will be interested to know
that Mrs. Henry Angus, B.A. '23, received a
Coronation Medal for her distinguished record in
the field of child welfare.
+       +
A note from Mrs. T. L. McMaster (Margaret
Craig, B.A. '28) tells us she and her husband have
moved to Victoria where Mr. McMaster is now
manager of the main office, Bank of Nova Scotia.
Their address is 572 Linkleas Ave., Victoria.
+       +
From Yugoslavia in September to UBC Teacher
Training in October was the jump that Elva Plant,
Page 14
B.A. '52, took. Like many UBC graduates Elva left
for Europe as soon as she'd received her degree—
and now she's back full of tales of all she's seen
and done.
But it wasn't all sight-seeing. Last January she
applied for, and received, a scholarship to the University of Saarbrucken, Germany. While there she
lived in old German army barracks, four students
to a room, costing about five cents a night. After
Easter she went travelling again, saw all she could
of Europe then went back to England for the
Coronation.
Also back in Vancouver after journeying afar
is Denyse Pierce, B.A. '52, who spent six months
in  Europe, followed en  route home by six months
in Montreal where she was in radio work.
+       +
One of the graduates at Fall Congregation had
her husband and two sons watching her when she
received her degree. Mrs. D. M. Lockhart graduated with first class honours in zoology and is now
taking teacher training to fulfil a life-long ambition.
She had planned on a teaching career after
graduating from high school but married instead.
As soon as her sons were old enough she decided
to resume her education and entered the UBC.
PLANS FOR HOME MANAGEMENT FUND
By Aileen Mann, B.A. '37
The Home Management Fund Alumnae Committee met on Friday, November 13th, in the Home
Economics Building, with Peter Sharp and Frank
Turner, representatives of the Alumni Development
Fund. Committee members present were: Jean
Gilley, Chairman; Mary Holder, Mary Reeves,
Doreen Coursier, Evelyn Cruise, Emily Mayhew,
Audrey Dunlop, Freda Paling, Aileen Mann and
Mrs. H. A. Hope.
The reconditioned army hut now in temporary
use for home-making instruction at the University
is a makeshift arrangement and is not economical
or practical to operate. The objective for 1954 is
to raise the $13,000 required to complete the Fund
to build a new house.
Several projects have been planned. The Provincial Executives of the Parent Teacher Federation
and the Women's Institutes have been approached
and are enlisting support of their individual
branches. We would ask Alumni to speak for this
project whenever it comes to their attention in their
own community. Although some groups may not
be able to make a large donation, small gifts in
large numbers will help us reach our objective.
A special committee of experts is working on
a booklet of homemaking ideas and housekeeping
short-cuts. It is hoped to include a section on
bachelor cookery. You will hear more about this
handbook later.
Undergraduates in the Home Economics Department and members of the Committee sold ice
cream bars at the Blue and Gold Revue on November 5, 6 and 7, and thus added to the Fund.
Mrs. H. A. Hope was convener of another effort
in November to raise the total—an evening of
films. Miss Charlotte Black showed her 1953 pictures of England and Europe and Miss Mary Fallis
showed hers of Hiking in the Canadian Rockies. FALL PLAYS
By Peter L. Smith, B.A. '53
(Peter Smith won the Governor-General's Gold Medal
on graduation and is this year reading for the M.A. degree.
He played the part of Apollo in "A Masque of Aesop."
—Ed.)
On November 12th, 13th and 14th, the University Players' Club presented an entertaining and
varied program, an abridged version of "Romeo and
Juliet" and the western premiere of "A Masque of
Aesop," by the Canadian playwright Robertson
Davies. The choice of plays was justified : although
some criticism had been heard, and many felt that
more concession should be made to popular taste,
it turned out to be one of the rare occasions in the
long history of the club on which the Fall plays
have shown a financial profit.
The opening play, "A Masque of Aesop," was a
triumph for the director, Sydney Risk. Working almost exclusively with inexperienced actors, Mr.
Risk drew sincere performances from his large cast.
The play, an adaptation of the Elizabethan masque
to the modern stage, is a witty satire on human
foibles in general, with many sly remarks on modern institutions and outlooks. Brought before
Apollo by irate citizens of Delphi, Aesop defends
himself against charges of blasphemy by presenting
in evidence three of his fables. Delightful in their
staging and most enjoyable visually, the fables were
at times somewhat inaudible, on account of the
cumbersome masks worn by the actors. The pace,
however, was always brisk, the stage action swift
and urgent.
Although it is difficult to single out performances, it may be said that the work of the three
Fates was especially effective, as was the intensity
and coordination  of the mob of citizens.    Special
Continued on Page 16
IT'S   FROM   BIRKS
cl-B
lOO.oo
125.00
150.oo
for a
Christmas
Engagement
175.00
Love knows no gift more precious
than a diamond. Make this
Christmas doubly joyous for her . . .
choose an engagement ring from Birks superb
collection. The diamond you select will be the finest
available, for the money invested.
Sterling silver presentation case and insurance
certificate provided without charge with rings illustrated.
BUDGET TERMS AVAILABLE
BIRKS
10% Down
Balance in twelve
monthly payments—
plus   a   small   carrying
charge
JEAN GILLEY, Chairman, Home Management Fund Alumnae Committee.
Reqistered Jewellers ^^ American Gem Society
Miss Anne Smith, B.A. '21, Assistant Librarian
and Head of the U.B.C. Library Reference Division,
has accepted a one-year appointment as professor in
the Japan Library School at Keio University, Japan.
She will teach courses in reference work and library
administration.
Page 15 THE STOA OF ATTALOS IN THE ATHENIAN AGORA
Restored  drawing  showing  the  building   reconstructed  for use  as the Agora museum.   The Acropolis appears in the upper right.
HOMER THOMPSON WRITES OF HIS WORK
IN ATHENS
(Homer A. Thompson, F.R.S.C, F.B.A., B.A. '25, M.A.
'27, Ph.D., LL.D. '49, has written for Chronicle readers a
brief account of the work done under his direction during
the past season. Dr. Thompson is Professor of Classical
Archaeology at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Since 1945 he has been Field Director of the Agora
excavation for the American School of Classical Studies in
Athens, having joined the excavation staff in 1931. His letter
is dated at Athens, September 12, 1953.—Ed.)
"As to current activities in the Agora, perhaps
I could outline them here. In the course of the
past spring and summer we carried out our 18th
season of excavation on this site, thereby completing the exploration of the principal area, i.e., the
ancient market square proper. We were especially
pleased by developments along the south side of the
square where two large public buildings have come
to light. One of them, dating from the second half
of the 6th century B.C., has good claim to be recognized as the Heliaia, the largest and most famous
of the several lawcourts of the ancient city. The
second building is of the late 5th century B.C. and
appears to be the Thesmotheteion, which contained
the offices and dining rooms of the Thesmothetai
or board of six magistrates who were responsible
for the proper functioning of the lawcourts.
"Although the actual work of excavating is
drawing to a close, we have other heavy commitments. One is the landscaping of the excavated
area which measures some 25 acres in the heart of
the modern city. This is a challenging task, for the
planting must elucidate rather than obscure the
ancient design of the square and it must also be
suitably related to the rather varied environs, which
comprise the Acropolis, Mars Hill, the "Theseum"
(the best preserved of ancient Greek temples) and
a dingy district of modern Athens. Through the
month of August we had with us an outstanding
American landscape architect who has prepared a
comprehensive design for the treatment of the area.
Next week we are expecting the King and Queen
of Greece to plant the first trees: an oak for Zeus
and an olive for Athena.
"We have also made progress this summer in
the matter of providing a museum to house the
finds from the excavation. We have decided that
the museum should take the form of a reconstruction of the stoa or colonnade built about 150 B.C.
along the east side of the square by Attalos II, King
of Pergamon, a distinguished alumnus of the Athenian schools of philosophy. The work of rebuilding
is now actually under way and from my window I
can hear the agreeable tinkle of many stone cutters'
chisels. The reconstruction will cost upwards of
one million dollars and will require four or five
years."
Tall   FlayS Continued from Page 15
mention must be given to club president and production manager Tom Shorthouse, who wrote the
original music for this production.
As the other half of the program, "Romeo and
Juliet" supplied an effective contrast. Under the
patient direction of Dorothy Davies, a remarkably
mature interpretation was given to the Shakespearian classic. Though abridged for this performance,
the play remained smooth and the resultant loss in
some of the poetry and subtlety of character development was compensated by a swiftly moving and
easily followed plot.
Miss Davies won high praise from the audiences
for her pacing of the play; scarcely seconds elapsed
between one scene and the next, as ingenious staging overcame the necessity of complex scene shifting. The actors themselves, though young, gave
earnest portrayals. All the principal parts were
well interpreted, with Bob' Woodward and Eve
Newitt both convincing in the title roles. Especially
appealing as supporting characters were Louise De
Vick as the nurse and Bill Gordon as Friar
Laurence.
Sets for the two plays were designed by Gordon
Shrum and Derek Mann respectively. Attractive in
their simplicity, they were greatly enhanced by
imaginative and often striking lighting.
Judging from enthusiastic audience response, the
ambitious program was thoroughly successful.
From both the artistic and the financial point of
view, it was one of the most rewarding of all Fall
ventures of the Players' Club.
Page 16 GREAT TREKKER AWARD TO DEAN CAGE
By W. Robbins and R. D. James
(Dr. R. D. James is Professor and Head of the Department of Mathematics at U.B.C. He received the degrees of
B.A. (1928) and M.A. (1930) at the University of British
Columbia and later went on for graduate study to Chicago
University, where he was awarded a Ph.D. He is a Fellow
of the Royal Society of Canada. Dr. Robbins is also a
graduate of U.B.C. (B.A. 1930, M.A. 1934) and holds the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy, conferred by the University of Toronto. Formerly a member of the Victoria
College Staff, under the late Principal Elliott, he is now
Professor  in  the  Department  of  English  at  U.R.C.—Ed.)
On the first day of lectures in September, 1927,
students at Victoria College were startled by the
roars of laughter punctuating the long intervals of
furiously cerebral silence in the Mathematics lecture-room, where a vigorous voice was expounding
the picturesque analogy. At the end of the hour
starry-eyed freshmen burst out of the room saying
"Who is he? What's happened? Mathematics was
never like this!" The answer was simple. A human
dynamo named Walter Gage had come to the
College.
For six years, under the benign and gratified eye
of Principal Percy Elliott, Walter was the mainspring of life at Victoria College. Advising students,
organizing timetables as Registrar, directing plays,
guiding student activities in ways that encouraged
energy wthout violence and exuberance without
folly—all this in addition to inspired teaching and
frequent scholarly publication. In 1933 he returned
to UBC where he had taught for a year before going to Victoria, and from the day of his return to
the present has devoted that same energy and
ability and versatility to the service of the University of British Columbia.
"Devoted" is not too strong a word. Walter has
worked in and for the university with a zeal and
efficiency that have identified him with its successful operation, and with a vision and wisdom that
have always pointed the way in which a university,
if it is to be worthy of the name, should develop.
Recognition of his work and abilities came in his
appointment to the newly-created office of Dean
of Administrative and Inter-Faculty Affairs, an
office which in fact merely gave official status to
the varied and important contribution he was already making to the life of the university.
After graduating in 1925, and taking his M.A.
in 1926, Walter spent the summers of 1927, 1928,
and 1930 in graduate work at the University of
Chicago, for part of the time under the noted mathematician E. T. Bell. In 1939-40 he held a teaching
fellowship at the California Institute of Technology,
where he again worked with Bell, whose high opinion of Walter's capacity for mathematical research
is well known to his colleagues at UBC. He has
been active in the Royal Astronomical Society,
serving as President of the Vancouver branch in
1935, and was for four years Vice-President of the
Canadian Mathematical Congress. He has been an
executive member of the B.C. Academy of Sciences
since 1938, a member of the American Mathematical Society, the Mathematical Association of America, and the Calcutta Mathematical Society. He
has served as Director of the Summer Session, as
assistant to the late Dean Buchanan, and during
the war years as Co-director of the Canadian Army
Course No. 2 and as instructional officer to men
in training for the Air Force.
Over all these years of teaching and administration, Walter's main interest has consistently been
the welfare of the students. His years as Honorary
President of both the Players' Club and the Musical
Society bring to mind a vivid picture of a wildly
geticulating figure back of the curtain on opening
night guiding a grateful chorus through "Robin
Hood" or "The Gondoliers". But his interest has
not been confined to group activities. Rather one
thinks of the thousands of students who have received individual help in selecting courses and
careers, and who have benefited from every kind of
aid and from generous hours of consultation in all
sorts of problems—academic, financial, and domestic. This individual consultation goes on all through
the year, though, of course, it is most obvious at
registration time; how obvious is shown in a story
told by Ranton Mcintosh, Director of the School
of Education. Returning through Montana on the
Great Northern Railway in September, Dr. Mcintosh was startled to hear this radio announcement:
"The University of British Columbia expects a
registration of 55,000 (sic) students, over half of
whom will be personally interviewed by Dean
Gage."
A great deal of committee work has inevitably
come his way, and in this regard his two major
jobs in recent years have been the annual production, single-handed, of the University calendar, and
the chairmanship of the Committee on Scholarships.
Prizes, and Bursaries. This last is undoubtedly, of
all his administrative duties the one nearest the
centre of Walter's interests, and it would be difficult to express the appreciation due him for the
amount of money that his efforts have obtained for
student assistance, and for the judicious care that
has gone to its fair distribution.
Enough to exhaust any three able-bodied men?
Yet that is not all. He still carries a full load of
teaching in large classes in Mathematics, and his
scholarly capacity is shown in the dozen mathematical papers published in leading journals since
1927, and in the text-book on "Elementary Analytic
Geometry" prepared in collaboration with the late
Professor Richardson in 1936 for use in university
and Senior Matriculation. His colleagues know that
the shift to an administrative emphasis reflects an
urge to see that the work is done efficiently rather
than a preference for administrative duties as such.
For Walter is still the teacher and scholar who
places teaching and scholarship first, and his fertile
mind goes on meditating mathematical problems
even when time does not permit their being worked
out for publication.
In Vancouver and in the province at large, the
name of Dean Walter Gage is identified with the
growth and future of this university. And the Great
Trek award, made in recognition of an outstanding
contribution to the university, could have had no
more fitting recipient than one who, himself a member of that trek, has since done so much towards
the fulfilment of the hopes it symbolised.
Page 17 R. J.  (BUS)  PHILLIPS
FALL SPORTS
By Bus Phillips
(Mr. R. J. (Bus) Phillips is a member of the School of
Physical Education as Instructor and Co-ordinator of Athletics. Prior to his joining the U.B.C. staff he spent 15
years with the Provincial Department of Education, the last
four years, as Acting Director of the Physical Education
and Recreation Branch. While he has a keen interest in all
sports, he has taken part, competitively, in Track and Field
events (particularly in sprints and middle distances), in
Basketball and in Rugby. He has numerous affiliations
with sports associations, both provincially and nationally.
He is a member of the British Empire Games Track and
Field  Committee.—Ed.)
Football
As the 1953 football
season draws to a close,
the record book shows
two wins, six losses,
and one game remaining to be played. The
scoreboard is not as
bleak as it first appears
since this is the "Birds"
most successful season.
They outclassed the opposition in total passing and rushing yardage in five games and
Eastern outgained them
only eight yards. Our
hard-fighting team has
averaged 3 12 yards
rushing and passing in
its six American games. Against College of Puget
Sound and Eastern Washington College of Education, Flemons and Stewart threw passes for 265
and 275 yards. It is believed that both of these
games set a new Evergreen Conference record for
yards gained from passing. U.B.C. was not a pushover for any team and the American Colleges now
do us the honour of scouting us.
The season opener was played under Canadian
rules in Montreal against the McGill Redmen. The
Thunderbirds were leading 4-3 at half time, but
two fumbles and a bad pass from center near their
own goal line in the second half, turned the tide and
gave the fine McGill team a victory. U.B.C. earned
11 first downs to McGill's 9 and completed 9 of 16
passes. The Redmen connected with only 1 of 8
passes for no gain.
The high point of the season was the win over
the Vancouver Cubs. Although U.B.C. was the
thirty-point underdog and was outweighed from 20-
40 pounds per man in the line, the college team out-
scrapped the seniors 11-1. This victory opened the
eyes of many townspeople and showed them that
U.B.C. plays good football. Barring unforeseen difficulties, the prospects for a winning team next year
are bright. The squad loses only John Hudson, Bill
Stuart, Ralph Martinson and Bill Boulding through
graduation.
Rugby
Albert Laithwaite's Thunderbirds have found
the going tough against First Division Miller Cup
teams, and at this writing have yet to win a game
this season. With the graduation of George Puil,
Frank Gower, Gerry Main, and the ineligibility of
several others, Albert is faced with the task of re
building, but he expects to be ready for the McKechnie Cup and World Cup Competition. Highlight of the Rugby season, of course, will be the
visit of the New Zealand All-Blacks, who are presently touring in England and will play the Birds on
March 11th. The Braves are leading the second
division, without a loss so far this season.
Basketball
While the Evergreen Conference does not start
until after Christmas, Head Coach, Jack Pomfret
has lined up an impressive series of Pre-Conference
Games which should round the Birds into top form.
The Big problem at the moment is not bench
strength, for most of the regulars are still with us,
but how to get all the boys out together for practices in the face of laboratory periods which conflict. However, a big season is in the offing and the
boys will be in there trying every minute.
Dick Perm's Chiefs are a hustling band of
youngsters just knocking on the Thunderbird door,
and we'll be hearing plenty from them before the
season is over.
Soccer
The lengthy Pacific Coast League "A" Division schedule makes it impossible for our Varsity
Soccer team to play first division, as do our other
Varsity sports. Nevertheless the team has proved
on more than one occasion that they are first class
and we would like to see this sport given more attention on the campus. With two games scheduled
for the Stadium this fall, soccer has an opportunity
to prove it is an excellent spectator sport.
Rowing
Frank Reed has continually produced U.B.C.
crews who more than held their own with the
States' best, losing only to California in the Newport Regatta last spring by three seconds. The boys
have been in strict training for the past six weeks,
and travel once more to Corvallis where they will
defend the Egg Cup, against Oregon State.
Fencing
In Charles and John Loewen, L-.B.C. has two
of the finest swordsmen in Canada at the present
time. After successfully disposing of all available
local competition, Charles went on to win the Pacific Northwest Championship in the Open Foil and
the Open Epee. We have every hope that both of
these boys will make the British Empire Games
Team next year.
Cross Country
Peter Harris and Doug Kyle have shared winning honours in all cross-country meets held so far
this year, and the U.B.C. team lost only one race,
when Doug Kyle's infected foot prevented him
from entering the B.C. Cross-Country Championship a week ago.
The University and Peter Harris were honoured
recently, when the A.A.U. of C, at its Annual
Meeting in Montreal awarded the Fred Tees Memorial Trophy, as the most outstanding Canadian
track and field athlete enrolled with a Canadian
University during the year.
A 3rd year Forestry student, Peter Harris set a
B.C. record in winning the Cross-Country Championship. He was Evergreen Conference Mile
Champion last year.
Page 18 Frankly
Speaking
*WHF*f
BY
Frank J. E. Turner
EXECUTIVE-DIRECTOR
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Methinks that GIVING gives Christmas real
meaning and life lasting value.
Why then, do we tend to ignore, forget or resent
oft-repeated appeals—when we know that most are
entirely worthy and are directed at both heart and
mind. And why do we try to get a mythical "them"
off our collective necks by making either a strictly
token contribution or the one donation to last
forever.
Certainly no one would inhale one big breath,
exhale, inhale no more and still expect to live. Yet,
strange as it may seem, many of us act as if that
one big give—be it moral or financial—should be
enough to satisfy any need for all time.
We continue breathing because we want to live,
and I suggest that each wants to live because life
has some fundamental purpose.
If that purpose is to live merely for the sake of
living, then life has no timeless significance. If the
purpose  is  good—and includes  things  other  than
Inter
-City
Amateur Ice Hockey
Dec.
11   Fri.
Kerrisdale     Westminster    Kerrisdale      9:00 p
m.
Dec.
16 Wed.
Westminster Forum                Westminster 8:30 p
m.
Dec.
18  Fri.
Kerrisdale      Forum               Kerrisdale      9:00 p
m.
Dec.
23 Wed.
:orum
Kerrisdale         Forum            8:00 p
m.
Dec.
25  Fri.
<errisda
le      Forum                 Kerrisdale      9:00 p
m.
Dec.
28 Mon.    Westminster Kerrisdale         Westr.          10:45 p
m.
Dec.
30 Wed.
:orum
Westminster     Forum              8:00 p
m.
Thun
derbird Basketball  Schedule
Tues
Dec. 29
U.B.C. at New Westminster
Sat.
Jan.     2
U.B.C.  at King  Edward
Fri.
Jan.    8
U.B.C. at Col'ege of Puget Sound
Sat.
Jan.    9
U.B.C. at Central Washington
Fri.
Jan.  15
Eastern  Washington  at  U.B.C.
Sat.
Jan.  16
Whitworth  at  U.B.C.
Fri.
Jan. 22
U.B.C. at Western Washington
Sat.
Jan. 23
Western  Washington  at  U..BC.
Fri.
Jan. 29
U.B.C. at Whitworth
Sat.
Jan. 30
U.B.C. at Eastern Washington
Fri.
Feb.    5
Pacific  Lutheran  at U.B.C.
Sat.
Feb.    6
Seatt'e  Pacific  at  U.B.C.
Fri.
Feb.  12
Central  Washington  at  U.B.C.
Sat.
Feb.  13
College of Puget Sound at U.B.C
Fri.
Feb.  19
U.B.C.  at Seattle Pacific
Sat.
Feb'. 20
U.B.C.  at Pacific   Lutheran
Thurs.    Feb. 25
U.B.C.  at Western  Washington
Fri.
Feb. 26
Western   Washington   at   U.B.C.
Fri.
Mar.     5
Uuniversity of Alberta at U.B.C.
Sat.
Mar.    6
Uuniversity  of Alberta at  U.B.C.
Mon
Mar.    8
Uuniversity of Alberta at U.B.C.
(3rd game if necessary)
food, clothing and shelter—then a full, rewarding
life is a natural result.
Surely our time and our money should be
budgeted so that these "things that count" receive
their fair share. That share should be determined
by us, in accordance with our personal appreciation
and our individual ability to contribute. We give
what we have to give; not what we have not.
May I take this opportunity of wishing you
one and all .  .  .        A Merry Christmas and a
Happy New Year
ALUMNOTES . . .
Glad to be back in Vancouver and Environs is
well-travelled James Ferris, '36, who was one of
Dr. Rhys Sale's top Ford men in Australia before
leaving to become Sales Manager, Vancouver
Motors ... a Ford dealership no less! . . . Sorry
to miss S. D. C. (Don) Chutter, Assistant General
Manager, Canadian Construction Association,
B.Com. '44, on his recent visit to the campus. Don's
"home base" is the Nation's Capital. . . . Good luck
to Howard Wright, B.A.Sc. '32, in his new position
as Chief Engineer of Alaska Pine & Cellulose. . . .
Formerly a Port Alberni resident, Ken Hanson, B.A.
'52, can now be reached in TCA's Vancouver office.
. . . Peeking at the North Shore Lions again for a
day was Lieut. Dennis Perrins '49, RCN, now on
the staff of C.O.N.D., Hamilton. . . . Succeeding
Dr. Cecil Killam, M.A., D.C.L., LL.D., as Chairman,
U.B.C. Convocation Founders' group, is W. J.
Elmore Meredith. B.A., Q.C.
Lieut. (S. B.) Doug Sherlock, R.C.N., LL.B. '51,
has been appointed Deputy Judge Advocate-General
to the Far East, and will be stationed in Kure,
Japan, for one year.
NOW!
LIFE INSURANCE AND
YOUR MONEY BACK
A BRAND NEW SUN LIFE PLAN WHICH:
Provides insurance protection to age 65.
Returns  all  basic  annual   premiums   paid   if
assured lives to 65.
Is available for male and female
lives ages 15 to 50.
At 65, the funds can be (a) taken in cash; (b) used to
purchase a paid-up policy for the original sum assured and
the balance taken in cash or as guaranteed income; (c) used
to provide an annuity; (d) left on deposit at a guaranteed
rate of interest.
Inquire    now    about    this    remarkable
new Sun Life plan.   Just call or write:
LARRY WRIGHT (B.A. 31)
Supervisor Vancouver   Unit
Royal Bank Bldg.
PAcific 5321
SUN LIFE OF CANADA
Page 19 EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE-DIRECTOR
(This   report  was   made  at  the   Convocation-Alumni   dinner   meeting   in
Brock Hall, November 19.—Ed.)
Mr. President, Dr. Hamber, Dean Chant, honored guests, fellow
members of Convocation and of the Alumni Association, in submitting
this Eighth Annual Report to you, may I say again that it is a real
privilege to continue to serve my Alma Mater as your Executive Director,
and to congratulate all the members of "U.B.C.'s family" for working
voluntarily and effectively on behalf of our  University.
A great number of persons—in different walks of life, in different
groups and regions, and in many different ways—deserve a lot of credit
for continuing to help build a better institution of higher learning in
this Province.
Your Members of the Alumni Board of Management, led by your
tireless President, gave unstintingly of their time and talent in tackling
several tough problems this year and in drafting a blueprint for future
Association activity. Directors of the Alumni-U.B.C. Development Fund,
headed by your dynamic Chairman, plus the Class and Regional Fund
Representatives worked long and hard to establish new records in participation and total amount contributed in this fifth year of the annual
giving programme. Special Committee members, alumni in organized
branches, Faculty and School alumni groups, and a host of others, including Original and early Convocation members, actively supported U.B.C.
one way or the other in  1953.
As the President has mentioned, the Association is unable to adequately service the hundreds of people intimately concerned with the
Fund's operation, to accurately record and change information about
graduates, and to revise and expand our programme. It is hoped that a
solution to this records-mailing problem will be definitely found within
a matter of weeks now.
In spite of the limitations and restrictions, alumni everywhere can
take pride in the many real accomplishments of this past year. An even
more valuble service is being rendered to U.B.C. by members of Convocation, this Association and other friends of the University. And as more
become aware of U.B.C.'s aims and objects, needs and problems there is
a more widespread feeling of "ownership" and of sincere gratitude on
the part of all other members of the general public.
"The intangible benefits to be derived from the continued operation
of an expanding, diversified Alumni Fund, and of the many other phases
of alumni work, far outweigh the tangible."
*     *     *
It would now appear that the Association is entering another "transition" period and will emerge better able to implement a well-rounded
programme of service to U.B.C. Therefore, perhaps it would be in
order here to reflect for just a moment and touch on some of the high
points in this gradual evolutionary process which now finds us at this
"maturing" stage of our growth.
U.B.C. itself was finally achieved because of the efforts and faith
of gradutes of other Universities. Some of these college-trained ladies
and gentlemen—who became original and early members of Convocation
—are with us again this evening. As a result of their guidance and counsel, brand new U.B.C. gradutes formed an Alumni Association within a
year after the first graduating class in 1916. U.B.C. grads played an
increasingly active role in Convocation affairs, and continued to expand
the activities and usefulness of the Alumni Association.
For a good number of years, however, the alumni "voice" was
almost entirely heard through Convocation.
Then, in the thirties, a group decided that there should be an
increase in active Association members and a more effective organization. As a result, many became Life Members of the Association, and
with the help of volunteer workers plus some part-time clerical staff,
caused the U.B.C. Alumni Chronicle (then known as "The Graduate
Chronicle") to be sent to several hundred  members regularly.
After study of other alumni programmes and fhe "Manual of
Alumni Work" published by the American Alumni group, these same
Life Members (some of whom are present tonight) together with other
interested grads, decided that a full-time alumni office should be opened
with an Executive Secretary employed. They were also convinced of the
soundness of an annual giving plan not only in providing a "Living
Endowment" for U.B.C. but also in increasing the number actively participating   in   U.B.C.   affairs.
This next major step was taken in 1945, and with the co-operation
and assistance of both the University administration and the students,
an alumni office was established. On January 2nd, 1946, your Executive
Director hung out an "open for business" sign in the room at the southeast corner of this Brock Memorial Building.
Like most alumni organizations who started operating on a full-
time basis, we started with no capital for machinery and equipment,
with no full-time clerical staff, and with an optimistic idea that dollar
bills for operating costs would just naturally follow in the wake of every
move made by the new Executive Secretary! Although no less enthusiastic about working for alumni and the University now as then, your
Director was destined to spend some considerable time before obtaining
a practical knowledge about reunions, branch groups, committee work,
the Chronicle, direct mail, public speaking, press releases, fund-raising,
etc.!
It should be pointed out, too, that almost all of that important first
year and part of the second was necessarily spent, not on alumni work
as such, but in helping students in the ambitious student-alumni B.C.
War Memorial Gymnasium campaign. Aside from the first organized
attempt to obtain annual dues, a major revision of the Association's Constitution and By-laws, and visits to several B.C. branches, perhaps the
most  important efforts  put  forth   in   1947  were  in  helping  to  stage a
highly successful Silver Anniversary of the Great Student Trek to Point
Grey, and some preliminary discussions about the establishment of an
alumni  fund.
The following year saw the alumni executive spend endless hours
in drafting and re-drafting proposals to implement the alumni fund idea,
which had been the dream of that small group of Life Members. A
special general meeting in September approved the plan and in December the "Trustees of the Alumni-U.B.C. Fund" Society was duly incorporated. As part of the legal agreement with that Society, the Alumni
Association agreed to organize and operate an annual giving programme
known as the "Alumni-U.B.C.  Development Fund."
Original brochures in January, 1949, described this Fund s a 3-in-l
appeal, the only appeal to be made to alumni and friends yearly. As far
as alumni themselves were concerned, it was stressed that this replaced
the dues, appeals and separate Chronicle subscriptions (to other than
Life Members), and that the first charges against contributions would
naturally be direct Fund costs, next Chronicle publishing and Association
operating expenses. The balance would be turned over to U.B.C. for the
stated or other objectives. To put it mildly, this whole concept was
misunderstood!
As a result, the 1950 Executive approached U.B.C. authorities and
obtained a financial arrangement whereby the Association was paid for
actual services rendered by keeping in touch with the thousands of U.B.C.
graduates and Convocation members and making thousands of address-
changes annually. Succeeding alumni executives successfully obtained
similar arrangements since that time. Because of this agreement, there
has not been any deductions for expenses—direct or indirect—from any
Fund donations from 1950 or subsequently. The Association underwrites
all Fund costs in addition to its own operating expenses and will undoubtedly continue to do so.
In every one of the five years this voluntary fund-raising plan has
been operating, the governing alumni group has devoted most of its time
and energy in trying to increase the numbers of donors and in the total
amount subscribed. This does not mean that several other very worthwhile projects—such as the Association brief on the proposed Medical
School, Senate elections, visits by Association officers to branches, further amendment to the Constitution to provide for what now may be
termed  "Divisions," etc.—were  not  undertaken.
Nevertheless, overdue action on a major overhaul of the recordkeeping and addressing problem was necessarily further delayed. Launching of an organized, balanced and stimulating programme—similar to
those found in scores of well-established Associations in the American
Alumni Council—was also postponed until staff and facilities were
available.
"Now is the time," as has been indicated to you in the President's
Report, to further broaden the base of the Fund and extend its spheres,
and to think in terms of adequate facilities and staff to service the large
and rapidly growing group of men and women keenly interested in the
University's further progress. This group of highly intelligent people
are quite prepared to share responsibility, but need a great deal more
in the way of information about U.B.C.—its plant, Faculty, students,
immediate  problems and  policy.
One good way to tell U.B.C.'s "story" to ever more people is
through the columns of the "Chronicle." Our present Editor is quite
aware of this opportunity and will continue to use the magazine, as in
the past, to interpret the Institution to alumni, to stimulate discussion,
and to record the achievements of U.B.C.'s "products." For very good
reasons, this magazine has been described as "the cement which holds
together the structure  which  is the Alumni  Association."
Much has been done by Convocation Founders and members, by
Association members, by students, by Faculty, and other friends of this
young University in personally living U.B.C.'s motto: "Tuum Est," "It's
Up To You" and "It Is Yours." Much remains to be done. The present
Chancellor, one of U.B.C.'s first gradutes, has declared "that the future
of the University of British Columbia may well be determined by the
(moral and financial) support of alumni and other friends in the next
five years."
SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES
ATHLETICS—Alumni   Committee   did   terrific   job.    Report   in  June-July
Chronicle.
—Alumni   Representative  on   Men's  Athletic   Committee  gave  de-
Annual Get-together, Calgary, Spring, 1953.
Herb  Cazozzi, Mrs.  Kay  McKaskill,  John  Gray,  B.A. '34, Aubrey  Kerr,
B.A. '40, John  Rudolph, B.A.Sc. '48.
Page 20 C. A. H. WRIGHT, President Alumni Association  Branch at Trail.
tailed   report   on   M.A.C.   problems   and   plans.   Re-appointed,   along
with  representative  in  Women's Athletic Committee.
BRANCHES—U.B.C.   President  N.   A.   M.   MacKenzie,  met  with  alumni
branch members in Kelowna and Penticton.
•—Dean   W.   Matthews  of   Pharmacy  addressed  the  annual   meeting
of the Victoria group.
—Executive   Director   visited   with   members   in   Toronto,   Hamilton,
Victoria,   Summerland,   Kelowna,   Nanaimo,   Calgary  and  Trail.
—New branches started in Montreal and Regina.   Director attended
initial  meetings.
CAPSULE COLLEGE—As noted in President's Report, a highly successful
"Capsule College"  (2 days) was jointly sponsored by the  Extension
Department  and  Alumni  Association   in  Kelowna.  More  planned.
CHRONICLE—Thanks to Students' Council and Administration, Chronicle
has an  office in the  Brock  Hall—Room  207.  (Phone connection—
ALma  3044—with  alumni  office).
—Extensive  recommendations  of  a  Chronicle   business  committee,
in consultation  with  professional  commercial  authorities,  will  result
in   increase   in   advertising   rates   in   1954,   reduction   in   number   of
copies of regular issues, and minimum of small, local advertisements.
—Provided budgetary requirements can  be  met,  number of copies
of Nov.-Dec.  issue yearly will be increased considerably.
DISTRICT VIII  AMERICAN ALUMNI  COUNCIL—Includes Saskatchewan,
Alberta, Washington, Oregon,  Idaho, Montana and British Columbia.
■—Summer  Conference,  Vancouver,   1953.
—Executive Director has been elected District Chairman for 2-year
term, commencing Spring,  1954.
"DIVISIONS"—Constitutional amendment designed to encourage existing
Department, School and Faculty alumni groups to affiliate with
U.B.C. Alumni Association, and to hje\p others to start.
■—Through integration on a "departmental" basis, avoid duplication
of effort in record-keeping and permit maximum use of central
alumni office facilities.
—Creates single qualifying membership, and provides method
whereby interested smaller and more intimate groups may support
University and/or specific University sections through all-inclusive
Development  Fund.
—Published "Aggie Profile" which was mailed to Aggie Grads.
—Strengthens the "parts" by strengthening the whole—through
more total active members, more representative opinions on Board
of Management, greater use of expanded Association services, etc.
—Establishes better Branches through creation of Regional or
District  "Division"  clubs.
—Degree Reps, on Board of Management appointed or elected by
own groups.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S DIGEST—A periodic news-lettter to Branches
and other interested out-of-town alumni, reporting on Association
activities planned.
FACULTY—Directed several regular bulletins to Faculty members.
FIRESIDES—Series  again  held   in  Spring  on  Sunday  evenings  in  Brock
Hall.    Very   interesting   but   poorly   attended.    Alumni   Board   seeks
direction on these.
FROSH    ORIENTATION—Again    arranged   for   one   of    "Trekkers"    to
address Frosh at annual Cairn Ceremony.
FUND—Large-scale reorganization undertaken in the "Class-Rep" system.
Tremendous  increase  in  number of volunteer  workers,  but  drastic
reduction   in  general  mailed  appeals.
—Production   of   special   pamphlet   "The   Future   of  U.B.C.—It   Is
Yours" and distribution of same through "Special Efforts" Division.
—More   effort   to   interest   business  and   industry   in   scholarships,
specific  projects.
—General report  in Sept.-Oct. Chronicle; donor  list to be included
in Nov.-Dec. issue.
HOMECOMING—Active alumni Homecoming offered sound suggestions
to Student Committee.
—Association addressograph used to mail Homecoming  booklets.
—Former Great Trekkers, in committee, recommended  1953 winner
of award.
HOSPITAL—U.B.C. President has set up an advisory committee on a
University   Hospital.
NATIONAL FEDERATION ALUMNI DIRECTORS—-Still endeavouring to
start a Canadian Federation of Alumni Directors. Meeting tentatively arranged by Lome Gales, McGill, for June in East. Executive
Director will probably attend if Conference of CO's U.N.T.D. planned
as in past 4 years.
PAST PRESIDENTS—Met with U.B.C. President at luncheon in Faculty
Club.   Agreed to meet periodically.
PRESIDENT'S REPORT (U.B.C.)—U.B.C. President made a fairly comprehensive report to alumni. Mailed in Spring to 10,000. Hope to
have University include.this report in Nov.-Dec. Chronicle annually.
RECORDS-MAILING—Executive Director made two fairly detailed reports
during year. One entitled "Things Not Done Which Should Be
Done" and the other recommendations re use of University Tabulating Division for records and use of Addressograph equipment for
most mailing. Association now has IBM cards for all Fund donors.
—Alumni Committee headed by experts in this field preparing
brief with Director for submission to special Governors' Committee.
REUNION DANCE—This popular function saw the largest attendance in
recent years. Special feature now is invitation to alumni of all
Universities able to be present.
SENATE—Alumni Board endorsed special Committee recommendation
that some means be found to restore original proportion of members
elected by Convocation to others on  U.B.C.  Senate.
STUDENTS—Worked closely with many student officials and enjoyed
excellent co-operation.
UNIVERSITY—Agreed "University Story" could be more effectively
told, and that Association should work more closely with Extension
Department.
■—Had active representatives on various University committees,
joined academic processions and attended numerous official University functions.
VARSITY REVUE—Assisted, through the mails, in publicizing the first
"Blue & Gold  Revue" staged.
*     *     *
In conclusion, may I take this opportunity of thanking Association
officers and Board members, Fund Directors and representatives, Branch
executives and members, the U.B.C Chancellor, President, Deans and
Faculty members, the Alma Mater Society President, Student Councillors
and Students, and other interested supporters of U.B.C. with whom I
have worked this past year.   Thanks again.
