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The UBC Alumni Chronicle Mar 31, 1951

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 IWU.IZ.e.ALufud
MARCH,   1951 can  y  cut down your
money problems...with
Personal H
Ask for your copy of "Personal Planning"
at your neighbourhood branch ... today.
There's no obligation—except to yourself.
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VANCOUVER,  B. C.
LETTER   TO THE   EDITOR
Vancouver, R. C,
December 24th. 1950.
Editor, "The Chronicle",
208 Yorkshire Bldg..
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir :
For the benefit of the ninety-nine percent of your
readers who have to stand on their head in an
effort to .understand the modern so-called "poetry".
I wonder if you would give us, in your next issue
of the Chronicle, a simple English translation, with
accompanying explanatory notes, of some lines entitled "Driftwood", appearing in the December
number?
Thank goodness I received my education in the
days when anyone with half a brain could understand, and rather enjoy, poetry. If this is the sort of
thing the students of today have to face in their
English course, is it any wonder that so main- of
them dread the English examinations?
I'd like to sign my name to this letter, but as
I have relatives at U.B.C, it might prove embarrassing to them.
—"Behind the Times"
Remember U. B. C. in Your Will
( Beloir is a form of Codicil which can be filled in
by an gone irho -wishes to leave a bequest to the Ini-
rersity and hasn't done no in their trill. Fill in the
Codicil, hare it witnessed by TWO persons, and .tend
to Alumni Office. Brock Building, C.B.C.)
THTS IS A CODICIL to the last Will and Testament of me...   ., of
    of
the Citv of Vancouver, Province of British Columbia, which said Last Will and Testament was made
the day of   in
the year of our Lord	
I GIVE AXD BEQUEATH the U.B.C.-Alumni
Development Fund the sum of $	
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set
my hand  this -day of ,	
in the year of our Lord, One Thousand, Nine Hundred and  Fifty-one.
SIGNED. PUBLISHED
and DECLARED by the
above-named    ,
the Testat as a Codicil   to   his   last   Will   and
Testament  dated the	
day of  19....,
in the presence of us both
being present at the same
time who at his request
and in his presence and in
the presence of each other
have hereunto subscribed
our names as witnesses.
MARCH, 1951
Page 3 "Now I want your
advice, Jim"
When a bank manager wants advice on
subjects like health, plumbing or the
behaviour of his automobile engine, he
goes to men with special training. And
when they, in turn, need advice about
finances, they come to him.
Your Royal Bank manager has had
long and wide experience in dealing with
people's money problems both business
and personal. Don't hesitate to call on
him. He will be glad to help you in every
way he can.
The Royal Bank in your community is there to
serve you in many ways. Perhaps you do not
realize that:
... if you find it inconvenient to visit the bank,
you can still open an account, deposit and withdraw money by mail.
. . . there are a number of reasons why you and
some other member of your family might find it
advantageous to have a "Joint Account".
. . . when you are going away, you can obtain
from us Travellers Cheques which are a safe way
to carry money.
... if you have valuable papers—and who has
not?—you can rent a Safe Deposit Box. It is your
private safe. Not even the bank can open it.
*
Page 4
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
tfotc ccut 6*h6 ok t&e "TRoyaC"
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE The U.B.C Alumni <H    ,/   hO       /
CHR0niCL€
Published by the Alumni Association of
The University of British Colttmbia
Editor: Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm., LLB.
Business Manager: Frank J. E. Turner, B.A., B.Comm.
Women's Editor: Joan Wallace, B.A., "5 0
Alumni Association Executive:
President    James A. MacDonald, B.A. '3S
Vice-President Col. Gordon M. Letson,
B.A. '24, B.A.Sc. '26
Secretary-Manager Frank Turner, B.Comm., B.A. '39
Treasurer G. Dudley Darling, B.Comm. '39
Second Vice-President Mrs. Maurice Sleightholme,
B.A. '30
Chairman Publications Board Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm.
'42 LLb. 48
Past President John M. Buchanan, B.A. '17
Third Vice-President Dr. Henry C. Gunning, B.A.Sc. '23
Members at Large: David Brousson, B.A.Sc., '49; E. T.
Kirkpatrick, B.A.Sc, '47; Roderick Lindsay, B.A.Sc, '48;
Mary McDougall, B:.A., '33; Jack Underhill, B.A., '24;
Doug. Sutcliff; Harry A. Berry, B.A., B.Comm., '37; Dr.
Fred Grauer, B.S.A., '30; Jean Gilley, B.A., '27; Isobel Harvey, B.A., '18; Mrs. James Harmer, B.A., '40; J. Norman
Hyland (B.Comm., '34; Doug. Macdonald, B.A., '30; Junior
Member, Ivan Fettham; President, Nonie Donaldson; Senate
Reps., Dr. Harry V. Warren, Dr. Earl Foerster and Darrell
T. Braidwood, B.A., '40.
Editorial Office:
5th Floor, Yorkshire House
900 W. Pender St. Vancouver, B.C.
Business Office:
Alumni Association, Brock Building, U.B.C.
VOL. S No.  1
MARCH, 1951
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ARTICLES PAGE
Sherwood Lett New Chancellor                                         7
Chancellor Hamber Retires         8
Alumni Development Fund ..._.                       14
A Much Needed Department—by D.  Brock 21
FEATURES:
Personalities   _...  9
Women                             12
Speaking Editorially          16, 17
Frankling Speaking    19
COVER PICTURE
U.B.C.'s beloved Chancellor Eric W. Hamber, retires
after the maximum two terms of office, and this issue's
cover picture's the Chancellor in his robes ... a story
on the Chancellor's varied and useful life is told on
page 8.
The winsome looking gal pictured here
is Joan (Charters)
Wallace, a Ubvssev
fugitive, who graduated in '50, married
Danny Wallace, former Ubvssev photographer, and now a
permanent staffer
with the Vancouver
Sun rewrite desk . . .
Joan is the new women's editor of the
Chronicle and will
fill the gap left by
Mary Fallis . . . she
does this capablv as
the reader will lind
out after a perusal of
her first effort in the
women's section of
this issue . . .
Joan grew up in the Peace River Country of
Alberta and after graduating from high school in
Edmonton, taught school for a year in a one-room
school house in Northern, B.C. . . . U.B.C. came
next, experience on the Ubyssey. three summers
with the Vancouver Sun and now a permanent job
. . . and marriage . . . we welcome her to the
Chronicle.
JOAN (Charters) WALLACE
Puhlishtd in Vtnctuwr, British Columbia and authorised ti second tltus moil
Post Offiu Deportment, Ottawa
THERE  IS  SATISFACTION
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Page 6
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE SHERWOOD LETT ELECTED
UNIVERSITY CHANCELLOR
DISTINGUISHED CAREER  IN  ARMY,  LAW
Sherwood Lett, distinguished soldier, lawyer and
one of U.B.C.'s first graduating classmembers, has
been called back to his Alma Mater to be its Chancellor.