Yours sincerely,  FRANK J.  E. TURNER,  Executive   Director.
Lcnora says she's never hated
Anything  human  God created;
No, those she hates, I know too well,
Are, ex officio, fiends of Hell.
—Geoffrey B. Riddehough, B.A. '24.
MONTREAL TRUST
COMPANY
"A Company that Cares for your
Affairs"
Services to Individuals and Corporations
• EXECUTORS & TRUSTEES
• EMPLOYEE PENSION FUNDS
• ENDOWMENT FUNDS
466 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C.
MArine 0567
J. N. BELL-Manager
Page 21 DUDLEY DARLING NEW ALUMNI PRESIDENT
The  Honourable R. W.  Bonner Addresses  Combined
Convocation-Alumni   Annual   Meeting
For the first time in the history of the University the
annual meetings of Convocation and of the U.B.C. Alumni
Association were combined and the business of both organizations was carried out at a dinner function in Brock
Hall on the evening of November 19th. The attendance was
large—upwards of 250 in all—including many foundation
members of Convocation. President Emeritus and Mrs.
L. S. Klinck were among the Head Table guests. A special
feature of the occasion was the attendance and presentation
to the gathering of the dozen or more winners of Alumni
Association scholarships—an impressive object lesson in
the practical value of Alumni giving.
In the absence of Chancellor Sherwood Lett, the chair
was taken by Chancellor-Emeritus The Hon. Eric Hamber,
who conducted the meeting of Convocation. Mr. Hamber
spoke of the unique nature of the meeting and, in commenting on the unusually large number present, he urged all
the Alumni to united action in serving the interests of the
University. The Treasurer, Dudley Darling, showed in his
report a bank balance of $177.82. Mrs. Sherwood Lett, wife
of the Chancellor, herself the first Secretary of the Alma
Mater Society, made a presentation to Theo Berry, who
was retiring after 23 years service in the honorary office
of Convocation Auditor. The firm of Meredith, Bruce,
Bladwin and Kitto were duly elected auditors for the ensuing year. The report of Jordan Guy, Chairman of the nominating committee, was accepted and the new Executive
Council elected as follows: Treasurer, Peter Sharp; Secretary, Frank Turner; Members, Elmore Meredith, Q.C.,
Dr. Anson C. Frost, J. Alex. Walker, W. H. Maclnnes
and Harry T. Logan.
The meeting of Convocation was then adjourned, on
the conclusion of its business, and President Douglas Macdonald proceeded with the Alumni Association meeting. A
number of vocal selections were pleasingly rendered by
Ronald Hancock, B.A. 'S3, accompanied at the piano by
Miss Jean Telfer, B.A. '24. After the minutes of the previous meeting were approved, the amendments to the Constitution and By-laws of the Association, as previously circulated to members, were passed, on motion of Frank Lewis.
The purpose of these Amendments is to regularise the
status, within the Alumni Association, of graduate groups
who form themselves into separate societies with membership based on common Faculty or degree course affiliations.
On behalf of the Alumni Association, the President made
a presentation to the past-editor of the U.B.C. Alumni
Chronicle, Ormy Hall, as a token of appreciation of the
fine contribution he made to Alumni interests and welfare
during the seven years of his editorship. In expressing his
thanks, Ormy paid tribute to help in his work received
from Alumni, including Mary Fallis, Dave Brock and
Frank Turner, and expressed his hopes and good wishes
for the future of the Chronicle.
Dudley Darling presented his report as Treasurer for
the Association's fiscal year ending October 31st, 19S3,
showing an excess of revenue over expenditure for the
year of $720.44.
Aubrey Roberts, Chairman of the Alumni-U.B.C. Development Fund Board of Directors, then reported on the
year's activities.   A notable feature in  this report was  the
Mrs.   Sherwood   Lett,   B.A.   '17,   makes   a   presentation   to   Theo   Berry.
B.A.Sc. '23, retiring Convocation Hon. Auditor.
increase in numbers of participating Alumni, viz., 2303 as
against 2190 contributors in 1952. Mr. Roberts also noted
the wide interest in the R. C. Palmer memorial fund and
in the Home Management Fund. A highly "encouraging
element also was found in the generous contributions of
non-alumni friends of the University—the Kinsmen's Polio
Foundation of $25,000.00; Cemco's gift of $250.00, through
Mr. Ben W. Ball, president of the Company; Simmons and
McBride Medical Research Lectureship, $300.00; Scholarship Donations, from Pacific Brewers' Agents Ltd.,
$5,000.00, Finning Tractor Company, $1,500.00 and Peter
A. Schwerdt, $1,000.00. No fewer than 18 U.B.C. students
were this year benefitting from the Pacific Brewers' Agents'
donation. Aubrey Roberts will continue for a second year
as Chairman of the Fund Board of Directors, with Peter
Sharp as Vice-Chairman. Mr. Kenneth Caple is Chairman
of the Fund's Board of Trustees, and in this capacity he
handed over to Acting-President, Dean Chant, a cheque
representing the major portion of the proceeds for the
Alumni-U.B.C.  Development Fund for the year.
Cecil  Killam, M.A.,  D.C.L.,  LL.D.  (left),  Elmore  Meredith,  Q.C.  (right),
with Aubrey Roberts.  Elmore Meredith succeeds Dr. Killam as Chairman
Convocation Founders' Fund Committee.
Dudley   Darling   (left),  presents   a   gift  to  Douglas   Macdonald,  retiring
Alumni Association President.
The results of the Alumni Association's elections were
announced as follows: President, G. Dudley Darling,
B.Com. '39; First Vice-President, W. James Logie, B.A.
'26; Second Vice-President, Aileen Mann, B.A. '37; Third
Vice-President, Dean Blythe Eagles, B.A. '22; Treasurer,
Peter Sharp, B.A., B.Com. '36; Editor, Harry T. Logan;
Members-at-Large, Mrs. H. A. (Rosemary) Hope, B.A.
'40, (for one year); Dr. W. G. Black, B.A. '22, Mrs. Helen
Harmer, B.A. 40, E. G. (Ernie) Perrault, B.A. '48. Degree
representatives: Agriculture, Harry Lee, B.Arch. '50; Arts,
Isobel Bescoby, B.A. '32; Forestry, Bill Hancock, B.S.F.
'49; Home Economics, Audrey M. Dunlop, B. H. E. '47;
Law, Frank Lewis, B.A. '49, LL.B. '50; Medicine, Arthur
M. Bagnall, M.D., B.A. '32. Representatives of Social
Work, Commerce, Physical Education and Pharmacy will
be elected by their own group.
The meeting was then handed over to Dudley Darling,
whose first act as President was to make a presentation to
the retiring president, Douglas Macdonald, at the same
time expressing Alumni gratitude for his three years' service  as  member of the   Executive.
Page 22 Ormy Hall, retiring Editor of the
U.B.C. Alumni Chronicle.
Introducing the guest speaker, The Honourable Robert
W. Bonner, Q.C., Attorney-General and Minister of Education, the Chairman referred to the close association of the
speaker with the U.B.C, not only as a member of the
first graduating class in Law, and Officer Commanding the
U.B.C. Contingent of the C.O.T.C. since 1946, but also in
his present office of Minister of Education. He spoke also
of the Minister's undergraduate activities as president of
L.S.E.  and  of  his  prominence in  debating.
In his introductory remarks Colonel Bonner voiced his
pleasure in returning to the University and especially to
Brock Hall, where he had attended the opening ceremony.
The wide use now being made of this building, in contrast
to its earlier years, was just another indication of the University's growth. He paid tribute to Ormy Hall's work as
Chronicle Editor, having been himself an Associate Editor
for two years. He called attention to the significance of
November 19th for the first
combined meeting of Convocation and the Alumni Association. Two events of great
importance to British Columbia had taken place on this
day in her early history. It
was on November 19, 1858,
that British Columbia was
formally proclaimed a Crown
Colony at Fort Langley, and
on November 19, 1866, the
Act was proclaimed uniting
British Columbia and Vancouver Island into a single
political unit.
The topic of the Minister's speech was "British Columbia 1954", and he proceeded to deal at some length with
the factors of production and development, viz., Land,
Population and Capital. He called attention to the vast area
of the Province, 366,000 square miles, greater than the
combined areas of California, Oregon, Washington and
New York. Two-thirds of this whole territory was alpine
or barren and but three per cent of the remainder was suitable for cultivation.
Population was concentrated in the inter-mountain
valleys, in the Lower Fraser Valley, in the Lower Mainland and in the Southern half of Vancouver Island, but
pockets of population existed in scattered districts within
the Province, corresponding to Nature's distribution of her
resources. Thus Geography had imposed a situation which
called for the construction and maintenance of costly rail
and road communications. In the period 1939-1953 the
population growth was 55%, an increase greater than in
other parts of Canada. Community facilities of all kinds
had to be provided for these new citizens and in this way
great labour and financial pressures were put upon junior
governmental groups—municipal, civic, provincial. There
was a "struggle for revenues among all responsible bodies."
Colonel Bonner spoke of the importance of education
as a factor in provincial life. He referred to the "tradition
of education" and mentioned his attendance on the previous
evening at the Diamond Jubilee of Union College as the
heir of Columbian College, founded in New Westminster in
1893. Today the total value of school properties in the
Province was $150,000,000.00, with an operating cost this
year of $41,000,000.00 and with an anticipated annual increase of $5,000,000.00 over the next 5 years.
Dudley Darling (left), the Hon. R. W. Bonner, and Peter Sharp, Treasurer
of Convocation.
The speaker also called attention to the remarkable
labour-adaptability of British Columbia as shown by the
late war experience, when shipbuilding, air-plane construction and other war-induced industry had to be developed
rapidly and when labour-power was proportionately increased to provide for these industrial needs.
Since the war, capital investments have appeared in
large sums in many portions of the Province. Additional
power is needed to meet the growing demands of industry.
In the Peace River Block, gas and oil wells are being developed and oil and gas lines constructed to make these
natural products available to industry. In all this development there has been revealed the same spirit of energy and
enterprise shown by U.B.C. undergraduates and Alumni—
in the Great Trek, in the creation of the Old Gymnasium,
the Stadium, Brock Hall, the Memorial Gymnasium and,
most recently, the  Faculty of Medicine.
Colonel Bonner spoke of the need for stability and of
a larger provincial population to assist in bringing it about.
He regretted the loss of sterling markets and especially
United Kingdom markets, and indicated the need for giving
attention to the means of recovering these markets.
In conclusion the Minister declared that the difficulties
confronting us in 1954 were not all of a material nature.
Such work as the University does, in teaching each generation of our youth and in the continuous search after Truth,
was needed today as perhaps never before. For the University, it is all-important that her Academic Freedom be
maintained. To co-operate in this task was the privilege
and the responsibility of all U.B.C. graduates. And the
same orderly study applied to the problems of community
life will serve to assist in maintaining and expanding our
way of  life in  British  Columbia.
PHOTOS  ON   PAGES 22 AND  23   BY   U.B.C. VISUAL  EDUCATION   SERVICE
Gordon R. Graham, William D. Burton, Thomas A. Nordstrom, John A.
Birch, William Gregory, Aiko Hori, James D. McGuire, H. E. McCandles*,
James  D.  Jamieson,  Arthur  Kuhn,   Edwin  T.   Menkes,  Stewart  P.   Paul.
+ +
There was a young fellow called  Griffiths,
Who lisped, and who used to say, "Iffiths
Dithtrethful to lithen
To a lithp thuch ath  thithen,
Pleathe thuggetht what I ought to do wiffiths."
Harmony, between Mark and May,
Is hardly at the best:
She's still at the Adoro te,
He's reached the Missa est.
—Geoffrey B. Riddehough, B.A. '24.
Kenneth   Caple,   Chairman   Alumni-U.B.C.   Development   Fund   Board   of
Trustees, hands over Fund Cheque to Acting-President Dean Chant.
REUNION DANCE —DECEMBER 28
At the Commodore Cabaret, the annual U.B.C. Re-union
Dance will have several new features this year. Plan to
be at this gala affair with your party. Please get in touch
now with Miss Aileen Mann, Dance Chairman, Cart
Collard, Ticket Chairman or Alumni Director Frank Turner
—Phone AL. 3044.   Tickets, $6.00 per couple.
Remember the  Date — December TWO  EIGHT!
Page 23 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT
(Presented at the Convocation-Alumni annual dinner meeting  in  Brock
Hall, November 19, 1953.—Ed.)
This report will only undertake to summarize
the policies we have followed during the past year.
A more detailed account of our activities is contained in reports from the Treasurer and Executive
Director.
The Board of Management — The constitutional changes made two years ago providing for
representation of graduates by Faculties on our
Board of Management has proven to be a wise one.
A further change in this direction is now desirable.
Graduate groups or societies have now been
formed in the Faculties or Schools of Pharmacy,
Social Work, Physical Education, Commerce and
Forestry. Agriculture is in process of formation.
The intent is to embrace these societies within the
framework of the Alumni Association and give
them representation on the Board of Management.
In respect to the aim, common to all, of promoting
the best interests of the University, the groups will
then be in a position to integrate their activities
rather than disperse them over a broad field.
The Alumni office is the logical source of address, mailing and other facilities for the graduate
groups who have a desire to promote the best interests of our University.
Branches — Through a good turn of fortune
involving our Executive Director, our contacts with
the branch groups in B.C. and Canada have been
more personal this year than for some time. Organization of branches in Regina and Montreal is now
under way. Our Executive Director is gifted in
this field of activity and it is to be hoped we will
be able to give him greater support in the future.
Public Relations — Our policy of assisting
the University, by means of direct contact with
the public, particularly with parents of high school
students, was followed again by holding a two-day
series of meetings and talks at Kelowna. The undertaking was a stimulating example of co-operation between graduate groups in the Okanagan
Valley, the Extension Department, the Faculty and
our Alumni Office. Much good would come from
the expansion of this type of public relations.
A.A.C.—In the past we have received much benefit from membership in the American Alumni Council. This year we were host to the convention of
this group's North-Western District, and gained
the impression that our Association, while not as
pretentious as some of those present, at least was
doing a good job by relative standards and was
developing rapidly in the fulfilment of our longer
range plans.
"Chronicle" — After many years of outstanding service as Editor of the "Chronicle", Mr. Ormonde Hall found it necessary to resign his position
which also includes membership on the Executive
Committee. From all points of view publication of
the "Chronicle" is a cardinal factor in our activities.
We made a thorough examination of the editorial
and business phases of the publication in order to
determine  the  qualifications  of  a  new  Editor.    It
was an immense satisfaction to all concerned when
Col. Harry Logan consented to take over the duties
of Editor. An Editorial Committee was created to
act as liaison between the Editor and the Association.
Athletic — The Association for some time has
required a policy for its guidance on the subject
of Athletics at the University. A Special Committee
with a most representative membership, under the
chairmanship of Dr. William C. Gibson, investigated the whole subject and submitted a report to the
Board of Management which, following a special
meeting, adopted the report. Three of the seventeen
recommendations clarify our approach to this
subject:
"No. 1. That the physical education and recreation of all students must be considered to be part
of a general University Education," and
"No. 4. That students shall not be paid or given
special considerations in return for participation in
athletics," and
"No. 5. That no participation in athletics should
be permitted to compromise the main educational
purposes of his attendance at University."
Financial — This year we operated within the
same budget appropriation as last year. We were
well aware our facilities in the Alumni Office were
in sore need of expansion and that our Director and
staff were badly handicapped in carrying on their
duties. We resolved nevertheless to complete the
fifth year of Development Fund activities in order
to make sure we had a sound basis for underwriting
the need for increased facilities.
The Development Fund — Under the inspiring
leadership of Mr. Aubrey F. Roberts the Development Fund Board has concluded an outstanding
year of accomplishment. All members participating
in this work deserve special recognition and thanks
from the Association. The vision of the founding
members of this enterprise as a means of stimulating
our membership and assisting the University in a
most tangible manner has proven its worth over a
five-year inaugural period.
It is now our responsibility to provide the Fund
Directors and our Executive-Director with the facilities they require to carry on and expand their organizations. Your Executive has already commenced negotiations in this regard.
Personal — Most members feel that work in
our Association is refreshing and interesting because of the very cordial relationship existing between our members, the University Administration
and the Faculty. Added is the knowledge that the
University needs and welcomes our help and support in fulfilling the indispensable role it must have
in the development of our Province and its people.
This has been my experience and I would like to
express my personal appreciation to all those who
have helped carry forward this thirty-sixth year in
the life of our Association.
(Signed) Doug Macdonald,
President.
Page 24 THE HONOURABLE MRS. TILLY ROLSTON
InM
emonam
PHOTO BY VANCOUVER PROVINCE
A congregation which
filled St. Andrew's-Wesley
United Church on the afternoon of Friday, October
16th, 1953, to take part in
the State funeral of the
Honourable Tilly Rolston,
bore solemn witness to the
affection and esteem in
which the late Minister of
Education was held by all
sections of the people. A
native daughter of Vancouver, Tilly Cameron, as
she was known to her
school-mates in old Vancouver High School, always eager, vivacious,
friendly, energetic, rose to
the top of the ladder in the
public life of the province
and retained to the last
that energy and spirit
which enabled her to
achieve so much in the
causes which attracted and
absorbed   her   active   mind.       Tl,e Honourable Mrs. Tilly Rolston.
Her teaching career to which she had looked forward
after two years at McGill College of B.C.—tne torerunner
of U.B.C.—and one year at the Vancouver Normal School,
was cut short by her marriage to Fred Rolston, friend of
her High School days, who pre-deceased her in 1945. She
left three children to mourn her loss, a son, Robert, member of West Vancouver Municipal Council, and two daughters. Mrs. Eric L. Hartley and Mrs. Norman E. Foster. Her
life was devoted to her home and to the service of her
native city and province.
The wide scope of her interests in community affairs
is indicated by the numerous organizations and public
bodies with which she was associated. In her earlier years
she was an active member of the First Baptist Church. She
was later President of the B.C. Council of Women. Other
societies which claimed her attention included the B.C.
Branch of the Canadian Society for the Control of Cancer,
and the Vancouver Symphony Society. During the Second
World War, she was several times re-elected President of
the Vancouver Women's Canadian Club, whose members
will perpetuate the memory of her splendid service during
those years by the Mrs. F. J. Rolston Memorial Fund. She
was a member of the Vancouver Parks Board from 1938
to 1947. She was first elected to the Provincial Legislature
in 1941 and, in July 1952, was named Minister of Education.
In recent years Mrs. Rolston travelled widely, visiting,
in turn, Eastern Canada and United States, the United
Kingdom and Western Europe, Argentina and other South
American countries, Australia, Honolulu, Japan and Formosa, studying at first hand the institutions and ways of
life of the peoples among whom she journeyed.
Eloquent tributes to her sterling qualities and to her
achievements in the public service were paid, at the time
of her death, by the leaders of all parties in the provincial
legislature.
The feelings of all graduates and members of the University were voiced by Chancellor Sherwood Lett in his
opening remarks at the U.B.C. Autumn Congregation when
he said, in expressing sorrow at Mrs. Rolston's death,
"We feel we have lost an honoured friend."
—H. T. L.
+
Dr. W. Kaye Lamb, B.A. '27, M.A. '30, Ph.D.
(London) '33, LL.D., attended the University of
Manitoba Autumn congregation to receive the Honorary degree of LL.D. in recognition of his services
to Canada in the field of Letters. Dr. Lamb has
already been awarded this degree by his admiring
Alma Mater.
DIAMOND JUBILEE CELEBRATION
AT UNION COLLEGE
Special celebrations were held on November
18th at Union College to mark the 60th anniversary
of the beginning of theological education under the
United Church of Canada in British Columbia. It
was in 1893 that Columbian College of the Methodist Church, situated in New Westminster, was
granted a charter authorizing "the education of
students in theology" and "conferring degrees in the
same". This institution then became not only the
first theological college but also the first degree-
granting institution of any kind in the Province.
Union College, which is affiliated with the University of British Columbia, continues the tradition of
theological education begun by Columbian College.
Principal W. S. Taylor, M.A., B.D., D.D., presided over a special convocation held in the College
Chapel in the afternoon, at which honorary degrees
were conferred on three graduates of Columbian
College, viz.. Rev. H. E. Morton, Rev. A. W. Mcintosh and Rev. (Major) G. Turpin. The ceremony
was attended by the Hon. R. W. Bonner, Attorney-
General and Minister of Education, and by many
leading clergy and lavmen of the United Church in
B.C.
Under the joint auspices of the Board of Governors and Alumni Association of the College, a
dinner was held in Brock Hall in the evening, after
which Rev. J. W. Decker, D.D., of New York,
Secretary of the International Missionary Council,
spoke on "Missionary Work of the Church in a
Changing World."
3 TRAINS
DAILY
From Vancouver
10:00 a.m.
for Intermediate Main
line points as far as
Calgary.
7:30 p.m.
"The Dominion*1 to
Montreal.
8:15  p.m.
"The Dominion" to
Toronto.
(Pacific   Standard
Time)
TRAVEL EAST
</lA GiMeJUJ&cifcc
For business? For pleasure? Travel on
Canadian Pacific's "The Dominion" to
Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal or to other
points in eastern United States and
Canada. Relax in the lounge car . . .
enjoy tempting meals . . . Accommodation
and fares to suit every  travel budget.
For further information see your local
agent.
6w«ufcw(5k$c
Page 25 CHOICE REVIEW OF BOOK BY EARLE BIRNEY
(The review of Earle Birney's book, Trial of a City,
Irom which the following extracts are taken, appeared in
the British Weekly. London, dated December 25th last.
The reviewer, with pen-name of Ilico, is Dr. Nathaniel
JVHcklem, himself a distinguished writer, theologian and
poet. Earle Birney recently met him at the Authors' Club
in London and writes, "Oddly, my first contact with Dr.
Micklem was fifteen years ago when I reviewed a book of
his poems, The Labyrinth, in the Canadian Forum. He did
not know of this when he reviewed mine (just as well,
perhaps.)"—Ed.)
EARLE   BIRNEY
The End of Vancouver — Ilico
Major Earle Birney is professor of English Literature in the University of British Columbia and
a poet. As a professor of English Literature he has
paid especial attention to Piers Plowman and peculiar inattention to the science of punctuation. As
to being a poet, that is no credit to him at all, for
even I could be a poet (I fondly believe) if my life
were spent upon the campus in Vancouver. Major
Birney is a wit and a satirist as well as a poet, and
he writes with the most invigorating zest. There
is a picture of him (and of British Columbia) on the
jacket of his new book ; the portrait is convincing.
I begin appropriately with his Christmas Ode.
It starts thus:
There was the star of course
over the Gatineau  hills
sudden and bright as a god
In the commotion, three Vice-Marshalls
roared to the air in pursuit
But it was only a nova in Virgo
betraying some  cosmic  tantrum
that ended a million years back
In a week the sky looked safe
and the astronomers' charts were mended.
My contribution to this is the full stop at the
end; the author must take all responsibility for the
comma in line 4.
This is not very like
Peor  and   Baalim
Forsake their temples dim
but it seems to me along the same lines, and Milton
would have been none the worse for a keener sense
of humour. . . .
Major Birney cannot be hailed as a satisfactory
exponent of orthodox Christianity, but he believes
(do all Christians believe as much?)
that somewhere again there has been a Birth
and Christmas . . .  Christmas . . .
could be any day every day now and forever!
The exclamation mark is Major Birney's.
I am not in general very good at "modern poetry," but I like this; it is all so boisterous and vivid
and unsentimental. There is here a splendid travel
poem describing a journey (by air) from Montreal
to Vancouver. I found myself comparing it, as I
read, with Calverley's celebrated Dover to Munich.
This is (in part) how Calverley describes the evening :
In the sapphire West the eve yet lingered,
Bathed in kindly light those hilltops cold;
Fringed each cloud, and stooping rosy-fingered,
Changed Rhine's waters into molten gold.
Calverley  represents  perfection  of  form.    Here  is
Major Birney on the dawn:
Like jungle-bright parrots migrating
the jangling colours and clouds of the dawn overtake us
snuffing the dew-bead lights of the farmhouse kitchens
filling the sky with the cry of the day. . . .
I personally think that last line quite useful, and
I want to pronounce it like a cockney; these assonances are not unintentional with Major Birney, but
he's "got something on" Calverley, as the modern
idiom has it. . . .
I have never ceased to admire and commend
Francis Brett Young's The Island as a magnificent
poetic achievement. It is the epic of England from
the very beginning down to 1940. Major Birney
has attempted something along the same lines but
on a very much smaller scale and in a wholly different idiom for the city of Vancouver. He has
written a play which he calls Trial of a City. This
by implication is in verse. Some of it seems to me
quite indubitably in prose (though with modern
poets it is difficult to be quite sure), and of the rest
some beyond all question is not poetry. But it is a
most engaging and ofen hilarious composition, and
the author must have enjoyed the writing of every
line of it. . . .
I have compared and contrasted Major Birney
with Milton and Calverley and Brett Young. He
emerges from the ordeal with no small credit.
+       +
Dr. Lionel Stevenson    continued from page 3
declares the book to be the "most complete Meredith Biography yet." Time, under the heading "The
Wounded Egoist" calls it "the first grand-scale
resurrection of Victorian literature's most neglected
writer." The New York Times in applauding the
volume writes, "Mr. Stevenson—author also of a
biography of Thackeray, "The Showman of Vanity
Fair",—everywhere floods with light the deep personal roots of Meredith's novels . . . Nothing in
Mr. Stevenson's biography is more valuable than
his demonstration of that courageous and painful
honesty that is the supreme achievement of Meredith's social comedy."
Page 26 COMMANDER   GLEN   McDONALD
NEWS OF ALUMNI
From the Editor's Desk
(Items of Alumni news for these columns are invited in
the form of press clippings or personal letters. These should
reach the Editor, U.B.C. Alumni Chronicle, The Brock
Building, U.B.C, for the next issue not later than Febru-
aiy 19th, 1954.)
The Honourable Robert W. Bonner, B.A. '42,
LL.B. '48, Provincial Attorney-General, was sworn
in October 19th as Minister of Education, in place
of the late Honourable Tilly Rolston. The Premier
has explained that the appointment is temporary
and that a permanent appointee will be found for
the post later.
On October 21st was
announced the retirement of Commander
Glen McDonald, LL.B.
'49, officer commanding-
Royal Canadian Navy
(Reserve) at H.M.C.S.
Discovery, Vancouver.
Commander McDonald is succeeded by Acting - Commander John
H. Stevenson, B.Com.,
B.A. '40, who served in
the Royal Canadian
Navy during the Second World War and for
the past four years has
been an active officer in
the Navy Reserve, first
at Saskatoon and more
recently in Vancouver.
Colonel Donald F. Purves, B.Com. '34, Kiwanis
Club gold medalist in his graduating year, has been
appointed officer in charge of Administration in the
Canadian Army, Quebec Command. He had been
Director of the Army budget since 1949.
A. Uretzky, B.A.Sc. '38, P.Eng., now holds the
appointment of chief engineer of the English Electric Company of Canada Limited, St. Catherines,
Ontario. He has been manager of the switchgear
engineering section of the company's work since
1950, a post which he still retains.
From England comes word to Professor Walter
Sage that Eric J. Holmgren, B.A. '47, has been
given the post of Librarian in the new Engineering
Department Library of Cambridge University
which was opened last year by H. R. H. the Duke
of Edinburgh.
Dr. Joseph Marin, B.A.Sc '28, M.S., Ph.D. has
returned from Trondheim, Norway, where he was
conducting graduate courses in Engineering Mechanics at the Institute of Technology. This instructional work was done as part of a Fulbright teaching and research award for the academic year
1952-53. On his return from Europe, Dr. Marin,
who is Professor of Engineering Mechanics and
Research Professor of Engineering Materials at the
Pennsylvania State College, was made Head of the
Department of Engineering Mechanics.
David F. Hayward, LL.B. '48, has given up his
law practice in Kelowna. With his wife (nee Ruby
Dunlop, B.A. '49) and their two small children, he
has gone to Hamilton, Ontario, where they will both
have a year's training at McMaster, in preparation
for service in India with the Baptist Foreign Mission Board.
Ragbir Singh Basi, B.A. '53, President of the
N.F.C.U.S.. according to the October number of
"External Affairs", visited Ottawa in September
"to discuss interests of university students in the
international sphere . . . He conferred with Mr. R.
M. Macdonnell, Assistant Under-Secretary of State
for External Affairs, and outlined for him the activities of the Federation in scholarship and seminar
projects." From this article we learn also that Mr.
Basi, who was President of the Alma Mater Society
last year and a leader in many under-graduate activities in U.B.C, "will enter Harvard University
Graduate School of Public Administration this
autumn on an Administration Fellowship to study
for a Master's degree."
Dr. J. M. Black, B.A.Sc. '35, M.A.Sc. '36, Ph.D.
(McGill) '42, after some years spent in geological
work in Africa, and in eastern and north-western
Canada, has returned to Vancouver to practice as a
consulting geologist. He has been employed recently by the department of mines in north-western
British  Columbia.
Dr. Ronald W. Lamont-Havers, B.A. '41, after
extensive post-graduate studies of arthritis in New
York, has accepted a position as consultant with the
B.C. Division, Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism
Societv in Vancouver.
R. "P. Forshaw. B.S.A. '36, M.Sc. (McGill) '38,
writes from Guelph, where he has been a member
of the Ontario Agricultural College Department of
Animal Husbandry Staff since 1947, and is now
Assistant Professor. After completing his M.Sc.
work at McGill he continued there until 1940, when
he turned westward again, spent three years in consultant and other agricultural work and in 1943
joined the Animal Husbandry staff at the University of Saskatchewan where he remained until assuming his  present appointment at Guelph.
F. R. Birkett, B.Com. '51, is with Canadian Industries Limited, working at Maitland, Ontario, and
living in Brockville.
Charles A. Sigvardson, B.Com. '53, has been
appointed Sales Manager of Pauline Johnson Candy
Shops Limited. He operates from the Head Office
in  Vancouver. Dr    Tohn  H   Fisherj
B.A. '35, M.A. '38,
Ph.D. (McGill) '41. has
been appointed director
of research for MacMillan and Bloedel who
have set' up a new department within the
company. Dr. Earl G.
Hallonquist, B.A. '28,
M.A. '30, Ph.D. (McGill) '33, will be assistant director. "The broad
field of the new department," said B. M. Hoff-
meister, company president, in announcing
these appointments,
"will be better ways of
making' present products, better use of raw
material — B.C. timber
— and new products
which have to be imagined, developed and
engineered."
DR. JOHN  H.  FISHER
Page 27 The appointment
of Mr. Gordon W.
Scott, B.A. '19, as
deputy police magistrate, has received
wide and outspoken
approval. Representative of these expressions of approbation
is the following editorial comment in a
Vancouver paper.
Referring to his
selection as a "tribute to high integrity" the journal continues : "We're more
than happy to see a
square - shooter like
Gordon W. Scott appointed as Vancouver's new deputy
police magistrate.
Mr. Scott has an outstanding record for fair-mindedness, human sympathy, devotion to duty and independence of mind
in nearly 30 years' service to Vancouver as deputy
city prosecutor and more recently as prosecutor.
These are exactly the qualities his new appointment
requires." Mr. Scott is a son of the late Dr. S. D.
Scott, to whom our Alma Mater owes much for his
devoted work on her behalf in earlier years.
Dr. Eric L. Smith, B.A.Sc. '42, B.A. '45, who
took his medical degree at McGill and later pursued
post-graduate   study   in   Ophthalmology   in   New
GORDON  W. SCOTT, B.A. '19
' LATCX
Z***2^
«•*.
'»*
&?**-<
'ODOR,,
FINEST RUBBER PAINT
AT LOWEST PRICE!
16 BEAUTIFUL COLORS  -  FAST CLEAN UP
AT ALL
Fffonamei— IVfonaseal Ut/\LtKo
York, has now commenced practice in Vancouver.
David Rome, B.A. '36, press officer of the Canadian Jewish Congress and editor of the Congress
Bulletin, has been named executive-director of the
Jewish Public Library in Montreal. After graduating
from U.B.C. he studied at the University of Washington and took a degree in library science at McGill.
In addition to many other literary activities, Mr.
Rome edited a two-volume work entitled "Canadian
Jews in World War II" for which introductions
were contributed by the late Right Honourable W.
L. Mackenzie King and the Honourable Brooke
Claxton.
Patrick (Pat) C. Keatley, B.A. '40, whose voice,
beamed from London by the B.B.C, is now familiar
to many listeners in Canada, went to England over
a year ago on a Commonwealth Press Union exchange plan. His B.B.C. broadcasting is done in
spare time, taken from his journalistic work with
The Manchester Guardian, which has given him a
number of important and interesting assignments.
His expose of the Traffic in Horses in Ireland and
England, in a series of articles in June and July of
last year, were brought to the attention of Sir Winston Churchill and led to the appointment of a government committee of enquiry.
John M. R. Margeson, B.A. '42, who graduated
with honours in Classics and English, proceeded to
England in 1952 with the help of a Royal Society
of Canada Overseas scholarship and has spent the
year in study at Oxford. He and Mrs. Margeson
have now returned  to Canada  to  Wolfville,  Nova
Scotia, where he has
been made Head of the
English Department at
Acadia University.
Powell River Sales
Corporation announces
the appointment of
Ronald M. Melvin,
B.Com. '49, as its pulp
representative in Chicago, where his area of
work will be the Midwestern States. Ron
has been associated
with  the  Powell  River
RON M. MELVIN, B.Com. '49 ,-,
Company since summer
vacation employment of 1947.
Bert R. Tupper, B.A.Sc. '28, manager and chief
engineer of the Northwest Telephone Company, has
been made a Fellow of the Institute of Radio Engineers, an honour previously awarded to only
twelve other Canadians. The distinction was given
for the prominent part played by Mr. Tupper in
the development of radiotelephony in Canada.
Clifford H. Stockwell, B.A.Sc. '24, Ph.D. (Wisconsin) '30, was awarded the Willet G. Miller Medal
by the  Royal Society of Canada in June,  1953, a
FOR ATTENTION  OF  CIVIL  ENGINEERING  GRADUATES
Civil  'S3—Whenever  possible the Chronicle  will be  used  to
keep in touch with you.   Also from time to time letters will be
mailed to you.   In any case we must have your correct address,
so, when you can, drop a line to Ray C. or the Alumni office.
Other Civils—It has been suggested that civils (as well as
other groups within Engineering) form some sort of association
under the Alumni banner in order to foster and maintain closer
ties with the University. If you would care to give us your ideas
on this matter just write to:
RAY CHRISTOPHERSON
2573 East 8th Avenue, Vancouver 12, B.C.
Page 28 medal given biennially for outstanding accomplishments in the geological sciences. As a member of
the Geological Survey of Canada, Cliff has made
important contributions to science and to the Canadian mineral industry by his work in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and the Northwest Territories. He
married Betty Johnston, Arts '30. They have two
children and reside in Ottawa.
Dr. George F. Davidson, B.A. '28, is in New
York City serving as a member of the Canadian
Delegation to the eighth session of the United
Nations General Assembly.
Dr. J. A. Gibson, B.A. '31, Dean of Arts, Carlton
College, Ottawa, is spending six months at the
Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, as a Visiting
Fellow while he holds the Guggenheim Fellowship
awarded him early in the summer. He returned
with his family at the end of September from a visit
to England where he attended the Jubilee Reunion
of Rhodes Scholars, the British Council Conference
on Commonwealth Studies at Christ Church,
Oxford, and the Commonwealth Universities Congress at Cambridge; he found time for extensive
travels in the United Kingdom and for work besides
in the Public Record Office in London.
T. G. Pearce, LL.B. '53, in a letter from London
University Faculty of Law, writes that he has been
allowed to read at once for his Doctor of Laws
degree, omitting the intermediate work for the
Master's degree, usually required of students with
equivalent academic standing. According to Dean
Curtis of the U.B.C. Law Faculty, this action results
from a recognition by the University of London of
the special attention given in U.B.C. to the study
of International Law—the subject in which Mr.
Pearce is specialising.
ALUMNI HELP PUT OVER
''BLUE AND COLD  REVUE"
By Dorothy Somerset
(Miss Somerset is Assistant Professor of Dramatics in
the Department of Extension and is also a member of the
English Department at U.B.C. A similar acknowledgment and thanks appeared in the "Ubyssey" of November
10 in a letter by Miss Somerset addressed to President
MacKenzie, Mr. Ivan Feltham, President of the Alma Mater
Society, and Mr. Douglas Macdonald, President of the
Alumni Association.—Ed.)
On Saturday, November 7th, 1953, the University of British Columbia presented the last performance of the first "Blue and Gold Revue", having
played to one almost full house and two sold-out
houses. Authors Eric Nicol and Ernest Perrault,
composer John Brockington, the actors, directors—
one of whom was Philip Keatley, and assistants—
including Irene Carlsen, were rewarded by the generous and enthusiastic response of their audiences.
Behind their modest success lay a story of co-operation and warm-hearted assistance without which
the Revue would not have been possible. "Town
and gown", faculty and students, undergraduates
and alumni—all were united in a single effort.
To the alumni the "Blue and Gold Revue" owes
a tremendous debt of gratitude. Without their
assistance the actual running of the production
would not have been possible. Two distinguished
alumni, His Honour Judge Lord and Mr. Kenneth
DOROTHY SOMERSET
Caple, played parts in the Revue. Whatever pace
the show had was due to that famous Players' Club
team of the 30's—Tommy Lea, Pat Larsen, Gordon
Hilker, and to their assistants headed up by Allan
Walsh, Doreen Odling. Valentine Clyne, Dick
Harris, Lyle Baigent. Jack Devereaux, Ron Fera
and alumnus-husband, D. O. C. Byng-Hall.
Properties were in charge of Dorothy Peck,
Katie Duff-Stuart and Dorothy McPhillips, and
other alumnae "manned" the costume committees:
Mrs. Arthur Lord, Mrs. Kenneth Caple, Mrs. R. E.
Walker, Mrs. George Dickson. Mrs. Gordon Mecki-
son, Gwynneth Lewis, Margaret Lewis. Mrs. J. V.
Clyne and faculty and alumnus wives, Mrs. II. V.
Warren, Mrs. St. Clair-Sobell and Mrs. Geoffrey
Woodward.
Ushers from the Sir Ernest Macmillan Club were
provided through the good offices of Marjorie Agnew, and the Alumni Association office helped with
publicity.
The Revue was a large undertaking, larger perhaps than the authors, composer and directors at
first realized. Had it not been for the truly remarkable co-operation and support given by the student
body, student organizations, Student's Council of
the Alma Mater Society, University Faculty and
Administration, kind friends of the "Town", and
ALUMNI, it could never have been brought to a
successful conclusion. U.B.C.'s first "Blue and
Gold Revue" was a heart-warming demonstration
of University spirit at its best.
MARDI GRAS IN NEW ORLEANS
COMMODORE   CABARET,  JANUARY   14  AND  15
COSTUME  PARTY
$6.00 PER COUPLE
TICKETS   AFTER   XMAS   FROM   MARDI   GRAS   c/o   A.M.S.
Page 29 THE FACULTY
News Items
President MacKenzie spoke to 600 Okanagan
Valley school teachers at Kelowna on the morning
of Saturday, October 17th. The subject of his
address was "Continuing Debate about Education."
On November 11th, Remembrance Day, the
President was in Washington, D.C, where he addressed a luncheon assembly of 500 persons attending the four-day Conference of Christians and Jews
drawn from the United States and Canada. The
theme of the Conference was "Our Moral and
Spiritual Resources for Brotherhood." On November 14th, at the Chateau Frontenac, Quebec, Dr.
MacKenzie spoke at a conference, sponsored by
Canadian Westinghouse, on the general topic of
"Canada Tomorrow." His subject was "Challenge
to Education." During the following week he attended meetings in New York City of the Teachers
Insurance and Annuity Association Trustees and
of the Carnegie Research and Equities Fund.
Dr. Douglas Derry is spending a year in Europe
as holder of a Canadian Government Overseas
Fellowship. Before settling down to his studies at
Dijon, France, he motored to Italy to attend meetings sponsored by the Italian Mathematical Union
in Venice, Padua, Bologna and Pisa. He writes
"The Symposium gave me a most pleasant opportunity ... to meet European mathematicians and
to gain some insight into the work they are doing.
We made a lot of friends at the meeting and are
planning to visit European Universities which we
should not have done otherwise. The one difficulty
encountered by everyone was to think about mathematics in the midst of so much splendor and lavish
hospitality."
R. F. (Bob) Osborne, B.A. '33, B.Ed. '48, Director of the School of Physical Education, has been
appointed assistant general manager of Canada's
team in the British Empire Games.
R. C. Cragg, of the Department of English, exchanged for the Trinity Term of 1953 with R. E.
C Houghton, Fellow and Senior Tutor of Saint
Peter's Hall and Lecturer to Oriel College, Oxford, Mr. Houghton lecturing at U.B.C. for the
Summer Session. Dr. Cragg spent altogether five
months at Oxford, teaching, writing, studying, and
a month touring the Continent by car—Brussels,
Cologne, the Rhine, the Dolomites, Venice, Florence, Rome, the Riviera, the Rhone valley, the
Chateaux of the Loire, London, a combined scenic,
cathedral, art-gallery, linguistic tour, and so back
to U.B.C. and English.
F. A. Forward, Head of the Department of Mining and Metallurgy, gave an address to the London
Section of the Institute of Metals at its annual meeting on Thursday, November 5th. The title of his
address was "Production and Properties of High
Purity Nickel Powder". He journeyed to England
via New York City, Paris and Brussels and planned to interview graduate students in France and
Belgium, and, if time permitted, to spend a few days
at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute in Dusseldorf.
A memorial plaque and painting of the late Dean
F. L. Woods, first head of the Pharmacy Faculty,
was unveiled by President MacKenzie at a special
ceremony held in the U.B.C. Pharmacy Building on
the afternoon of October 28th. Tribute to the work
of Dean Woods was paid by George T. Cunningham, Member of the U.B.C. Board of Governors,
Professor John E. Halliday, R. B. Thomson and F.
H. Fullerton. Dean A. W. Matthews was chairman
of the ceremony.    .
Dean Andrew is away from his U.B.C. duties
this term on a travel grant from the Carnegie
Foundation to study Administrative Methods in
Universities in the United States and abroad. He
has so far been visiting Eastern Universities. Next
term he will have an opportunity of seeing Universities in the Southern and Western United States;
in the summer months his plans will take him to
the Universities of the United Kingdom and Europe.
Professor Emeritus Frank E.  Buck (left) presents to Dr. Alden  F.  Barss,
Chairman Department of Horticulture, a table made of Laburnum Biblio-
thecate—a   unique  species.
Dr. A. F. Barss, Chairman of the Department
of Horticulture, was the central figure at a party
given by the Faculty of Agriculture on March
26th last, the occasion of his 65th birthday. He
was presented with a table bearing the inscription:
Presented to Dr. A. F. Barss; Authorized by J. D.
Lee; Designed by J. McGlashan; Made by T. W.
R. Bonsey; Finished by J. Bell; Made of LIBRARY
LABURNUM, 1928-1951. The trees, from which
the wood was selected, formerly grew along the
path to the Library: they were planted under direction of Dr. F. E. Buck who made the presentation.
Dr. Barss was made Fellow of the Agricultural Institute of Canada at the 33rd Annual  Convention
Continued on page 47
IN THE U.B.C. MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM, 11:00 A.M., NOVEMBER 11th.
Pipers June  Taylor and  Robert  Roger,  2nd   Lieutenant  D.  L.  Williams,
Cadet  Fitzgerald,  Leonard  B.  Stacey, Gordon  M.  Letson,  Fred  Colbum.
Page 30 THE CAMPUS
by Wil
Since you've probably been following the more sensational and dynamic side of student life on the front pages
of the local press I'll confine myself to a description of the
more worthwhile events that have been going on around
the Campus.
The fall blood drive has gone down in the records as
the most successful fall blood drive in the history of U.B.C.
What started out as a five day campaign designed to net
the Red Cross 1500 pints of blood quickly turned into a
rout, and after four days and two hours the Red Cross,
richer by 1922 pints, was forced to close shop, because of a
shortage of equipment, and turned away many potential
donors. After the enthusiasm shown during this Fall Blood
Drive, officials are confident that the Spring drive will see
the return of the Canadian Inter-Collegiate "Corpuscle"
trophy to the U.B.C. Campus.
The Red Cross was by no means the only charitable
organization to benefit from the Student Body. Sparked by
the Commerce Undergrad Society, the students carried out
their Community Chest Drive. The campaign lasted only
two hours during which time the money hungry Commerce-
men invaded every lecture room on the campus collecting
over $600 for the Red Feather Agencies.
The Community Chest also received a different form
of donation from the Campus Greek Letter Organizations.
For the first time in their U.B.C. history the Fraternities
and Sororities put on a combined "Help Day" as part of
the initiation for all pledges. A total of seven different Red
Feather agencies received a helping hand from over 200
new pledges. Their work ranged from clearing an acre of
land at the Alexandra Fresh Air Camp at Crescent Beach
to repairing toys for Christmas distribution.
While we're on the subject of Fraternities, don't forget
the annual Mardi Gras. This year's "Mardi Gras in New
Orleans" will be held in the Commodore on January 14th
and 15th. In an attempt to make this year's party even
more successful the- committee has decided to make this a
masquerade ball complete with prizes for the best costumes.
One of the most striking features of U.B.C.'s present
development is the international atmosphere that is growing
daily. As many of you will remember, the students of five
years ago voted to tax themselves an extra one dollar a
year to establish international exchange scholarships between ourselves and Germany. That work has continued
under the auspices of the World University Service of
Canada and today we have over 300 foreign students studying here at U.B.C. Four of these students receive full
tuition and board while all of them receive many services
from the U.B.C. branch of the World University Service
of Canada.
This month the World University Service of Canada
will sponsor a drive to raise clothing and blankets for the
relief of Greek University Students who have suffered so
much during the recent earthquakes. This will be followed
later by a Sale of Indian Handicrafts on November 30.
December 1st and 2nd in order to raise funds for relief
work in  India.
A different aspect of international life is being carried
on by the Campus U.N. Club through the presentation of
noon hour speakers and the staging of the U.N. model
assembly. This year's model assembly devoted nearly three
hours to a lively 60 nation debate on the admission of Red
China to the U.N.
Remembrance Day was marked by a short and solemn
service conducted by the Rev. Wm. Deans, padre of the
196th Western Universities Battalion, in the Memorial Gymnasium. The service was highlighted by the unveiling of the
University  of B.C.  Book  of  Remembrance for  those who
Continued on Page 34
WILLSON E. KNOWLTON
Kjptometriil
•
MARINE 801 1
823 Birks Building Vancouver. B. C.
INCORPORATED   2"°    MAY   1670.
Merchandise from the four
corners of the earth — as
well as our own domestic
markets ... for you!
You know we're famous for
famous names . . . you look
for them and recognize
their quality. Good ... for
you!
tyiran, s^ote; Jot Mafadb
The Merchandise you want
—at a price you want to
pay—the result of canny
buying! We do that . . .
for you!
The Bay is the centre of the
downtown shopping business
. . . the hub of happy
shopping! So convenient
.  .  . for you!
Our clerks are friendly —
helpful ... we try to make
your first visit mean many
happy returns ... for you!
That's the guarantee of
HBC — you must be completely satisfied. That means
happy associations . . . for
us all!
<^>
Piage 31 THE HIGHER EDUCATION
by David Brock
Back the Pack:
B.C. was fortunate this autumn in having Canada's only candidate for the title of Miss Football.
The competition took place in Berkeley, California.
I forget what the result was. Probably somebody
from Frog City, Vermont, won the coveted honor
and brought new lustre to her Alma Mater. In any
event, somebody won it. I don't suppose she was
expected to look like a football or even act like a
football ... it is not necessary or even desirable for
Faith to have too humble a connection with Logic.
Football is one thing and Metaphysics another.
With the help of certain graduates, I am planning to have a little competition next February, on
Saint Valentine's not very metaphysical day, to
select Miss Basketball, Miss Billiard Ball, Miss Golf
Ball, Miss Curling Stone, and Miss Tennis Ball.
Roll on! Roll on, thou gold and dark blue spherics,
roll! (Byron, but not Byron Johnson.) I think we
might also have time, and the inclination, to choose
Miss Canasta, Miss Community Chest, and Miss
Homemade Pickles, not to mention a certain Miss
Giving. For the men, we shall have a very pretty
struggle to see who-11 be known as Joe College for
the coming year.
Bottled Gas
Not long ago, a campus social worker told the
Parents' Institute and the Parent-Youth Conference
(and possibly the Babies' Union) that if you prop
a baby's bottle and leave the kid to feed by itself
that way, you are stunting its social growth. (The
baby's social growth, not the bottle's. The social
growth of the bottle is unabated.) A baby fed by a
propped bottle doesn't learn the meaning of cooperation. He has trouble holding jobs, making a
successful marriage, and living with others. So now
you know.
I had long suspected it. I knew an old prospector who lived on the propped bottle. Or rather, on
the propped keg. Above his bed (in which he hibernated) was a keg of beer. From the keg to his
mouth there was a tube. When the keg was empty
he got up and installed a fresh one and went back
to bed for another few weeks. In the spring he was
weak as a cat, and had great trouble in holding jobs,
making any sort of marriage (let alone a successful
one), and living with others. (He really did exist,
by the way.)
Of course, many babies don't want to live with
others. Sometimes they are quite right, too, nor is
their trouble mere Timonism. And a distinguished
teacher has recently said we are getting far too
much emphasis on co-operation, which can be degrading and lazy, with less work being done and
much poorer work. However, he was probably
just trying to justify his own propped bottle. Instead of saying "Who prop, in these bad days, my
mind?" he should ask "Who propped, in those bad
days, my bottles?"
The Sensitive Plant
One of the deans was addressing the Society of
Industrial and Cost Accountants of B.C., and he
told them we must be educated in how to live as
well as in how to earn bread. Which is true enough. He said we must be taught sensitivity, compassion, and nobility. Well, yes, perhaps ... if
these things can really be taught.
However, we must make sure they are of the
right sort. The general idea today is to feel noble
all right, but too noble to work. As for sensitivity
and compassion, we have quite a lot of those, but
we tend to feel sorry for all the wrong things, including ourselves. According to Edmund Bergler
(no relation to Burglar Bill), man is an animal that
goes round collecting injustices. Our basic neurosis,
he feels, is what he calls psychic masochism. We
inflict suffering on ourselves as a hobby. (This
makes us feel pretty noble, too.) Yet even in having this form of fun we cannot enjoy it, for there is
a fringe of distaste around every human desire, including the desire to make yourself cry.
Nutcracker and Mouse King
I am glad to see that the Extension Department
has extended itself to include a course in Toy Making. Unfortunately, the Technical School is not
planning to co-operate by giving a course in Persian
Philosophy or casting fresh light upon the Dark
Ages . . . which (I've heard) are called dark because we know so much about them.
However, let us remember that toys in college
are no new thing. In some respects, my own education was entirely concerned with toys, and I am
not gloomy enough to fancy I was unique. The
list of the toys I acquired or made is too long for
this page. But it included my first tobacco pipe, my
first professor of English, my first awakening to
love . . . aroused by a damsel who sat across from
me at a library table ... or who sat there till she
noticed passion in my eyes, blistering my nose, and
she went home and told her mother she hated college, and her mother said all right, then, she needn't
remain. As a result, my wife is not a college graduate. But that is all equal to me. As I tell her, my
sheepskin is something of a toy too, though I seldom get it down and play with it.
+       +
"SETS BY CLIFF ROBINSON"
How often has that brief notice appeared on a
University theatre programme! The "Blue and
Gold Revue" is only the latest production to owe a
debt of gratitude to Cliff who, besides being a very
fine painter and artist, is also one of Canada's outstanding and most modest theatre designers. And
in his case "sets by" does not mean only the designing but also the actual painting.
A setting by Cliff Robinson is always "theatrical" in the right sense of the word, contributing to
and reinforcing the spirit of the play for which it is
designed. And each setting also is witness to the
artist's own creative individuality—a combination
of delicate perception, boldness, wit, and personal
comment. U.B.C. is indeed lucky in the possession
—if we may be said to "possess" him—of a theatre
artist of Cliff Robinson's quality. His backdrops
for the Varsity Revue, the setting for "Totem Park"
will remain a delightful and witty memory—until he
designs his next set for us. —D.S.
+       +
A New Leaf All Round
The criminal responds to love and freedom.
Orders are things  he  cannot understand.
So take him camping, put him onto baseball,
And make him feel in pretty brisk demand.
How often have I thought this message over . . .
Applied it to my children, too.   By cripes,
From now on, all their discipline being ended,
I'll try to treat my young like criminal types.
Page 32 "BLUE AND GOLD REVUE"
By Ivan Feltham
(Ivan  Feltham,  B.A.  'S3;  member class  of '54,  Faculty of
Law.    President,   Alma   Mater   Society.—Ed.)
In  Front—James  Wycherley;  Neal   Harlow  (U.B.C.  Librarian),  President
MacKenzie, Dean Chant, Terry Hare.
In Rear—Alison Leiterman, Jean Francis, Elizabeth Dudley.
The successful staging of the first "Blue and Gold
Revue" marks the passing of another milestone in the his-
story of our adolescent university. For several years, interested students, faculty and alumni have been tossing
about the idea of producing a "varsity" revue. On November 5, 6 and 7 packed houses were delighted to witness the
fruition  of  this  idea.
It is not within my province to attempt the role of the
drama or music critic. Your editor has asked me to evaluate the 'Revue" from the point of view of one who is on
the verge of stepping from the ranks of the student group
into those of the graduates.
To define my task, I have set the following three questions: What effect did the first showing of our "Blue and
Gold Revue" create? What should be the purpose and
effect of such a production? What is the immediate prospect  for  the  next  showing?
The first question, then: What effect has the first showing created? Widespread comment indicates that the most
striking impression fixed on the audience was one of the
whole university, students, faculty and alumni, co-operating
in poking fun at themselves.   Many people, even members
of the university, are apt to think of the students and
faculty as two distinct bodies wtih few interests in common
outside of the classroom and of the alumni as separate altogether from the university. The 'Revue", thanks mainly
to the sympathetic and understanding pen of authors
Ernest Perrault, B.A. '48, and Eric Nicol, B.A. '41, M.A.
'48, and to the sensitive interpretation and able direction of
Miss Dorothy Somerset and Phil Keatley, B.A. '51, successfully fitted the three groups into one picture of university life.
The Revue" joins the other aspects of the University
which the public can see and thereby helps to establish the
university as a living force in the Vancouver community.
The criticism has been voiced that some of the skits, for
example, "Club Day" (entitled "Fund for All"), were limited
in interest to those members of the audience familiar with
the campus. Perhaps—but these same skits must have
revived dormant memories and added new touches to the
feeling of our graduates for their Alma Mater. Even "Outsiders" will have acquired new knowledge about the university from asking questions about scenes which they did not
fully   understand.      Continued on Page 34
In  Front—Dave McEachren,  Douglas  Fraser, with  Rusty Cameron  hidden
behind him, Valerie Roach, Norma Grayson, Xenia Gosko, Penny Crehan
(behind Xenia), Bob Corrigan, Beverly Cook, Jack Woods, Alison  Leiterman, Elizabeth  Dudley, Ralph  MacPhee.
In Rear—Len Grundall, Roma  Heam.
Will You Be Financially Secure At Age
-*? .
,'mK
/±
.,H>
£
KT^j
V^T
*M
**[""*»***»
H
A" A N c «■
Page 33 "Blue and Gold Revue" continued from pa0e 33
What should be the purpose and effect of a "Blue
and Gold Revue"? The "Revue" should have a two-fold
purpose—to portray by parody representative aspects of
university life and to draw together in cast and production
team members of the student, faculty and alumni groups.
On all too few occasions is there an opportunity for these
three groups to work together, to expose one to the experience and viewpoint of the others. Here is a project which
provides personal enjoyment and satisfaction in co-operating for the useful purpose of publicizing our university.
The whole-hearted support of all groups, which made the
first "Revue" a success, encourages us to plan on this basis
for the future.
In fulfilling the other purpose, that of presenting an
adequate image of the university in all its aspects, careful
thought and painstaking preparation is required. Of course,
no single production can touch on any more than a few
parts of campus life. Themes should be varied, as they
were in the first "Revue", to demonstrate that the university is mature enough to laugh at itself and, at the same
time, to create a lasting impression that many of the
events and institutions lampooned in the show have also
a useful function. That is not to suggest that a veil of
seriousness be draped over the whole production—not at
all. A revue is essentially a gay caricature. But while we
entertain ourselves and our "downtown" friends with hilarious comedy, there is ample reason for attempting to leave
a serious  impression from  the  harmonious  entertainment.
What is the prospect for the immediate future? The
favourable reaction to the first show is due in large measure
to the novelty of such an endeavour in entertainment in
Vancouver. I am sure that the directors are fully aware of
the defects—and there were many—of this year's show.
To attain even the same level of success, the next attempt
will have to be several times more polished and the talent
much improved. Further, staggering proudction problems
face those  eager to prepare for the next show.
If the show is to go on again next Fall, writing, composing and planning must begin now. Even more support
from students, faculty and alumni will be essential. Can
U.B.C. establish the institution of the "Blue and Gold Revue"?—TUUM  EST.
The   CampUS Continued from Page 31
served in the Second World War. The handsome memorial
volume was unveiled by Dr. H. J. MacLeod, Dean Emeritus of Applied Science.
The roll, which contains the names, decorations, ranks,
and degrees or faculty of all U.B.C. students who served in
the recent conflict, was hand made by Chuck Yip, a U.B.C.
graduate, and bound in the University bindery. It is indeed
a valuable addition to the University and in the words of
Dr. MacLeod it should "be an inspiration to develop and
maintain those traditions and institutions whiclr make a
people great."
Back Row—Squadron Leader Ray Herbert, Major George Hartling, Donald
Clark,  James  Stewart,   Ivan   Feltham,   Lieut.-Commander  Frank  Turner.
Middle  Row—Rev.  William   Deans,   Dean   Emeritus   Hector  J.  MacLeod,
Colonel  Colin   Ferrie.   In Front—Rev. F. Temple Kingston.
+ +
New Director of Extension at U.B.C.
"Interested in putting B.C.
adults back in the school-age
group is Dr. John K. Friesen,
new Director of the Extension
Department. Many of you
throughout the province will
have an opportunity to meet
him personally when he visits
the various centers to interest
the residents in the adult education program carried on by
this University and to
acquaint himself with the particular needs of the different
areas. Dr. Friesen came to
Vancouver in September from
Winnipeg where he had been
Director of Field Services
since 1948 for the Manitoba
Pool Elevators, an organization responsible for a large
amount of the adult education
work in that province. Le comes to the University of
B.C. with a wealth of experience in the field of adult education. Among his appointments are those of Adult Education Director, and later Executive Secretary of the Manitoba Federation of Agriculture; Secretary of the Manitoba
Royal Commission on Adult Education; Chairman of the
Manitoba Joint Committee Presenting a Brief to the Massey
Commission; and twice Manitoba Secretary of the C.B.C.
Farm Radio Forum. He is a graduate of the University of
Manitoba and received his Master's and Doctor of Education degrees at Columbia University, New York. The
University is proud to introduce Dr. Friesen to you. With
his boundless enthusiasm and his wide background of experience it is evident that he will continue to expand the
present adult education  program  in  British  Columbia."
—Dept. of Extension News Sheet—Oct. 15, 1953.
JOHN  K. FRIESEN
Page 34 Jane Banfield
INDIAN SUMMER
By Jane Banfield, B.A.
(Miss Jane Banfield is the daughter of Mr. W. Orson
Banfield, B.A.Sc. '22, M.A.Sc. '23, and grand-daughter of
the late J. J. Banfield, well-known pioneer citizen of Vancouver. She is in her final year in the Law Faculty and
expects also to take her B.A. degree in the autumn of 1954.
She has taken a leading part in many activities during her
undergraduate career, having been a member and Vice-
President of the Students' Council. Miss Banfield spent a
year at McGill as a N.F.C.U.S. exchange student.—Ed.)
We were two days out
of Le Havre, bound for
Quebec, and rocking in the
September sea, when a
young archaeology lecturer
who had spent the summer
in Greeve, hunched his elbows on the ship's rail and
said, in a bored and offhand way, "I suppose you
spent the summer in Europe like everyone else." In
an equally off-hand way, I
replied. No, no; as a matter of fact, I was in India
all summer." "India! Really?   Tell me  all about it."
So I told him all about it, and although my account was
not in the carefully calculated prose you now read, it was
in essence the same story.
It all started when the Canadian committee of the World
University Service (an international organization serving
students and staff of universities in forty countries and
with international headquarters in Geneva) organized summer tours at the end of the recent war in order to take
Canadian university students abroad for eight weeks of
study with Europeans. Four summer seminars were held,
in France, Germany and Holland in the years immediately
after the war, but in 1951, because of financial difficulties,
the seminar was held near Ottawa and for a shorter period.
It was this seminar, attended by Indian and Pakistani
students in Canada under the Colombo Plan, that added
fuel to the national committee's desire to undertake a seminar in S.E. Asia.
Definite plans were finally made for the summer of 1953.
The Indian W.U.S. committee in New Delhi completed
arangements in India, the Ford Foundation made a very
generous grant to the Canadian committee (the first time
they had given such aid to a student group), businessmen
and service clubs, universities and provincial departments
of education, all contributed funds for the enterprise.
Twenty-eight Canadian students, from universities across
Canada, were selected from the numerous applicants on
the basis of their participation in student activities, and
their local campus W.U.S. committees, and on the understanding that they would return to their universities to
share their experiences. Ken Faris, now in his final year
in a B.A. honours economics course, and I, in my final
year of law, were chosen to represent U.B.C, and, with a
large travelling grant from the Senate of the university, and
armed with passports, summer clothing, cameras, and vaccinations against all manner of disease, we were on our way.
We travelled by train to Quebec City, where, on May
24, we joined our confreres on the boat and spent six
leisurely days debating among ourselves as to what the
summer had in store, and arguing with the eight American
students who had joined us about American internal politics and external policy. Four days in Paris allowed us only
time to watch the coronation on television and meet the
eight Europeans who were delegates from their national
W.U.S. committees.
Supplied with reading material on India, and pills, we
boarded our chartered plane, leaving Paris at noon, stopping at midnight at Nicosia, capital of Cyprus, under a
magnificent Mediterranean sky, and spending the next
noon in the broiling heat of Bahrein, in the Persian Gulf.
Midnight brought us to Bombay, and six hours later we
were on our way by train to the south, and Mysore city.
When we reached the site, I had travelled more than half
way around the world—11,000 miles—and had lost thirteen
hours. I was to travel another 6,000 miles in India and
West Pakistan before the summer was over.
We arrived and found ourselves in the flurry of introductions. We shared rooms at the University of Mysore
hostels with twenty-one Indian students, representing as
many universities, seven S.E. Asians, six Pakistanis, a
student from  Uganda and  two  from  the   Middle   East.
We met our permanent staff: Dr. John Coleman, University of Toronto mathematician and administrative director, Dr. Zakir Hussain, one of the two seminar directors, vice-chancellor of Aligarh Muslim University and
head of the Indian W.U.S. committee, Dean Georges Henri
Levesque, the second director, and Dean of the Social
Sciences Faculty at Laval, Dr. Eugene Forsey of Ottawa,
Dr. John Hastings, our young seminar doctor from Toronto, Gerard Filion of Montreal's "Le Devoir", George
Bennett, lecturer in colonial history at Oxford, Rev. Fr.
Jerome D'Souza, a member of the federal Indian legislature and of the Indian delegation to the United Nations;
these and others lived with us, shared our problems and
answered  our  questions.
And. of course, there were many questions. The object
of the five-week seminar in Mysore city was not only to
bring Canadians in contact with S.E. Asian students, but
also to have us fill the woefully large gaps in our education, to find out what, where and how foreign aid programmes are active in India and Pakistan, and to learn
something of the W.LT.S. committees, locally and nationally.
With a great deal of pomp and circumstance, with radio
broadcasts and a movie which was later shown in Indian
theatres, the Maharajah of Mysore and the Chief Minister
of the state opened the seminar and the university officials
welcomed us, all to the accompaniment, of the green-clad
turbaned palace band playing stirring European music.
Indian music, as we found later, was played by another
orchestra, with  red uniforms and bare feet.
The seminar began in earnest, and because we had
arrived in India (luring the summer, just before the monsoon, it began early. My room-mate, a twenty-two-year-old
Indian girl, Kumud Inamdar from Poona University, and
I lived in a small room on the ground floor of an open building, all the rooms opening, not on an interior corridor but
on an outside covered passage with an outside staircase,
our glassless windows having vertical bars and wooden
shutters.
The kitchen bearer, in white uniform and turban, and
bare feet, awakened us at 6:30 with bed-tea and bananas, so
that the hot liquid roused me immediately and just in time
to walk across the open courtyard to the baths where I
stood on the concrete floor of my cubicle and poured water
over myself, dipping a small bronze bowl into a tub of hot
water which then drained off the sloping floor into the hole
in   the   corner.
Breakfast saw us in one long narrow room at an enormous table eating fruit, hot porridge with hot boiled milk
and tea. Lectures lasted from 8 till 12:30 and were given
across the road in the university classrooms and assembly
halls, with topics on everything under the Indian sun—
Indian music, philosophy, the Five-Year Plan, student
unions in Asia, population control, land reform, basic education, North American economics and politics, and so on.
Here, in our small discussion groups, we met the Asian
point of view which in many cases baffled us and although
all Indian university courses are given in English, their
use  of some  words became  a problem in  semantics  for us.
Lunch at one was a time for further discussion, the
Asians eating their vegetarian meals of rice, hot curries,
vegetables and chutneys, the Europeans trying to do the
same, but rebuffed by the hot food and falling back on their
meat and bland vegetables. Dessert was fruit, bananas, small
and green, oranges and mangoes. Mangoes were our favourites, pear-shaped with a green-yellow skin, a large pit
and bright orange pulp, sweet and juicy, to be sucked from
one end.
The afternoon was free, a perfect opportunity to explore.
We did, renting boys' bicycles (an awkward proposition for
wearers of skirts) and spending the moderately hot hours
in the Mysore markets, learning to dispute prices with the
owners of the small roadside stalls which were grouped
according to the goods sold—a street selling silver, one for
brass and copper, one for materials, another for food,
another for ivory. And everywhere we went we were surrounded by children, lining up expectantly when a camera
appeared, sometimes begging, but always very happy and
laughing at us in our predicaments so that we, seeing the
humour of the situation, laughed too.
(To be concluded in next issue.—Ed.)
Page 35 ALUMNI-U.B.C DEVELOPMENT FUND
Board of Directors
AUBREY F. ROBERTS, Chairman
PETER SHARP, Vice-Chairman
Mr. Justice J.V. CLYNE, Chairman
Advisory Board
ALUMNI
TOTAL OF ALL
YEAR
DONORS
DONATIONS
1949
—
1452
—
$   12,215
1950
—
1845
—
1 5,393
1951
—
1802
—
17,327
1952
—
2190
—
1 8.437
1953
^"
2303
-—
40,072
Totals
9592
$103,444
Five-Year Report
This report contains the names of
those who have participated in the
Association's voluntary annual giving
programme during the first five
years of its existence.
1916 — $ 600.50
1917 — $3249.00
1918 —        $ 408.50
1916
4 CAIRNES, C. E.
4 CAMERON, Ella G.
5 CARRUTHERS,  B. M.
CLAYTON,  Mrs. W.  R.
(nee Mary L. Wilson)
4 DUNTON, Marjorie
EVANS, Mrs. Elmer
(nee Grace Miller)
5 LANE, Laura M.
5  LETT,  Sherwood
MclNTOSH, Mrs. Lome
(nee Carrie Elliott)
5 McMILLAN,  Isabel G.
5 MENZIES, Dr. and Mrs. A. M.
(nee Irene Vermilyea)
MULHERN, John E.
2 MUNRO, O. H.
3 ODENDAHL,  Mrs.  Harry C.
(nee Jean Robinson)
RAE, H. M.
5 SCHWESINGER,   Gladys  C.
SOUTHCOTT, J.  P.
TAYLOR,  Edna M.
UCHIDA, Chitose
5 WILSON, William C.
1917
5 ABERCROMBIE, W. T.
BAYLY,  Rev. Milton D.
3 BOLDUC, Mrs. M.
(nee May McCrimmon)
5 BUCHANAN, Mr. and Mrs. J. M.
CAIRNES,  D.  E.
4 CELLE, P. D.
EVANS, Elmer
5 FOUNTAIN, Anne
FRASER, G.  L.
5 GREEN, Mrs. H. C. (deceased)
(nee Marion  Mounce)
HAGELSTEIN, Rev. H. W.
5 LANNING, Mabel
5 LEE, A. Winifred
5  LETT, Mrs. Sherwood
(nee Evelyn Story)
4 MATHERS, F. D.
5 MAYNARD, Margaret E.
2 MESTON,  Mrs.  A.
(nee Vera Muddell)
5 MILLAR, Mrs. T. G.
(nee Jean Abernethy)
5 MURISON, Mrs. C. A. P.
(nee Shirley Clement)
5  RUSSELL, John
2 SMITH, Mrs. A. C.
(nee Kathleen Mutrie)
5 STAUB, Mrs. R. R.
(nee Pearl Roseburgh)
4 SWADELL, Mrs. Eric
(nee Laura Pim)
THORMAN,  Mrs.  C.   M.
(nee Helen White)
4 WRIGHT, Dr. C. A. H.
1918
3 DEAN, Mrs. Curtis M.
(nee Hazel Wilband)
3  EMMONS, Dr. W. Frank
2 HARVEY,   Isobel  (deceased)
HOLMES, Rev. Cannon A. T. F.
3 HURST, M. E.
3.JACKSON,  Lome  H.
LEWIS, Mrs. H. C.
(nee Stella McGuire)
MARSHALL, A. L.
3  MclNNES,   Harold  W.
2
MclNTOSH,  R.  H.
5
b
RUSSELL, Mrs. John
(nee Ruth  Fulton)
b
SEXSMITH,  Mrs.   F.  F.  B.
(nee Eleanor Frame)
2
SOUTHCOTT,  Mrs.  J.  P.
5
(nee Bonallyn Clement)
3
a
SPEARS,  Mrs.  R.  B.
(nee Dorothea Bolton)
4
4
STEWART, Mrs. G. M.
2
5
1919 —        $1458.08
1920 — $ 920.50
1921 —        $1839.68
1919
3 ADAMS, Mrs. Cecil R.
(nee Constance Highmoor)
5 ALLARDYCE, Dr. John
3 ASHWELL,  Iris
CASPELL, E. V.
3 GIBSON, T. Ian
3  GIEGERICH, Mrs.  Henry C.
(nee  Katherine Maynard)
5 HUNTER, Ellen C.
KERR,  Donna
3  KETCHESON,  Laura M.
3  KIDD, Mrs. Geo. H.
(nee Ruth Stewart)
5 LETSON, Maj.-Gen. 8, Mrs. H. F. G.
5 MACCORKINDALE,  Mrs.  H.  N.
(nee Alice Gross)
3 MARTIN, Mrs. G. H.
(nee Marjorie Peck)
4 McDiarmid, Mrs. h. l.
(nee  Muriel  Costley)
McKAY,  Evelyn C.
3 MURPHY,  E.  A.
4 MURRAY,  Mrs.  Norman
(nee Norah Wallace)
5 NAPIER, Mrs.  Ross
(nee Edna Marwick)
RAMAGE,  Mrs.  J. S.
REID, Gertrude  K.
5  ROBERTSON,   Mrs.  G.  C.
(nee Helen Wesbrook)
2 SADLER,  Dr.  Olive
3 SCOTT,  Gordon W.
SEYMOUR,  Mrs.   R.  A.
(nee Margaret Cameron)
5 SHAW,   Ian A.
5  SHEPHERD, Mrs. H. G.
(nee Muriel Grant)
SHIMIZU,  Rev.  K.
4 SUTCLIFFE,  W.  G.
WELD, C. B.
1920
5 ANDREWS,  H.  I.
BARKER, Amy
BIANCHI, Mrs. John M.
(nee Margaret Morrison)
3 BOTTGER,  Hermine D.
2  BOWN,  Mrs.  H.  W.
5 COATES,  Willson  H.
CULTER, Mrs. Harold
(nee Agnes Matheson)
5  DRAPER,  Hester  E.
FLEISHMAN, Mrs. A.
(nee Evelyn Lucas)
GILCHRIST, G. G.
2 GILLEY, Janet K.
4 GLADWIN, Aleen H.
HENDERSON, Mrs. V. E.
5 HILL,, Annie G.
3 KLINCK, Mrs. L. S.
(nee Beth Abernethy)
2  LAMBERT,  N.  D.
4 LINTELMANN,  Mrs.  Leslie
(nee Ada Smith)
ORAM,  Mrs. Chas J.
(nee Agnes Darner)
REBBECK, J. W.
SIDDONS, J. D.
STEWART, James L.
STIRK,  Louie
SWENC1SKY,  A.  H.  J.
SWENCISKY,  Laura  M.
WATTS,  Harold  N.
WELD, John  N.
WILSON, Gordon S.
1921
ANDERSON,  R. G.
2 ANGEL, Mrs. R. Basil
BARNWELL, Geo. F.
CARTER, B. M.
3 CRAIG, Ruth D.
4 CROSS,   George  C.
DAVIS,  Dr.  H.  R. L.
3  DICK, Mrs.  F.  B.
(nee Norma McGregor)
3 EAGLES,  Mrs.  Blythe A.
(nee Violet Dunbar)
5 FOURNIER,  Mrs. John  R.
4 FOERSTER,   Dr.   R.   Earle
3 GALBRAITH,  S.  T.
2 GILLIE,   K.  B.
5 HARRISON,  Ruth
5  HONEYMAN,  P.  D.  I.
5 JAMES, H. T.
4 KINGHAM, J. R.
KIRBY, J. O. C.
5 LAMB,  C.  A.
5  LAWRENCE, Jas. L.
5 LAWRENCE, Marion  E.
5 LECKIE, C. P.
LEWIS,  K.  G.
LEWIS, Gwynneth
5  LORD, Judge and Mrs.  A.  E.
4 McAFEE, Mrs. W. R.
(nee Nina Munn)
4 McAFEE,  Irene
5 McDOUGALL,  W.   R.
McKEE,  Enid M.
McKENZIE, Fred F.
4 McTAVISH, Janet L.
4 MILLEY,  C.  E.
MILLEY, Chesley E.
MITCHELL, James R.
3 MORRISON, D. M.
2 OSBORNE,  D.  Hillis
4 PALMER,  Dr.  R.  C.  (deceased)
4 PALMER, Mrs. R. C.
2 PARKER, Mrs. W. C.
(nee Georgina Reid)
3 RIVE, Alfred
2  ROSE, Hedley A.
RUSSELL,  A.  M.
4 SAUDER, Marion
4 SCHELL, J. M.
SCOTT, S. Morley
SHANNON,  Myrtle
2 SINCLAIR, Mrs. Ralph
(nee Hattie McArthur)
2 SMITH, Anne M.
5 SMITH,  Mrs.  F.  S.  S.
(nee  Dorothy  Blakey)
4 STEWART, Mrs. C.
(nee Freda Wilson)
STRIDER,  Frank R.
4 STUDER,  Frank J.
2 SUTTIE,  Gwen
5 SWANSON, Clarence O.
4 WILKS,  A.  Fred
1922
—
$4007.98
1923
—
$3222.50
1924
—
$3101.34
1922
5 AGNEW    Marjorie
5 ARGUE, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph S.
BANFIELD, W. O.
5  BLACK, Dr. W. G.
BOLTON, Dr. L. L.
BURCH, Edna F.
5  CLARKE, Mr. and Mrs. G. E. W.
5 COLES, E. M.
3 COLLARD, Carlton
5 CUTLER, Dr. Norman
5  DAUPHINEE, Dr. J. A.
3 DOYLE,  Harold
4 EAGLES, Dr. Blythe A.
5 FAILEY,  Mrs.  C.   F.
(nee Christine Urquhart)
3 FOURNIER, John R.
4 FOERSTER, Mrs.  R.  E.
(nee Gwen Kemp)
4  FULTON,  Doris
3 HARRIS, Dr. J. Allen
2  HARRIS,  G.  Howell
4 HATCH, W. G.
HEASLIP,  Leonard
5 IMLAH,  Dr.  J.  A.  H.
2 JANE, R. S.
5 JOHNSTON, Mrs.  H. Lloyd
(nee Gwen  Robson)
5  KING,  Mrs.  Graeme
(nee  Margaret  McCabe)
KUHN,  Mrs. John
(nee  Isobel Miller)
5  LANNING, R. J.
LEVICK, Mrs. J. E.