The U.B.C. Alumni Association nominated
Brigadier Sherwood Lett, 55, to take the post when
Chancellor E. W. Hamber's term expires in May,
and as no other nominations opposed the respected
lawyer's selection, he will assume the highest position at the University, by acclamation.
Mr. Lett was elected first president of the U.B.C.
Alma Mater Society and he has never been far
from the side of his University which he has served
with faithfulness over a period of 35 years. He
graduated in 1916 and went as a Rhodes Scholar
to Oxford, taking time out to serve overseas in the
first world war with the Irish Fusiliers and win
the Military Cross.
On Board of Governors
He served as a member of the University Senate from 1922 to 1949 and the Board of Governors
from 1935 to 1939 and he is a past President of the
U.B.C. Alumni Association.
During the last war he again won distinction
and was in the Dieppe Raid and the Normandy Invasion. He rose to the rank of Brigadier and won
the D.S.O.
Considered one of the outstanding city lawyers
and known throughout Canada, he is listed in Canada's Who's Who and has accumulated among other
honours CBE, DSO and MC decorations and DD,
LLD andED degrees and in his own profession
is a K.C.
His wife is the former Evelyn Story, who graduated in Arts from U.B.C. in 1917, and he has a
daughter, Mary, now in third year Varsity, and
another daughter, Frances, in high school.
Commenting on the nomination James A. MacDonald, President of the U.B.C. Alumni Association, said: "We feel that with his wide experience
and long association with the university as a member of the Senate, he will give outstanding service
as head of the University."
Mr. Lett feels greatly honoured and on his
nomination said, "It's especially heartening to think
that the alumni have that much confidence in one
of their own graduates. I expected they'd nominate
an older man for the job."
Graduates warmed to the nomination and election of a man who is held in high regard and much
affection everywhere for his years of quiet and
efficient service to U.B.C. over the first quarter
century and more of the University's history. It
couldn't have happened to a nicer man is their unanimous opinion.
SHERWOOD LETT
A MESSAGE FROM THE
CHANCELLOR-ELECT
March 20th.   1951.
May I. through the Chronicle, extend to all
fellow Alumni and other Members of Convocation,
my appreciation of the honour they have done me
in electing me as Chancellor.
With the guidance of President MacKenzie, the
support of our very loyal Faculty members, and
the good will and co-operation of the Alumni. I
shall do the best I can to maintain the high
standard of accomplishment set by my predecessor
the Hon. Mr. Hamber during his term of office.
Thank you one and all.
Yours sincerely,
SHERWOOD LETT.
MARCH. 1951
Page  7 CHANCELLOR ERIC W. HAMBER
RETIRES AFTER TWO TERMS
BRILLIANT CAREER IN
ATHLETICS, BUSINESS, UNIVERSITY
Eric Werge Hamber has had a life that can be
equalled by few individuals, past or present, for its
variety of undertakings and sheer accomplishment.
Not the least of his services was performed as
Chancellor of the University of British Columbia
from 1944 until Monday, March 5th when he relinquished the position to the newly acclaimed Chancellor Sherwood Lett.
The Honourable Eric W. Hamber. C.M.G., K.
St. J., B.A., LL.D.. was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, April 21st, 1880. He graduated from the University of Manitoba at the age of 18 and entered the
Dominion Bank as a junior clerk and ten years later
occupied one of the highest positions in the Bank
as Manager of the London, England  Branch.
At the age of 41 he became a Director of the
Bank.
His athletic career was as phenomenal as his
professional career. In rowing, football, and ice-
hockey, he distinguished himself nationally; rowing
for Canada twice in International Regattas and participating in American and Canadian championship
regattas. He was a team member in Stanley Cup
ice-hockey matches and Canadian championship
football and was considered in his day as one of
Canada's best all-round athletes. In later years he
participated actively in the Vancouver Polo Club
and took part in sailing regattas, racing in the well-
known yacht Lady Van, he was several times winner of the Lipton and Isherwood Cups.
Lt. Governor in 1936
In 1936 he became Lieutenant Governor of the
Province of British Columbia, and in 1937 was made
a Knight of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem in
an investiture at Buckingham Palace.
His period as Chancellor of the University of
B. C. marked one of the most important and exciting
years of U.B.C.'s history. In that time enrollment
skyrocketed close to the 10,000 mark, a building
program   worth  six  million   dollars   was   instituted
U. B. C.'s  WOMEN'S   RESIDENCES . . .
FLOORS
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and carried to near completion, and several new
Faculties and Schools were incorporated. At all
times he was willing to devote energy and influence
to the many pressing problems of the University;
and even though indifferent health at times made
his task a difficult one, he seldom failed to arrive
at the monthly Board of Governors meetings com-
pletly briefed on the business at hand and eager to
carry the involved procedures of administering one
of Canada's largest universities through to satisfactory completion. The many friends that he has
made in University circles, in the city and the
nation as a result of his contribution to academic
life, both here and elsewhere in Canada, were reluctant to see him relinquish the Chancellorship
after a maximum term of office. Still none of them
in good conscience could have asked him to do
more than he has already done. His has been a full
and memorable life. We wish him well in all his
activities.
ALUMNI   PRESIDENT  MARKS
CHANCELLOR'S RETIREMENT
Chancellor Hamber will shortly retire from
office after serving for a little more than two terms.
The University was to him, not just a casual interest, but one to which he devoted a great part of
his time and energy. He indeed won such respect
as Head of the University that he seems, to many
of us, to be quite indispensable now that he is leaving the chancellorship. The Alumni extends to him
congratulations on a job well done, and wish him
every good fortune in the years to come. We feel
sure that retirement does not mean an end of his
interest in the University, and that we will still
have the benfit of his counsel.
JAMES A. MacDONALD
U.B.C. Alumni Association President
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Page 8
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE iJr
PERSONALITIES
*
The University lost
a great friend and
popular figure recently with the
death of Dean Daniel Buchanan, 70,
who was Dean of the
faculty of Arts and
Science from 1928
until retirement in
1948 ... a witty
speaker, an erudite
scholar and most of
all a staunch champion of the undergraduate and the
University, he perhaps was the most
popular figure ever
to lecture at U.B.C.
U.B.C.
He was a professor
of mathematics DEAN DANIEL BUCHANAN
when he came to U.B.C. from Queens in 1920 and
in that line he gained world wide recognition with
several papers on mathematical astronomy ... his
tall, stooped figure, and handsome appearance will
be remembered  and  missed by many.
CAMPUS CAPERS
Piqued by a refusal of the U.B.C. Publications
Board to allow them to take over the university
magazine for the propagandising of the annual Sci-
enc Ball, some of the Engineers attempted a coup
of the Pub, which failed but had widespread results.
. . . After the shouting had died down editorial
writer Les Armour announced that he might lay
assault charges against unnamed Engineers who.
he alleged, knocked him to the ground and pummelled him during discussions over the paper. . . .
Among other things, the Engineers kidnapped two
campus women. A.M.S. President Nonie Donaldson
and Ubyssey senior editor Ann Langbein, and held
them in a Burnaby auto court until 9:00 p.m. that
evening, locked up four additional Ubyssey staff
members for three hours and "snake' - paraded
through the women's residence at 9:45 p.m. ... At
the Dorms the Engineers stormed through the hallways and reportedly pushed a small English car
into one of the lobbies, and the Engineers wound
up the evening by storming the editorial offices and
College Printing and Publishing Company where
the Ubyssey paper is normally printed, in an effort
to prevent the Ubyssey from carrying on its usual
work.
On the credit side of the ledger, a U.B.C. vouth.
21-year-old Rolph Blackstad, won the $1,200.00
Emily Carr scholarship for painting, and will take
up his scholarship for the year's study, probably
in England following his graduation in May. . . .
Mr. Blackstad's work is described as abstract or
representational, and he is fond of the modern paintings of B. C. Binnings, of West Vancouver.
Also in the students' credit in campus activities
recently was the students' rally to the faculty members' aid in the question of increased salaries. . . .
Led by law student Peter van der Hoop, a student
MARCH, 1951
rally was engaged in presenting a resolution to the
B. C. Government.
Fred Lade, U.B.C. stationery engineer, has invented a device which, he believes, is the answer
to Vancouver's tragic gas situation. ... A special
civic council committee under Alderman Procter
inspected the safety invention last week and the
council is enthusiastic about Mr. Lade's gadget, a
switch which performs guardian duties by cutting
off the gas flow when water is spilled over the
flaming gas spout, prevents any gas from flowing
into the stove when the pet-cocks are accidentally
opened or when a drop in pressure kills the flames.
APPOINTMENTS
Arthur H. Sager, since recently secretary to Hon.
R. W. Mayhew, Federal Minister of Fisheries, has
been appointed executive-assistant to the chairman
of the Salmon Canners committee. . . . Sager graduated from U.B.C. in 1938, served in the R.C.A.F.
during the last war and later became public relations officer for the University of B. C. and Regional Talks-Producer for the  C.B.C.
Harold M. Wright, Vancouver Metalurgical Engineer, is the new chairman of the B. C. section of
the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metalurgv for
1951. . . . He was a member of the Canadian Olympic
team at Los Angeles and is well known all through
Canada and some of the United States.
M. D. "Dave" Francis, Chemistry graduate from
U.B.C. 1949. has won an assistantship at Ottawa
and a fellowship with the Atomic Energy Commission for high marks obtained at Iowa State. . . .
Robert Boroughs, assistant U.B.C. extension director for four and one-half ytars. has taken a position
with the Federal Old-line Insurance Co. in Seattle.
. . . He taught for more than four years at Chilliwack High School and returned to the university
in 1946 as an instructor in history.
J. A. Jones, O.B.E.. of Vancouver, has been appointed chief engineer of the Construction and Projects division. Central Mortgage Corporation in Ottawa. . . . He graduated from U.B.C. in 1928 after
arriving from Nanaimo, B.C.. and was associated
with several large construction firms in Vancouver
prior to enlisting in the R.C.A.F. in 1939.
W. H. McLellan, president of Capilano Timber
Company, has been elected president of the Red
Cedar Shingle Bureau at Seattle. . . .
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Page 9 U.B.C. FOREST CLUB PROSPERS ON CAMPUS
By Ken. Williams, Forest Engineering '51
Chiefly through the efforts of Marc Gormely,
Class of '29. a general meeting was called on March
26, 1929, for the purpose of forming a Forest Club
at the University of British Columbia. Professor
Christie, then head of the forestry department, was
chairman of the meeting. Prof. Knapp, who at that
time was the only other staff member of the forestry
department, gave a great deal of advice and guid-
ace by outlining the aims and objects of the proposed organization.
Marc Gormely (now district forester of the
Prince Rupert forest district, B.C. Forest Service)
was the first president and Prof. Christie the first
Honorary President. Other members of the first
executive included such men as J. D. Curtiss, C. D.
Schultz, D. L. McMullen and A. C. Buckland.
The club was named "The Forest Club of the
University of British Columbia" at a meeting held
March 28, at which time the constitution was also
adopted.
The purpose of the club is to promote interest
in forestry and to establish closer contact with outside interests in forestry and the lumber industry.
This purpose has been carried out throughout
the past 22 years primarily by bringing men, employed in the many fields of forestry, to the campus
to address club members at weekly meetings. In
addition, the club publishes an intimate and interesting year-book about club activities.
Before World War II, club membership was
usually limited to the 5 or 6 graduating class members. Trouble in obtaining speakers who would
come to the campus and speak to so small a group
was encountered, and no large-scale projects could
be carried out with so few members. It was then
decided to include all forestry and forest engineering undergraduates in the club.
However, during the post-war period the club
membership hit an all-time high in 1948-49 of over
200. It was this boost that enabled the club to go
ahead on its own initiative to foster developments
in forestry.
One of the first undertakings along this line
was an investigation carried out in 1947 as to the
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possibilities of establishing a Forest Faculty at
U.B.C. Although the efforts of the Forest Club in
this regard were not entirely responsible for the
setting up of a Forest Faculty in 1950, its efforts
was felt.
In 1948 an arboretum Committee was organized
to exchange forest tree seed with foreign countries,
and to plant seed received and study the progress
made by the different species in our climate. This
committee was expanded in 1950 into a research
committee.
This Committee published its first research note
in October, 1950, on the "Glue Properties of Coast
and Interior Douglas Fir." At present, the Research Committee, has several projects underway
for which the results will be published. Research
done by the committee is along the lines of silviculture and wood products.
In 1949 the club instigated an educational program to send student speakers to the Vancouver
High Schools to speak to the senior boys' class
on the opportunities in forestry work
The Forest Club is doing much to help maintain
the degree of enrollment that was evident in the
post-war years. Club activities are well established; keen interest is shown in them by both
graduates and undergraduates.
We are proud to have
taken part in the
construction of
U. B. C's
Women's Residences
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
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Page 10
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE *
BRANCHES
*
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
U.B.C. Alumni in Northern California held their
annual dinner on December 9 at the Palace Hotel
San Francisco. Percy Barr presided in the usual
delightful manner as master of ceremonies.
Greetings and good wishes were conveyed to the
guests from Dr. Mackenzie, Mr. John Macdonald,
and Mr. Frank Turner. Our ex-president, Mr. John
Buchanan, sent his greeting in the form of a letter
and attractive souvenir cans of B. C. Salmon. Each
can carried on top a neat printed tab showing the
date and place of the dinner, the names of the
officers, and the menu.