(nee  Dena  Weinberg)
5  LEWIS, Mr.  and Mrs.  E. Dewart
(nee  Winifred Bullock)
5 MARRION, Mrs. R. F. C.
(nee Dora Pye)
5  McAFEE,  W.  R.
4 McCOLL,  E. Stuart
5 McLENNAN, Mr. and Mrs. L. W.
(nee Cora Metz)
4 MICHENER,  Mrs.  R.
2 MUNRO, Mr. and Mrs. Robt. J.
(nee Dorothy Hopper)
2 NAPIER, Mrs. A. J.
(nee Mona Miles)
5 ORR, Mrs. Reginald
(nee  Edna Rogers)
3 PURDY,  Mrs. Mary  I.
5 PURSLOW,   Mrs.   Norah
5  REDGRAVE,  Mrs. Marion C.
5  REID, M.  Lillian
3 SCOTT, Wm. O.
SHAW, Donald L.
5 STEVENSON, Lionel
STEWART,  Mrs. William
(nee Moira  Bremner)
3 VOGEE, Arthur
5 WALKER, Dr. John F.
3 WALLIS,  Mrs. H.  D.
(nee Rona Hatt)
3 WATSON,  James
3 WHITLEY, Paul N.
5 WHITTAKER,   Mrs.   N.
(nee Gwen Gillis)
WOODFORD,  Mrs.  R.  S.
(nee June Reid)
1923
ALLEN,  H.  T.
2  ANDERSON,  Allan  J.
5 ANGUS, Mrs.  H.  F.
(nee Annie Anderson)
5  AYLARD, C. Muriel
2 BENEDICT,  Frances
BERRY, T. V.
5  BROWN,  Jos.  F.  Jr.
BLAIR,   Archibald
3 CASSELMAN, Jessie  E.
2 CASSIDY,   Harry  M.
5 CAVERS, R. V.
Page 36 4 COWDELL,  Mrs.  Stanley
(nee Gladys Pedlow)
5 CREIGHTON,   Mrs.  John
(nee Sallee  Murphy)
4 CLYNE, Hon. Mr. Justice J. V.
3   DALLAS, Dorothy F.
3 DEAN,  Curtis M.
4 DRENNAN,  Albert  A.
5 ELLIS, T. E. H.
5  FAHRNI, Mrs.  Walter
(nee  Mildred  Osterbout)
FARIS,  Mrs. D.  K.
(nee Marion  Fisher)
3   FRASER,   Mr.  and  Mrs.   Duncan
(nee  Margaret  Kerr)
2  FULTON, Harry G.
2 GIBBON,  Marion   E.
5 GIEGERICH,  J.   R.
5 GREGG, E. E.
3 GROSS, George
5  GROSS,   Rowena
5 GUNNING, H. C.
HALLETT,  L. T.
3  HARRIS,  Mrs.   E.  L.
(nee Sarah  Battle)
HIGGINBOTHAM,  Margaret W.
5  HODSON,  Reg.
5   HUNTER,  Alan  D.
2 JENKINS,  J.  H.
5 JOHNSTON,  Islay
2 JONES, R. H. B.
3 LAIRD,  Dr.  Fred W.
5   LANDON, G.   L.
LAZENBY,   Doris  E.
5  LEESON,   Mrs.   L.   H.
(nee  Mary  Chapman)
LEWIS,   Hunter  C.
LIDGEY,   Ralph   C.   G.
2  LINDSAY,  Margaret  P.
2  LORD,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  H.  D.
(nee Gertrude  Bickell)
5  LOVERIDGE, G.  T.
2  MACKENZIE,   Mary   I.
MAIN, Jessie
2 McCALLUM, N. M.
4 McLAREN,  Mrs.  A.
(nee Mary Tupper)
2  PARKER,  R. W.
4 PEARSE,  Hubert A.
2  PORTSMOUTH,  K.  M.
5 RICE,  Dr.   H.  M.  A.
5   RICHARDS,  A.   E.
2  ROBATHAN,  Mrs.  E. 0.
(nee Elsie Wood)
5   ROBERTS,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  F.
(nee Zella  Smith)
5   ROBERTSON,   Dr.   Norman  A.
5 SANFORD, O.  M.
2 SHAW, Mr. and Mrs. D. Keith
(nee Gladys Weld)
3 SHIER,  Dr. J.  W.
5  STEWART,   F.   C.
STEWART, William
SWANGARD,  Dr. and  Mrs. W.  M.
(nee  Helen  Mathews)
SWITZER, Rev. Gerald B.
THOMPSON,  Willard   A.
5 TURNBULL,  Dr. Frank A.
5  UPSHALL,  Dr.  C. C.
3  WALKER, Mr. and Mrs. R. E.
(nee Evelyn  Eveleigh)
5  WALLACE,   F.   M.
WATERS,  Mrs.  P.  E.
(nee  Mary  Bulmer)
5 WELLAND, Fred J.
3 WELLS, L. E.
4 WRIGHT, Mrs. A. Fraser
(nee Gladys Jack)
4 WOOD,  Mrs.  F. G.  C.
(nee Bea Johnson)
2 WOODS. J. J.
1924
5 ASTELL, Mary C. L.
3 BAIGENT, Mrs.  Jack
(nee  Cora   Cook)
4 BARR, Dr. Percy M.
4 BARTON, Charles M.
2   BARTON, Mrs. C. F.
(nee Magdalene Aske)
2  BELL, John G.
2 BICKELL,   L.  K.
3 BRAMSTON-COOK,  H.  E.
4 BRAND,  F. J.
BRINK,   R.   Murray
4 BRUUN,  Dr. Geoffrey
BOLTON,  Mrs.  L.  L.
(nee   Mary   Pittendrigh)
3 BURTON, J.  S.
BURTON.  Jean
2  CANTELON. H. B.
2  CARLISLE,  Kenneth W.
5 CARR. Mrs. M.
(nw  Marie  Fawcett)
CASS^LMAN,  Mrs.  Ralph
(nee   Frances  McMorris)
4 CASSIDY,  Mrs. Harry M.
fne= B«tri'-e Pearce)
CHARNLEY, R.
2  CHOATE, Wm.
5 CREELMAN.  Helen
2 CROZIER,  Robert  N.
3 CLYNE, Mrs. John V.
("»"  Bi"tty Somerset)
5  COFFIN,   Fred W.
3   DAVIDSON,   Dr.   J.   R.
5 DIXON,  Mrs.  G.  C.
(nee Isabel MacKinnon)
5  ELLIOTT,   F.   G.
5  ELSEY,  C.  Roy
EVANS,  C.  S.
5  FRAME,   Mrs.  S.   H.
(nee  Laura  Archibald)
5  GARDOM,  Mrs.   R.
(nee Esther Naden)
5 GIBBARD, John E.
3 GIEGERICH,  Henry C.
5 GRANT,  Mr.  and Mrs   John A.
(nee Helen Turpin)
3  GOODWIN,  T.   Howard
HARDIE,  D.   B.
2 HARRIS,   Mrs.   F.   K.
HEDLEY,   R.   H.
3 HIGGINBOTHAM, Frances I.
4 HOOD, Mrs. R.
HUGGETT,   J.   L.
JOHNSTON,  Florence  E.
4 KIEVELL, Myrtle L.
5 LETSON,   Gordon   M.
5   LIPSEY, G. C.
LUNDIE, J. A.
MACWILLIAM,   Ruth   A.
2 McCUTCHEON,  James C.
5  McLACHLAN,   C.   G.
4  McLANE,   Paul   V.
3 McLUCKIE,  Mrs. John A.
MEADOWS,  L.  E.
2 MILLER,  G.  Stanley
MITCHELL,  James  R.
MORGAN, Mr. and Mrs. L. T.
(nee Lucy  Ingram)
4 NAPIER, A. J.
NORMAN, G. H. C.
5 OFFORD,  H.   R.
2 OGILVIE,  A.   E.
4 ORMROD,  Eleanor
3 PARROTT, Mrs. G.
(nee Florence Williams)
2 PECK,  Dorothy C.
3 PEELE,  J,  P.  F.
3  PETTYPIECE,  Mrs. A. P.
(nee Marie Chapin)
3 RIDDEHOUGH,  G.
ROTTLUFF, Mrs. E.
2 SIMPSON,  Dr. W. W.
2  SMITH,  D.  Blair
5 SMITHERINGALE,  Wm.  V.
2   STACEY,   L.   B.
STEWART, Mrs. T. C.
(nee Phyllis  Edgell)
2  STOCKWELL,  Dr. C.  H.
4 STROYAN,  P.  B.
5 TELFER,   Jean
2 TOLMAN, Carl
TUPPER, Mrs. Harry
(nee  Ivadele Hyland)
5  UNDERHILL, J. E.
4 WALLIS,   H.   D.
5 WILCOX,  Dr. J.  C.
3 WOLVERTON,  J.  M.
1925 —        $3412.25
1926 —        $1924.25
1927 — $1346.50
1925
2  ARGUE,  C.  W.
2 ARKLEY, Stanley T.
5  ARKLEY, H. O.
5 ARNOLD, Mrs. Jean D.
(nee Jean Davidson)
5 ARNOTT, C.
ALLEN, G. A.
AYLARD,   A.   W.
5 BARNES, Vera F.
BEHRENDT,  Dr.  Vera M.
4  BENNETT,  Mrs.  W.   R.
(nee Evelyn Crich)
BRINK,  Mrs.  R.  Murray
(nee Zoe  Farrand)
4 BROWN,  T.  W.
3 BLACK, T. B.
5 CARTER, Dr. Neal M.
4 CHARLTON,  David B.
CHESTER, H.
CHOATE, W. H.
4 CRITTENDEN, Mrs. Chas. B.
(nee Lucy Edwards)
4  COLLISON, Mrs. C. S.
(nee Doris Pattullo)
DAVIES,  Mrs.  Dermot
DAVIES,  Elsie
3 DEANS, Rev. W.
DEMIDOFF,  P.  H.
DISNEY, C.  N.
4 EADES, J.  E.
4 FRASER,  E.  B.
2 FUTCHER, Mr. and Mrs.  F. G.
(nee Winifred Hall)
5 GAGE, Dean Walter
5 GILLANDERS, E. B.
5 GRAUER, Dr. A. E.
GUTTERIDGE, H. S.
3 HALL,  Mrs.  Harold  O.
(nee  Dorothy Groves)
2  HALLAMORE, G. Joyce
HANKINSON, B.
2   HARDIE, W.  Leslie
HAY,  Ken A.
HEMINGWAY, Allan
2 HENDERSON,  H.  R,
KNAPTON,   E.   J.
4   KNOWLTON,  Willson   E.
LAING,  Arthur
LAMBERT,  A.  A.
4 LEDINGHAM,  J.   P.
3 LOVICK, James E.  H,
LUCAS, Colin C.
3  LUCAS,   Edith  E.
3  LUMSDEN,  Mrs. A.  Carr
(nee  Mary  Sawson)
MACWILLIAM, Ruth A.
2 MANZER,  Mrs.  Gwen
(nee Gwen Newcombe)
MARTIN,   Edith   I.
5 McCULLOCH, Mrs. John
(nee Vera Sharpe)
5  McDONALD,  Malcolm
3 McKILLOP,   Lex   L.
2 McLEOD,  Florence
5  MITCHELL,   Mrs.   H.  T.
(nee Janet MacDonald)
MURRAY,  Dorothy
2  NELSON,  Clarence
2  PAIN,   Mrs.   E.
2   PAINTER,   F.   M.
2 PARKER, R. W.
RAE,  Hugh  M.
5  ROSS, Mrs. Frank M.
(nee Phyllis Gregory)
5 SHAW, Mrs.  Ian
(nee  Gwladys   Anderson)
SMITH, Mr. and Mrs. J.  E.  Sr.
(nee Helen Whiteside)
SMITH,  H.  B.
STAFFORD,  Mrs.  Eric
(nee Doris Shorneyl
3 STEVENS,   E.   G.   B.
5  STOODLEY, George  E.
5  SUTHERLAND,  B.   P.
SUTTON, Mrs. A.
(nee Mary Clarke)
5 TAYLOR,   Dorothy  G.
5 THOMPSON, Dr. Homer A.
THRUPP, Dr. Sylvia L.
TUDHOPE,   Eloise
5 TURNBULL, Mrs. Frank A.
(nee Jean  Thomson)
3  WILSON,   Mrs.  G.  Yorke
(nee   Dorothy   Rogers)
1926
ALLEN,  Maude A.
ATTRIDGE,  Mildred  H.
3 BAIN,   W.  A.
4 BALL,   Dr.   and  Mrs.   R.   H.
4 BALMER,  Dr.   I.  A.
2 BARTON,  Bernice  E.
3 BARTON,   Carl   F.
5 BAYLIS,  Robert  H.
2  BIELY, Jacob
2  BIRNEY, Earle
2  BROCK, Mr. and Mrs. B. Britton
(nee Barbara  Stirling)
4 BROWN,  Mrs.  H.  Leslie
2 BROWN,  K. P.
4  CAPLE,  Kenneth  P.
3 CREES,   Rev.   N.   J.
CROPP,  Mrs.  C.   W.
(nee Gladys Garesche)
CLARK,   Kathleen  L.
4 CONRAD,   Elsie
4 CULL,  Dr.  J. S.
2  EDGETT,  Freda B.
FALCONER, Jos. G.
FRASER, Mrs. John A.
(nee Jean Macrae)
GIBB,  Mrs.  Harry D.
(nee Marjorie Dimock)
GIOVANDO,  L.
2 GOULD,  Clara  W.  H.
5 GRAHAM, Jean
5 GREIG, Janet T.
5 GRIFFITH,   B.  S.
2  HESS, Mrs. John
HILL, Mark
HUNT,   Mrs.  A.   L.
(nee Jean Faulkner)
IRWIN,  Everett J.
INNES,  Florence
5  KANIA, J.  E.
5  KERR,   Margaret   E.
5  KIDD,  Dr.  Honor M.
LANGRIDGE,  G.  A.
5  LAWRENCE,  Mrs.  J as.
(nee  Mary  MacKay)
5  LEACH,   F.  Wanetta
2 LEDINGHAM,   George
LEEMING,  Marjorie
5  LEVIRS,   F.   M.   O.
McLEAN,  Lorna  D.
4 MURPHY,  William
3 MUSGRAVE,  Flora
3 NEEDLER,  Mrs.  A.  W.  H.
(nee  Alfreda   Berkeley)
5 NORMAN,  Dr.  G.  W.  M.
OLIVER, Mrs. J.  C.
2  PALMER,  Dr.  R. A.
4 PURDY,  H.  L.
2  ROBINSON,  George  R.
2 SELBY, Mr.  and Mrs.  Cyril
(nee Mary McKee)
3 STIBBS,  L.  B.
STIRLING, Gwen G.
SUTTON,  Mrs. A.
(nee Mary Ciarke)
2 TARR, H. L. A.
4 TAYLOR,   Dr.   T.   M.   C.
5 TIMLECK,   Curtis   J.
5  TURNcR,   Mrs.   D.  B.
(nee Margaret Swanson)
TURNER,   Mrs.   R.
(nee  Mary   McGregor)
2  WAITES,   Mrs.  G.   Frank
(nee Winona Straight)
5  WALES, Mr. and Mrs. Bert
(nee  Doris McKay)
4 WALKER,   Mrs.   T.   A.
(nee Marion Bullock-Webster)
5 WALLACE,   Mrs.   F.  M.
(nee Dorothy Arkwright)
5  WARREN,  Dr,  Harry V.
2 WASHINGTON,  Dorothy M.
2 WHALEN,  J.  J.
3 WILCOX,  Laura
2  WILLIAMSON, Lillian A.
2  WOODROW, Jean
WOOLLIAM5,  Mrs. G.  Ewart
(nee Doris Baynes)
1927
5 ALLARDYCE,   Mrs.  John
(nee  Hennetie  MacKenzie)
2 BAGSHAW,   Ralph   M.
5  BARNSLEY,  Frank  R.
BATE,  Isobel
BELL, Mrs. C. H. C.
(nee  Mary   Kilpafrick)
3 BELL,  Mrs.  H. G.
(nee Margaret Morrison)
BERRY, J. C.
5  BERRY, Anne B.
4 BROWN,  Norman
5 BROWN, Rex L.
BLACK, Mary L.
BURTON, J. Stuart
4 CALVERT,  D.  E.
3 CAMERON,  M. A.  (deceased)
3 CHRISTIE,  William  H.
3   COTTINGHAM,   Mollie   E.
2 CLARK, Mrs. Norman A.
(nee Helen  Milne
COADE,  Lillian M.
3 COOMBE,  Dorothy  L.
5 DAOUST,   J.   G.
2   DICK,  Dr.  R.  N.
2  DONALDSON, Margaret A.
DUNLAP,   Mrs.   C.   R.
(nee Hester  Cleveland)
2  FARRAR,  Ben
2 FUGLER,   Ethel
FURNISS,  Mrs.  Harry  W.
(nee Helen  Peck)
5  GILL,   O.   H.
5  GILLEY, Jean  R.  D.
3 GRIFFITHS, Mrs. V. W.
(nee Edith Dwinnell)
3  GROVES,   Dr.   Kenneth   P.
2  HIDY, Mrs.  R.  W.
(nee Muriel Wagenhauser)
5  HOBART,  Mrs.  T.  R.
(nee Frances  Lyne)
2 HOFFMEISTER,   Mrs.   B.   M.
(nee Amber Strauss)
JOHNSTON, Mary H.
3 KING,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hubert  B.
(nee Katharine Reid)
KING, Roy
2  LANG,  A.  H.
2  LEEK,  Charles W.
2 MAWDSLEY,  Dean  M.  D.
5 McTAVISH,   Isabel
4 MORRISON,  Mrs.  R.  L.
(nee Marion Roberts)
5 MOORE,  Mrs. George  E.
(nee  Dorothy  Partington)
2  MOORE,  Mrs.  J.  H.
(nee  Charlotte  Chislett)
4  MUNRO,   Mr.   and   Mrs.   H.   G.
(nee Blanche Almond)
4 MUSGRAVE,   Jean
2  NEROUTSOS, Mrs. C.  H.
(nee   Edythe Winter)
OLIVER,  J.   C.
OLIVER, Mrs.  Mary
(nee Mary  Robertson)
PEARCEY,  John G.
2  PHILLIPS, W. J.
2 PIGGOTT,   Eleanora
PILLSBURY,  Richard W.
5 PUMPHREY, Avis
4 RIDDELL, Marie
ROBINSON, G.  Russell
5 SHAKESPEARE, John S.
SMITH, Mrs.  R. M.
(nee Florence Holland)
STEVENS,  Rev.  F. H.
3 STEVENSON, Mr. and Mrs. C. D.
(nee Anne MacKenzie)
4 STEVENSON, Ian
4 STROYAN, Mrs. P. B.
(nee  Lillian  Robinson)
5 WALKER,  Mrs.   Harry
(nee   Elizabeth   Stoddard)
Page 37 1928
—
$1413.50
1929
—
$1601.28
1930
—
$2072.50
1928
5 APPELBE,  Mrs.  F.   E.
(nee Doris Woods)
2 BARNETT, Thos. P.
3 BARR,  Bruce A.
5  BARRA1 r,   Mrs.   Harry
(nee Margaret Tnomson)
4 BARRETT, Mrs. C. G.
(nee Kathleen McLuckie)
BEACH, Mrs. David H. D.
(nee Anne Yates)
4 BEATTIE,  Arthur   H.
2 BOYES,  F. C.
5 BROOKS,  Mrs.  W.  R.
(nee Annie Taylor)
BROWN, J. E.
5   BROWN,   Wm.  C.
5  BROWN,  H.  Leslie
5 BLACK, Mrs. W. G.
(nee   Nora   Haddock)
3 BLACKETT,  Harold W.
BULL,   E.  B.
2 CAMERON, Mrs. J. Arthur
(nee Mary Cole)
5 CANDLISH,  Mrs. G.  H.
(nee Margaret Greig)
5 CAPLE,  Mrs.  K.  P.
(nee Beachy Clegg)
3 CORNWALL,  Mrs.  Harry
(nee  Margaret  Smith)
CRAWFORD,  L. G.
3  CROKER,   Mrs.  A.  P.
(nee Flora  Burritt)
CLARKE, Sidney V.
EDEN, A. H.
5  ELLIOTT,  Mrs. Andrew
5  ESTEY, Margaret J.
FRASER,  Gilbert G.
GIBSON, Swanston
GOULD, Dr. C. E. G.
2 GORANSON,   E.  A.
2 GUSTAFSON,  C.   E.
HERBERT STEPNEY, Mrs. A. H.
5  HERITAGE, Olive W.
2 HOW,  H. Jessie
HODSDON, Mrs. Mona N.
HUNTER, Mrs. James D.
(nee  Helen  Burton)
3 JOHNSTON, Mabel
2 KASK, J. L.
LOGAN, G. V. E.
5 MACDONALD,  Margaret C.
MACIVOR,   Dolina  C.
4 MACLEOD, Mrs. Earl L.
(nee Flora McKechnie)
2 MACQUEEN,   M.   E.
3 MARIN, Joseph
MARRION, R. F. C. (deceased)
5 McFARLANE,  M.
McKECHNIE,  Mrs.  R.   E.
(nee Myrtle Harvey)
5 McKILLOP, Mrs. Lex L.
(nee Lucy Ross)
3 McKINNON, Mrs. F. S.
(nee Beatrice Ruttan)
5 McWilliams, h. g.
MINNI, Mrs. Adolfo E.
MITCHELL,   Inez
NICOL, Grace
ODLUM, Mrs. R. M.
(nee  Margaret Tolmie)
OSTERHOUT, V. H.
PRINGLE,  Mrs.  Harry
(nee Doris Mann)
5 POLLOCK, Mrs. J.
(nee  Ruth  Macdonald)
ROBINSON, Audrey
ROBSON, Annie O.
SALMOND, Mrs. Kenneth
(nee Helen  Leeming)
2 SCACE, Muriel Mackay
2 SINCLAIR,  The  Hon.  James
3 STEWART,  C. Jean
STEWART,  V.   L.
3 STEWARDSON,  A.   E.
2 TELFORD, Dr. Douglas
5 THOMSON, Wm.  E.
2 TOUZEAU,   E.  G.
TOWELL,  A.  S.
2 TODD.  Col.  D.  K.
4 TULLOCH,  Mrs.  F. C.
(nee Priscilla Matheson)
5 WELCH,  Mrs.  R.  Douglas
(nee   Dorothy  Hipperson)
5 WHITELEY, Mr. and Mrs. A. S.
(nee Marion Swanson)
5 WILKS, Mrs. A. Fred
(nee Dorothy  Russell)
1929
ABERCROMBIE, C. W.
3 ARCHIBALD,  Mrs.  Donald  K.
(nee Constance McTavish)
3 ANDERSEN, Mrs. George C.
(nee Doris Crompton)
5 ANDERSON,   Dr.  O.   E.
ASPINALL, T.  E.
3 AUNE, Mrs. O.
(nee Luella Strangland)
5  BAILEY,   Jean
BISHOP,  Brig. J.  W.
BRYSON,  Margaret
5 BLACK, Dr. L. M.
BLAND,  Mrs.  V.  H.
BLANKENBACH,  W.  W.
4 BOGGS,  Mr. and Mrs. T.  R.
(nee Mamie Moloney)
3 CARL, Mrs. G. C.
(nee Josephine Hart)
CARPENTER,  Mr.
3 CARRICK, R. Bruce
CORNISH, C.  R.
3 CRICKMAY,  J.  L.
5 CRUICKSHANK, Dorothy M.
4 CRUISE,  Evelyn
2 CLARK, Mary E.
5 DARCY,  Mrs.  Geoffrey
(nee Grace Ryall)
DHAMI,  B. S.
3 DOW, Elizabeth
2 DUFFELL, Stanley
4 EADES,  Mrs. J.  E.
(nee Jessie Aske)
3 EMERY, D. J.
FOUBISTER, Mrs. D. W.
(nee Alida  McRae)
3  FRANK, Mrs. Ivan
(nee Mary Mclnnes)
3 FROST,  Dr. A. C. G.
FOOTE, William R.
FOURNIER,   Frank L.
5 FULLERTON,   H.  W.
GAMEY, Herb. T.
GAMEY,  Harold  W.
5 GORMELY,   M.   W.
4 GOURLAY,  Margaret T.
2 GROVES,  Elizabeth A.
5 HALL, W.  N.
5  HALLEY,   Mrs.  J.   K.
(nee Dorothy Downes)
2 HAMBLETON, Mrs. Gordon
(nee Claudine Tait)
3 HARVEY,  Mrs.  H.  E.
(nee  Virginia  Holland)
HATFIELD, Mrs.  H.
(nee  Edith Tisdall)
2 HELMER,  Dorothy E.
HENDERSON, Mary E.
4 HUTTON,  Mrs. Gordon
2  ISAACSON, Mrs. E.  E.
JACKSON, Suzanne C.
2 JOHNS,  Harold P.
5 KEYSERLINGK,  Robert W.
5  KIRBY, Mrs. A. L.
(nee Jean Adam)
5 LAING, Dr. Lionel H.
LAMBERT, Mrs. Walter H.
LANGRIDGE,   Marion
LAUDER,  Mrs. Cecilia M.
(nee Cecilia Garesche)
LEE, Mrs. F. A.
(nee Daisy Christie)
5 LEVIRS, Mrs. F. O.
(nee Marjorie Lanning)
5  LOCH, Mrs. H. Muriel E.
MacDONALD,  Mrs. J. W.
(nee Marjorie  Edwards)
2 MACKENZIE, C.  D.
4 MORRISON,  R.  L.
5 MOUAT, Olivia D.
MURPHY,  Paul D.
4 MURRAY,  Dr. J. Vernon"
NICHOLSON, H. G.
4 NORTHROP,  H.
ODLUM,  Roger M.
2 ORMSBY, Dr. Margaret A.
5 OWEN,  Mrs. Walter S.
(nee Jean   Dowler)
2 PEARCE,   D.  W.
3 PRETIOUS,  Edward  S.
3  RICHMOND,  W. O.
3 SARGENT, Mrs. H.
(nee   Mary  Jean   Fisher)
4 SELBY, Mrs. Wm.  R.
(nee  Lylian Jackson)
5 SPILSBURY, R. H.
5 STEELE,  Dr.  D.  A.
2 SUTHERLAND, Helen M.
2 THORPE, Robert S.
3 TODD,  Eric E.
4 TOMLINSON,  Mrs.  G.  H.
(nee Frances  Fowler)
2 UPSHALL, Muriel
WHAITES, Mrs. J.  H.
(nee Ellen Mellish)
3 WILSON,  Dr.  Reg.
2 WORTHINGTON,  Iola A.
5 WOOD,  Mrs.  B.  Montgomery
(nee Eleanor Riggs)
2  YARWOOD, C. F.
1930
5 ARCHIBALD,  Dr.  R.  M.
2 ATKINSON,  Mrs.  H.  N.
(nee Sally  Irene Collier)
5  BAKER,  Russell K.
3 BARBAREE, Mrs. E. J.
(nee  Enid McEwen)
BELL   Mrs. C.  H. C.
(nee Mary Kilpatrick)
5 BERTO, T. V.
BOLTON,  L.
BOOTHROYD, G. G.
BRAND, G. A.
5 BRAZIER,  Mr.  and Mrs.  C.  W.
2 BROWN,  Robert  Campbell
2 CAMPBELL,  Mary  E.
CAREY,  Mrs.  D.  M.
(nee Dorothy  Ingram)
3 CARL,  Dr. G. Clifford
5 CHALMERS, Tom
2 CLAYTON,  J.  N.  C.
COATES, Carol
5 COCKBURN,  Mrs. G.  R.
(nee Mary Barton)
4 COOPE,  Margaret
CURTIS,  J.  D.
2 DALY,  Mrs.  J.  S.
(nee Catherine  Urquhart)
DAOUST,  Mrs. J. G.
3 DEANS,  Chas.  W.
DEHART, Marjorie
2 DOBSON, Mrs. George
(nee Dorothy Downing)
5 DUNN,  Rev. James
3 DYDE, Mrs. H. A.
(nee Dorothy Pound)
4 EDWARDS, T. Bentley
5 ELLIOTT, Mrs. H. A.
(nee   Marion   Grant)
4  ELLIOTT,  E. N.  R.
3 ESSELMONT,  Mrs.  W.  T.
(nee Muriel  Crawford)
4 FLATHER, D.  M.
FLETCHER,  Margaret G.
GADDES,  Mrs.  C.  D.
(nee  Jean   McGougan)
3 GILLEY, H.  Frances
5 GILLISON,  Mrs. J. M.
(nee  Naomi  Cornish)
5 GRAUER,  Dr. F. W.
GROSS, Mrs. Aubrey
(nee  Marjorie  Kirk)
GROVES,  Mrs.  Tom  D.
(nee Betty Whiteside)
4 HADGKISS, James
4 HALLONQUIST,   F.  W.
HARVEY, H. Frances
5 HAY, Letitia A.
3  HAY,  Mr.  and Mrs.  Edward  C.
(nee Betty McKenzie)
2 HENNIGER, Mrs. Wm.  F.
(nee Viola Palmer)
3 HICKMAN,  Dr. W.  Harry
4 HRENNIKOFF,  A.
5 HUNT,  Basil G.
JAMES, Mrs. E. S.
(nee Rowena Helliwell)
5 JENKINS,   E.  A.
4 JOHNSON,  Thelma
KEELING,  F.  T.
5 KIRBY,  W. J. C.
5  LAING,  L.  Muriel
2  LEDINGHAM, Mrs. George
(nee Margaret Harvie)
LITCH,  J.  B.
5  LOCH,  Margaret  S.
4 LUNN,  E.  O.
2 MacDONALD,  Alan J.
5 MacDONALD,   Doug.
MacKAY,   Mrs.  George
(nee Dorothy Bolton)
5  MAXWELL, D. A.
5 McGREGOR, Dr. Malcolm F.
MORRISON,  Mrs. M.
(nee Cherrie Campbell)
MOSCOVICH,  Mrs. J. C.
(nee Mary Armstrong)
MUNN,  R.  Russell
MUNRO, J. B.
NICHOLSON, Mrs. H. G.
(nee Mary Colledge)
PEERS, Mrs. Mary F.
(nee Mary McQuarrie)
4 PETERSON, Mrs. Evelyn
3 PHILLIPS, Paul
5 PIKE, James A.
PITT   Mrs. Cyril
(nee Isabel Dee)
POLLOCK,  Mrs.  L.   E.
(nee Doris Young)
PUTNAM, Mrs. H. S.
(nee Margaret Logan)
4 READ,  Mrs.  Frank
(nee Beatrice Davis)
RHODES, Audsley V.
3 ROBBINS, Dr. and Mrs. William
(nee Margaret  Ross)
2 ROSSITER, Mrs. Philip W.
(nee Olive Malcolm)
3 SAVAGE, Edna
5 SAVAGE, Gertrude M.
4 SELBY,  Wm.  R.
3 SHIER,  Mrs.  J.  W.
(nee .Grace  Hilton)
5 SLEIGHTHOLME,   Mrs.   M.
(nee Jean Salter)
2 STOCKWELL, Mrs. C. H.
(nee Annette Johnston)
WILSON, Dr. Roger
5 WOOD, B. M.
WOODWARD,  G.  G.
YOUNG,  Dr. and Mrs.  A.  C.
1931 —   $3126.50
1932 —   $2179.50
1933 —   $2109.88
1931
5 ACORN,  Jessie
ANDERSON, Mrs. C. E.
(nee  Beatrice  Stewart)
2 ARGUE, Mrs. R. S.
(nee Alice Smith)
3 BANNO,   Dr.   E.  C.
5 BERTO,  Mrs.  T.  V.
(nee Margaret Finlay)
4 BISCHOFF,   Herman   D.
3  BRINK, Mrs.  V.  C.
(nee Ruth  Fields)
5 BRISSENDEN,  P.  R.
2  BRUCE,   Dorothy  M.
2 BRYANT,  Beverly
BUCKLAND, Dr. F. C.
5 CAMPBELL, Mr. and Mrs. A. T. R.
(nee  Frances Greenwood)
CARPENTER, Mrs.  R.  B.
(nee Margaret Sutherland)
3 CHAPMAN, Robert J.
4 CLAYTON, Mrs. G.  E.
(nee Olive Selfe)
2 CRESSWELL,   Mrs.   F.   S.
(nee  Betty  Buckland)
DAWSON, Barbara L.
5 DENNY,  Mrs.  M.  M.
(nee Margaret Harris)
5  DICK,  Margaret  B.
4 DUNHAM,  C.  B.
5 DUNN,  Mrs. James
(nee  Frances  Robinson)
FAIRLEY, Mrs. J. J.
(nee  Kathleen  Burridge)
5  FISHER,   Mrs.   A.   W.
(nee  Lois Tourtellote)
3 FRASER,   K.   F.
FROST,  Dr.  John  W.
5 GIBSON,  Dr.  J. A.
GORDON,   Roth G.
5 GRANT,   George
3 GREEN,   Edith J.
2 GRIFFIN,  Eileen  B.
2 GROVES, Tom D.
5 GUY,  R.  D. Jordan
4 HACKER, Mrs. G. C.
(nee  Margaret  Allan)
5 HOCKIN,   Katherine
3 HOLMAN, Mrs. H. S.
HURT,  E.  F.
5  KERSHAW, Ernest M.
3  KIRK, N. L.
2 LATTA, W. S.  B.
LEACH, T. A.
LENDRUM, R. M.
LEPAGE, David H. L.
3 LOVITT,  E.  H.
MARTIN,  K. W.
4 MATHESON, Don N.
5 MAWBY,  Vera  B.
McAFEE,   Jessie
4 McLEAN,   John   F.
McNeill, d. f.
4 MEREDITH,  Geo.  M.
2  MUNRO,  Mrs.  Alex
(nee Freda Lasser)
2  MURDOCH,   D.   C.
5 OLIVER,  Mrs.  V.
(nee Frances Milligan)
2  PIERS, Mrs.  Robin
(nee Ann  Ferguson)
2  PIGOU,   Elfrida
5  PIKE,   Mrs.   James   A.
(nee Patricia Newlands)
2  PLANT, J.  L.
5 POOLE,   Louise  E.
POUND,  Marjorie  R.
REID,   E.  C.
RICKER,  Mrs.  William  E.
(nee Marion Cardwell)
5  RUTHERFORD, J.  M.
5 SCHULTZ,  Charles  D.
SELDER,  Rev. Wm. J.
5 SHILVOCK,   W.   A.
SMITH, Norma F.
5 SMITH, Ronald N.
2 STREIGHT, J. M.
2 SWANNELL, L. F.
5 THOMAS, M. A.
2 TIMMINS, Talosa
5  TURNBULL, Alex
2 TURNER,  Mrs.  C.
(nee Margaret Muirhead)
WATSON,   H.  D.
3 WEEKS, Mrs. A.  D.
(nee Margery Jean  Robson)
2 WINRAM, J. M.
4 WRIGHT,  L.  O.
2 YERBURGH, E. R. M.
1932
ARKELL, R. R. (deceased)
ARMSTEAD, Mrs. Miriam R.
(nee Miriam Ashton)
5 BAGNALL,  Dr. A. W.
3 BAYNES,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  G.  E.
(nee Jean  Cameron)
BEALL,   D.
BECKETT, K. M.
2  BESCOBY,  Isabel
BEWS,  K.  F.
2  BLACK, Ross M.
5  BROOKS, W.  R.
BROWN.   Mrs.   George  M.
(nee Margaret McNicol)
5  BROWN,  W.  Tom
Page 38 BRUCE, Mrs. Bertie A. F.
5  BRYSON,  Dr.  B.  F.
BULL, Mrs.  E. B.
(nee Margaret Jean Carder)
2 BUTLER, Dorothy
CAMERON, Ruth E.
CAMPBELL,  Mrs. J.  K.
(nee Mary Dooley)
2 CHAPMAN, Mrs. Robert J.
(nee Velma  Carmath)
3 CHATWIN,   Mrs.   Leonard   W.
(nee  Dorothy   Kelly)
4 CLARKE,  Margaret E.
COOKE,   Carlton   C.
3 COWAN,  Ian McT.
2 CRAWFORD,  Elmer J.
EDGAR, Mrs. G. M.
(nee   Kathleen   MacDermot)
2  ELLETT, Mrs. A. S.
(nee  Kathleen  Campbell)
ELLIOT,  A. J.
EMANUELE,   Dr.   H.
5 FALLIS,  Mary  M.
FALLIS,  Mrs.  A.  Murray
(nee Ruth Bostock)
5  FARRIS,  Mrs. J.  L.
(nee Dorothy Colledge)
5  FILLMORE,   D.   C.
5 FISHER,  A.  W.
FRASER, Mrs.  K.  F.
(nee  Jane  Stevenson)
4 FREEMAN,  D. A.
GIBBARD,  Harold Allan
2 GILES,   Fred  C.
GINTHER,  Mrs. Lome
5 GLEED,   Ellen
GRIMMETT, F. K.
5 HAGGERTY, A. S.
2  HAGGERTY,  W.   P.
HALL, W.
5  HALLEY, J.  K.
4 HARVEY,  W.   H.
HENDERSON,   Wilson
5 HILL, William H.
5  HOLMES, Terence C.
2 HRENNIKOFF, Mrs. A.
(nee Alexandra Turin)
4 HUMPHREYS,  M.  Gweneth
IDIENS, Mrs. Stanley
(nee Elizabeth Halley)
5 JACK, Lawrence B.
5 JENKINS,   Mrs.   E.   A.
(nee Lillian Youds)
JOHNSON,  F.  Henry
4 KNOWLES,   Mrs.   C.   L.
(nee Marion Hanes)
LAWLEY, Ryan
3 LEE, J. Wilfred
5 LIND, Walter J.
MacFARLANE, Mrs. M.  E.  D.
2 MACORQUODALE, Mrs. D. F.
MARSH, Mrs.  H. G.
5 McGAULEY, Mrs.  E. V.
(nee Evelyn McGill)
MITCHELL, J. A.
2- MYERS,  Dorothy  (deceased)
5  NEIL,  Mrs.  Rupert
(nee  Alice Cleveland)
NESBITT, L.  M.
ORMSBY, Dr. H. L.
PEARSON,  Dr. and Mrs.  J.  M.
(nee Muriel Clarke)
4 POOLE,  Mrs.  H.  W.
(nee  Katie Thiessen)
5 ROPER WILLIAM J.
2 ROSSITER,  Philip W.
3 ROTHWELL, Dr. G. S.
SARGENT, John Payne
3 SARGENT, H.
SAVAGE, J. P.
5 SELLARS,  Carol
SHARP, R. F.
2  SHAW,  H.  A.
SHIRREFF, H. A.
2 SMITH, Alex
5 SMITH, Donald S.
3 SMITH, R. Hamilton
3 SNELL, Mrs. Albert M.
(nee Alice Morrow)
3 STEWART,  Kenny N.
2 STREIGHT, Mr«. J. M.
(nee  Isabel  Bews)
SWANSON. Mo. John
VAN ALLEN. H. M.
2 VICK,  Mrs.  R.  E.
TAYLOR,  Mrs.  C.   I.
(np° Dorothv Barrow)
2 WAITES.  G.   Frank
5 WALLACE.  Robert T.
5 WATTS,  Alfred
4 WILCOX. Mrs. J. C.
(nee Mina MacKenzie)
3 WILLIAMS, Lloyd
2 WILLIS, Mrs.  C. H.
(nee Mary MacDonald)
2 WILSON, Mr. and Mrs. J. A.  R.
(nee Nora Mains)
5 WILSON.  Florence  I.
3 WITBECK.  Jean
2 WOOD.  W.  A.
5  WRIGHT, Howard R.
2 WYNESS, Enid S.
1933
4 ALLEN, Dr. George S.
3 ANDREWS,  Harold  S.
ARMITAGE, Dr. T. F. H.
5 ASHBY, JOHN
4 ATKINSON, J. R.
5 ATKINSON, K. W.
5 BIRMINGHAM,  W.   H.
3  BLACK, Catherine L.
2 BOGARDUS, F. W.
BROOKS, F. C.
BUCKLAND, Mrs. A. C.
(nee Helen Jackson)
5 BULLER, A. E.
3 BYNG, HALL Mrs. D. O. C.
(nee Elizabeth Jack)
5 CAMERON,  William  H.  Q.
2 CAMPBELL, J. K.
3 CAMPBELL, D. H.
5 CAMPBELL, Mrs. C.
CANNON,  Mrs.  H.
(nee Margaret Baynes)
3 CAREY, Gladys H.
5 CHALMERS,  Mrs. T.
(nee  Elizabeth  Smith)
2 CHIPPERFIELD,  Mrs.  L.  S.
(nee Frances Wilson)
CLEVELAND, H. D.
5 COCKBURN, G.  R.
3 COLLI NGS,  Mrs.  Thos.
(nee Catherine Clibbom)
CURR, Mrs. James
(nee Muriel Reid)
CURRIE, J. M.
2 DANN,  Mrs.  Fred
(nee Muriel  Smith)
DARLING, F.
DAVIDSON, Donald C.
4 DAVIS,   Charles  A.
5 DEANE, Mr. and Mrs. R.
(nee Fiona Jean Sutherland)
5  DESBRISAY,  Eileen
3 DODD, A. J.
DRYER, Victor L.
DUNCANSON, Mrs.  F.  R.
(nee Diana Whellems)
2 ELLETT, Alec S.
5  FARRANT, M. H.
5  FISHER, Dr. D. V.
FOURNIER,   Mrs.  Frank  L.
(nee Helen McDiarmid)
4 FOWLER, Hedley S.
5 GIBSON,  Dr.  W.  C.
GRAHAM,  Kenneth
4 HACKER,  G.  C.
HENSLEY, C. A.  E.
3 HICKMAN,  Mrs.  W.   Harry
(nee Grace Parkinson)
5 HOLMES, Mrs. T. C.
(nee Ellen Irene Ramage)
HOUSTON, John
3  HOW,  L.  Kathleen
HOW, Thomas G.
HOWARD, A.  M.
HOWE, Jacqueline
2 IRVING,  Mrs.  R.
(nee Mary Darnbrough)
3 JACKSON,  A.  B.
4 JAMIESON, Gordon T.
JOHNSTON, John R.
JORGENSEN,  R.  H.
JURE,  R.
2 KILLAM. Mrs. F.  R.
(nee  Kathryn  Hebb)
3 LEE, Mrs. J. D.
(nee Marion Falls)
2 LEECH, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh B.
(nee Frances Quail)
LYDIATT,  W.  M.
MANNING,  C.  M.
MATHERS.  William W.
3 McALISTER, Mrs. Donald
(nee   Rosemary   Winslow)
3 McDOUGAL,  Mary
2 McJUARRIE.  Colin  D
3 McTAGGART-COWAN,
Mr. and Mrs. P. D.
(nee  Maroaret   Palmer)
MIARD,  H.  T.
4 MOORHEAD,  H.
3  OKULITCH.   George   J.
2 OSBORN, C.  D.
5 OSBORNE, Robert F.
PATRICK. John
3 PERRY, G.  Neil
2  PHILLIPS, A. H.
5 PHILLIPS, Dr. N. W. F.
5  PORTER, Mrs. L. Y.
(nee Alica  Davidson)
4 RAD^R,  Louis T.
REEVE,   Mr.  and  Mrs.   D.  D.
(ne*1 Marinn Janaster)
REYNOLDS    Kathleen,   M.  W.
5 RICHMOND,  R. H.
5  ROGERS, Mr. and Mrs. J. V.
fnp"   Ruth   With»rk)
ROLSTON. M". R. C.
(nee  Arm'  Carson)
2   RUSSELL,  F. M.
RUTTAN   J. G,
4 SCHULTZ,  William  A,
5 SCOTT. Annie E.
2 SEDGWICK, Harry J.
SHARP,  Eleanor L.
3 SMITH,  Lt.  Col.  C.  H.
2 STANTON, John
4 STRAIN,  R.  E.
3 SUTTON, Beatrice M.
2 THOMSON, Mrs. David
(nee Louella Harper)
5 TIMBERLAKE Morley
5 TURNER, Dr. David B.
VICARY, Vivian C.
4 VOLKOFF, Mrs. G.
(nee Olga Okulitch)
5 WASHINGTON, A. D. C.
5 WATTS, Mrs. Alfred
(nee  Rosalind  Young)
5 WEBSTER, Alan
2 WELD, George F.
4 WHILES,  Bill O.
3 WILSON,  Mrs.  Reg.  A.
(nee Jean  Emerson)
3 WILSON, E. C. Duff
5 WRIGHT, Mrs. T. G.
(nee Virginia  Cummings)
WRIGHT, Rika L.
1934
—
$1795.25
1935
—
$1678.75
1936
—
$1813.75
1934
4 AGNEW,  H.  W.
ANDERSON, Gordon  M.
3 ARKELL,  Mrs.  R.  R.
(nee Elena Macdonald)
2 BAKER,  Kathleen M.
BEALL, Molly
2 BEATTIE,  Mrs.  Aldridge  N.
(nee  Myrtle  Beatty)
5 BOURNE, John A.
4 BRAND, A.  Gordon
4 BRINK,  Dr.  Vernon  C.
5 BROWN, V. Yvonne
4 CAMPBELL, J. Meryl
CAPRETTO, Fredena
5 CLEVELAND,   C.   E.
3 COLLINS, Mark
5 COPEMAN, J. U.
2 CRAGG, Mrs. T. K
(nee Wilhelmina Stokvis)
DALTON, C. J. A.
DE LA HAYE, Mrs. Raymond G.
(nee Sophie Witter)
3 DERRINBERG, R.
5 DINGLE,  Walter B.
5   EYRE, C. A.  Roy
FAIRLEY, J. J.
5   FARENHOLTZ,   W.
2 FINDLAY,  R. A.
4 FREEMAN, Mrs. D. A.
(nee Beulah James)
5 GENGE, Mrs. J.  R.
(nee Dorothy Harris)
3 GORDON, Mrs. H. J.
5  HARPER, Arthur M.
HARRISON, Mrs. J.  R.
(nee Margaret Jean  Reid)
HENDERSON, G. M.
HOOLEY, J. G.
2  HULLEY, Clarence C,
5 HYLAND, J. N.
4 HYND, R. F.
INSLEY,  Mrs. J.  H.
(nee Helen Lowe)
2 IRVING,   R.
3 JONES,  Howard F.
3 KATZNELSON, H.
KEENLEYSIDE,  Dr.  Wm.  M.
4 KOSIN,   I.  L.
KING, Paul
5 LATTA,  Mary
4 LENG, Mrs. George
5 MacDOUGALL,  J.   Innes
4 MACKENZIE, Mrs.  R. K.
(nee  Hilda  Bone)
4 MACLEOD, Mr. and Mrs. A.  K.
(nee Bea Cooke)
5 MacQUEEN.  I.  C.
McDIARMID,   Josephine
2 McDONALD,  R. S.
McGOWN, Walter M.
5  McMASTER, Mr. arid Mrs. R. J.
5 McMULLAN,   D.  L.
3 McMYNN, J. D.
MILLAR, Mr. and Mrs. J.  M.
(nee Clara  Hutchinson)
2  MITCHELL, J.  D.
2 MOONEY,  Mrs.  A.  W.
(nee   Janey   Findlay)
4 MULLOY,  Florence
NELSON, Elsie L.
3 NICHOLSON,  L. J.
3  NIVEN,  Ivan
5 OWEN,  D. M.
PARNELL,   Dr.   and  Mrs.  John  L.
(nee Margaret Miller)
2  PATERSON,   I. C.
PEARSON,  H.   B.
2 PERLEY,  D.  A.
3 PETRIE,  Mrs.  William
(nee  lsabelle Chodat)
4 OUIGLEY,  D. C.
3  ROSE,  Mrs.  W.  R,
(nee Verna  Shilvock)
5 SCOTT,   Mrs.   I.   E.
(nee   Irene   Elgie)
SHARE,  Dr.  Milton
2  SIMMS,   M.   Frances   G.
3 SMITH,  Douglas
TAYLOR,  C.  I.
4 TELFORD,  Dr.  Kenneth M.
TOUZEAU, W. D.
5 VOLKOFF,  Dr. G. M.
WALES,  Muriel
WALKER,  Dr.  Forestier
4 WEST, H. A. S.
3 WESTON,  David
5 WHITELAW, Dr. D. M.
3 WILSON, J. Norton
3 WILSON, Dr. James W.
WRIGHT, Ken
WYNESS,  Mrs. Gordon
(nee Alison  Reid)
ZARELLI, John
1935
2 BARCLAY,  Herbert  R.
BENNETT,  Mrs. Mary
5 BLACK, Edgar C.
3 BOLTON,  F.  D.
3   BREEN, A. W.
3  BROOKES, D. W.
5  BRYNELSEN,  B.  O.
3 BUCHANAN,  Donald
4 CLAYTON,  H. H.
3 COLLINS, Mrs. Mark
(nee Phae Van Dusen)
5 CONWAY, John
CURR, James
CURRIE,   T.   G.
DARRACH,   Dr.   Marvin
2 DAVIS, Ralph
DELLERT,  Berna A.
5  DILL, Charlotte
3 DOLSEN, George
DONALD, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J.
(nee  Kathleen  Coles)
EDMONDS,  Mrs.  W.  Freth
(nee  Barbara  Watts)
2   EVANS,   Mrs.   H. J.  W.
(nee Marjorie Kilgour)
5  FAIREY,  F.  .
FITZPATRICK, D. M.
2 FOX,  M.  H.
FRASER,  Mildred Marie
3 FRENCH, R. H. S.
5 GANSNER,   Mr.   and   Mrs.   Leo  S.
(nee Nettie Harvey)
5 GIBSON, Mrs. W. C.
(nee Barbara Baird)
GILES, Mrs. Marion E.
(nee Marion  Root)
GRAHAM, C. D.
GREENE, Robert K. W.
HARMON, Mrs. T. R.
(nee Margaret Wilson)
5   HARRIS,  Mrs.  A.   A.  C.
(nee Madeline Whitter)
5  JOHNSON, A. J. F.
3 KEATE J. Stuart
2   LOGGIE, John  M.
2   LOWER, J.  A.
4 MacDONALD, A. M.
5 MATHER,  Mr. and Mrs.  R. M.
(nee Elenita Hall)
2 McDONALD,  Mrs.  R. S.
(nee Mary  Eakins)
3 MclNTYRE, J. A.
McMAHON, Howard 0.
3  MELLISH, Violet
3  MILLS,   Douglas W.
2 MOONEY, Dr. A. W.
3 MOORHEAD,  Mrs.  H. P.
(nee Miriam  Day-Smith)
5  MORTIMER,   John   M.
5  NORTHCOTT,  P.  L.
4 OSBORNE,  Mrs.  R.  F.
(nee   Dorothy   McRae)
5 PARNALL, John E. A.
5  PEIRSON,   Arabell
PRIOR,  John
3  PURDY,   Dwight W.
PYLE,  Dr. J. J.
3 RADER,   I. A.
RICE,   D.   F.
4 RINGLE, Viola A.  E.
RITCHIE,  Cdr.   I.  F.
5 RUSH,  Frank  F.
5 SALISBURY, H.  F.
SCHOLEFIELD, Mrs. Gordon S.
(nee Dorothy Buchanan)
3 SHANEMAN, Jack A.
SHAYLER,   S.   V.
5  STEVENS,  Frank S.
SULLIVAN,   G.   S.
4 TOSCHACH, Mrs.  F. M.
TOUGH,  W.  J.
5 TWINING,   R.   C.
2  WALKER,   Florence  H.
4 WELLWOOD,  Robert W.
WILLIAMSON,  Mrs. G. S.
2 WILLIS,  C.  H.
3 WILLOWS,  Pearl
2  WILSON, J. R.
4 WOOD G.  Roger
4 WRIGHT, James H.
WRIGHT,  Mrs.   Kenneth T.
(nee  Rosemary  Edmonds)
1936
5 ABERNETHY,  Mrs.  D.  E.
(nee  Doreen  Agnew)
2 ALLIN,  J.  S.
2  BAIN, Roger M.
Page 39 5  BERRY, Mr. and Mrs. John P.
(nee Vivian MacKenzie)
BLAIN,  Mrs.  W. A.
4 BROCK, Thomas L.
2 BUCKLAND, A. C.
BUCKLEY, Mrs. B. P.
(nee   Ellen   Raphael)
2 CHANG, Helen
CLANDININ, D. R.
CLEVELAND, Mrs. H. D.
(nee Jean  Bogardus)
3 CLEVELAND, E. A.
CORNISH, John B.
CREELMAN,  Lyle
3 CUNNINGHAM, W. L.
3  DIGNAN,  Marian M.
DRYER,   Mrs.  Victor   L.
(nee Isobel Wales)
ELLIOT, Mrs. Geo.  R.  F.
nee Kay Bourne)
2 EVANS, Mrs. Ernest M.
(nee Lorna Carson)
FAHRNI,   Keith C.
5 FINDLAY,  J. A.
FORD,   Wm.   L.
5 FORSHAW,  R.  P.
3 FRANCIS,   Mrs.   R.   A.
(nee Margaret Ecker)
3 FULTON,  E.  D.
4 GAUTSCHI,  E.  H.
GILLIES,  Mr. and Mrs. G.  Brodie
(nee Jane Nimmons)
5 GODARD,  H.  P.
4 GROSS,  R. W.
4  HARKLEY,   Harold   L.
4 HARPER,  Mrs.  A.  M.
(nee   barrel  Gomery)
HARRISON, J.  R.
5 HENTIG, Mrs. J.  K.
(nee Irene Wallace)
HODGSON,   Faith
5  HOLLICK,   Kenyon   Mrs.   H.
HORNBY, C. A.
HOUSSER, Mrs.  H. C.  K.
(nee Martha  Farris)
3   IRVING,  Evelyn
3 JOUBIN,  F.  R.
KERMODE,   Kathleen  V.
KERSEY,  Lome  R.
4 LACEY, O.  L.
LAMBERT, Walter H.
LANDELS,  Mrs. A. G.
(nee Margaret   Elliott)
5 LIND, C. Arthur A.
LOUGH EED, Mrs. M. S.
(nee Gwen Pym)
4 MaclNNES, A. S.
MARTIN, Frank L.
MATTHEWS,  Mary C.
5 MAYHEW,  Mrs.  Alan
(nee  Elza  Lovitt)
5 McHATTIE,  Geo.  T.
McHUGH,  Dr. J.  L.
MclNTYRE, J. A.
2  McKEOWN,   Robert
4 MELVIN,  John  F.
4 MOXON, A. H. W.
NICHOLSON,  Mrs.  C.
ORR, James M.
5 PARADIS,   R.
PATMORE, A. M.
2 PEARSON,  Mrs.  K. G.
(nee Mary Matthews)
4 RENNEY,   Arthur   J.
RICHARDSON, J.
RIDLAND,  G. Carman
5 ROBINSON,   Bruce   A.
ROSE, J. M.
ROSS, Mrs. A. C.
5 ROXBURGH,  Jean W.
5 SAGER, Mrs. A. H.
(nee Dorothy Planche)
3 SCHMIDT,   Eliot  A.
5 SCHULTZ,  Mrs.  C.  D.
(nee Ardy   Beaumont)
4 SELDON, G.  E.
5 SHARP, Peter J.
3 SMITH,  Elsie  K.
STANIER,  R. Y.
STEWART,  Winifred  M.
STEWART,  P.  Clayton
TATUM,  Mrs. Allan
(nee  Mary   De  Pencter)
4 THOMPSON, A. J.
THOMSON,  David
4 TURIN,  Boris
WATSON, C.  B.
WHIMSTER.  W.
2 WILLIAMSON, G. S.
1937 —   $1900.16
1938 —   $1552.50
1939 —   $2026.60
1937
ALLEN,  Mrs.  S.  G.
(nee Molly Shone)
3 ALMSTROM,   Mrs.  M.   E.
(nee Marjorie Carter)
AMES, A. M.
4 BAKER,  Mrs.   C.   E.
(nee Vera Baker)
2  BARBER,  Mr.  and  Mrs.   Leslie   E.
(nee Constance Baird)
BARSS,  Walter M.
4 BELL, Ralph K.
5 BERRY, Harry A.
5  BIELER,   Mrs.  J.   L.
(nee Zoe Browne-Clayton)
2  BILLER, Jill
5  BUCHANAN,  Sheila C.
CADE, J. A. V.
CAMPBELL,  Effie
CHAPMAN,  Mrs. L. H.
(nee  Katherine Scott)
5 CHARLES,   Walter   D.
5 CHESTER,  Roger N.
CLARKE,   Anna   P.
4 CLAYTON, G. E.
2 COPP, Stanley A.
CUDMORE, Ralph E.
5 DARLING,  David  A.
DOHM,  Thomas A.
3 EAGLES, Mrs. R. J.
(nee Joan  Martin)
4 EASTHAM, A. M.
FOUBISTER, D. W.
GARDNER, A. P.
5 GARRISON,   Florence   T.
GORDON,  B. M.
5 GOULD, John G.
GRAHAM, C. D.
3 GRAM, R. H.
3 GRANT,  Ken
3 GROVES, Mrs. Kenneth P.
(nee Kathryn Clugston)
2 GWYN,  G. H.
HALLETT, Joan  M.
HODSON,  Phyllis E.
5  HOFFMANN,  Elfriede H.
HOUSSER,  H. C   K.
3 HUNTER, Mrs. George H.
(nee Joan Pinhorn)
3   IRWIN, Arthur B.
IRWIN, Everett J.
JACKSON, T.  E.
2 JOHNSEN,  Clara  E.
5  KADZIELAWA, A. S.
5  KILLAM,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  R.  J.
(nee Yvonne Ladner)
5   KITLEY,  Philip J.
2 LADNER, Thomas E.
3 LARSEN, Mrs. C.  E.
(nee Elsie Porteous)
2  LEE, L.  K.
LEQUESNE, Mrs. Bert
(nee   Dora  Wilkie)
4 MACKAY,  Dr.  H. J
2 MACKENZIE, M. H.
4 MAGUIRE, John S.
4 MAGUIRE,  E. H.
5 MANN, Aileen E.
MASON,  Glen  E.
3 MATHISEN,  Dr. A. K.
4 MclNTYRE,  Mrs.  J. A.
(nee Dorothy Newcomb)
3  McQUEEN,  Mrs.  W. C.
(nee Jean McCleery)
MORRIS, W. M.
5 MORRISON, Mrs. John G.
(nee Pat Murphy)
3 MUIR,  Robert A.
3 NICHOL,  Margaret J.
4 PATTERSON,   Mrs.   F.   L.
(nee Margaret Allison)
PATTERSON, Pauline
3  PINKHAM,  Mrs   A.  H.
2 PORTER, Mrs.  R.  K.
(nee Merle Turnbull)
PORTER,   Robin   M.
5 QUAYLE,  D.  B.
3 ROBERTSON, Mrs. W. J.
5  ROSS, Rupert
5 SAYWELL, John F. T.
4 SELDON, Mrs. G. E.
(nee Helen Westby)
3 SHAW, John M.
SHIPTON, C. Bernard
SMITH, Mr. and Mrs. R. N.
(nee Violet Clark)
4 SMITH, Mrs. D. S.
SOUL, Norman
STAHL, Mrs. G. W.
(nee Margaret Smith)
STIBBS, L.  B.
5 SWIFT,  S.  A.
TOMKINSON, William
5 TURNER, G.  A.
2 VEITCH, W.  F.
3 WAINWRIGHT, W. S.
4 WATTS,   Rev.  J.   H.   H.
5 WEST, John J.
WEST,   Kenneth  A.
WILKIN,  Clarke
2 WITBECK, J.  L.
1938
2 ASHBY,  Mrs.  Con
BAIRD,  Dorwin  R.
4  BALDWIN, Mrs. J. E.
(nee Lillian  Boyd)
4 BAWDEN,  Rosemary
BEVERIDGE,  J.  A.
2 BOGARDUS,  Mrs.  F. W.
(nee Mary Black)
BRADSHAW, Mary G.
BROCK,  P. H. G.
3 BRUNTON,  Dr.  F.  M.
BUCKAM, T. R.
5 CAMPBELL, C. M.
CARLSEN,  Mrs. Alfred  E.
3 CHAPIN,  M.  F.
5 CHARTERS, A. N.
COLBERT, James L.
2 COWAN,  Phyllis  L.
2 CRAIG,  E. MARY
CUDMORE, Mrs. Ralph E.
(nee Lois Still)
3 DETWILLER, Mrs. L. F.
(nee Margaret Jean Harvey)
3  ELFSTROM,  Roy H.
ENNALS, Rev. B. F.
5  FOTHERINGHAM, A. M.
2 GIBSON, Eleanor
GORDON, Bruce
GREGORY, George
3 GRIFFIN, Mrs. T.
(nee Helen Gray)
4 GROSS,  Mrs.  R.  W.
(nee May  Peacock)
5 HALL, J.  Z.
4 HALL,  E.  W.
HAYDEN,   F.   Stanley
HILL,  Loree
5 HILLIER,   Mrs.  T.  G.
(nee Cynthia McLean)
HOCKIN, Neil
HOCKRIDGE, C.  M.
HOLDEN, Mrs. J.
(nee Jean Seaton)
HOOLEY, Agnes S.
4 HUDSON, J.  W.
5 IDYLL, Clarence
5  INGLEDEW,   Mrs.   Kenneth
(nee   Margaret   Fox)
2 JACK,  Elsie W.
JOST,   Audrey   E.
KERR,   Edna  L.
5 LECKY, Mrs. John McD.
(nee Bev Cunningham)
3 LEE, T. K.
LEUNG,   Dr.  S. W.
4 LIGHT, J. G.
5 LITTLE,  H. W.
LOUIE,  Tong
4 LOVE,  Mr.  and Mrs. C.  P.
(nee Betty Jones)
5 MACDONALD, James A.
4 MACKAY, Mrs. H. J.
(nee Mary Gibson)
2 MADELEY, S. T.
3 MARTYN, James R.
MASON, G.  B.
McMORRAN, Mrs. J.  D.
(nee Marjorie Jessup)
3 McNAIR,  Mrs.  F   E.
McQUEEN,  Mrs. W.  C.
MELLOR, Frances C.
MILLER, Cathalin  I.
MORAN,  Frances M.
5 MORTIMER, Mrs. J. M.
(nee  Barbara  Hutton)
MUNRO, Donald W.
2 NEIL,   Mrs.   Robert
(nee Mary Holdom)
NELSON, Emily L.
3 NEWMARCH,  O   H.
PAO. Johnson C. T.
3  PENDRAY,   W.   C.
5  RETALLACK,  J.  G.
RICE,  Marqaretta G.
ROBSON, C. George
5 SAGER, A. H.
5  SCOTT.   I.   E.
SPENCER, David
2 STEVENSON,  Mr.  and  Mrs   B.  R.
(nee  Phyllis  McKean)
STIBBS,   L.   B.
TALLING, Mrs. R. H.
(nee  Nan  Thomson)
5 THOMSON. Grace
5 TREMAINE,  William S.
2 TRUSSELL,  Dr. Paul
5 TUCKEY,   Elizabeth
WAINWRIGHT, W.  S.
2 WALDEN, F. E.
5 WELSH,  Dr.  M.  F.
WILSON, Georgina
3 WINRAM, Mrs. James M.
(nee Lois Tipping)
5 WRIGHT, Maurice M.
ZINK, Mrs. Leonard A.
(nee Joan McTaggart-Gowan)
5  ZOTOV, G.
1939
2 ADAMS,   Percy A.
3 ALDOUS, Dr. J. G.
4 ALLEN,  Alfred   R.
5 ASHFORD, Walter R.
4 BEECHING, T. A. G.
2 BOROUGHS,  R.  J.
5 BROWN,  Joanne
4  BOYD, Ottilie G.
BROWN,   Elinor M.
BURNS, Jean  E.
4 CALHOUN,   Joyce
5 CALNAN,  Wilfred M.
CAMPBELL, J. J. R.
CAMPBELL,  Dr. C. G.
CAPELLE,   Pauline
5 CARTMELL, Clara E.
3 COOPER,  Burt M.
5  DARLING, T. Graham
5  DARLING, Mr. and Mrs. G. D.
(nee Miriam Cosens)
DAVIS, Trevor C. M.
2 DAVIS,  Dr.  John
DEAN.'Venie L.
3 DETWILLER,  L.  F.
5 DONALDSON,   D.   R.
DOWLING,  Mrs. J.  L.
EASTHAM, H. M.
5  ERLEBACH, Graham B.
4 FLOOK,  Mildred  S.
4 FORD, Sherwood D.
2 GALE, A. M.
GINTHER, W. Lome
5 GODSON, Warren L.
GORDON, Mrs. B. M.
(nee Dorothy Cummings)
GRAY, J.  L.
2 GREEN,  J.  W.
GUTHRIE, J.
4 HARTLEY,   Fred  L.
2  HARVEY,  H.  E.
2  HENDERSON,  A.  E.
5 HETHERINGTON,  W.  L.
HODGSON,   Mrs.   W.   R.
(nee  Margaret  Evans)
HOWATSON, C. H.
2 JONES, Major F. B.
5 JONES,   Dr.   Elmer A.
2 JONES,  F.  Ray R.
JONES, Frank B.
2 KIDD, George P.
KING,  J.  C.
3 KING,  J.  Gordon
5  LAMB, John
3  LARSEN,  Mr.  and Mrs.  M. P.
(nee Sheila  Ewing)
LAYARD, P. R.
3 LECKIE,   Ewing   P.
5  LEGGAT, W. S.
4 LOCK, Arthur E.
2   LOGAN,  Mrs.  S. A.  K.
4 MACDERMOT,  J.  G.
MACDONALD,  A.  B.
2 MACDONALD,  Colin  H.
4 MACKENZIE,   Dr.  John  M.
2 MADELEY, Mrs. S. T.
(nee  Kathleen  McKenzie)
MARTIN,  Les
McCANN,  Elizabeth  K.
5 McDOUGALL,   Dr.   Robt.   L.
2 McDOWELL,  Gordon  E.
5  McELHANNEY,   R.  G.
4 McGUIRE,  Dr. Carson
McLAGAN,  R.  M.
3 McLAREN,   Dr.  J.  A.
4 McNAIR,  Dr.  F.   E.
McTAGGART, D.  E.
5 MORRISON, John G.
MUNRO, Constance
2 MURARO, Sylvio
5 NESBITT,  B.  I.
NESBITT,  R. W.
5  NEVISON,  Myrne  B.
4 NORIE,  Elizabeth
5 OWEN  Mrs. D. M.
(nee Marion  Reid)
3 PENDRAY, Mrs. W. C.
(nee Margaret Deas)
5  PEPPER,  James  M.
5  PEPPER, T. P.
3  PHILLIPS, Roy A.
2 ROME,  Harold
RUSSELL, Patricia M.
3 SELLENS,  Edith
SHAW, Phyllis Jean
4 SIBLEY, W. M.
3 SIMPSON, Dr. R. E.
3  STEWART, J. W.
5 STOKVIS, Wilfred D.
2 SUTTON, A. L.
TAYLOR, Douglas K.
5 TAYLOR, Milton C.
3 THOMSON, Mrs. W. S.
(nee Cicely Holmes)
5 TURNER, Frank J. E.
2  WADDELL,  D.  B.
2 WESTON, Stanley
2 WILLIAMS, W. O.
5 WILSON, Beverley E.
WILSON,  Ridgeway W.
WRIGHT, Kenneth W. T.
YOUNG,  John  W.
1940 —        $1553.35
1941 —        $1342.50
1942 —        $1494.50
1940
5  ap ROBERTS, R. P.
ATKINSON, R. G.
2 AWMACK, Mrs. Joseph W.
4 BAIN, Mrs. A. C.
(nee Jean Anderson)
BALFOUR,  Elizabeth  M.
BARTON, W. H.
BOOTH, K.
5 BRAIDWOOD, Darrell T.
2 BROWN, James B.
2  BUSH,  Irene B.
BUTLER, Enid
CALDER, W. A.
Page 40 2 CAMPBELL, Jack C.
CAMPBELL, Mrs. J. J. R.
(nee  Emily Fraser)
CARBON, Dorothy W.
CAREY, D. M.
5 CARRUTHERS, Harvey
2 CLARK, S. H.
5 CLARK,  Frank B.
DAUNT,  H. T.
DONALD,  Mrs.  Pamela
(nee Pamela Runkle)
DOUGLAS,  Gordon
4 DOWNHAM, Audrey L.
DUNCAN, M. R.
EADIE, J.  K.
EDMONDS,  W.  Freth
3 FALCONER,  Mrs.  D.  M.
5 FLESHER,  Eric R.
5  FRARESSO, Marino
GARDNER, Joseph A. F.
3 GARSTIN,  L.  H.
5  GAYTON,   Mrs.   R.  T.
(nee Adrienne Collins)
4 GERMYN, Mrs. Roy
(nee Frances Humphrey)
GREGORY,  Mrs.  A.  J.
(nee Aileen McKinnon)
2  HAINES, A.  R.
2 HANSEN, M. B.
5 HARMER, Mrs. Helen
5  HARTLEY,  Mrs.  Fred  L.
nee Margaret Murphy)
HOLE,  Mrs. John S.
(nee Mary Campbell)
3 HOPE, Mrs.  H. A.
(nee Rosemary Collins)
3 HUGHES, Mrs. F. H. D.
(nee  Lois  Grant)
HUNTER, T. G.
KAY,  Ian B.
4 KENNEDY, Janet S. M.
4 KENNEDY, Milton M.
2  KERR S. Aubrey
2  KING, Barbara C.
2 LADNER,  Mrs.  Thomas  E.
(nee Janet Fleck)
LESLIE,  John  D.
5 LIND,  Norman
LOUGHEED,   M.  S.
LOUIE,   Mrs.   Tong
(nee Maysien Seto)
5   MACKENZIE,   R.   K.
5 MacLEAN, J. C.
MATHEWS,   W.   H.
4 McBEAN,  R.  H.
3 McCANN,  Elizabeth K.
McDONALD, Ruth
2 McEWEN, Mrs.  R. J.
MclNTOSH,  D.  G.
MITCHELL,  L.
5 MONASCH,  L.  B.
5 MOORE, John C.
4 MOYLS, B. N.
2 MUNRO, Marjory H.
5 MURPHY,  Dr. Mary A.
4 NEY, Charles S.
5 OVANS, C. D.
4 OWEN,  Gladys
2 PARKER,  W.  A.
5 PEARSON, Jean  E.
3 PETRIE,  Dr. William
3   PHILLIPS,  Mrs.  Roy A.
PRICE, S.  R.
3 PROVENZANO, A. F.
4 ROBERTSON,   Walter  J.
3  ROBINSON,   Basil
ROSS,   Jack
RULE,  Mrs.  J.  H.
RUNKLE, J. D.
5 RUSH, Jack T.
SHAW,  Kenneth N.  F.
3  SHAW,  Mrs.  John M.
(nee Phvllis MacEwen)
3 SIVERTZ,  B. G.
SMILLIE,   Mrs.   R.
(nee Dorothy Paulin)
5 SPRING. Harry C. F.
3 STAGHALL. Hattie R.
STAMER,   S.
STEVENSON, Mr. and Mrs. J. H.
(nee  Doris Pratt)
SWANSON, Dr. A. L.
SWEETNAM, A. G.
TAYLOR,  F.  H. C.
TEIR. John B.
THOMPSON,  Mrs.  D.   E.
(nee Gertrude Pierson)
THOMPSON,  N.  K.
5 TOOMBS,  R. B.
TRAPP,  Nell
4 TRIBE. Jonathan
2 WESTON,  Mrs. Stan
(nee  Isabel Stott)
5 WHITE. G.  E.
WILLIAMS. Maud
4 WILLISTON,   R   G.
4  WILSON,  Leslie G.
ZINK, Leonard A.
1941
3 ALDOUS, Mrs. J. G.
(nee  Elsie Hooley)
2 ANDREWS, A. J.
ANONYMOUS
ANSTEY, T. H.
5 ap ROBERTS, Mrs. R. P.
(nee   Evelyn   Heyer)
4  BAIN, A. C.
BAIRD,  Mrs.  Dorwin
(nee  Verna  MacKenzie)
2 BARCLAY, Dr. W. R.
BEATON, Mary
BERTON,  Mr. and Mrs.  Pierre
(nee Janet Walker)
4  BRUCE,  Graham
3 BUCKLAND, Mr. and Mrs. D. C.
(nee Jean Adam)
BYERS, A. M.
CAMERON, James G.
CHRISTIE,  W.  D.
CLARK, Mr. and Mrs. W. G.
(nee  Marjorie  Jack)
CRONE,  Thomas  H.
DANIELS, Dorothy M.
DAVIS,  Mrs. John
(nee Margaret Worthing)
3 DAVIS, Mrs. Stanley F.
(nee Vivian Thomson)
DAVIS, Russell L.
4 DEARING,   Ina
DIER, O. W.
4 DONEGANI, R. Grant
DOUGLAS, Mrs. Gordon
(nee Ruth Seldon)
5 DRYSDALE,  Alistair  J.
5  EVANS, Stanley
4 EVANS, Maureen
2 GATHERCOLE, Patricia M.
3 GOURLAY, Mrs. D. C. (deceased)
(nee Audrey Reifel)
3 GRAHAM, G. Wilfred
GREGORY, A. J.
5 HAUGER, Alice
3 HENDERSON, Mary E. P.
4 HERD,  B. C.
HEWITT, George B.
4 HOLLAND, C. E.
HOWARD, Gerald V.
3  HUMPHREYS, A. N.
2   KELLY, Mrs.  E.  H.
(nee Valerie Gardiner)
2 KERR, Donald P.
5 LECKY, John McD
LESLIE,  Mrs. John D.
(nee Pat Cumming)
LIGHTBODY,  F. P.
5   LOWE,  Margaret
LOWE,   R.   A.
3 LUMSDEN, Harold D.
2  MACKAY,   Hector
2 MAXWELL, J. J.
4 McARTHUR, James A,
5 McEACHERN,  R.  G.
2 McLEOD,  Mrs.  Clyde M.
(nee Joan  Bruce)
3 MIDDLETON,  F.  T.
4 MORGAN, Dr. J.  F.
3  NASH, A. J.
NASMYTH,  P.  W.
NORTON, Mrs.  R. J.
3 OLDFIELD, J.  E.
5 OSBORNE, W. M.
3  PARKER, Charles W.
PARKINSON,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  R.  H.
5  PATIENCE,   L.   P.
POWELL,   Georqe
PULLEN, M.  Elizabeth J.
5 PURDEY, James W.
5  RETALLACK, Mrs. J. G.
(nee  Grace  Bunnell)
5  RICHARDSON,  Allyn
RIDLAND,  Margaret
3 ROGERS. C. B. W.
SAGE. F. Marqaret
SCHOFIELD, Mary Lenore
5 THOMPSON, R. M.
TODD. Douqlas
4 TURNILL,  E. S.
WADE, G. S.
2 WALLACE,  William
3 WELDON,  C.  C.
3 WHILES,   Dorothv   E.
WILLIS,  Mrs.  Ellis L.
WILSON,   Ruth  P.
WOOD, John E.
1942
ANGLEY,  William  P.
BARTHOLOMEW,   B.
BEECH, J.  E.
BELL,  Mona V.
2  BELL,   H.   R.
BENNETT, J. H.
BENNETT,   Dr.   John
2 BUCKLAND,  D.  C.
2 BURNETT, N. H.
4 BUSHELL, Norman F.
3 CAMPBELL,   Mr.   and   Mrs.  J.   M.
(nee Jean  Thomson)
2 CARTER. Mrs. R. B.
(nee   Kathleen  Augustine)
■>  CAWLEY.  Sheila
3 CRAIG,  Dr. and Mrs. Charles
4 DARLEY,  Harry P.
4  DONEGANI,  Mrs.  R. Grant
(nee  Mary   Lister)
DOUGLASS.  M.  K.
ELLIS,  E.  N.
FINLAY. Mrs. J. G.
(nee Elizabeth Worthington)
3  FLEMING, Dr. K. 0.
FOSTER, Ray E.
4 FOWLE, Dr. C. D.
GIOVANDO,  Lucille
GRAHAME,  R.  W,
GUICHON,  Urban
2 GUNN, J. S.
HAGGART,   Margaret  M.
5 HALL,   O.  J.
3 HILCHEY,  Gordon   R.
5  HODGSON, Joan V.
4 HORNE,   Harry  J.
2 HOWIESON, Margaret L.
JOHNSTON, Mrs. Angus
(nee Gwen  Holmes)
3 JOHNSON,   Wm.  J.
4 JOINER, Dr. Wm. M.
2  KERMODE,  E. J.
KORSCH,   Leonard
LEECH, G. B.
4 LETHAM,  Dr. W.  H.
5 LIDSTER,   Echo
2  LITTLE,  Mrs. Margaret  L.
LOGAN, Jack D.