During the evening the guests were invited to
describe their first days at school. And this the
guests *<lid to the interest and amusement of all.
At this point, it was learned that Miss Marjorie
Dunton in 1917 was probably the first U.B.C. graduate to attend the University of California.
The mem'bers were asked to support the De-
levopment Fund. A special plea was also made in
support of the new women's dormitories.
The new officers were installed. There are:
Mr. A. A. Drennan '22, president; Miss Marjorie
Dunton '16, and Mr. Harold Offord '24, as vice-
presidents ; Mr. Bryon Straight '45. as secretary-
treasurer; Mrs. Margaret Pickler '22. Mr. Don
Shaw '22, Dr. Oscar Anderson '28, and Mr. Lawrence Prowd '45, as an advisory group.
Those present were: Dr. and Mrs. Barr, Miss
Marjorie Dunton, Mr. and Mrs. Offord, Mr. and
Mrs. Barron, Mr. and Mrs. Hood, Mr. and Mrs.
Prowd, Chaplain and Mrs. Swadell, Mr. and Mrs.
Verner, Mr. and Mrs. Byron Straight, Miss Margaret Coope, Mr. Thornycroft, Mr. Al. Drennan,
Mr. Donald Shaw, Mr. Oram. Mr. and Mrs. Harris,
Mr. and Mrs. McLennan.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
The Annual Fall Meeting of the Southern California Branch of the Alumni Association of the University df British Columbia was held at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. (BASc. '39)) Hartley,
Palos Verdes Estates, on December 3, 1950. Tea
was served and a short business meeting followed.
Officers for the year 1951 were elected as follows:
President, Mr. Guy Corfield; Vice-President. Mr.
Arnold Ames; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Dwight
O. Miller. Those present at the meeting were:
Mr. and Mrs. Corfield. Mr. and Mrs. Miller, Dr.
Lionel Stevenson and his mother Mrs. Stevenson,
Dr. Frank Seyer and his son Frank, jr., Mr. and
Mrs. Alfred Nicholas, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Latta.
Miss Victoria Herman, Mrs. Roden Irving, Mr. and
Mrs. O. M. Steed. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Follick. and
of course Mr. and Mrs. Hartley.
We though you might be interested in hearing
of our meeting. It was a very enjoyable one and we
plan to get together again in the Spring.
Sincerely yours.
PATSY L. MILLER,
Secretary-Treasurer.
PENTICTON
Dear Editor:
I should like to inform you that the Executive
1950-51 for the Penticton Alumni Association is as
follows:
President, Mr. F. Shirley, 897 Winnipeg St.;
Secretary-treasurer. Miss D. M. Cole, 230 Abbott
St.; Vice-President, Mr. W. W. Whinester, Nara-
mata, B.C.; members. Mrs. B. Emerson, 1101 Kensington; Miss M. Pallat, 230 Abbott St.; Mrs. C.
M. McLeod, 920 Karey St.
Yours truly,
(Miss) DOROTHY COLE.
CAVE
& COMPANY
A
LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND CHEMICALS
For  Assay   Offices,   Educational,
Hospital & Industrial Laboratories
567 Hornby St.
Vancouver, B. C.
MArine 8341
Congratulations
on  U* B. C 's
Building  Expansion
PACIFIC MEAT Co. Ltd
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
MARCH, 1951
Page  11 ^
WOMEN
By JOAN WALLACE-
UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S CLUB REGIONAL CONFERENCE, held at the University of B.C.
March 17, attracted delegates from 10 B.C. and
Washington University Women's Clubs.
Hostessed by the Vancouver club, the conference dealt with the rising cost of living and the
practice of human rights. Dr. Olga Jardine, of Victoria, fourth vice-president of the Canadian Federation of University Women, was chairman of the
conference. Mrs. R. B. Crummy, past president of
the Canadian Federation, and Mrs. F. H. Soward,
were speakers at the luncheon and dinner in the
Faculty Club.
The New Westminster club, under the direction
of Mrs. Paul Smith, led the cost of living discussion,
while four other members led discussions on human
rights. They were Mrs. R. E. Forrester, president
of the Nanaimo club ; Mrs. J. P. McArthur, Vancouver club; Mrs. A. J. Butterfield, Victoria, and Miss
Trenna Hunter, Vancouver.
Clubs represented included Victoria, Nanaimo,
New Westminster. Chilliwack, Seattle, Everett,
Bellingham, Tacoma, Port Angeles and Port Towns-
end, Washington.
CAREERS IN THE THE NEWS . . . Home
from Malaya is Mrs. Isabel (Stott) Weston (S.W.
'41), who accompanied her husband to Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaya in 1946. Mrs. Weston
worked as a rural social worker there in 1948 when
social welfare work was first being organized. The
Provincial Social Welfare department in Vancouver
claims her attention now. ... A six-week tour of
Great Britain and Western Europe was all part of
the job for Frances McLean (Arts '41) and Frances
Lee (Arts '44), travel advisors for the Vancouver
office of Ask Mr. Foster, travel service.  Their trip,
)mart
vor
^Jravei, ^Jt
id
own
an
(^■ounti
ountru
We
ear
IDs/ cJ\aLnz
BRITISH IMPORTS
826 HOWE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Evelyn Cruise and her Alumni Women's Residence
Committee provided assistance to the Faculty
Women's Club open inspection of the new women's
residences early in March. Conveners of the tour
and tea were Mrs. H. P. Hrennikoff and Mrs. H. V.
Warren of the Faculty Club. The Alumni Committee helped with ticket sales and served at the tea.
made last October and November with seventeen
other advisors from across Canada and the United
States, was to help them sing the praises of their
company's tours. Miss Lee is now working in the
Pittsburgh office.  ...  In  Singapore it took three
§
SPRING
Mlbk
FASHIONS
W
in
FURS
WZM
CAPES — JACKETS
w
Designing,   Making,
Remodelling
^srodter A  ^J~ine ^jrurA cJLtd.
825 Howe Street                                   VANCOUVER, B. C.
Page 12
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE #
WOMEN
*
marriage ceremonies before Barbara Blagdon Phillips, missionary with the China Inland Mission for
the past two years, and her husband, Kenneth
Budge, of Australia, were finally married last January. First they had to have a civil ceremony, then
one before the British consul, and finally a church
ceremony to complete the circle. . . . Making a name
for themselves in the east are Mrs. Pierre Berton
(Janet Walker, Arts '41), who is doing national
publicity for the Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism Society, and June Gremell (Arts '50) who is
one of the few women actuaries with a large insurance company in Toronto. Mrs. Berton, active in
Toronto's U.B.C. Alumni Association, helped organize a U.B.C. reunion and cocktail party there in
March. ... In Vancouver, two recent graduates are
climbing quickly in newspaper circles. Mrs. Beverly Robert McGavin (Arts '49), is fashion editor
of the new B. C. magazine, "Western Homes and
Living", which first appeared last fall, and Leona
Francis (Arts '50) is women's editor of the "News
Herald".
Focal point of feminine interest on the University of B. C. campus, the new $500,000 women's
residence units, made their official debut March 3
when the Faculty Women's Club conducted inspection tours of the three buildings.
Tea in Brock Hall followed the tours and all
proceeds are to be used to help furnish the residences. The Alumni Women's Residence Committee, under the chairmanship of Evelyn Cruise, assisted in the project.
Latest residence news is the new names bestowed upon the buildings. The names chosen to
honour prominent women in U.B.C.'s history, are
the Mary Bollart residence, named after the first
dean of women; Isabel Mclnnes residence, in memory of U.B.C.'s first woman professor, and the
Anne Wesbrook residence, for the wife of the first
president.
J^00
f^>«
hats in the headline news
Tricorne, bicorne & pillbox
in fashion's newest colors
Lilac, Banana, Tangerine
Jiada^
%a&e
645 Howe Street
PAcific 8913
Editor Corrects
Picture  Error
Your editor made a ghastly error in the last
effort and only because of the tolerant attitude of
Ernie Perrault, U.B.C. Information Officer, is he
able to hold up his head . . . Practically all of the
pictures appearing in the last issue (remember the
University buildings number) were taken by the
EXTENSION VISUAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT and old knuckle-head not only forgot to give them credit anywhere in the issue but
also credited two of the picture's including the
cover, to an independent photograph an unpardonable sin Ernie and we hope this partly makes
amends because you and your staff and the Visual
Education Department are ever a great source of
practical help to this magazine.
The University lost a dear old friend when Dean
Daniel Buchanan died in December ... a man of
great learning, charm, wit and kindliness, he will
long be remembered as one of the University's true
pioneers.
happu thi
• Bridal
Consultant
Our clever Bridal
Consultant, Miss Jean
McLeod, loves weddings . . . and will
assist you in the selection of your wedding gown . . . attendants' fashions and
the smartest dress for
the mother of the
bride.
who chooses
at the Lady Gaye
Wedding Gowns
Bridesmaid Frocks
SUITS
COATS
DRESSES
LINGERIE
Everything
for your
lovely
wedding
£- Ltd.
"The Shop With Personality"
2654 South Granville
CH. 5025
MARCH, 1951
Page 13 UBC   ALUMNI    DEVELOPMENT
$10,000. SPECIAL GIFT FROM KINSMEN
FOR ELECTRON MICROSCOPE
Surely, steadily another fine tradition is being
built at U.B.C. ... an alumni tradition of regular,
spontaneous and tangible assistance to higher education  in  general  and  new  students  in  particular.
Clear, unmistakeable evidence is already on hand
in this third year of operation of the voluntary annual giving programme—the Alumni-U.B.C. Development Fund—that more and more alumni are finding deep personal satisfaction in supporting U.B.C.
and especially those individual projects which appeal
to them most. The many letters of commendation
received by Fund directors and class representatives
which accompany donations are even more important than the contributions as far as the gradual
development of this fine alumni tradition of practical good will and unwavering faith in U.B.C.'s
future.
So far. over 700 individuals have donated over
half of last year's fine total of $15,000-odd total.
Most donors are supporting the 1951 Fund's general
objectives (War Memorial Gymnasium. Scholarships. Women's Residence Furnishings and the
U.B.C. President's Emergency Fund), but quite a
few have selected special projects of their own. As
an example of the latter, substantial support has
been given the student Varsity Outdoor Club which
has completed a fine cabin on Mount Seymour.
For the
benefit of the
statistics-min
ded, here is
a table
of c
ass
donations
and amounts
(as at Feb-
ryary
25th)
Class
Number
Total
Year
of
Donors
'Amount
1916 ..
..    7
$ 80.00
1917
11
..    3
623.00
1918 ..
40.00
1919 ..
..    6
430.00
1920 .
.  14
129.00
1921 ..
..  11
88.00
1922 ..
.. 11
142.00
1923 ..
.. 22
373.00
1924 ..
..  15
408.00
1925 ..
..  11
157.00
1926 ..
..    7
50.00
1927 ..
..  11
68.00
1928 ..
..  11
60.50
1929 ..
.. 19
149.00
1930 ..
.. 21
186.00
1931  ..
22
206.00
1932 ..
..  19
137.50
1933 ..
..  23
171.00
1934 ..
. n
181.00
1935 ..
.. 26
233.00
1936 ..
. 20
121.00
1937 ..
.  16
116.50
1938 ..
..  19
167.00
1939 ..
. 26
195.00
1940 ..
. 19
107.00
1941 ..
. 22
154.00
The Chairman's Message
Not many of us are able to bequeath a large
endowment to our Alma Matar. We can, however,
provide a living endowment through giving continuing support to our Development Fund.
Our individual gifts may be small, but combined
with our classmates, other Alumni, and friends generally, this Fund can snowball into an impressive
total. We may also be able to interest corporations
and friends of the University in giving aid through
this Fund.
Being a Provincial University rather than a private one does not make the need less urgent for our
support as is sometimes suggested. Student fees
(although increased materially) and Government
grants do not cover the operating costs of the University. President MacKenzie has urged that individual interest and support are necessary if basic
freedoms in educational matters are to be maintained.
I would emphasize again the following basic
facts of our Fund :
(a) Contributions go to the objectives in entirety. (There are NO deductions for expenses of
any kind.)
(b) You may select your objective of those
named or other objectives of a similar nature.
(c) A contribution gives you an active membership in the Alumni Association and entitles you to
receive all issues of the U.B.C. Chronicle. Our Fund
appeal is the only annual appeal made to the Alumni.
(d) Early contributions make for less cost in
time and stationery and give encouragement to your
volunteer committee.
(e) Your individual interest in our University
will be further stimulated by active support in this
effort.
(f) Contributions are deductible from taxable
income.
Alumni-U.B.C. Development Fund.
JOHN M. BUCHANAN,
Chairman,
Page 14
1942   21 144.00
1943  19 103.00
1944   14 93.00
1945   23 127.00
1946  33 212.00
1947  42 291.00
1948   75 427.00
1949   66 430.00
At this point, $5.00 was again the most common
gift, followed by $10.00, then $3.00. Donations have
varied from $1.00 to $200.00, with the average individual donation being $9.28.
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE FUND   REACHES   $8,000.00
Dr. 2V. A. M. MacKenzie receives $10,000 cheque from Dr. C. R. Hoi man of Kinsmen's Club. Looking on ure Joe
Brown, Alderman Halford Wilson, Percy White and John Buck man.