4 MACKENZIE,  Mrs. John M.
(nee   Dorothy   Stamatis)
5 MacSWAN,    lain C.
MADDIN,  Dr.  W.  S.
5 MATHEWSON,  Peter S.
5 MAYNE, Thomas W.
4 McBRIDE, W. Edward
McCALL,  G.  R.
McCRADY, E. R.
McKENZIE,   W.  C.
McKERCHER, Mrs.  R.  J.
(nee   Betty   Morton)
5 McLAGAN,  Murie!  G.
2 McMILLAN, Jack  L.
McMULLAN, M. Jean
3 MENCHIONS,  R. G.
5 MENZIES,  Dr.  M.  A.
2 MEREDITH,  Mrs.  T.  W.
(nee  Betty MuiO
4 MUNRO, Elspeth
MURPHY, Marion E.
4   NASH,   Charles   W.
4  NEILSON, Nora
4 NICHOLS,  David  R.
5 NISSEN,  Hansi
4 OASTLER, J. W.
5 PATON, Mr. and Mrs. A. T.
(nee  Claudia  Matheson)
PATON, Mrs. A. T.
3 PAUL,  Rachel
2   PAYNTER,   Mrs.   Henry
(nee Sheila  MacKay)
2  PERRY,  Lome
2 PHILLIPS, A. J.
2 PORTER,  R.  Keith
4 ROWELL,  Florence V.
RUMBALL,  Les
SHELDON, Stanley W.
SMITH, Barbara E.
3 SMITH,   Dr.   Eric  L.
3  SPENCER,  Barbara  Ellen
TEAGLE,  E.  E.
2 THOMPSON,  E. A.
THOMSON,  Dorothy
5 UNDERHILL, Dr. Anne B.
2  WALLACE, Mrs. Wm.
(nee Dorothy Hird)
WALKER,  Douqlas L.
5  WHITE, C.  E. T.
2 WOOD, Mrs. G. R.
(nee Dorothy McDonell)
1943 — $1265.66
1944 —        $1375.75
1945 — $1511.00
1943
2  ANSTEY, Mrs. D. G.
(nee Amy Hackney)
ASZKANAZY,  C.  L.
2 AWMACK, Joseph W.
2 BANNERMAN, Donald K.
4 BEAUMONT,  Elizabeth N.
5 BELEY,  J.  Patrick
BENNETT,  John   N.
BERTON, Lucy F.
BEVERIDGE,  I.  Isabel
5 BINGHAM,  Rev. W. J.
BLISSETT,  W.  F.
BONUTTO,  A.   L.
BRADNER,  F.  E
4  BUCK    Dr. F. A. M.
4 BUCKERFIELD, Mary
2 BURCHELL, Sheridan
3 BURNS, Mrs.  David
(nee  Norma   Erickson)
2  CAMPBELL,  E. Jean
2 CARSON, John J.
2 CARTER, R. B.
3 CHATWIN, Leonard W.
CLARIDGE, Mr. and Mrs. C. A.
(nee  Marjorie  Rogers)
CLAYDON,  George
2 COOPER, W. Charles
2 COPP, Stanley S.
2 COX,   Leonard
4 CREIGHTON, John  D.
CROMIE, Peter
3 CROSBY,  Marjorie
CURRY,  R.  M.
5 CURTIS, Alice M.
5  DENNIS, Mrs.  Don
(nee Mary Mulvin)
ELLIOTT,  A.  H.
3 EVANS,  Donald C.
4 FIELDS,  Donald  B.
FOSTER, R. E.
5 FOWLE,  Mrs. C.  D.
GILL, N. A.
GOBLE,  Margaret
GODFREY,  Mrs.  Gerald  F.
(nee Anne Beddome)
GOLDSTICK, Mrs. Marianne Lourie
GOODWIN, Dr. Martin B.
2 GORDON, Arthur D.
GORDON, F. J.
2 GRAY, J.  S.
2 GREEN,  C. A.
3 GREEN,  Mrs.  Philip
(nee  Norma   Drysdale)
3 CRIGG,  Vernon  H.
HAGGART,   Mrs.   D.   A.
(nee  Margaret Gibbs)
2  HALL,   H.   U.
2  HALSTEAD,  J.  G.  H.
HANBURY, A.  W.
HOLE, John S.
HUNGERFORD, Mrs. R. M.
(nee  Florence  Farrell)
2  HUNTER,  Trenna  G.
INMAN,  H.  C.
4 JACKSON,   Roy V.
4 JESSUP,  Douglas G.
2  KELLER, C. W.
2  KER,  Mrs. W. A.
(nee   Ida   Francis)
KERR, C. W.
KULLANDER, M. 0.
4  LETHAM,   Mrs.  W.  H.
4 LIVINGSTON,   Mrs.   D.  A.
(nee Elizabeth Harvey)
2 LOCKE,  Elizabeth
5 LONG, Charles F.
MacGOWAN, K. O.
4 MANN, Clarence W. J.
4 MANN, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. T.
(nee   Daisy   Edwards)
3 MATHESON,   Ian D.
2 McCAY, Mr. and Mrs. James T.
(nee Jocelyn Daniel)
McNEELY, Chas. J. Jr.
McTAGGART,  K. C.
3 MERCER, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. M.
(nee Mary  Dunfield)
MILLER,  R.  C.
MILLS, Laura E.
3 MILLS, Mrs. F.  H. G.
(nee Catherine Lipsetf'
MOYLS,  A.  W.
4 MOYLS, Amy C.
NEVISON, James H.
NORTON,   E.   H.
5 ORCHARD,   Mrs.   Robert
(nee Jean  Elliott)
2 PATTERSON,   L.   A.
REYNOLDS, Kathleen M. W.
RICKETTS, Donald B.
3 ROBINSON,  E. A.
ROBINSON,   Eric  W.
ROCHE.   R.   G.
ROSS,  Florence Mary
5  ROUSSEL, D. M.
5  SCHIEDEL,   I.  H.
SHORE,  Alma  M.
SINCLAIR, G. W.
3 SNADDON, Andy
2  SNIDER,   Mrs.   I.   E.
(nee   Phyllis   Nemetz)
5  STEWART,   Mrs.   J.
STEWART, Hugh M.
SWACKHAMER,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  D.
(nee  Mabel   Robson)
2 TURNER, S. W.
3 UGLOW,  Elizabeth R.
WALKER, Wm.  M.
4 WEED, Joseph  D.
3 WELSFORD   W. D.
5 WHEAT,  Mrs.  J.  A.
(nee Elizabeth Barss)
4 WRIGHT,  Leora  R.
5 YOUNG, Honoree G.
1944
BISHOP,  Marion  L.
BONUTTO,  A.  L.
4 BOWSER, Mrs.  E. P.
(nee Lorraine Large)
BOYD,  Nora  E.
3 BOYES, J. C. P.
BRADLEY, E. M.
2 BUCHANAN,  James  B.
BUCK,  Arthur A.
3 BURNS,   David
2 BURTON,  Mr.   and  Mrs.  John  A.
(nee Phyllis Ney)
5 CARNCROSS, C.  A.
3 CARROTHERS, P. J. G.
CHRISTIE,  Huqh
3 CHUTTER, S.  D.  C.
COTE, Mrs. P. T.
CROSBY,  R.  S.
4 DIETRICH, Mr. and Mrs. F. H.
(nee Elizabeth Ann Scott)
3 DOUGLASS, J. B.
4 EDWARDS, Douglas A.
Page 41 2 FARINA, Charlie 0.
4 FIELDS,  Mrs.  Donald B.
FINDLAY, Mrs.  D. H.
(nee Helen Welch)
2 FOLEY,  Fred  R.
FRIESEN,  E. P.
2 GEORGE, Margaret S.
GITTERMAN, Charles O.
GIURATO, Lino
GODFREY, Gerald F.
2 GOODMAN, J. E.
GREENWOOD, C. G.
GRIFFITHS,  Mrs.  Donald  F.
(nee Muriel Whimster)
GRIGG, V. H.
2  GRUENBERG,  Harry
2 HAGGART,  D. A.
4  HAILE,   I.
3 HOOD,  John  A.
HOOKINGS, Paul H. H.
HUGHES, R. B. Chalmers
2 IVEY,  D.  G.
4 JAGGER, Paul S.
2  LAM,  Andrew
2 LAMBE,   Mrs.   Edward   D.
LANE, W. T.
4 LIVINGSTON, D. A.
MacDONALD,  M. Joan
MacKENZIE, Murdo G.
3 MARSHALL,  Rex S.
2 McDIARMID,  Lorna Kathleen
4 McDOUGALL, Mrs.  Robert L.
(nee Brenda Goddard)
4 McGEER, J. P.
5 McLEAN,  Alastair
McLEAN, Bell Janet
5 McLORG, T. W.
MORRISON, John T.
2  NAROD, Alvin J.
NESBITT, Mrs. W. A.
(nee Barbara Ellis)
NICKERSON,  Darcy
2  NIMMONS,   P.   R.
2  PALLOT, Margaret E.
2  PARKER,  A.  M.
2 PARKER, Mrs. John T.
PARROTT, Harold N.
3 REID,  Mrs. J. M.
(nee Barbara Godfrey)
4 REIFEL,  George H.
4 RHODES, Mrs. E. S.
(nee A. St. L. Reynolds)
ROBERTSON,  Rod F.
3  ROCHE,   R.  G.
5 ROME,  A.  H.
3  SAUNDERS, R. G.
SHAW, A. John
SHUGG, Mrs. A. G.
(nee Mae Munro)
SIBLEY, Mr. and Mrs. J. C.
(nee Laura Macintosh)
2 SLEIGH,  Barry
5 SMEDLEY, Jack V.
THICKE, Joan C.
THOMSON,  Mrs. James G.
2 THUMM,  Walter  D.
2 TIEDJE,  J.   L.
2 TURNER, A. Desmond
3 WALDIE,  Dr. Adam  C.
WALLACE, J. M.
WARK, B. E.
WARNER,   Mrs.  Howard
(nee Winnie Turner)
3 WHITAKER,  Mrs.  John   E.
(nee Muriel McDiarmid)
WOODS, W.  E.
WRAGG, Laurence E.
4 WRIGHT, C. C.
5 WRIGHT,  Dr.  N. S.
1945
ADAMSON, Mrs. J. H.
ALLISON,  Geo.  W.
4 ANDERSON,  J.  D.
ANDERSON,  Catherine Mel.
2 ARSENAULT, Mrs. J.  R.
2 ASHTON,  Harry  E.
2 AUBREY, June L.
2  BAKER, M Anne
4 BARER, Ralph D
5 BARRACLOUGH, W E.
2  BARRY, Frank W.
BARTHOLOMEW, W.
BELL, Barbara A.
BERRY, Mrs. D. K.
(nee Ada L. McLaren)
BERRYMAN,  D. J.
4 BEST, George C.
5 BIBBS,   Richard  M.
5  BINNIE,   R.   F.
BOYD, A. W.
2 BRYANT, J. L.
3 BUCK, Mrs. A. M.
(nee Elizabeth Paulin)
3  BUCKLAND, Mrs. D. C.
(nee Jean K. Adam)
BURTON,  Margaret O.
BURTON, Mrs. J. A.
(nee Phyllis W. Ney)
2 CAMPBELL, Mrs. W. R.
(nee Suzanne  I.  Dalrymple)
CAMPBELL, Gordon
CLIFTON,  E.  H.
COCHRANE,  E. O.
2 COLE, Kathleen M.
2 COLEOPY,  Norman
CREELMAN, E. A.
DAWSON, Mr. and Mrs. J. A.
(nee Moire E.  Keeves)
DONALDSON,   D.  J.
5  ENGLISH, H. E.
FERRY, Mrs. J. A.
(nee Sheila A. McLeish)
FINNIE,  Jack D.
4 FISHER, Mrs. Marjorie P. L.
(nee Marjorie C. L. Smith)
2 FLEMING,  Ormond  W.
2 GOODLAD, John
GREENE, Barbara H.
3 GREGORY,  Edward S.
2 GRIFFITHS,  D. F.
4 GRONLUND, Max D.
4 HAMILTON,  J.   Kelvin
3 HAYWARD, Gilbert J.
4 HETHERINGTON,  J.   D.
5 HEWITT,  Ruth  L.
4 HICKS,  John  B.
5 HIGH, Robert L.
2 HODGSON,  Margaret A.
HOUSTON,  John
HUYCK, E.  B.
4 JAGGER, Mrs. Paul S.
(nee Gertrude H.  Livingston)
3 JENKINS, Mrs. A.  E.
(nee Kathleen W. Farrell)
KELLER, C. W.
4 KERR, Mr. and Mrs. W. A.
(nee  Ida C.  Francis)
KING, J. David
KINNAIRD,  Ellen
5 KIRKPATRICK,  Sheila
KURTH,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burton 0.
(nee Erica Nalos)
LAWLEY, Gordon E.
5 LEES, Sylvia A.
LETHAM, W. H.
LYONS,  Nancy Louise
4 LYTLE, D. D.
4 MACKAY, Mrs. Stuart
(nee Patricia M. Cunningham)
3 MACLEOD, Margaret H.
2 MACLEOD, P. Arnold
2 MANSON,  Marion M.
MAUNSELL, C.  D.
5 McCARTER, William K.
McDOUGALL,  Mrs.  R.  L.
(nee Phyllis B. Goddard)
2 McKERCHER,  Mrs.  R.  J.
(nee Betty H. Morton)
McLEAN-BELL, Janet M. G.
3 McPHERSON, Mr. and Mrs. H. J.
2 MERRY, Margaret G.
MILLAR, Gregory
2 MORRITT,  Harry  H.
4 MORTON, Roy E.
3 NELSON, James T.
NICOLLS, Joan
2 OSTLE, Bernard
PARLIAMENT, J.  H.
4 PHELPS, Jas. W.
2  REID,  Lois C.
2  RUSH,  Mr. and Mrs. George  E.
(nee Anne L.  Bennett)
SCEATS,  H.  B.
2 SERAPHIM, A. F.
3 SHARP,  William M.
4 SHOPLAND, Stella
3 SODERHOLM, R.
SOPER,  Mrs.  R.  A.
STAMATIS,  Patricia
STEELE,  Isobel F.
STEINBOCK, Mrs. Helene
(nee  Helen  Lourie)
STEWART,  W.   B.
4 STRAIGHT, Byron W.
TRUMBULL, Mary F.
UNWIN, Mrs. R. V.
(nee Dorothv B.  Payson)
VAN DE PUTTE, M. L.
WALDIE, Dr. A. C.
2 WALKER, Claude E.
4 WALKER, Wm. M.
WHITE. Loise Allan
WILLSON. Marqaret M.
WOODCROFT, John
5 WYATT, G. R.
YIP,  C. W.
YOUNG. Victor M.
2 YOUNGER,  Andrew  H.
1946 —   $2206.08
1947 —   $2947.75
1948 —   $4452.50
1946
INMAN,  W.  V.
3 AINSWORTH, Allan H.
ALDERDICE, Don F.
2 ASHBY, A. Con
5 ATKINS,  Roma J.
BAKER, W. R.
5 BAKKEN, Ole
5  BARLOW, C. V.
BARTON, George M.
BEWELL, B. E.
2  BLAKE,  Ian S.
BOWELL,  B.  E.
2  BRINE, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph H.
(nee Marion E. Copp)
5  BROE,  Kenneth L.
BROWN, Helen M.
BUCHANAN, Sheila
BUNKER, J. L.
5  BURGESS, J. A.
3 BYERS, Mrs. A. M.
(nee Caroline L. Johnson)
CARLSEN, Alfred E.
4 CAVALIER,  Eva E.
CODRINGTON, R. S.
4 COLEMAN, Robt. S.
5 COOK,  F. WARD
CROCKER, Charles B.
CROMIE,  Peter
CRONE, Mrs. Thomas H.
(nee Maisie P. Borgerson)
3 DEANE,  K.  H.
5  DENNIS, Mel W.
3  DIMOCK,  A   C.
DUNCAN,  Helen
2  EDMONDS,  Mildred
EDWARDS, Owen C.
5  ELLINGHAM, J. C.
FLAVELLE,  Sidney
2  FORDYCE,  David B.
FOWLER, Evelyn
FRASER, Mrs. H.
2 GILLEY, Gordon R.
2 GIOVANDO,  Laurence F.
2 GOLDIE,  D.  M.  M.
2 GRABER, Mrs. H. B.
GRANT, Phyllis F.
2 GRAY,  Neil T.
2 GRODZKI, L. N.
2 GULLOCH, Muriel I.
2 HAMMERSLEY,  Donald Wm.
2 HANSEN,  H. T.
HARDY, Gordon
5  HENDERSON,  C.  R.
2  HETHERINGTON,  Mrs.  J.   D.
(nee Audrey J.  Buchanan)
2 HILTON, H. B.
5  HODGSON, A. G.
5 HOWLETT, S. B.
2 HULFORD, Rev.  E. J.
HUNTINGTON, A. R.
5 JARDINE,   Judith
3 KATAINEN, Violet
2 KEEFFE, John
KENNY, W. E.
KERMODE, Mrs. Ruth A.
KILBURN, J.  H.
KOLBEINS,  H.
KWONG, Wm.  K.
LAKE,  Addison A.
3 LANE, Ruth A.
LANG, Frank A.
LATIMER, N.
2  LAZAREFF, Anne
LETHAM, Mrs. W. H.
LINDGREN,  William  M.
LINDON, Maxine
4 LYLE, W.  E.
MacCARTHY, James
2 MacDONALD,  A.  R.
4 MacGOWAN,  K.  O.
MacKENZIE, M. L.
(nee Mabel L. Hunter)
2  MANZER,  Nobel R.
MARKS,  Walter H.
MARTIN, James P.
MARTIN,  Sally V.
McAULAY, J. D.
McDONALD, Mrs. J. F.
2  McGEER, Mrs. J. P.
2 McGREGOR,  Marjorie H.
McKEEN,   Mrs.   G.   B.
(nee Joan  L.  Clarke)
3 McLELLAN.  R.  N.
5 McLEOD,  Donald C.
3 McLEOD, Huah
3 MEREDITH,  Thomas W.
MILLER,  R.  S. G.
MILNER, Ronald S.
5  MINIATO, Oswald K.
2 MOORE,  Eileen
MORAN, John R.
3 MORISON,  Joan  D.
MOW ATT,  J.  GRAHAM
5 MOYLS, F. D.
2  MUNROE,  F.  Marguerite
MURRAY, John C.
NAIRNE, Mrs.  Ronald S.
(nee Dorothy B. Smith)
NALOS.  Ervin
NEIL,  King
2 NEILSON. J. A. S.
NEWBERRY, Gordon  E.
3 NEWSON,  D. A.
3 NICHOLSON. Wm. V.
2   NICKELLS, R. G.
5 PEATFIELD, John H.
2  PFIRSON.   Georqe   F.
PETERSON,  Nancv
2  PHILLIPS. Jacquelyn N.
4 PLATT.  Arthur L. V.
5 POISON.   R.  C.
5  POO^e   Dorothy
5  PUDN-Y    Peter  H.
2 REID,  William  D.
3 RHODES.  F   <;.
4 RITCHIE,  David M.
4  ROBINSON,  Joyce
2  ROBINSON,  K.   Estelle
ROOTS,  E.  Fred
ROSE,  Margaret  A.
ROULSTON,  Aline M.
4 RUSH, Mrs. Jack T.
(nee Rohan F. M. Peele)
SAGER,   S.   Murray
SCHUTHE, G. M.
SCOTT, A. D.
5 SCOTT, Tom F.
2 SCOTT, Donald A.
2 SCOTT,  Mrs.  H. James
(nee Anita J. Thompson)
2 SERAPHIM, Mrs.   R.  H.
SMART, Catherine J.
5 SMITH,  A.  F.
STEPHEN,  John  E.
4 STEVENS, Don R.
4 STEWART, Donald L.
TEEVAN, J. T.
2 THOMAS,   Blodwen
5 TWEED,  R.  C.  R.
4 VAN   DER  ESCH,  Mrs.   Patricia
5 WALDIE, R. A.
4 WALLER, A. B.
4 WARDROPER, Mrs. W. K.
5 WARRENDER, A. C.
4 WATT, A. W.
5 WATT,   Nancy
3 WATTS,  William B.
5  WELTON,  R.  J.  H.
WHALLEY, Mrs. J.
WHITE, Patrick C. T.
5 WHITTINGHAM,  E.  H.
2 WONG, Wm.  K.
1947
3 ALLAN, M. H.
2 ADDEMS, A. H.
3 ALLEN,  Mrs. Shirley M.
(nee Shirley M. Corbould)
4 ALLESTER,  William  V.
ANDERSON, Evelyn
5 ANDREWS, Ernest H.
ANONYMOUS
ARCHIBALD, R. D.
3 AYERS, J. D.
BAILLIE,  Christine M. M.
2  BALL,  E.  R.
BARCLAY-ROSS, Mignon
2 BARRITT,  Dorothy  E.
3 BATEMAN, G.  M.
BELL, Gertrude Mary
5  BELYEA,  Arthur  Douglas
2 BIRNEY, William J.
BOOTH,  R.  D.
4 BOURNS, T.  K. R.
3 BULGER, T.  D.  C.
5 BULHAK, A. George
BYRNES,  Marguerite
CALDICOTT,  Mr.  and Mrs. A. H.
CAMPBELL, Margaret A.
CAPOZZI, Herb
CARLSEN, Alfred E.
2 CARRE,  Hilary M.
2 CARSON,  D.  J.
CARTER, K. A.
4 CARTER, A. Gordon
2 CHEW, V. B.
3 CHOW, Richard H.
CLEARIHUE, Joyce
4 CLIFFORD, Richard
COCHRANE, Ruth C.
2 COHEN, Jack
2 COLEMAN, Mrs. Margaret R.
2  COLLINS, June V.
2 COTTINGHAM, R.
CRAPKO, Onysia
CREELMAN, Claude W.
4 CRIBB, John M.
2 CROIL,  Mrs.  George  A.
(nee Heather Blundell)
3 CROOK,   Lois  M.
CURTIS,  B. E.
2 D'ANDREA,  Joseph A.
DAVIDSON, K.  E.
4 DAY, John H.
DAYKIN,  Philip
DONEGANI, Joyce A.  P.
DONOVAN, Mrs. Mignon
3 DOUGLAS,  C.   M.
DOWNMAN, Lorna
5 DUNLOP, Audrey
2  ELLISON, Gordon  D.
EMBLETON,  Mrs.  Nonie
FARLEY,   Dorothy G.
FARR,  Robin
2 FERRY,  Mr. and Mrs. J. A.
(nee Sheila A. McLeish)
FLEMING, T.  K.
3 FORD,  Margaret  J.
5  FORRESTER,  A.  G.
FOSTER,  Helen  G.
FOWLER,  C.  S.
4 FREUDIGER,   R.   H.
3 FREWING, J. M.
FUNDY, Walter
FYLES, J. T.
4 GAFF,   Beryl
3 GILMOUR, D. A.
GLUSKA, William
GRAYSTON,  Irene
GREEN,   Arthur  R.
5 GREENAWAY, E. M. Jr.
GREENIUS, Arnold W.
5 GRIGG, Naomi I.
GRITTEN,  Richard A.
GUMAN, P. G.
GUNN, Mrs.  E. M. ,
Page 42 5 HACKETT, T. L. Jr.
4 HAMILTON, Mrs.  J.  K.
(nee  Agnes  E.  Mehling)
HAMPTON,  Robert W.
3 HARE, William A. D.
2  HARRIS, Mr. and Mrs.  Kingsley
5 HAZLEWOOD, D. A.
2  HENDERSON, J.  Neil
HETHERINGTON,  Mr.  &  Mrs.   RM
4 HILL,  A. T.
5 HODGSON,  Elizabeth  J.
HODGSON, W. R.
2   HOLDER,  C.   E.
HOLMGREN,   Eric
HOLMS, David L.
HUDSON, Jessie
HUNTER, A. J.
2 JAMES,  Frances E.
5 JAMES, R. A.
JOHNSTON, Alex C.
JOHNSTON,   William   G.
KENDALL, Gloria  E.
4 KENNEDY,  Gerald  B.
5 KERSHAW,   Dennis
5  KIRKPATRICK,   E.   T.
KLENMAN,  Norman
KNUTSON, A. L.
LAMBERT, Nona C.
2   KOERNER,   Nicholas  T.
LAURENCE, Mrs. R. H.
(nee  Margaret  C.  Wilkinson)
4  LEE, James W.
2   LEITCH, Jane C.  B.
2 LEITCH,   Henry  C.   B.
LIDDELL, Constance A.
LOFT, A. E.
4 LYMBERY, Alice  R.
MACAULEY, A. R.
MACDONALD, D.  Keith
5 MACDONALD,   M.   Allan
4 MACDONALD, Nancy K.
MACDONALD,  R. M.
MacFARLANE, Jean
5 MACKAY, J. W.
MACKAY, M. C.
4 MACKIRDY,  Kenneth A.
MacLEAN, Mrs. Duart A.
(nee Christine M.  M.   Bai 11 ie)
3 MACLEOD, Dorothy M.
4 MANN,  Mrs.  A.  R. Jr.
MARTIN,  Muriel   E.
3 McAULEY,  Dr.  John  D.
4 McCALLUM, Mary F.
McCRADY,  E. R.
4 McCUBBIN,  William  D.
McDILL,  R. C. Capt. W.  A.
3  McDONALD,  Ian W.
5 McGHEE,  William
2   McKEAGUE,   J.   A.
2 McKEEN, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. B.
(nee Joan L.  Clarke)
2 McLELLAN, Harold D.
McLELLAN,  J. M.
MEAGHER,  Mrs.  T.  W.
MILL, Mary M.
3 MILLER,  Donovan  F.
MITCHELL, Miss G. H.
2 MOLSON, David H.
MOORE, Mrs. A. M.
2  MORETON,   Grant   K.
MOTHERWELL,   Elizabeth
MOYLS, C. Maury
NAIRNE, Ronald S.
5   NEWMARCH,   Thos.   F.   R.
2 NICHOLLS, John  W.
3 NIEUWDORP, John  L.
OUROM,  Lorraine
5  PALING,  Freda  M.
3  PATTERSON,  G.  A.
3  PAUL, Yvonne L.
PEACH,   S.  B.
2 PENNINGTON, T. E.
3 PERRAULT, R. J.
PHILLIPS, Frank A.
2  PHILLIPSON, J.
PLATER,  R.
POTTER, W.  S.
2  PRESCOTT, Pauline
5   RADCLIFFE, R.
2 REED, T. Gordon
REAVILLE,  Eric
4 RALSTON, G. B.
3 RENNIE, J.  M.
2  RICE,  E. T.
2  RIDEOUT,   Eldon   F.
RIFFER,  Louise
ROBERTS, Mrs.  G.
4 ROBINSON,   Norman   A.
2   ROBINSON,  Wilbert  L.
4 ROBINSON,  Frederick W.  Jr.
RODENCHUK, Eugenia
2  ROSE, Thomas F.
2  ROSE,  Dr.   David J.
5 ROSS,  Ruth  R.
RUSH, W. L.
SABA,   Albert   H.
SAINAS, Gus H.
5  SCAGEL,   Robert   F.
2 SCINBEIN,  Dr. J.  E.
SCHUTHE,  Mrs.  G.  M.
(nee Dorothy Duncan)
SCOTT, Margaret C.
3 SELKIRK, D.  R.
3 SERAPHIM, Dr. R. H.
SEYMOUR, Jane
SLINGSBY, J. C.
5 SMITH, J. S. D.
4  SMITH, Mrs. A. F.
(nee  Eleanor W.  Mathewson)
4  SPRINGATE,  Mrs.  Freda  B.
STRANG,  Douglas M.
2 SWISTOON, J. B.
3 SWINTON, A.  H.
TALBOT,  Robert
TALLING,  R.  H.
TEAGLE,   E.   E.
THOM, H. Gilbert
4 THOMAS,  Mrs.  R.   D.
THOMSON, A.
4  TORRANCE,  R. J.
TREHEARNE,  Mrs.  T. G.
(nee Hilda W. Hughes)
TRETHEWAY,  Helen C.
3 TURNER,   John   J.
2 VAUGHAN,  Margaret  E.
WALKER,   R.   E.  Jr.
WALSH,  M. J.
4 WALSH,   Isabel
4 WARDROPER, W. K.
WASYLKOW,  Walter  C.
WEBER,   Ronald J.
3 WESTINGHOUSE,  Margaret
WHEELER, John 0.
WHITE,  Mrs.  Patrick C. T.
WHITTALL,  W.   E.
3 WILSON, George A. C.
WILSON, Rosemary
2  WOODS,   E.  J.
2 WRIGHT, Mrs. N. S.
YATES,   Doug
1948
4 ADAMS, W. S.
AITCHISON,  Ken
4  ALLLN, Harry, J. Jr.
3 ANDERSON,  Wm.   Ian
4 ANDERSON,  Reg  S.
2 ANGUS, Anne
3 ARD, Thomas
2 ARGYLE,  P.  E.
2 ARNASON,   Stefan   B.
2  BABB, A.  L.
BAIN,  W. A.
2 BALLARD,   H.   Ray
BAMFORD, Gwen J.
BARKER, Mrs. R. A.
3 BARLTROP,   John
3  BARRACLOUGH,  Lila  P.
5 BARTLET,  A. W.
BARTLETT, J. G.
3  BASSETT,  Beverley A.
BATEMAN, Gwendoline Mary
BEESLEY, J. F. B.
3 BEGUIN, Andre C.
BELKOV,  G.
4 BENE,  Eva
BERGSTROM,   E.
2 BEST, Helen J.
5 BIBBS,   Mrs.   R.   M.
2  BILLINGSLEY,  J.   R.
2  BIRNEY,  Mrs. W. Jack
(nee  Joyce   Bayliss)
BLAIR,  Ruth M.
2  BLAKE,   F.  Gordon
BOGAS,  Ken
2  BOON, Mrs.  D. A.
2 BORTHWICK,   John   W.
4 BRAATHEN,  Hans
BRAMLEY, J. H.
BRANDT,  Beatrice  E.
BRAYSHAW,  T.   C.
4  BRIDGES,  Russell
4 BRODIE, M.  N.
3 BROOKS,  Allan  C.
BROWN,  R. S.
BROWN,  Robert G.
2 BRYANT,   Charles  W.
3 BURCH, Donald A.
BURCH, W. Gerald
BURCH,   Ivan  D.
2 BURNS,  C.  A.
5 BUTLER,   Alfred   J.
3 CALAM, John
4 CALLOW, Mrs. Nora Clarke
CAMPBELL,   Frances   C.
3 CAMPBELL,   Ian  J.
2  CAPOZZI, H. P.
5 CARLYLE, A. M.
2  CHARNLEY,  E.  M.
4 CHERNOV,   Eva
CHERNIAVSKY, Peter
CHOATE, Deryck C.
CHRISTIAN, C. Joan
CLARK,  Douglas H.
CLERIHUE,  Clarence J.
4  CLIFFORD,  Richard M.
COCKBURN, Mrs. W. F.
2  COLE,   Donna  M.
COLLINSON, Mrs. Norman  R.
COLLINSON,  E.
2  CONNER, Orville
COOPE, Shirley M.
4 COOPE, Felicity
2  COTE,  P. T.
COTE,   R.
COWAN, Patricia
2  COWIE,   Lillian  M.
CRAIG,  Alex
2  CRAIG,  George L.
CUMMING, Marion S.
5 CUNNINGHAM, J.  R.
CUTHBERT,  Betty J.
DAKIN, John  Kenreth
DAVIS,   Evan  T.
2  DEANt,   Kenneth  H.
DENHOLM   M.   Pat
2  DtSTRUBE,   Francette
5  DIXON,   Mary  M.
5   DORE,   B.  V.
DREWRY, Neil T.
2 DUNCAN,   Mary   L.
1 DUN DAS,  R. M.
3 DYER,  Lawrence N.
DYRNDAHL,   Lillian
4 EAGLE,   M.
EARNSHAW,   E.  Mary
2 ELART,  Alice J.
ELLIS,  H. M.
EMBLETON, Tony
EVANS,   L.   D.
5 EWART,  tlizaQeth May
3 FALCONER,   D.  M.
FERRIES,  Clarke  H.
3  FISH, John H.
3   FLETCHER,  Alan  G.
5  FORBES, J. Wendell
3 FORBES,   R.   N.
FORREST,  S.  R.
FROOD, David G.
FRY,   Howard C.
GARDNER,   Howard
2  GENNIS,   Emerson
GIBB,  Harry D.
2  GIBSON,  D.  L.
2 GILLESPIE,  Gray A.
GILLON,  Mrs. A.  R
4 GOUGE,  Mrs.  J.  W.
GRAHAM, John W.
5 GRANTHAM, R.  D.
3 GRAY,  Mrs.  L.  C. A
GRAY,   Robert   V.
5 GREEN,   Gordon  A.
GREENAWAY, Jean E.
2 GREGG, Mrs.  H. M.
3 GREIG, J. W.
GRIFFITH, Gwynneth M.
2  GRUNLUND,  Jean
4 GRUNLUND,   B.   E.
2 GYUG,  Mrs.  Helen A,
2  HAAS,   Robert L.
2  HALL, John G.
2  HANSULD,  Mary  K.
5 HARBELL,   J.   L.
5  HARDY,   Stafford   L.
HARRIS,   Dorothy
2   HARRIS,   Mr.   and   Mrs,   K.   F.
HARRIS,  R.  P.
2   HART,   Suzanne   M.
HARWOOD, Robert S.
HAWKSHAW, S. J.
2   HAYWARD,   David  F.
2  HENDERSON, Mr. & Mrs. A. D. H.
2  HESLOP,   Marjorie
2  HEWSON,   E.   L.
2 HEYWOOD,  Joyce
3 HILL,  A.   G. Jr.
HIRTLE, J. G.
HOBBS,  Barbara J.
3 HOBSON, G. W.
4 HOOKER, H.  F.
HOOPER, Grace V.
HORSFIELD,   E.   M.
2 IRWIN,   Louise
3 ISBISTER, Mrs. W.
2 JACKSON, K. E. A.
2  JAMES,   D.   H.
2 JAMES,  Michael
JAMPOLSKY, M.
4 JEFFERY,  C.  B.
3 JEFFERY,   Mary  Lou   E.
JOE,  Ruby
3 JOHNSTONE,  J.   S.
JOHNSON, Mrs. C. W.
5 JOHNSON,   Robert
2 JONES,   Stanley   C.
KAREN,  Walter
KENDALL, C. J.
4 KENNEY,   J.   H.
4 KERR,   J.  S.  S.
2   KLUSENDORF,   Edith   M.
2 KNIGHT, G.  Ronald
3 KNOTT, Douglas
3  LAMBE,   Edward  D.
5 LAMMERS,  R. G.
LANA,  I. Dalla
3   LANDREY,   Mrs.   Elizabeth   J.
(nee  Elizabeth Lang)
3 LARSEN,   E.   R.
2  LAUGHTON,  D. B.
LAURENCE,  Robt.   L.
5   LAWRENCE,   H.   Brooks
LEGG, Peter G.
4 LEITH, Wm. C.
2 LESLIE,   Alexander
LESLIE, Mrs. R. M.
5 LESSARD,   J.   I.
LEYDIER, Mrs. Bernice
3 LIGHTBODY,  A.
2   LINDSAY,   Rod
2 LIPSETT,   Frederick
3 LIST,   Joan   A.
2  LOMAS,  N.  B.
LONGFIELD,  H.  F.
LONGLEY, J. Donald
LORIMER, J. Duncan
LOWES,   Betty  D.
LOYD, Alisen G.
5  LOYD,  D.  B.
2 MACAU LAY, J.
z   MACDONALD,  Mrs,  M.   A.
2   MACDONALD,  H. W.
2   MACKAY,  BRUCE  S.
MACKINTOSH,   M.   F.
MACKINNON, Jean
2  MACKINNON,  R.
2 MACKINNON,  Isobel  F.
3 MACKINNON,   R.   Ross
MACLEOD,   Mrs.   C.   F.
4 MACQUEEN,   M.  Jean
MALCOLMSON,  Susana
MALTBY,   R.  G.
4 MARSHALL   T.  C.
MARSHALL   Dr.   R.   E.
2  MARSHALL'   F.   L.
2   MARSHALL    Robert   E.
MASON,   J.'L.
MASSY,  D. H.
2   McALPINE,  Mary
McCANDLESS, J. G.
McCONNELL,   Catherine
2 McCONNELL,   Dr.   Fleming
McCROSSAN,   R.  G.
5 McCULLOCH,  T.  A.
McDILL,   W..  A.
3 McDONALD,  Leslie M.
3 McGregor, f. c
MclNTOSH,   D.   L.
MclNTYRE,   K.   G.
3  McKENZIE,   Archie   C.
5  McKEOWN,   Robert J.  E.
McKIMM,   Dennis S
McLENNAN,  J.  R. B.
3  McLEOD,   Marilyn   J.
2 McNEILL,   Dennis  N.
McTAGGART,   Mrs.   D.   E.
3 MILLAR,   Perry   S.
MILLIGAN,  Geo.  B.
MILTIMORE, James E.
MUTTART,   M.   E.
2   NATION,   Beryl
NEELANDS,  D. J.
2 NOBBS, Graham W.
3 OLDHAM,  P. A. J.
OLSON,  E.
ORR, Mrs. W.  E.
PANTON, John A.
PATENAUDE, Wilfred H.
5  PATERSON,   Mr.   and   Mrs.    I.   C.
PEART,  A.  E.
2 PERRY,  Frank S.
PIKE, Margaret
5   PILLMAN,  Raymond
PINCHIN,  H.  R.
3 PINCOTT,  Clifford  E.
PRINGLE, Alan  H.
PULLAN,  Edith M.
2   PYE,   Eleanor
REDLICH, Aline
5   RICHARDS,   G.   C.
5  RIEHL,  Herbert
4 RITCHIE,   Mrs.   David
(nee Winifred Johston)
ROBERTSON,   Philip
RODENCHUK,  E.
2  ROFF, Jack W.
2   ROSS,  Margaret J.
2  RUDOLPH, John C.
RUSSELL,   Wm.   J.
2   SABISTON,   Colin
SATURLEY, Michael J.
2   SCARABELLI,  J.   R.
SCHJELDERUP,  H.  C.
4 SEARLE,   Marion   E.
SELFE,  Conrad A.