MICROSCOPE
A highlight of the Class Manager's dinner on
January 24th was the presentation to the University
of a $10,000 cheque by the fifty-two Kinsmen's
Clubs of B.C., and the National Foundation for
Poliomyelitis for the purchase of an electron microscope.
In accepting the cheque on behalf of the University, President MacKenzie reiteratea his view
that once the public of British Columbia knew what
our needs were and what the opportunities for service were, U.B.C. would not have to seek far for
help of this kind. As a result of this generous gift
a Committee has been set up representative of the
various departments on the campus likely to have
specific research uses for this instrument. While
the study of poliomyelitis and other virus diseases
will take priority, the electron microscope has been
given with the realization that a very broad use of
it will contribute to scientific knowledge in many
spheres.
This gift to aid basic research at U.B.C. is due
largely to the energetic and faithful work of two of
our alumni. Dr. David Steele and Joe Brown, Jr.,
the former on behalf of the Kinsmen's Clubs of
B.C. and the Poliomyelitis Foundation, and the latter on behalf of the U.B.C. Alumni Development
Fund. The good will of the contributing clubs
throughout the Province is another evidence of the
"grass roots" type of interest being taken by the
people of B.C. in their University.
The Monthly Commercial Letter issued by
The Canadian Bank of Commerce is one of the
oldest publications of its kind. It contains
material on economic conditions gathered from
reliable sources and carefully weighed and sifted
for the benefit of its readers.
This Letter has a wide circulation among
business and professional men, students and
journalists in Canada and abroad. An application to the Head Office, Toronto, will bring
The Monthly Commercial Letter to you regularly, free of charge.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
MARCH, 1951
Page 15 ORMONDE
HALL
c^fiEakina ^ditoxiaiiu
University Salaries
The current demand by faculty members of the
University of British Columbia for higher salaries
has brought into focus a problem which is affecting
all the universities of Canada, and which is threatening the very foundations of higher education in this
country.
Despite the fact that university graduates are
perhaps our most important product in Canada
today, higher education has been somewhat neglected by provincial and federal authorities and is subject to apathetic treatment on the part of Canadian
citizens.
Universities have not escaped the ravages of
inflation and either our universities will obtain complete readjustment of their position in the minds
of the government and a new deal all around, or
they face the probability of having to close entirely.
The tendency on the part of many of our citizens and government authorities is subconsciously
to realize the university is a tremendous asset but
do nothing towards helping the university either
through financial grants from those governments
in question or in dollars from the public.
They seem to think that universities, like Tennyson's brook, go on forever, and forget that they, like
any other institution, are subject to all the stresses
and strains inherent in our economic system today.
Contributing to the public's apathy and to the
government's lethargy about university professors'
income, is the professors' own attitude which traditionally eschews monetary reward in favor of the
reward of aesthetic pleasure.
University faculty salaries, however, have fallen
so far behind the professional salary scale prevalent
in the country today, that the university professor
has found himself in a position where he can barely
maintain a decent standard of living. We are now
presented with the ridiculous situation wherein
labourers on the waterfront are making more money
each month than many faculty members. This situation, if allowed to continue, would result in our
university being staffed by the most mediocre individuals, as eventually all the talented people would
leave for the United States where faculty salaries
are higher, or for other parts of Canada, where a
similar situation exists but to a much lesser degree.
The problem is not entirely a result of inflation,
but is also a product of an expanding province.
After the war, the university facilities were greatly
increased because of the demand of the public and
especially young students who were interested in
obtaining, within their own Province, the opportunity to pursue studies which theretofore had not
been available. Therefore, the university set up new
faculty including the faculties of Law, Medicine,
Pharmacy and Education, an Institute of Oceanography, Departments of Music and Slavonic Studies.
Page 16
There is no question that some of these new schools
and faculties will have to be cut down considerably,
and it may be that some of them will have to go
altogether. The Alumni Association does not countenance courses in every available subject, as this
program can deteriorate to the point where, as the
humorist has described, courses are given in "Cafeteria Management".
Valuable Product
However, all this does not detract from the fact
that the university is producing the most valuable
product in the Province today. A casual glance at
the activities of graduates will make one realize
the important positions held by our graduates in
British Columbia, Canada and the world.
Another important factor why the university is
suffering from lack of money, is the decrease in
enrollment at the university, caused by the decline
in Veteran students, who have been educated under
the Dominion provisions for Veterans and who have
now graduated.
In order to meet the situation one of several
things must be done. Either (a) new grants from
the Dominion Government must be made to replace
subsidies on behalf of Veterans, or (b) augmented
grants from the Provincial Government must be
made available to replace Dominion Government
subsidies, or (c) an appreciable increase made in
student fees, or (d) cutbacks made in some of the
facilities extended by the University.
There is no question that the Provincial Government must come through with bigger grants in order
that the faculty salaries be increased, as the federal
government does not at this time intend to take up
the slack with added subsidies now that the veterans
have left the university. This fact was made clear
in parliament recently and we can expect little from
the Federal Government at this time, except perhaps an increase in general scholarships all round.
Student fees should be increased because money
values have depreciated greatly.
Also some of the facilities put forth by the
university should be reduced, as it is much more
important that the university provide the very high-
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE est calibre of instruction in restricted lines than to
try to provide teaching in every branch of learning
in a situation where that instruction can only be of
a mediocre calibre.
One source of revenue which must be exploited,
is private endowment by individuals who benefit
by living in a community where first-rate
services are obtainable from graduates of our university. So far, this source has been sadly neglected.
The public has been apathetic, and in only very rare
instances have any sizeable bequests been given to
the university. Enlightened citizens will realize the
tremendous part the university is playing in the
development of our province, and it is the worst type
of neglect on their part not to encourage and assist
the university in every way they can, and in this
regard the placing of money at the university's
disposal is the most practical thing they can do.
The Provincial Government is constantly badgered these days by demands for more money from
all sources, but in view of the fact that the money
alloted to the University of B.C. to meet its budget
is an investment in B.C.'s and in Canada's future,
there should be no hesitation on the part of the
Provincial Government to increase the budget for
the University. This must be done immediately or
we will be faced with the unique situation of having
a fine university deteriorating because of the lack
of equipment and of teaching talent, save and except
those faithful few who have loyally stood by the
side of the university through many lean times and
who are now being neglected in a period when the
average citizen is far better off financially than he
has ever been before. We can expect no further
sacrifices from them.
COMPARISON Or PEROERTAOE INCREASES OVER 1939 LEVEL OF THE COST OF
LITOKJ INDEX, UBC FACULTT SALARIES, AND AVERAGE WEEKLY EASRH1QS
IN 22 B.C. INDUSTRIES.