5 SEMPLE,  Jean  E.
5  SENAY,   Chas    M.
2 SHELLEY,  Raymond
5  SHIRLEY,   F.   S.
SIMMONS, Mrs. G.  E.
3 SIMPSON,   Marguerite
4 SISSONS, W.  J.
SMITH,  Edna
4  SMITH,   Eric  S.
SMITH,   William   H.
4  SNAPE,  M. Anne J.
4   SOUTH,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Don
(nee  Joan  Byrnes)
STEWART, M. J.
4 STEWART,  Mrs.  Edna A.
3  STOCKSTAD,   Paul
3  STOKES,   H.   A.   C.
STOKKELAND,   Margaret  C.
2  STROUD,   Ross C.
2   SWINTON, A. H.
2 SYKES, Jr., Major Paul J.
TALBOT, M.  Kay T.
3 TANNAR, Rev. Norman
2 TANNER,   Aubrey  C.
3 TAYLOR,   Chester   C.
5 TEMOIN,   Maurice
2 THOM,   Margaret
THOMAS,   R.   B.
3 TIEDJE,  Patricia  A.
TIERS,  Mrs.  Charles  A.
TODD,   Mr.   and  Mrs.  Stuart
(nee   Eurince   Reitlo)
2 TODD,   Harold
5 TOMS,   Humphrey
3 TONKS,   N.   V.
2 TOREN,   Mr.   and   Mrs.   C.   K.
(nee  Marjorie  Hinchcliffe)
3 TREDAWAY,  Edna  P.
2  TREILHARD,  Mrs.  D.  G.
(nee Agnes  Brown)
Page 43 TUBBS, Dorothy M.
5  UNSWORTH, Charles
2 VINCENT, Ronald J.
WACE,  Lionel  T.
WAITE,   Peter
2 WALLIS, Mrs. J. H.
2 WALLING, Evelyn Jean
5 WALLS, L. Jerrold
2 WALTON, H. W. G.
WARDEN, Geoff
WATTS,  B. G.
WELBOURN,  Mrs.  Susana
WELLBURN, G. V.
2 WEST, C. John
2 WHEATLEY, Gordon H.
WHITE, Wm. A. T.
WHITEHEAD,  C. J.
WHITTALL, H. V. Jr.
3 WIGGINS, M. M.
3 WILLIAMS,  N.  T.
WILLIS,  M.  E.
WILSON, Alan J.
2 WILSON,  Beverly
WILSON, Catherine A.
WILSON, D. D.
3 WILSON, Mr. and Mrs. W. L.
WINTER,  W.  H.
4 WOLFE,  M.   Iris
WOODWARD, F. A.
2 WORMSBECHER,  John  H.
2 YOUNG, William H.
2 ZUK, Peter
1949 —   $3536.75
1950 —   $2760.41
1951 —   $1834.75
1949
ADAMS,  John  R.
ALLAN,  Gordon  R.
AMY, J. C.
2 ANDERSON, Agnes M.
ANDERSON, Katherine E. D.
4 ASHDOWN,  Mrs.  Jean
(nee Jean Hempsall)
ATKINSON,  C.  M.
2 ATTWELL, L. S.
BACON,   Eileen   N.
3 BAEHR,  W.  F.
BAKER, E. J. Howard
BAKER, H. J.
BALMER, J.  L.
2 BAZETT, Sonia C.
2 BEAMISH Katherine  I.
3 BEDUZ, Louis B.
3 BELL, Kenneth E.
3 BELL,  Fred  S.
BETTS,  W.   E.
BILSLAND, Allan
BILSLAND, John W.
3 BLAIR, Gilbert
BLOCKBERGER,   R.  J.
BOULTBEE,  Mrs. J. L.
BOWELL,  Nancy  E.
BOWMAN, Mrs. Ron
4 BRAATHEN, Mrs.  Pat
BREDT, M.  D.
2 BROADHEAD, Mr. and Mrs   G. C.
BROOKS,  Diana E.
3 BROUGHTON, F. W.
2 BROUSSON,  D.  M.
4 BROWN,  Bruce E.
3 BRYCE, John
2 BURNS,   Robert  L.
3 BURWELL, James D.
2 BYRN, M. Rosemary
CADMAN, Fred W.
CAMPBELL,  Roland F.
4 CARNEY,  Anne
CARR,  Elizabeth J.
CHERRY,   Doug   H.
3 CHISHOLM,  Shirley M.
CHRISTIE, Mr. H. R.
3 CHRISTIE,   R.   L.
4 CLIFF,   Ronald   L.
COLBERT, John W.
3 COLCLEUGH, Murray
3 COLEMAN, Mrs.  Helen
COLES,   Barbara
3  COLLISON, Anne P.
2 COLLINSON,   Norman   R.
COLLUM, J. A.  L.
3 CONGER,  D. Stuart
COOK,   Richard  M.
CORKER,  Barbara   D.
CORNWALL,  Brooke
3 CRAVEN, John  H.
2 CRITTENDEN, A. W.
CROMBIE,  Christopher C.
3 CURRIE,  Robert S.
DAMER, Warren  R.
3 DAY, Mr. and Mrs. J. H.
(nee Norah J. Moffatt)
BENNETT, T.
4 DEWAR,   R.  P.
4  DOBBIN,  Lillian  C.
DONOVAN,   Basil  G.
2 DORAIS,  Leon L.
DRYSDALE, John A. W.
3 DUNFEE,  Donald R.
4 DUNLOP, Robert D.
DUNN, R.  I.
DUTTON,   M.
EDDLESTON, J. A.
EDWARDS, J. S.
2  EDWARDS, Inglis W.
4  EDWARDS,   Robin  W.
2  ELLIOT, Charles W.
ELVIDGE, Dorothy M.
2  ENG, Harry
2 ESLER, John A.
3 EVANS, B. H. Philip
3 EVANS, Marjorie G.
2   FAIRBAIRN,   J.   K.
FAWSITT, Joyce
FERGUSON, Jean
FINDLAY, W. D.
2 FITZPATRICK,   Robert  C.  D.
3 FLETCHER, Mr. and Mrs.  H.  F.
FLOOD,  Joyce
FORD, Barrie
4 FORSYTH, William M.
FRANCIS,  Mary G.
2  FRANKLIN,   H.   J.
2  FRANKOVITCH,   Jerrold
FRASER, Frank S.
4   FREEMAN,  Jack A.
FREY, John  D.
4  FULLERTON, Margaret A.
2 FULTON, W. Graham
GARDNER, Robert R.
GAROM, G.  B.
3 GARVIE,   Leslie  A.
4 GATTENMEYER, J.  L.
2 GAYTON,  R. R.
GELLATLY,   Peter
GEMMELL,  Robert H.
GLADSTONE,  Percy
4 GODFROID, J. J.
2 GORDON, A.  P.
GREEN, Mrs. L. H.
2 GREENWOOD,  Ian F.
GREER,  B. A.
GREER,  Douglas M.
4 GRIFFITHS, M.
4  GUSTAVSON,   E.   S.
3 HAGE,  Keith D.
2  HALL, T.
HAMILTON,  J.  D.
2 HAMILTON, Mrs. M. B. A.
3 HAMILTON,  R.  W.
2 HAYWARD,  Mrs.  David F.
3 HENNIGER,   E.  C.
2 HERRING, Stephen E.
3 HESELTON, Myrl
2  HESLOP, Lorna M.
2  HEWITT,  Peter T.
HEWLETT, C. G.
HICKS,  Henry
2  HINCHLIFFE,  A. T.
HIPWELL, W. D.
HOGAN, John  F.
HOLLAND,   J.   G.
2 HOPKINS, C. N.
HORNE, G.  T.
HUGH, William I.
4 HUGHES,  S.  R.
HUGHES, Eric C.
3 JONES,  Philip A.
2 KAY,  Donald Wm.
KENNETT, Patricia
4 KENNEY,  P. L.
KYLE, George B.
3 LAKES, John R.
2  LAMMERS, Mrs. R. G.
(nee Lillian Lyne)
LAWRENCE, J. E.
LAWSON,  Ben
2  LEANEY,   David  B.
2  LENARDON, Robert J.
2  LEWIS,  Juliette
2 LINDHOLM,   H.   R.
2 LITTLEWOOD,   C. A.
LITTLER,  Alan   E.
3 LIVINGSTON,  Mrs.   Edmund
2 LOCKARD,   Raymond G.
4 LOGAN,  K. T.
LUCAS,   Dudley C.
LYDIARD, E.  N.
4  MacBRIDE,  John  F.
MacDONALD, Mrs. Jerry A.
MacFARLANE, W.  E.
4 MacKAY,  Colin  B.
2  MacKAY,  Ronald  H.
2 MALCOLM, David E.
4  MANN, Arthur Jr.
4 MANSON, F. N.
MANZER, Mrs. Dorothy Mary
3 MARSHALL,  F.  L.
3 McAFEE,   George   W.
2 McCAWLEY,  J.  Douglas
2  McCOMBIE, G.  E.  B.
McCONNELL, W. J.
2 McCORQUODALE, Wm. A.  H.
McDERMOTT,   Nora   J.
4 McLAREN, J. B.
2  McLEAN,  David M.
McLEOD,  K. Gordon
2 McLEOD,  D. Cameron
3 McMINN, Robert G.
2  McNARY, T.  E.
2 Mcpherson, Geo. m.
McPHERSON,  I.  E.
4 MEHLING, Frank R.
2 MENZIES, Morris M.
2 MERRITT, Rex D. V.
2  MILLAR,  Douglas
2 MITCHELL,   Mrs.   William   G.
MITCHELL, R.
2 MOE,  Kenneth  G.
MOTTISHAW, R. K.
3 MOULDS, James H.
3 MOULSON, D. C.
2 MURPHY, R. H.
MURRAY, J.  F.
MURRAY,  E.  Claire
MUSSENDEN,  R. N.
MYLREA,   Frank  H.
2  NIX, Mrs. Slade C.
NORRIS,  Margaret
NUTCHEY, T.
2 OATES, John  L.
4 OLDERSHAW, C. G.
2 OWEN,  D.  R
PAGE, Harold J.
4  PARKER,  Eric  G.
PARSONSON, Violet M.
2 PATERSON, William P.
3 PATTERSON, Mrs.  F. J.
PAUL, D. K.
PAXTON, Mrs. C. C.
2 PELTER, J. A.
PETTICREW,  John C.
4 PIERCE, Alan F.
PINCHIN, Mrs. H. R.
4  PITTSON,  Victor  J.
3 PLANT, Paul S.
PORRITT,  S.  W.
PRATT,  E. A.
PRESTON, T.  B.
PROBYN, Mrs. John
(nee  Colista  Clarke)
PULLAN,   Edith  M.
3  RAMSAY, E. A.
3   RAWSON, Mary
RAYNOR,  Rona
3  REID,  John  D.
RENNIE,  Nancy J.
3 RICHARDSON,   Nenagh
2  RICHMOND,   Audrey   D.
4 RIDDELL, Archie G.
RIDDLE,  James
ROBERTSON, James D.
ROCHE, A.  I.
ROGERS, R. G.
2 ROWELL, F.  N. A.
RUCK, J. A.
RUDOLPH, Mrs. J.  C.
3 RYMER, K. W.
SACUTA,  Norman
3  SCHJELDERUP,   H.   C.
SCOTT,  Priscilla  R.
SELFE,  Patricia M.
SEVERIDE   N.
SHAFER,  Donald G.
3 SHAFER, Dixon
SHARPE, Mrs.  D.  E
SHEARMAN,   Jacqueline
SIEBURTH,  Louise   R.
SIVEZ, Roy L.
2 SLARK,  Gordon  A.
3 SLOAN, John
4 SMITH, J. H   G.
SMITH,  W.  Kirke
4  SMITH,   Robert  R.
3 SNOW,  Dorothy
2 SNOWLING,  R.  G.
3 SOUTHCOTT,  B.  A.
2  SPRUNG,  Douglas L.
STABLES, Allan G.
STANGROOM, R.
STEINER, Robert
STREET, A. V.
2 STUART, Robert John
3 SUNDBERG, Lyall  M.
3  SUTHERLAND R.
SUTTON, D. A.
2 SWEATMAN,  H.  C.
2 TALBOT, B.  F.
3 TAYLOR, Lieut A. D.
2 TECHY, S.
THI ESSEN,  A.  W.
THOMPSON,  A.  K.
2 TOMPKINS,   Neville  C
2 TOWN,  D'Albert A.
TREMAINE, Mary C.
i TUNINGLEY, V. May
4 TUPPER, Marjorie P.
2 TURNER,   John   N.
TYRWHITT-DRAKE,  M.  L.
4  URQUHART,  Gilroy
VENUTTI, D. L.
VERKERK, Rev. J. D.
VISE, Helen
2 WACE, Lionel T.
WALKER, Charles E.
WARE, Mr.  and Mrs.  Dennis W.
WARILA, Mrs. John R.
WARTNOW, Floyd
2 WATSON, Waverlie
WATTS,  K.  H.
WEBB,  L.  E.
3 WEBSTER, Gordon R
3 WEEKES,  W.  H.
WELLWOOD,  E.  W.
3 WELSH, Daynard M.
2 WELSH,   Douglas  A.
WHISTLER, Mrs. A. H.
WHITE, Michael
WILKINSON,   A.  T.
3 WILLCOX,  John A.
WILLIAMS, C. J.
3  WILLIAMS, Dave
2 WILLIAMS, I. Hugh
2 WILSON, G. Rex
WOODLAND,  Arthur  G.
WORK,  Mrs.   E.  M.
2  WOTHERSPOON, A. H.  B.
ZIMMERMAN, H. W.
1950
ABBOT, Shirley
ABERCROMBIE,  E. W.
ADAMS,  Alvin  M.
AITKEN,  J.  D.
ALLAN, John R.
ARCHBOLD, G. J. D. E.
ATKEY, R. E.
AYERS, Mrs. J. D
2 BAILEY, D. Freda
2  BAILEY,  D.  R.
2 BAIN,   A.   S.
3 BANKS G.  N.
2  BARAGAR, W. R.
BARKER, A. J
2 BARKER, Thomas W.
3 BARNES, Edward T.
BARNET, Ian F.
BARRAUD,  M.
3  BASHAM, Joyce
BAXTER,   D.   H.
BEAVO, William A.
3  BEEK,   Graham
BENNETT,  Lois M.
BENNETT,  Marion
BERRY, Marilynne E.
BINGHAM, M.  M.
2 BODIE,  Roland G.
3 BODMAN, P. B.
BOKSTROM  C.
BOYLE,  Marion
3  BRACEWELL, R. G.
3  BRAY,  J.  R.
BREEN, John K.
2 BRIBA, John Phillip
BROOKS,  Mrs.  Fred  H.
BROOKBANK, RCN Lt. A. H.
BRYANT,   Dorothy M.
BUCHANAN, Joyce H
3 BURNS,  B. J.
3  BUTTEDAHL,   Knute
3  CAMPBELL, Marguarette
CAMPBELL,  Mrs.   N. A.
CARLSON, Allan B.
2 CARSON, John A. H.
CHADWICK, C. A.
CHANCEY,  H. W.  R.
CHANT,  Don A.
2  CHAPMAN,  Mr. and Mrs. R.  E.
2 CHERRY, Mrs. Doug H.
CHILD, A. H.
2 CHURCHLAND,  Norman
CLARK, John S.
2 CLARK, Peter N.
2 COLLEY,   M.   Elizabeth
3 COLLINS, David
COLLUM, Mrs. J. A. L.
COOMBER,  H. S.
COOPER,  Doreen M.
COOPER, William S.
3  CORNISH, Norman C.
COURSIER,  Doreen
COX, Dianne R.
CRABB, Margaret S.
2 CUDDEFORD, Robert
CUNLIFFE, S. J.
CURRAN, Joy M.
3 DALY, Katherine A.
DAVIDSON,  Derek
3  DAYTON, F. J.
DE  GUEFE, Taffara
DEEBLE,   E.  Marion
DENNIS,  P.  B.
2 DESBRISAY,  G.   R.
3 DIXON,  S.  S.
DONATT, N. L.
2 DORAN,  Walter H.
2  DOWSLEY, Allan H.
DRAPER,  W.   E.
2  DUNN,  C.  E.
2   EASTMAN, James H.
2 EASTON, M. Donald
ELLIS,  Jack A.  N.
3 ELLIS,   David  N.
ENGLAND,  Leslie  L
2   ENGLISH,   D. A.
ESPLEN,  Robert William
EVANS, Mrs. J.  I.
2  EWING, Walter M.
FEARNLEY,   R.   J.
2  FERGUSON,  W.   N.
2 FISHER, Hans C.
FITZGERALD,   John
FITZPATRICK,  Margaret
FLANAGAN,  R. T.
2  FLOOD,  Joyce
FULTON, Alexander
FYLES, Mrs. J. T.
GALLOWAY, Norman R.
2 GIBNEY,  William   H.   R.
GILBERT, Victor
2 GILLON, Alex R.
3 GILMOUR,  Robert F.
GOODFELLOW,  J. A.  K.
3 GOUGE, J.  W.
2 GOULD,  R. C. D.
GRAVELLE, Henry O.
GREER, Kathleen M.
GUNN,  Ronald A.
2 HAAKONSEN,   Rosaltie
Page 44 HALL, J.  R.
HARRISON,  Nellie
HASTINGS,  Margaret  E.
HASTINGS,  W.  F.
3  HAVARD, Dave
3  HAY,  G.   D.   E.
2 HENDERSON, Melville L.
HENLEY, Angus
HENNIGER,  E. C.
HERRING, B. A.
HEYWOOD, W.   W.
HIRD,   E.  V.
HODGSON, S.
2  HOLME, C. A.
HOPKINS, Jean  E.
HOWARD, R. C.
HUGH, Mrs. Williams I.
2 HUGHES,   Hugh  D.
HUGHES, R.  W.
JACKLIN,   M.  Lillian
3 JENKS,  Robert
2 JOHNSON,  Clarence  W.
JOHNSON, Mrs.  Ross A.
JOKISCH, A. W.
JONES,  J.  C.
JONES, Susie G.  E.
JONES, Evelyn J.
JONES, G. J.
KANIK, S. A.
2 KELSBERG, Roy P.
KENNEDY, Mrs. Pearl A.
KENNEDY, F. T.
3 KER, David N.
KIRKER, R. J.
KIRKPATRICK,  L.  A.
3 KNIGHT, H. A. W.
3   KULBEINS,   H.
KYLE,  D.  S. A.
2  LAMBERTON, Mr. and Mrs. C.  H.
LANE, P. H.
2  LANG, Marvin R.
2  LAW, C. E.
LAW, G. R. J.
LEE,  E. J.
LEE,  Harry
LEGGATT, Mrs.  John   N.
(nee  Daphne  Sinclair)
LEVEY,  Gerald  S.
2 LEWIS, Frank G.  P.
3 LIVINGSTON,  Edmund
LIVINGSTONE,   G.
3  LOW-BEER, Margaret
2  LOWE, E. S. C.
2  MacCARTHY,  H.  R.
MacDIARMID,  John   A.
MacDONALD,   Allan   G.
MacDONALD,  Jerry  A.
2 MacFARLANE,  B.  R.
2 MacGOWAN,  John
3 MacKAY,  R. S.
2 MacKINNON,  Carolyn   P.
2 MacLEOD,   Ian
2 MacMILLAN, H. Allan
MacPHERSON,  H.  G.
MAGUIRE, John  F.
MAHAFFY,  E. F.
2 MALTMAN,   K.   K.
MARSHALL, Mrs.  R.  E.
MARTIN,   Richard  C.
MASON,   A.   Marie
MATHESON,  S.  W.
3 MATHER, H. M.
MATTHEWS, L.  E.
2  MATTHEWS,   Herbert   L.
2 MAURER, Stanley
MAWER,   R.  J.
3 McADAM,  D.  K.
McALISTER,   Louise   M.
McALISTER,   M.  O.   B.
3  McBEATH,   Ian  T.
McBRIDE, R. W.
McFADYEN,  W.   N.
McGAVIN, Mr. and Mrs. W. A.
(nee  Beverley   Roberts)
McHUGH, B. J.
McKEE,  Dr.  G.  H.
3  McLAREN,  James G.
3  McLEOD,  D.  M.
McNAIR, D. L.
McNeill, r. j.
3 McQUARRIE, J. G.
3 McVEAN, Bruce S.
2 MEHMEL, Lucille  E.
MILLER, Olive M.
2  MILROY,  R. J.
2  MITCHELL, John L.
MITCHELL,   Norman
2 MITCHELL, William  G.
MOORE, Donald E.
MORRISON,   Melba  M.
2  MOWATT, Jean G.
MOZZANINI,  John S.
2 MUNRO,  J.  F.
MUNRO,   K.  Anne
MURPHY,  R. G.
MURRAY, W. S.
NIXON,   H.
2   NOBLE,   K.   E.
NOEL,  G. A.
O'CONNELL,  M.  S.
O'GRADY,   Doreen
O'NEILL, W,   E.
OSTROM,  J.  Brock
2 PAINTER, Michael F.
2 PARKER, John T.
3 PATTERSON, F. J.
2  PEACEY,  Arthur T.
PEARCE, D.  L. S.
PEARCE,  H.  G.
PERCY,   Barbara  A.
2  PERRET,   Nolan  G.
2  PHARE,  D.  Rowina
2 PHILLIPS,  James  B.
PIERCE,  Marianne
2 PIGGOTT,  Irene
PIKE, C.  R.
3 PLUMB, W.  N.
3  POLSON, F. Virginia
PUIL,  Mrs. George
2 PURDIE,  James J.
3 PYKE,   Robert   A.
2 QUINLAN, B. A.
RAE, Robert R.
RAGG,  H.   I.  G.
RAINE,  Mr. and Mrs. J.
2  REGIER,   E.
REID,  John  D.
RICHARDS,  Esme  D.
RILEY,  J.   P.
RITCHIE,  A.  G.
ROBINSON,   Helen  B.
ROOTS,   J.   Walter
ROY, R. H.
2  RUDDELL,  Douglas  R.
RUSS,  A.   B.
2 RYTZ,   Arden  A.
SABISTON,   L.  C.
3 SAMPSON,  F.
SANDISON, J. M.
SANFORD,  Travers  D.
SCHON,   H.   A.
SCHULTZ,   A.   C.
SEENS,   G.   L.
SETTERFIELD,   Mrs.   G.
SHARPE,  P.O.  D.  E.
SHAYER,  M.  A.
SHNAY,   R.   C.
2 SHOPLAND, H. J.
SHUGG, A. Gordon
SIMMONS,  G.   E.
3 SMITH, Mr.  and M's.  Ken.  F.
SPEED, R. H.
3  SPROULE,  W.  D.
STARKS, R. E.
STEELE, K. J.
STEINER,   Robert  R.
STEPHENS, Florence E.
2 STEPHENSON, John A.
2  STICKNEY, J.  A.
2 STONE,   John
3 SYSON,   Daphne
TABATA,  S.
2  TALLING,  Gordon T.
2 T ASS IE,  Peter
2 TAYLOR, J. P.
3 TENCH,  Stanley
THACKRAY,  W.   S.
THOMAS, J. P.
3 THOMAS,  R.  D.
2 THORNTON,  R. C. G.
2 TREILHARD,   D.  G.
TREWIN,   H.   E.
TUCKER, Mrs. Frances K.
UNWIN,  R. V.
3 WATSON,   Harry  M.
2 WELK,   S.  A.
WEST,   D.   R.
WHEELER, Shelagh
WHIMSTER, Lois Ann
WHISTLER,   A.   H.
WIDMEYER,   R.  W.
2  WILDE, W. H. A.
2 WILLIAMS,  Mrs.  I.  Hugh
WILLS,   Dorothy   E.
2 WINTER,  Margaret G.   B.
WOOD,  H.  J.
WORAM, G.   F.
3 WORSLEY, G. N.
WYLLIE,   P.
3  YOUNG,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  R.  1.
2 ZACHARIAS,  N. C.
1951
AFFLECK,  Margaret  N.
ALLMAN,  J.  J.
ALLSEBROOK,  Naomi
ANDERSON,   Harvey M.
ATKINSON,   Jane   M.
2 AUBREY,   Roland  G.
AUDET,  Anna  Mae
2  AYERS,   Maurice   J
BAILLIES, J.  A.
BAKER, Nick
BAKER,   R.   J.
BALL, Charles E.
BALL, Elizabeth J.
BANCROFT, June Diane E.
BATES,  L.  A.
BELL, A. W.
BELL, Jos.  H.
2  BINNS,   Allan  S.
BIRKETT,  E.  R.
BJARNASON,   O.    0.
BLISS, J.  D. M.
2  BORRELL, Lynn
2   BOWYER,   F.O.  J.   C.
2  BOYD, Dr. John R.
BRADLEY, Gwen
BROWN, Marjorie
2  BROWNE,  G.  P.
BRYANT, J. E.
2  BRYSON, Elizabeth A   E.
2  BUCKLEY, David W.
BURCHNALL, L.
2  BURNETT,   David   H.
BURNS,   Brian  J.
BURNS,   Robert  L.
2 CAMERON, Alexa G.
2 CAMERON,  Donald S.
CAMERON,  W.  O.
CAMOZZI,  Walter  J.
CAMPBELL,  W.   D.
2  CARMICHAEL, J    D.
CARTER, A.  C.
2  CAWLEY, W. H.
CHERRY, Doug. H.
CHETKOW,  B.  H.
2  CLEMENTS,   B.   H.
2  CLERKSON,  J.   Donald
CLIFF, June
2  CLOWES,  Myra
2  COLEOPY, Hugh
COLLICUTT,   J.
2 CUNNERY, W. J
COOPER,  J.   F.
2  CRANE,  Lavinia  M
2  CREERY, L. John
CROSBY,  L.  O.
CULKIN,   R.  J.
CUMMING, Beverley C.
DAVENPORT,   Rirhard
2   DAVIES,  Geo.   B.
DAVIS, Elizabeth
DEMBICKI,   H.
DENHOLM,   D. A.
DENISIUK,  Mary A.
2  DEWEY,  Arthur  W
DIBBLEE,   George
DICKIE,   D.   C.
DOUGLAS,  Mrs.   F.
DRAKE, Clare
2  DUGUID,   Donald  A.
DUMMET, A.  W
EAST, Mrs. W. A.
EDWARDS,  V.  J.
2  EGERDIE,  Russell
ELHORN, H. B.
2  ELTON,   Kathleen
ERLEBACH, W.  E.
2  EVANS,  Eileen
EWING,   Anne   M.
FENTON,   A.   P.
FLETCHER,   R.   H.
2  FORD, A.  Geoffrey
2  FOSTER,   David  A.
FRANKS,   P.  M.
FUKUYAMA, G.
2  GEDDES,   J.   H.
GIGLIOTTI, A.
GILLESPIE, J. C.
GIRARD,  D.  A.
2  GLASSFORD, Betty Ann
GLENN,  Betty
2  GLENN,  Sheila
GLOVER,  Geoffrey
GOLDBERG,  M.  A.
2  GORDON,  Malco m  J.
GORDON,  N.  F.
GORNALL,  John  C.
GOUDY,   F.   G.
2  GREENFIELD,   Barr
2  GREENHOUGH,   H.   B.
2 GREMELL,  Ernest
GRIFFITHS, Joan
2  HABKE, Georqe  3.
HAGGERT,  Wm.
2   HALL,  Albert   D.
2  HALTON,  H.  Noel
2   HANSEN,   Ivan   E.
2   HARDY,  J.   E.
HARVIE,  Carolyn
HENRY, J.
2   HODGERT, Kenneth A.
2  HOLME,   G.   Wm.
2   HOLMES,   Constance   D.
2  HUDSON,   Ian   R
2  HURN,  David  R.
2   HUTTON,   John   M
2   IRVING,  M.  Claire
JELLICOE, Mr. and Mrs. H. C.
JOE,  Edward
JOHNSTON, Alan Ferquson
JOHNSON,   Byron  O   S.
2  JOHNSON, Wm. L.
2  JOKISCH,   C.   R.
JOKISCH,  Mrs.  A.  W.
JONES,  Kenneth W.
JONES, R. Bruce
KELEKIS,  L. C.
2   KING, D.  A.
KNUTSON,  Mrs.  Marjorie
LANGLEY,  Helen
LEE,  Paul
LEGG,  Huqh P.
2  LEITKIE,  Charles  E.
2  LESLIE,   R.   M.
LINDSAY,  R. D.
2  LOGAN, James D.
LOGAN, Bernice A.
2  MacDONALD,   Mrs.   Phyllis
2  MaclNTOSH,  J.   A.   Cameron
MacKENZIE,  Ma-y  V.
2  MacKINNON,   A    Grant
2  MacKINNON,  Donald  C.
MacMILLAN,  H. Allan
MAIN,  Douglas   R.
MANNING,  Donald M.
2 MANSON,   W.  G.   Jr.
2 MARTIN, Audrey M.
2  MATHESON,   Eleanor  A.
2  MAXWELL,   Eleanor
McDONALD,  Mary
McGREGOR,   Peggy
2 McGUIRK, John  0.
2 MclNNES,   K.   D.
McLAREN,   Mrs.  J.   B.
2 McMORLAND, Mrs. I. P.
2  McNAIR,  David  L.
McTAGGART,  A.  C.
MESSINGER,  Mary M.
MILLER,   Dorothy  Lenore
2  MILLICAN,  Margery  E.
MILNE,   Keith
2  MILNE, Leona M.
MITCHELL,  A.   David
MITCHELL,   Beverly   J.
MITCHELL, Victor E.
MONTGOMERY,   H.   W.
MOREL, Freda
2  MORGAN, Antonia
MORRISON, Melba
MUNRO,   E.  Joan
2  MURPHY,   L. A.
NAGLE,  Clayton  M.
NAIRNE,   Ronald  S.
2  NESBITT,   Mrs.   Eileen
NIXON,   P.   F.   H.
NOEL,   Gerald  A.
OBORNE, Howard E.
2 O'BRIEN,  R.   N.
OGLE,  Margaret A.
2  OLSEN, M. T.
PEDERSEN,  Edmund
2   PERKINS,   Frances
2   PERRY,   Edwin  B.
PHILLIPS,  M.  M.
PIERCE, E. M.
2  RAVEN,  D. James H.
REID, Shirley
2   ROBERTS, A. F.
ROBERTSON,   D.   E.
ROBINSON,  G.   Dean
2   ROGERS, Jack  D.
2  RONAGHAN, Georgina P.
2  ROSS,  W.   D.
ROY,   R.  H.
RYDER,  Dorothy  E.
2   SCHMIDT,  M.  C.
SCHRODT, P. Barbara
2  SEPHTON,  Richard
2  SHAW, George C.  F.
2  SHAW, Gerald A.
SHIELDS,  Shirley
SLADE,  G.  R.
SONES, W.  A.   P.
2  SOURISSEAU,  George A.
SQUIRE, G.
2 STEENSON, Gordon T.
2  STEINER,   Leonore E.
2  STEPHEN, George D.
2  STRUTT, Joanne
SUTTON, P. Joan
SZOGYEN, J.  R.  M.
2  TAM,  Ennio A.
TANNER, G. C.
TAYLOR, James N.
TAYLOR,   John   A.
TAYLOR, Gordon S.
THOMAS,   J. W.
2 THURGOOD,  H.  M.
2  THURSTON,   Robert
TIERS, Charles A.
TINGLEY   Valerie
TOLTON, Mrs.  David
TRIP,  Lieut.  O. H.
2  TRITHART, Walter A.
TRUMPLER,  D.  A.
TURIK, Nicholas
2   UPHAM,   Margaret   E.
UTTERSTROM,  Mrs.   S.   R.
VIVIAN,  Richard K.
WALLACE,  R. A.
2  WALLIS,  Mrs.   A.   D.
WALLIS,  G.   W.
WALPOLE, R. A.
WEDECK,   Edmond L.
WELLS,   Richard   E.
WESTAWAY,  A.  G.
WHITN,  Denis  R. T.
WHITHAM,  D. J.
WHITTEMORE, Sheila
WIEBE,   Henry   J.
2  WILLIAMS,  Kenneth H.
2  WILSON,   Marnie   A.
WOLLEY, Dod Wm. A.
2  WOOD,   AArs.   Beverly  G.
2 WRIGHT,  Jack  C.
2  WRIGHT, James H.   E.
2 WYGLE,   Brien
YOUNG,  W.   M.
YOUNG,  H.  S.
1952
— $  642.50
1952
ADAMS, Carl
ALLMAN, J.
ANGUS,   Isobel
ATAMANCHUK, W. E.
Page 45 BAGSHAW, E. Carolyn
BAILLIES,  John  A.
BANCROFT,  John  B.
BARBER,  F. G.
BARNES,  R.  F.
BEDDOME, John M.
BELLIVEAU,  P.  H.
BERTRAM, M.  E.
BLACK,   Eleanor
BLEACKLEY,  Mr.  and  Mrs. C.
BLOEDEL,   Nulalie  M.
BONIFACE,   N.  J.
BORRELL,  Lynn
BRAAMS, John H.
CAMPBELL, Margaret A.
CARLSON,  N. A.
CARRICK,   S.
CARSON,  R. S.
CHATTEY,  Robt.  B.
CHRISTENSEN,  Goldis
CLARKE, W. G.
COOK, Francis A.
COPAN,  D. A.
COWLIN, J. A.
DE  KUIPER,   Elizabeth
DEARING, Enid M.
DENNIS, D. D.
DEVEREAUX, J.  E.
EADES, Gwen
EDWARDS,  Mrs. V.  J.
ELWORTHY,  B. J. Diane
EMMONS,   Kathleen
ESO, Joseph
FAHLMAN,  Patricia
FARINA, Norah
FIDDES,  M. J.
FLETCHER,  Gordon  J.
FOXALL, R. G.
* Business and   Industry
t Associations and Societies
A. P. GARDNER & CO.*
ADAMS, Mrs.  W.  E.
ADAMSON,  R.  M.
ALBION LBR. & MILL. CO. LTD.*
ALEXANDER,   Dr.  J.   D.   F.
ALLEN, Dr. C. S.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY!
AMM, Mrs.  Dorothy  F.
3 ANDREW,   Dr.   F.   W.
ANGUS,  Roy  F.
ANONYMOUS
ARCHIBALD,   E.   S.
ASTELL, Miss M.
ATKINSON, F.  E.
AUSTIN,  Dr.  W.  E.
AYERST McKENNA & HAR. LTD.*
B.C. BREWERS ASSOCIATION
B.C.  FDN.  FOR  POLIOt
B.C. INTERIOR VEG. MARK. BD.*
B.C.   PROV.  CHAP.   P.E.O.  SIS-t
B.C. REG. NURSES AS., Pentictont
BAIGENT,  Mrs.  J.
BAIRD,  Dr. Murray
BAIRD, Mrs. W. J.
BALFOUR,   Dr. J.
BANFIELD, Mrs. W. O.
BARSS,  Dr. A. F.
BASSO,  Mrs.  L.
BEDFORD, Fred
BEGGS, G. J.
BENNETT, Louise V.
BERRY,  Anne  B.
BETHEL No. 7 JOBS DAUGHTERS,
New  Westminsterf
2  BLACK,  Charlotte S.
BLANE,  FULLERTON  & WHITE
LTD.*
BOGGS, Dr. T. H.
BONNEY, Mrs. P. S.
BOOTH,  D.  R.
BOOTHE,   K.  L.
BOSWELL LOCAL B.C.F.G.A.*
BOUCHER,   Dr.  H.  H.
BOWLES,   Allan
BOYD,  Dr. William
BOYD,   Dr.   R.   W.
BOYD, Wm.  R.
B.C.   PACKERS  LTD.*
BROWN,   Harry
BRYSON,  Ruth  S.
BUCK,  Dr.  Frank E.
BULMANS   LIMITED*
BURD,   Frances A.
BURNS, John M.
BURNS, W. T.
BUS.  AND  PROF.  WOMEN'S
CLUB,   Kimberleyt
BUSCH, George
BUTLER,  L. G.
BUTLER, Mrs. N. J.
CALLOW,  Gordon
CAMERON, Mrs.  M. A.
CAMOZZI, Walter J.
CAMPBELL, C. F.
CAMPBELL, Dr. K.  A.
CAN.  PAC.  AIR  LINES LTD.*
CAPLE,   Dr.   H.   H.
CARNCROSS,  Mrs.  E.  E.
CARR,   Ernest  C.
CARROLL,   Catherine
CASORSO, Anthony
CAVE  AND  COMPANY*
FRANKS, Thomas W.
FRASER, Joan  N.
GALBRAITH, Alistair J.
GILLARD, Glenda
GUMMER,   G.   D.
GURNEY, A.  H.
HANSON,  K.  M.
HARMSWORTH,  H.   P.
HARRIS,  Nancy
HARVEY,  S. Ann
HENDRY,  L. J.
HERRON,  R. P.
HEWLETT,   Isabel
HIBBERD,  R. A.
HODGINS, John
HOGARTH, Gordon L.
HOLBROOK,  D.   R.
HUDSON,  Donald  J.
JAFFARY,   Bruce
JAMIESON,  R.  K.
JOE, Hazel A.
JOHNSTON, Lyle H.
JOHNSTON,  Donald  E.
JONES,  G. A.
JUDD,  Philip H.
KEENLEYSIDE,  M.
KERGIN,  Dorothy
KING,  A.  E.
LAMBE, Thomas A.
LANE,   Elva   I.
LANGLEY, Helen
LEPAGE,   Derek G.
LETT, Mary
LIGHTFOOT,   H.   D.
LOOSMORE,  R.
LOWICK,   Ballantyne  A.
MacCULLOCH,   James   P.
MacKAY,  F.  D. S.
MALYUK,   Peter Jr.
MARCHESE,  Irene J.
MARKLAND,  Beverley
MARTIN,  Frank
McADAM, K.
McCALLUM, Bruce
McGOWAN, W. M.
McGRATH,  Dorothy
McLEOD,  D.  Robert
McPHEE, W. Bruce
MITCHELL,   Harold  B.
MOILLIET,   David
MOONEY, Stuart D.
MORE, J.  H.
MORRIS,  F.  I.
MURRAY, John G.  Y.
NICHOLS, Paul
NUTT,  W.  G.
PEGUSCH,   W.
PELECH, E. Lloyd
PEPLER, Erica
PEPPER, Gerald W.
PETTY, James A.
PINSKY,  Bernice
PLANT,   Mrs.   Paul
PLOYART,  J.
POWLES,   Doreen  M.
PUIL, George J.
PURDON,   Arthur  D.
RANKIN,   Edward  J.
RILEY, Elizabeth J.
ROBERTS, John  L.