PERCBiTAQE IHCREASE OVER 1959 BASE LEVEL
LOGGING   DIVISIONS
Enjlewood, B.C. - Harrison Milli, B.C
>               i
0                   4
0                  6
o            e
j      it
50
\
6
COST OF LI
INQ INDEX
I§^-i<
1949
1948^ "«
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BSTRIAL WAG;
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PSINTIHQ 4
PUBLISHING |
MARCH, 1951
Page 17 #
POETRY
*
SIX EPIGRAMS
On Animal Lovers
Some animals and birds hoard nuts away-
And vice damwell versa, I might say.
On Russian Literature
All  Russian  novels,  plays,  and  verse
Remind me in most places
Of some poor pensive little nurse
Who talks about her cases.
On a Pair of Knaves
It made you smile behind his back
To hear Pot call old Kettle black.
'Twas nothing to my pure delight:
I heard them call each other white.
On Temperance
My body's a block of flats, I know.
What jollity I forsake
Because of the Nerves in the flat below
Who mustn't be kept awake.
On Spirit Messages
If ghosts exist, they're in a Stupor;
I've never understood it.
Still, the  supernatural  wouldn't be  super
If it were natural, would it?
On Pale Hands I Loved
To wash your hands of me, my pet,
Is naught to make me vexed.
But if I know you, I will bet
You'll wipe them on me next.    tj jj ^
ADDRESS TO NEIGHBOUR
The fact the my dog may admire you,
Mrs. Jones,
Does not prove he is intelligent.  Far from it.
For one thing, he adores many things that would
tire you,
Including putrescent bones,
And he returneth to his vomit.
(This is not a disgusting libel.
You wouldn't know it, but I quote the Bible.)
Apart from that, the poor damfool of a tyke
Also happens to admire the entire human race.
He has never met anyone he didn't like
So how can this be a compliment in your case?
And furthermore, my footling Mrs. J.,
Allow me to observe that if he did care
Much more for you than anyone else he's met
As you appear to say,
This still wouldn't prove him an intelligent pet.
No. Au contraire.  Chips
ffjapfSi           Qift6 /*"■ the ftjride
,jg|||||||j^   DIAMOND
RINGS
;f§S|P^^^y)  DIAMOND
WATCHES
I?/         <3J ch,naware
•   SILVERWARE
^/   WaLr
mc~
861 Granville Street
One of the best sources of security
and contentment is your money in
the bank. It is never too early to
start a savings account.
THE BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA
Page 18
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE FRANKLY     SPEAKING
BY
FRANK J. E. TURNER
ALUMNI
SECRETARY-MANAGER
Sometimes it seems that Democracy is simply a
system of "Decision by Default".
As but one example, let's review what happens
in the triennial U.B.C. Senate elections—remembering that the 15 members elected from and by Convocation are tremendously important to the proper
balance of that governing University group.
A few years ago. Registrar C. B. Wood, Secretary of Senate, would wonder if IS people would
actually be nominated as required by the University
Act.
Subsequently, an election was held to determine
the 15 successful candidates fewer than 20% of
those eligible to vote actually cast ballots. This
situation has improved only slightly over the years,
the best effort to date being the 30% who voted in
the 1948 elections. . . . still less than one-third of
the eligible voters.
When it is realized that this vote is conducted
entirely by mail, it becomes an even sadder state
of affairs. No one is forced to battle the elements to
reach a polling booth. Just a few "X's" in the mail
box—that's all that's needed.
Finally, it should be remembered that alumni
have a grave responsibility in this particular election, because they represent all the taxpayers of
the Province to a large extent. And after all .the
15 elected should know that a large, representative
group   selected   them.
Let's hope that democracy is served in the 1951
Senate elections, and that the group selected are a
real majority choice. Alumnotes . . .
Congratulations to Vaughan Lyon, Law Student, upon being elected to succeed Nonie Donaldson as A.M.S. President. . . . More of the same to
Terry Lynch, a Past-President of the U.B.C. Branch
72 of the Canadian Legion, upon election as 1951
Graduating Class President. ... A sincere "thank
you" to Mrs. John H. Creighton (nee Sally Murphy)
for her many years of continuous and fine service on
the U.B.C. Senate. Nice to see her serve on the
Board of Governors for a brief period. . . . Aggie
grad Cliff Barry has been appointed Chief of the
Livestock and Poultry Division, the Marketing Service, the Department of Africulture, Ottawa. . . .
1950 grad Les Brooks is now with Tremco Manu
facturing in Cleveland, Ohio. . . . Dr. J. Laurence
McHugh (B.A. '36) is Director of the new Virginia
Fisheries Lab., Gloucester Point, Virginia. . . .
Ernie Rice (B.A. '47) has been teaching in Salmo
High School. . . . W. Laird Wilson (B.Com. '47,
B.S.F. '48) has a new address: 76 Popular St., Wa-
tertown, Miss. . . . Among alumni office visitors
were U.B.C. Senator Bob Wallace, of Victoria, and
Capital City Branch President Harold G. McWil-
liams and Past President Dr. David B. Turner. . . .
Two sons of Mrs. F. E. B. Sexsmith (nee Eleanor
Frame, B.A. '18) and the late F. F. B. Sexsmith
(B.A.Sc. '45) and Bill (B.Comm. '50). . . . Mrs. H.
L. McDiarmid (nee Muriel Costley, B.A. '19) has
two daughters who are U.B.C. graduates—Mary,
B.A.Sc. (Nursing). 1950. and Mrs. J. E. Whitaker
(nee Muriel Mc Diarmid), B.A. '40—and another
daughter, Daily, who is in 3rd year Arts. . . . Mrs
Howard C. Green (nee Marion Mounce) has two
sons now grads—John (B.A. '45) and Lewis (B.A.
Ss. '49). ... Dr. Howard James (B.Sc. '21) has two
sons now grads—Don (B.A.Sc. '48) and Robert
(B.A.Sc. '50) as well as a daughter, Margaret, in
2nd year Arts Gil Clark (B.A. '41) is Public Relations Director with CBC, Vancouver. . . . R. K.
Porter, a Past A.M.S. Treasurer, is now President
of Harriet Hubbard Ayre. . . . Art (Lefty) Barton
(B.Comm. '41) is now a partner in the Kamloops
General Insurance firm of Barton & Hay.
Compliments
of
ARMSTRONG & MONTEITH
Construction
Co. Ltd.
1449 HORNBY STREET
ENGINEERS
and
GENERAL   CONTRACTORS
MARCH, 1951
Page 19 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION   ISSUES STATEMENT
ON FORTHCOMING SENATE  ELECTIONS
By now, all graduate members of the U.B.C.
Alumni Association have received notices from the
University Registrar with respect to the forthcoming election of 15 persons to the U.B.C. Senate..
Many of these members of Convocation may have
wondered whether the Alumni Association has any
official policy in connection with nominations for
these positions.