ROBERTSON, Margaret W.
SCOTT, F. W.
SCOTT,  Findlay  W.
SELLICK,  S. B.
SHUMLIN,   Mrs.   George
SLIGHT, Douglas J.
Faculty Members and other Contributors
3  CEMCO   ELEC.  MFG.   CO.   LTD.*
CHAMBERS,  E. J.
CHAP.   A.D.   OF   P.E.O.   SISTER.t
CHAP. B.P.E.O. SISTERHOODf
CHAP. C.P.E.O.  SISTERHOODf
CHAP. Z.P.E.O. SISTERHOODf
CHARLTON,  R.  M.
CHARLES,  Verne
CLARK,  Donald L.
CLEARIHUE, The Hon. Joseph B.
CLEGG, Mrs.  Bernulf
CLELAND,   E.  H.
CLEVELAND,   Dr.   D.   E.  H.
CLUFF,   Dr.   J.   W.
COBURN,  Mrs. Wallace
COLDHAM,   Mary
COLE, Miss  D.
COLE, D. E.
COLLECTION  FOR  HOME
MANAGEMENT HSE.f
COLLIN,   R.  S.
COOKE,  A.  C.
COPP,  Dr.  Harold
COURSIER,  Mrs.  H.   L.
CROCKER, Mrs.  S. J.
CROSS, Alan
CRUISE,  Mrs.  A.  W.
CRUMB,  Dr. Joseph A.
CUMMING, A. F.
CUNNINGHAM   DRUG  STORES
LTD.*
CURRAN, E.
CURTIS, Dr.  E. J.
DARBY, Mrs. G. E.
DAVENPORT, H.
DAVIES,   Dr.  C.   E.
DE   B.  FARRIS,  Mrs.  J.  W.
DE JONG,   Daisy
DE VICK, Mrs. Vera F.
DELTA GAMMA ALUMNAE OF
VANCOUVERf
DEWAR,  D.
3  DIAMOND,  Dr.  R. W.
DICKINSON,  Bessie S.
DILGER,  Edward
DING,   Chow  Mee
DRIVER, Geo. W.
DUCOMMUN, Mel
DUNCAN, Mrs. M.
DURHAM &  BATES OF CANADA
LTD.*
EASTMAN,  S.  Mack
EASTMAN, C. Elizabeth
ELDRIDGE,  G.  S.
ELLIOT, Dr. Geo. R. F.
ELLIOTT,   lsabelle
ELSEY,  C.  H.
ENDACOTT, W.  E.
ERICKSON  CO.  OPERATIVE
UNION*
F. M. YORKE & SON LTD.*
FAHRNI,   Dr.   B.  M.
FAHRNI,  Dr. W. Harry
FAHRNI,   Mrs.   M.
FARRELL,   K.
FIDLER,   Dr.   H.   K.
FISHER,  J.   M.
FLAVELLE, Mrs. Aird
FLESHER,  E. G.
FOLEY, Mrs.  H. S.
FOULKS,   Dr.  James  G.
FRANCIS, Allan  E.
FRANK   W.   HORNER   LIMITED*
FRATKIN,  Dr. L.  B.
FRIEDMAN, Dr. S. M.
FROST, Dr. H. Maxwell
FROST, Mrs. A. C.
FULLERTON, Mrs. Harold
GALBRAITH, Mrs. S. T.
GALLOWAY, Mrs. Theresa
GANSHORN,   Dr. J.  A.
GANZEVELD,  J.
GARNETT,   Thos.  J.
GAYMAN,   Dr.   G.   R.
GEHRKE  STATIONERY  AND
PRINTING CO.*
GILLESPIE,   Dr.  H.  S.
GILLEY,  D.
GILLEY, Mrs.  R. W.
GORDON, Mrs. R.
GORDON,  R.  E.
GREEN   VALLEY  FERT.   AND
CHEM.   CO.   LTD.*
GREGG,   Mrs.   E.  E.
GRIMSTON, D. G.
GRIMSTON,  Mrs.  G.  W.
GRISWOLD,   Dean   Erwin   N.
GROWERS   SUPPLY   CO.    LTD.*
GRUNDIG,  Alfred
HALE,  Mrs.   I.  S.
HANCOCK,  Percy G.
HANNA,   Leila  O.
HARRIS,   Lawren
HATFIELD,   Mrs.   H.
HAWLEY,  Wm.  M.
HEALEY,  Ken
HEMSLEY,  Edwin
HICKS,  Harold
HOFFMANN   LA   ROCHE  LTD.*
HOGG,   Mrs.   Sydney
HOLDER, Mary  E.
HOLWEG,  A.  A.
HOTSON,  Isabel
3  HOWE,  Rt.  Hon.  C.  D.
HUGGARD,   Dr.  Roy
HUNTLEY,   C.   E.
3  HUTCHINSON,  Dr. A.  H.
HUTCHINSON, William
HUTTON,  Dr. G.  H.
INST.   OF  CHARTERED  ACCOUT-
ANTS OF  B.C.*
INT.   ORDER   JOBS   DAUGHTERS
BETHEL  7f
IRELAND,  Harold  B.
JOHNS, Ethel
JOHNSON,  G.  D.
JONES,  Mr>. Joyce G.
JOYNSON, T. R.
KAMLOOPS AND  DISTRICT
GARDEN   CLUBf
KELLY, L. J.
KELOKA ORCHARDS  LTD.*
KELOWNA   AND   DIST.   HORTICULTURAL SOC.f
KER,  David
KER,  Edwin
KERR,  Dr. R.  B.
KILLAM, Mr. and Mrs.  Lawrence
KING,  Dr.  Ken
KING,  Mrs.  F. W.
KING, Harry M.
KLIX,  H.  R.
KOERNER, Leon J.
KOERNER,  W. C.
KRIVEL, Dr. H.
LADIES' AUX. CAN. LEGION,
Pentictonf
LADY LAURIER CLUBt
SMITH,  David W.
2 SMITH, Marjorie V.
SMITH,   Frances
STANLEY,  L.
STEWART, R. G.
STEWART,  Irwin  F.
STOKES, Rosemary
TALBOT, Sheila N.
TAYLOR, C. P. S.
TAYLOR,  Laurence A.
TAYLOR,   Mrs.   A.   D.
THOMPSON,  R.
THORDARSON,  Lara
TRESIZE,   D.   K.
UMIKER, John  E.
UPHAM, Betty A.
UTTERSTROM,  Mrs.  Sheila
VINCENT,  R. S.
VISSAC,  Jacques   N.
VISSAC, Georges A.
WALLACE,  Mrs.  R.  A.
WASSICK,  Robt.  H.
WATSON,  B. C.
WEBSTER,   Alex   D.
WELLS,   Ray  M.
WELSH, William J.
WHEELER, Mrs. John O.
WILKINSON,  K.  H.
WILLIAMS,   C.   P.
WOOD, S.  David
WOOTTON, Anna F.
WORTHINGTON,   Marjorie   E.
WRIGHT, Douglas A.
YEOMANS,  John  W.
YOUNGER, G.  R.
SMITH,  Mrs. J. H. G.
ZAHARKO,  Daniel S.
LANDRY, J. M.
LAWSON, Stan
LAYRITZ, R.
LECKIE,  Helen M.
LEESON,   Dr.   Lavell   H.
LEHMANN, Dr. Peter O.
LEIR,  Mrs.
LEWALL, E.
LINDEBURGH, Marion
LIVINGSTONE,   Grant
LLOYD,  E. A.
3  LOGAN, Harry T.
LOVICK,   JAMES   H.   &   ASSOC*
LOWER MAINLAND DIETETIC
ASSOCIATION!
MacDONALD,   S.   A.
MacDONALD,   W.   L.
MacFARLANE,   M.   E.
MacKAY,  Mrs.   F.
McKELLAR,   J.   R.
MacKENZIE,  K.C,  Kenneth F.
5  MacKENZIE,  Dr. Norman A. M.
MacKENZIE, Hugh S.
MACKIE  BROS.*
MacLAURIN,   E.   M.
MacLEAN,  Dr.  Keith
3  MacMILLAN,  Dr. and Mrs.  H.  R.
MacNAUGHTON, Mrs. Geo.  K.
MALKIN,  J.   P.   D.
MALLAN,   H.  C.
MALLEK, Mrs. E.
MANCHESTER, G. H.
MANN, A. J.
MANNING,  Shirley
MANNING, Mrs. F. C.
MANTEN, J.
MARSHALL, L. E.
MATHESON,   Angus   R.
MATHER,  Dr. James M.
MATTHEWS, Elmer
MATSUMOTO,   E.   S.
MAXWELL, Clara E.
MAYHEW,   Emily
MCALLISTER,  Margaret  O.   B.
McCaffrey, Dr. j. a.
McCLEERY,   Mrs.   F.   L.
McCREARY,  Dr. J.  F.
McFARLANE,   D.  J.
McFETRIDGE,  Dr.  S.   A.
McGAVIN   LIMITED*
McGEER,   Charlotte. E.
McGILL   AND   ORME   LIMITED*
McGREGOR, Mrs. Norma S.
MclNTOSH,  Mrs.  Phyllis  R.
MclVOR, W.  H.
McKAY, Alex
McKECHNIE, Dr. R. E.
McKENZIE, Dr. A. D.
McLACHLAN,  J.   B.
McLACHLAN, A.
McLACHLAN,  Ross
McLARTY, Dr. H.  R.
McLEAN,  Dr. J. A.
McLENAGHEN, Jessie L.
McMYNN,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  D.
McNAUGHTON, Mrs. G. K.
McVETY,  Mrs. J.  H.
MEAD  JOHNSON  AND  CO.   OF
CANADA  LTD.*
MERCK AND  CO.  LIMITED*
MEREDITH,  BRUCE,  BALDWIN
AND KITTO*
MINNES, Dr. J.  F.
MITCHELL,  J. W.
Page 46 MOFFATT, Muriel
MOORE, Hazell C.
MORGAN,  Shirley R.
MORROW, C. W.
MUNN,  Dr. W. H. B.
MURPHY,  Nita  E.
MURRAY, Mrs. Vernon
MURRAY, R. P.
MURRIN, Mrs. W. G.
NADEN,  Dr. John  R.
NEILSON,   Dr.   J.   R.
NELSON  BROS.  FISHERIES  LTD.*
NESBITT,  Mrs.   Fred  W.
4  NICHOLS, Dr. M. E.
NISBET,  A.  W.
NOBLE, Doris
NORTH   OKANAGAN   JERSEY
BREEDERS CLUBt
O'BRIEN,  Mrs.  R.  N.
OCCIDENTAL   FRUIT  CO.   LTD.*
OKANAGAN TURBO SPRAYERS
LTD.*
OLDS,  H.  F.
OLIVER  BOARD  OF  TRADE,
Oliver,   B.Ct
OLIVER, Mrs. Charles  E.
OLIVER  HORTICULTURAL
SOCIETYf
OMEARA, K.
ORTHO  PHARMACEUTICAL
CORP., CANADA*
OTTAWA   BRANCH   U.B.C
ALUMNI ASSOC.t
P.E.O. SISTERHOODf
PACIFIC PIPE AND FLUME
LIMITED*
PALMER, Dr. and Mrs.  E.  F.
PATERSON, Dr.  Donald
PATTERSON, Dr. F   P.
4  PATTULLO,  Dr. T.   D.
PATTULLO,   R. J.
PAULSON,  Mrs.  P.  E.
PEARSON, Mary Jean
PENTICTON AND DIST.  HORTIC.
SOCIETYf
PENTICTON BRANCH  U.B.C.
ALUMNI  ASSN.f
PENTY,   S.   B.
PHRATERES  AUUMNAEf
POINT GREY JR.  HIGHf
POULENC   LIMITED*
POVAH,  Mrs.   A.   H.
PROFESSIONAL   EQUIP.   AND
SUPPLIES LTD.*
PROVERBS,   M.   D.
PYTHIAN   SISTERS  OF  PENTICTON,   B.Ct
RAE, Mrs. T. C.
RAYNER,   Greta
REBER, Paula R.
REDLAND   REBEKAH   LODGE
No.   12,  PENTICTONf
REID COATES  LTD.*
RICHMOND,   J.   C.
RIFFER, Miss L.
RITCHIE,   R.   E.
ROBERTSON, A. Bruce
ROBERTSON, Margaret W.
ROBERTSON,   Dr.   H.   Rocke
ROBERTSON,  Mrs.  R. S.
ROBERTSON,  W.   H.
ROBSON,   Mrs.  J.  G.
2  ROGERS, Mrs. B. T.
ROOTS, Frederick F.
ROSE,  Carlene
ROSENBERG,  Sydney M.
ROTARY CLUB OF
SUMMERLANDf
ROWLES, Charles A.
SANDILANDS, K. M.
SANDOZ PHARMACEUTICALS*
SCHWERDT,  Peter A.
S. M. SIMPSON  LIMITED*
SCOTT,  Dr. H.
SELDON,  Mrs. G.  E.
SHAW, MacLaren T. D.
SHIRLEY, F.
SILBERNAGEL,   Michael
SIMMONS  &  McBRIDE  LIMITED*
SIMPSON, Mrs.  S.  M.
SISSONS,  Mrs. W. J.
SMELTS,  Mrs. F.
SMITH, John A.
SMITH, Mrs. Sholto
SMITH,  G.   D.
SMUIM, Lorenzo
SOLLY, Ivor
SOUTHERN CO-OP.  EXCHANGE,
OLIVER,  B.C.*
STARR,   Dr.  D.   E.
STEUART,  F. M.
4 STEVENS,  Hon. H.  H.
SUMMERLAND  BRANCH   No.   22
CAN. LEGION,  B.E.S.L.f
SUTHERLAND, Mrs. J.  K.
SWAN, Ernest
TAIT, Eric M.
TAM, Giuseppe
TANEMURA,   A.   I.
TAPP, Cecil
TAYLOR,   Lionel   E.
TAYLOR, Dr. W.  Ronald
TAYLOR,  Dr.  H.  E.
TERMAN, Dean F. E.
THE BANKHEAD ORCHARDS CO.
LTD.*
THICKE,  Mrs.  Claude S.
THOMPSON, Mrs. C.  E.
THOMSON, Dr. Frank B.
THURSTON, Mrs.  F.  R.
TINGLEY,   B.  A.
TITCHMARSH,  E. A.
TOWGOOD, J. Y.
TOWGOOD, Thomas S.
TRAIL   BRANCH   U.B.C.   ALUMNI
ASSN.f
TRUAX,   Dr.   W.
TURNBULL, J.
TLSOE, Charles W.
U.B.C. ALUMNI ASSN.,
VICTORIA AND DIST.f
UNIVERSITY  WOMEN'S   CLUB,
REVELSTOKEf
VAN.  ALUMNAE CLUB  OF ZETA
TAU ALPHAf
VAN   DER  HOOP,  John
VAN.   NAT.  COUNCIL  JEWISH
WOMEN OF CANADA!
VAN   ROECHOUDT,   L.   L.
2   VANCOUVER WOMEN'S   LIBERAL
CLUBt
VANCOUVER   ICE AND COLD
STORAGE LTD.*
VERNON   ORCHARDS   LTD.*
VICTORIA   HOME   ECONOMICS
ASSOCIATION!
WALKER, Dr. J.  E.
WALLACE,   Dr.  A.  W.
2 WALLACE, W. S.
WALTERS   LIMITED*
WARD,  W.  F.
WARK,  A.  E.
WASTELL, Mrs.  Fred
WATSON, Chas.  M.
WATT,  George  M.
WEAVER,  Dean  M.  M.
WEIGHTON,   Archibald
WELSH,  Mrs.  M.   F.
WESBROOK,   Mrs.   F.  F.
WESTMINSTER HOG FUELS LTD.*
WHIMSTER,   W.
WHITE,   Mae   E.
WHYTE,   Mrs.   M.   M.
WHYTE, William A.
WIDDESS,   W.
WILCOX, Georqe F.
WILFORD,   P.   E.
WILLIAMS,  Dr.  D.  H.
WILLIS,   H.  A.
WILLOUGHBY,  C. J.  M.
WILSON,  J.  V.  H.
WILSON,  Harvey
WILSON,  R. M.
WINOKA  CO.  OPERATIVE
EXCHANGE*
WINSLOW,  Mr.  and Mrs.  R.  M.
WOMEN'S UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETYf
5 WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY CLUBt
WOOD,  S.  N.
WORSFOLD, J.  H. T.
WRIGHT, Janie
WRIGHT,  W.  H.
XI  ALPHA CHAPTER OF BETA
SIGMA PHIf
ZELDOWICZ, Dr. L.
Coronation Medal Awards
Coronation Medals have been awarded as follows to members of the University of British
Columbia: Chancellor Lett. President MacKenzie.
Dean Gunning. Dean Fagles. Dean Curtis. Dean
Allen, Dean Matthews, Dean Weaver, Dean Angus,
Dean Gage, Dean Mawdsley. Dean Andrew, Professor Hunter C. Lewis. Professor Gordon M.
Shrum, Professor W. A. Clemens, L.-Comdr. Frank
Turner, Squadron Leader Ray Herbert, D.F.C, and
to the Principals of the Affiliated Colleges. Dr. \Y.
Harry Hickman, Rev. W. S. Taylor, D.D., and Rev.
W. A. Ferguson, D.D.
TH E    FACU LTY Continued from Page 30
of the Institute held in Saskatoon. Presentation of
the Fellowship Certificate to Dr. Barss was made
on October 26th at a meeting of the A.I.C., Vancouver Branch.
Professor Geoffrey Davies of the Department of
History attended a Conference on Commonwealth
Studies held under the auspices of the British
Council at Christ Church, Oxford, from 29th June
to 11th July this summer. All countries of the Commonwealth, including the .Asian members, were
represented, with the many colonial territories. Professor Davies read a paper at the Conference.
Dr. Fade MacPhee. Director of the U.B.C.
School of Commerce, is currently conducting a 16-
week evening course at the University in the basic
principles of Advertising.
Professor Fmeritus F. A. Lloyd, who retired last
year as Head of the Poultrv Husbandry Department, has accepted a position with a large Poultry
Co-operative at Petaluma, California, where he will
direct the breeding programme.
Dean Walter Gage, this year's recipient of the
Great Trekker award, was presented with the handsome replica of the Cairn at half-time in the Fastern
Washington-Thunderbird game on Saturday, October 24th. The presentation was made by Tvan Feltham. Alma Mater Society  President.
HISTORY   OF   CHRISTIANITY
Lectures by Dr. John W. Grant, Professor of Church History at
Union College, will resume on January 12th at 12:30 p.m. in
Room 204, Arts Buildinn: the series of ten lectures is on "The
Influence of Christianity  upon  the Civilizations of Asia."
jv   "^ ■
Now YOU can take
your own exciting three dimension
color pictures of family, home and
friends! We want you to use the
amazing new View-Master Personal Stereo Camera...to see how
easy it is to take fascinating "come
to life" stereo pictures. THERE'S
NO OBLIGATION TO
BUY. Make a date to try
the View-Master Stereo
Camera... TOD AY I
J
A Perfect Gift - $199.50
Easy Terms
787   Hornby
at Robson
Dick Dowrey
Commerce '40
Phone
TA.  2467
Page 47 ALLAN McLEAN HURST
In Memoriam
By Paul N. Whitley, B.A. '22
(Paul N. Whitley is Principal of Lord Byng High
School. He served in the Canadian Infantry and was
wounded in World War I. After the war he entered
U.B.C. where he was Editor-in-Chief of Publications in
1920-21 and Alma Mater Society President in 1921-22.
After short periods of teaching in Kamloops, Vernon and
Magee High School he was for 22 years Principal of Point
Grey Junior High School. He is a Past-President of the
Alumni Association and of the B.C. Teachers' Federation.
During World War II he was for two years in charge of
Army  Education,   Pacific   Command.—Ed.)
One of the outstanding students
and leaders of the
sixth class gradu-
a t e d from this
University w a s
Allan McLean
Hurst. When the
class of "22 held
its Graduation
Dinner in the Citizens' Club on the
top floor of the
Vancouver Block
on May 4. 1922,
Allan was Master
of Ceremonies.
The Arts students
made him their
permanent class
president.
The U. B. C.
Book of Service
for World War 1
states that he enlisted as a private
in March, 1916,
with the B. C.
Company of the
196th Western
Universities Battalion. It is recorded that he became a sergeant
in three months
and a sergeant-major two months later. Reverting
to the ranks he went from England to France where
he was severely wounded.
In the last war the Y.M.C.A. wanted a suitable
man to direct their services on the Air Force Stations in Pacific Command. Their choice was Mr.
A. McL. Hurst. So exceedingly well did he fill this
position that he was retained in their service and
sent to Toronto where he compiled the history of
the Y.M.C.A. War Services for Canada and the
Overseas countries.
The teaching profession attracted Allan. It was
here that he proved himself an excellent instructor
and administrator, always giving freely of his time
and himself in the interest of students.
This man of service to his fellowmen died suddenly, possibly not without secret warning to himself for he never really recovered from his war
wounds. His passing leaves us stunned. "No, not
Allan," "It just can't be true," are the first reactions
we   experience.    It   is   true,   for   there   comes  into
ALLAN McLEAN HURST
focus in our minds all that he meant to us, to his
host of friends, and to his colleagues.
The Hurst family moved from Bruce County,
Ontario, to Vancouver when Allan was but eight
years of age. They resided in the Grandview district where it was natural that he attend the
Britannia High School as he grew up. It was in
this school that he came under the influence of Mr.
T. A. Brough and the late John Dunning especially
in the field of language study.
World War I demanded the attention of young
men such as Al. He responded by enlisting in the
Western Universities Battalion. He worked at
soldiering as he did at everything he undertook. His
reward was rapid promotion. When the B.C.. Company bade farewell to Vancouver under command
of the late Major R. W. Brock, Sergeant-Major
Hurst was the senior non-commissioned officer.
Service on the firing line was the objective of every
volunteer. Reverting to the ranks in England, Allan
was soon in France with the 7th Battalion. On
September 27, 1918, he was wounded, later being
discharged in Canada.
As a young veteran, ex-soldier Hurst soon established himself as a student leader in the infant
University of British Columbia with the class of
Arts '22. In Philosophy and in English he set the
pace. He won the distinction of being the first
to graduate with honours in this field of activity.
Not only in scholarship did he excel but also was
this true in the life of the student body.
"Hurst, rugby man and president of the Men's
Lit.," "The man of many inches," for he was quite
tall, is his description in the 1921 Annual. In those
days the Glee Cbib was a leading activity. Al was
one of the reasons. His "Muck-a-muck" page in
the Ubyssey, both caustic and humorous gave the
"shacks" a life-like quality not always free from
Faculty criticism. It was said that "He taught us
philosophy and vain deceit."
Air. Hurst was amongst the first post-war graduates to study teacher training at the Vancouver
Normal School. School-teacher Hurst served in a
Vancouver Elementary School for a short time prior
to a H.gh School appointment which took him to
Armstrong for three years. Allan then became
principal of the Revelstoke High School until 1940
when he was granted leave of absence to take
charge of the Y.M.C.A. War Services in Pacific
Command. During this period of leave one of his
more noteworthy accomplishments was the erection
of a building for AVar Services, later to become the
present Community Centre in Prince Rupert. His
interest in this Northern coast city no doubt influenced his decision when he accepted an appointment as principal of the Booth Memorial High
School. Throughout his teaching career Mr. Hurst
actively supported teacher organizations. His logical argument, sound advice and rare wit will be
missed in the convention halls when teachers gather
in the future to consider their varied problems.
Tf medals were given for service beyond the line
of duty for an interest in community work, Al would
be one to qualify. He ran an excellent school, participated in local service clubs, sports organizations,
Chamber of Commerce and the Canadian Legion.
Fitting tribute was paid to his work when services were conducted in the Prince Rupert Civic
Centre with which he had had so much to do. Also
a Memorial Service by the staff and students of
Booth Memorial School indicated the esteem and
Page 48 regard in which he was held by the young people
of the northern city. In Vancouver services were
conducted by the Rev. Harry Lennox at Simmons
and McBride Funeral Parlours. Here his comrades
of the 196th Battalion gathered in their diminishing
numbers together with many of his ex-students and
University friends to pay their last respects.
In December, 1924, Mr. Hurst married Ella
Dunlop. Mrs. Hurst now resides in Prince Rupert.
He is survived also by a brother, Tom, and a Sister, Flora. A host of friends extend to them, their
heartfelt sympathy in a time of irreplacable loss.
Dr. Douglas Cordon Mathias
Dr. Douglas Gordon Mathias, well-known Royal
City medical practitioner, died on Thursday, October 29th, aged 44. He was a past president of
the New Westminster Medical Association and
chief of staff at St. Mary's Hospital.
Dr. Mathias was a U.B.C. graduate, B.A. '37
and M.A. '40. He was an Assistant in the Department of Bacteriologv during the Sessions 1938-42,
and Instructor. 1942-'43.
He received his doctorate in medicine at the
University of Alberta in 1946 and he set up his
practice in the Royal City the following year. He
was an active member of Holy Trinity Cathedral
and served on the church committee for four years.
Surviving are his wife; two sons, Richard and
Douglas; a daughter, Joanne; his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. D. G. Mathias of Vancouver and two sisters.
His wife's parents are Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hicks
of the Experimental Farm at Agassiz, B.C.
When you go.
and
Where you go i
is your
C.N.R. AGENT'S
BUSINESS
Your destination may be
near or far — somewhere in
Canada; the United States;
Europe. But your first step
is to consult your C. N. R.
Ticket Agent. He is the man
with all the information you
require.
It's his business — and
pleasure — to help you
with  your plans.
WE REPRESENT ALL
TRANS-ATLANTIC
STEAMSHIPS AND
AIR LINES.
BIRTHS - MARRIAGES - DEATHS
Notes for this column should include graduation pa'ticulars. For the next
issue they should reach the Editor not later than February  19th,  1954.
BIRTHS
To Mr. and Mrs.  Clifford Anastasiou (Joan Barton,  B.A.
'51), a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Arnesen (LL.B. '51), (Lois Whimp-
ster, B.A. '50), a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Dewar (B. Com. '50), (l'at. Henderson, B.A. '51), twin sons.
To Mr.   and   Mrs.   Donald    Erickson    (B.A.    '50),    a    son,
Christopher.
To Dr.  and   Mrs.   W.   L.   Grant   (B.A.   '36,   Ph.D.   (Tor.)
'43), (Ella Kathleen Allen, M.A. '50), a son, John Hugo
Alexander.
To Mr.  and   Mrs.   Harold  Gregg   (Beverley   Bassett,   B.A.
'48), a daugiter.
To Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  King   (B.Com.   '46,   LL.B.  '49),
(Maureen Beck, B.A. '52), a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs.  Jain MacSwan  (B.S.A. '42),  a daughter.
Margot Elizabeth.
To Mr. and Mrs. William T. Mann (Daima Edwards, B.A.
'43), a daughter, Margaret Evaline.
To Mr. and Mrs. Graham Mowatt (Margaret Gibson, B.A.
'48),  a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Gerald O'Connor (B.A. '51), (June Gava),
a daughter, Nancy Elizabeth.
MARRIAGES
Gordon  Anthony   Arnold-Wallinger,   B.A.Sc.   '52,   to  Joan
Margaret Butler.
Clifford Bokstrom, B.S.F.  '50, to Evelyn  Edythe  Stafford.
Richard Grant Bracewell, B.A. '50, to Eleanor Kuth Bowes,
B.A. '52.
Bruce Haddon Carter to Enid Deirdre Anne Young, B.A. '53.
William Gilbert  Eckersley to Alary Teresa Allan. ..
Donald    Robert   Fargey,    B.A.Sc.    '53,   to    Elsbeth    June
Aikenhead.
Malcolm John Finlayson to  Rachilia Rose Yakoweshen.
Dr. Hugh Singleton Ford to Anne Pattullo Collison, B.A. '49.
James Glenn Gates, LL.B. '52, to Irene Henrietta Mjos.
Philip    Boyer   de    la    Giroday,    B.Com.,    to   Yilma   Grace
Gianchiglia.
Colin C. Gourlay, B.Com. '47, to Margaret Ross, B.Com. '48.
Ronald Bancroft Haggart to Audrey Leona Farris.
John   Boyd   McTavish   Ivens,   Law   '54,   to   Olive   Muriel
Treece.
Michael J. Jones, App.Sc, to Shirley-Mae Weir.
Donald Allen McCoy, App.Sc, to Juanetta Mercer.
David    Robert    MacFarlane,    B.Com.   '51.   to   Marilyn   Jill
Osterhout.
James Braynard McGovern to Sally Brown, B.A. '52.
William  Wilson  McGowan  to  Barbara  Ann Johnston.
George William MacKay Murdoch, B.A. '48, to Dr. Monica
Evelyn McMullen.
Donald Richard Nesbit,  P.E. '52, to Helen Cale Papple.
Timothy John Nichols  to  Leona Frances Watts.
Dr. Bernard Ostle,  B.A. '45, to Ruth Jean Lowe.
Lt.  James  Barry Studley Rose to Charlotte Julia  Horsey.
Lieut-Commander John Rose, RCN, to Ruth Weir.
William George Sharpe to Xorene Marvel Mitten.
Edwin Milton Wade, App.Sc. '54, to Nola Richards, B.H.E.
'51.
Deaths
Rev. T. W. Muir, B.A. '48, was drowned between Sidney and Port Washington, Pender Island, on Saturday.
November 6th, 1953. He was a graduate of U.B.C. and
Trinity College, Toronto. He served with the Royal Canadian Navy on a corvette during the war. At the time of his
death he was Anglican minister of the Gulf Islands parish.
He is survived by his mother, who lives at 612 Main St.,
Vancouver.
Flying Officer
flying   accident   at
9th,   1953.    Besides
brother,  of  Powell
two sons.
Nicholas W. Rodin, B.Com., B.A. '47, died at Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A., on October 7th. 1953. After graduation from U.B.C". be studied two years at Columbia University and since 1949 has been engaged in Research in
Political Economy at John's Hopkins. He is survived by
his wife and infant son in Baltimore, also by his mother, of
Cloverdale and a brother at Smithers, B.C.
Robert A. Pegues. B.A. '50, died in a
Greenwood, Nova Scotia, on October
his parents, of Quesnel, B.C., and a
River,  be   is  survived  by  his  wife  and
Page 49 EAT
ADA   E>
CANAD
N5or CAN
EATONS of o
ADA  EATON'S -
' CANADA  EATO.-.
N'S of CANADA  EA
EATON'S of" CANADA _     , . ,       _	
ADA EATON'S Of CANADA EATON'S of CAN ADA EATON'S Of CANADA EATON'S Of CANADA EATON'5 of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATOn a - wn»«i/- t«. «.■.*»• »-~^*-.^- _„.«...,
! CANADA EATON'S or CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S or CANADA EATON'S Of CANADA EATON'S Of CANADA EA"
N"S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'Sof CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S or CANADA EATON'S Of CANADA EATON'S o» CANADA EATON'S Of CANAD
EATON'S Of CANADA EATON'S op CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S or CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S of Qfi
ADA EATON'S or CANADA   EATON'S or CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S Of CANADA  EATON'S OF CANADA  EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S of CANADA  EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S
CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA BATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S or CANADA £A1
N'S OF CANADA EATON'S Of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S or CANADA EATON'S Of CANAD,
EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S op CANADA EATON'S «F CANADA EATON'S of CAN ADA EATON'S or CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of C/
ADA EATON'S of CANADA EATONSof CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S
! CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S Q> CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EA'
EATON'S of CANiiMMBMH|HMMM|MHHlHHHBMHHHIHllllHH CANAD
Of CANADA Of CANADA OF ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^HON'S of
EATON^^^^B^H^^H^^HI^^B^^B^BH^B^^^^^^^^^^^^B^^^BI^^Iil^BI^^I^^BH^^^B^^^^^B eatons
CANADA  EATON'S of CANADA  EATON S of CANADA  I ^^^M ^m)    M W   -    W^TTyV^^^^^^^^rr!^»^M^r^»^B^^»^^^MNAPA  EA
N'S Of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CAN^^^^H ^^^M A ^H WM ^m, W ^ ^A ^^^^TA ■ ^V A#l« ^ ^M A ^H ^ Wl^^B,r CANAD
EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S of ^^^H   ^^V        ^B H ^B ■ W^  ■^WVJ ^^H. «« V  ^  V        » V M        ^^^^BON'S of Ci
ADA EATON'S of CANADA EATON S or CANADA E ATOr^m^mM_^^^KjM± V J^^^^B_^L_^t7^^^^^^^^^^^^/^^^^^ « ^L M^^^_M ^ ^^^^^^Mb EATON'S
CANADA EATON'S of CANADA   FJ)^^B^BBH^H^feB^BI^^^^^^BflHHBlBBHH^^|NADA
of CANADA                        of CANADA                        or CAN>^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Bof CANAD
of CANADA                        or CANADA                         or ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^■^^■^■■^■■^^■^■i^Hi^lHII^BON-S of C/
.EATONS of CANADA   EATON'S of CAN ADA   EATON S> of TANAUACAITWRI O^rRNABA  EATONS or CANADA   EAToN 5 or CANADA EATON'S or CANADA   EATONS OF CANADA  EATONS
.DA  EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S °c CANADA   EATON'S Of CANADA   EATON'S or CANADA  EATON'S OF CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA  EATON'S or CAN ADA   EATON'S of CAN ADA  EAi
■"NADA  EATONS of CANADA   EATON 5 Of CANADA  EATON'S of CAN AOA   EATON'S OF CANADA   EATONS of CANADA   EATON'S OF CANADA  EATON'S of CAN ADA   EATON'S of CAN AD,
?f CANADA  EATON'S OF CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA  EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S or CANADA  EATON'S OF CANADA   EATON'S Of Ct
N'S of CANADA EATON S cf CANADA   EATON'S or CANADA  EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S or CANADA   EATON'S of CAN ADA   EATON'S OF CANADA EATON'S OF CANADA   EATON'S
ETON'S OF CANADA   EATON'S or CANADA   EATON'S or CAN ADA  EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S of CANAOA   EATON'S of CAN ADA   EATON'S OF CAN ADA  EATON'S Of CANADA   EA'
EATON'S of CANADA  EATON'S or CAN ADA   EATON "Sof CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA   EATONS of CANADA   EATON'S OF CANADA   EATON'Sof CANADA  EATON'S °F CANAD
'ADA  EATONS or CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA  EATON'S or CAN ADA   EATON'S OF CANADA  EATON'S Of CANADA  EATON'S OF CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S or CA
"ANADA  EATON'SOF CANADA  EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S OF CANADA  EATON'S or CANADA EATON'S of CAN ADA  EATON S or CANAOA  EATON'S
^or CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S or CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S or CANADA   EATON'S OF CAN ADA  EATON'S OF CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA   EA*
i'S of CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S Of CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA  EATON'S of CANADA   EATON'S of CANADA EATON'S or CANADA   EATONS of CANAD
'ATON'S of CANADA   FATON'S OF CANADA   EATON'S or CANADA   FAT-"—   -             - - ~-           	
Page 50 VALVES, F.TT.NGS  AND  P.MNG
Plun.bina and Healing Equipment
,or & M-* ana e^ -e
,rom OME COMPUTE LINE ^ |-\/*l^ ■—
An unequalled selection of VALVES AND FITTINGS
is offered for your selection in the complete Crane line—
for every power, process or general service need. Crane
brass, iron, steel and alloy piping materials are recognized for
durable and dependable performance. Crane Quality means
long service life . .. less maintenance ... low ultimate cost.
* 1
In PLUMBING FIXTURES, as with valves and fittings, the
name CRANE is synonymous with finest quality—in beauty
of design, durability and convenience features. Bathtubs
and lavatories, toilets and urinals, kitchen sinks and
laundry tubs ... all are available in a wide choice
of styles, materials and prices. Many of these
fixtures are available in eight attractive
colours as well as white.
In HEATING, too, you can depend on Crane to meet
the specific need—a hot water or steam boiler of the right
type and capacity—hot water heaters—standard or
concealed radiators, or radiant baseboard panels.
Whether it be for home or apartment, for school,
church or store, there is a Crane installation
to assure dependable heating service.
Descriptive literature on any phase
of Crane Service gladly supplied. Ask any
Plumbing and Heating Contractor or Crane
Branch—or write direct to Crane Limited,
1170 Beaver Hall Square, Montreal.
CRANE
--i
LIMITED
6 CANADIAN  FACTORIES   •  18 CANADIAN  BRANCHES
 I
Page 51 As the sun goes down tonight...
... it will be the signal for a great spectacle to
spread westward across this broad land of
ours. Millions of people will see it, yet
scarcely one of them will think it worthy of
comment. It is the forgotten wonder, lost
among so many newer wonders. It is electric
light.
From myriad city windows it will shine forth, creatine
its own beautiful patterns in the night, as in the view
of the Vancouver waterfront above. It will stream from
the open doorways of farm buildings in remote communities . . . poke probing fingers of light into the sky
from airport beacons . . . and, everywhere, set about
its task of adding pleasant hours to the day for well-
earned recreation.
Today we have moved far beyond the point where we
light our homes solely for the purpose of being able to
see   comfortably;   we   now   devise   interior   lighting
schemes for each room to add to the decorative effect of furniture and drapes. We have increased
the intensity of outdoor lighting until there is
hardly an activity of the daytime that cannot be
successfully carried on  "under the lights"—
Irom playing baseball and tennis to loading freight cars
and landing airliners.
Canadian General Electric has been in the business of
making electric lamps for over sixty years. It has pioneered a long succession of improvements that have
resulted in better illumination—including the inside-
frosted bulb, ihe new White Bulh with even higher
efficiency and softly-diffused light, and the remarkablv
economical, long-life, fluorescent lamp that has revolutionized the lighting of industrial plants, stores and
offices. In no small measure, its work has resulted in
the cost of good lighting falling consistently over the
years. Not so many years ago a 60-watt bulb cost close
to a dollar. Today you can buy one for about a fifth of
that and yet it will give you much more light.
As a public service, the Company maintains a Lighting
Institute where people from industry, hospitals, hotels,
municipalities—wherever good lighting is needed—
may learn all that is newest and best in lighting practice.
Long a leader in lighting research, Canadian
General Electric can be depended upon to head
the steady march  of progress towards better.
more   efficient   and   more   abundant   light   to
serv-e Canada's needs.
CANADIAN     GENERAL     ELECTRIC     COMPANY
LIMITED
Head   Office:   Toronto
Canada's Oldest and Largest Electrical Manujactur

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.alumchron.1-0224279/manifest

Comment

Related Items