In a specially prepared statement, our President,
Mr. James A. Macdonald, declared: "As a result
of considerable deliberation, the Association's executive has decided to continue the policy established
by the 1948 governing alumni group, and has no
intention, therefore, of backing any particular slate
of candidates.
"In consultation with Branch officers, and past
executive members, the present executive is attempting merely to ensure that a suitable number of
candidates are nominated—definitely more than 15
—and those nominated are considered to be geographically and occupationally representative of
the Province."
"The main concern of your Association officers,"
continued Mr. Macdonald, "has been and is that a
large percentage of those eligible to vote actually
do cast a ballot, and that, in view of the importance
of this election, some thought is given by voters
as to the qualificaions possessed by each candidate
offering: herself or himself for election."
Fine Clothes
are known by
their   JlaUt
* LEISHMAN
* LOMBARDI
* SAVILLE ROW
* THOS.  HEATH
the up-and-coming businessman looks successful when
he dresses in good taste.
For your SPRING SUIT,
TOPCOAT, FORMAL WEAR
and ACCESSORIES
Caddie #s. oDi
}eem
534 SEYMOUR ST. (Opposite Yorkshire Bldg.)
Undoubtedly some members of Convocation
have failed to receive notices due to incorrect or
out-of-date addresses. Where this is the case, a
note to the alumni office or the Registrar will guarantee receipt of the 1951 Convocation Election
Register. Voting will be by mail, and will not take
place until May.
SENATE AND BOARD
VACANCIES FILLED
The Senate vacancy created by the recent death
of Senate and Board member, Dr. A. B. Schinbein,
has been filled by the appointment of Dr. Lawren
Harris.
At the same time Dr. R. E. Foerster was elected
to fill the vacancy in the Board of Governors caused
by Dr. Schinbein's death.
As the term of Mr. Kenneth Caple, Senate representative on the Board of Governors has expired,
the Senate unanimously approved of the oppoint-
ment of Mrs. J. H. Creighton.
Mr. Caple, Regional Director of the CBC, has
completed two terms" on the Universiay Board of
Governors. Mrs. Creighton is the second generation in her family to sit on the Board and Senate.
Her father, the late Justice Dennis Murphy, was a
Senate member for some years. Dr. Foerster was
Director of the Pacific Biological Station at Nanaimo until April, 1950. He has relinquished that
position to devote full time to salmon investigation
in the province.
* O JOHNNY COME TO HILO
O Johnny come lo Hi/o,
O wake her, O shake her, O shake
thai girl mull  the blue dress on.
O Johnny come lo llilo, poor old man.
For over a century Lamb's Navy
has been the caM of those who
know good rum. Smooth and
mellow it is matured, blended
and bottled in Britain of the finest
Demerara Rums.
Lamb's Navy Run
This advertisement is not published or
displayed by the Liquor Control Board or
by ihc Government of British Columbia.
Page 20
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE A   MUCH    NEEDED    DEPARTMENT
By David Brock, Arts '30.
I have decided to start a fund to endow a Department of Women. I am not referring to the
province of the Dean of Women. A Dean of
Women knows how to look after young women, but
she would be the first to agree that neither her
training nor her contract obliges her to understand
ALL women. You might think that a Dean of
Men would have to know quite a bit about women,
one way or another, but this is not so. And if he
did know a frightful lot about them, heavens, he
might be impeached as a scoundrel of some kind,
and lose his job. No. what we need, and what every
university needs, is a Professor of Women. Hence
my little fund. Since I will probably be the Professor myself (or himself), it would save much
trouble and bookkeeping, not to mention auditing,
if all cheques were made payable to me. I should
add that my expenses for research will be rather
heavy, as is true of all research these days, so give
without stint. Give till it hurts twice and hurts
quickly, like dat Latin dat was cited more dan bis.
But any gift's a gift for all dat, so don't let your
pettiness of spirit deter you entirely rather than
deter you slightly. Any man who is shy enough to
prefer sending me no gift rather than a measly five
bucks is being' modest at my expense, and dat's dat.
PROFESSOR OF WOMEN
I was Professor of Women at Whatnot College
in the State of Washington for some years. Whatnot is a very small college ; it has only 86 students.
(U.B.C. might care to tackle Whatnot at American
football some time. There would be a very pretty
struggle.) But even in so small a college I found
a great interest in women. Indeed. I believe every
thinking creature is interested in women, for
friendly or hostile reasons. Even such poets and
women as can hardly be described without paradox
as thinking creatures . . . even these take an interest
in women . . . the poets in order to have something
to write about and the women in order to have
something to compete with. Over half the paper
and ink sacrificed to Old King Poesy in the last
six thousand years has been filled with complaints
about women, praise of women, and other inaccuracies about women. And that goes for poetry
scratched on bricks and clay tablets, too. If all
the bricks about women were built into one huge
seraglio, zenana, horeem, or jail, you could lock
thirty-seven million women inside it, if you so desired, or they did. Which would not only make a
wonderful stockpile (as it is now called) for Science,
but might prove a great tourist attraction. And
since attracting tourists is Canada's manifest and
single destiny, and since it is a university's duty to
help Canada to dree its weird or suffer its doom,
it will be my department's task to erect such an
enclosure, possibly with the assistance of the Department of Architecture. But first things first.
Let us begin in a small way, except in the matter of
those cheques. Cash, too, is always welcome. Pay-
men can also be made in cattle. But not stamps
or wampum.
Where was I? Oh yes. We cannot deny the
world's interest in women. The only trouble is,
the world doesn't know what it is talking about,
and dat goes bis for de poets. The enthusiasm
(positive or negative) is there all right, but it is
uninstructed and misguided, built on myth and
legend and tabu. With instruction, guidance, research . . . things never before attempted in this
line outside Whatnot College ... a new era may
dawn for men, if not for women. And a quarter
of the world is composed of men. A half, you say?
Men are half women, on their mother's side . . .
that leaves a quarter.
Pessimists (and indeed optimists) will point out
that my studies have little chance of success, women
being difficult to understand. "Uncertain, coy, and
hard to please," sang Scott of women. Now, an
acute French critic (I am told) went so far as to
say that few philosophical novels contain such keen
psychology as Scott exhibits. But that line of verse
shows how little he knew of women, and the fact
that we quote it so often shows how little we know
ourselves. Women are extremenly certain . . .
far too certain . . . they are incapable of sa}nng "I
don't know" (in which respect the late Mr. Shaw
was also an old woman.) Women are anything
but coy, as Mr. Kipling had the sense to point out,
though he erred in saying they -were sent into the
world for one purpose only. As for being hard to
please, great God! they are pleased wtih themselves,
with toys, and even with men. Of all the sexes
that roam the earth (as Josh Billings or Bill Nye
began a somewhat different remark), women must
be the easiest to please if they are pleased with
men.
But I see I am beginning a lecture on women,
which is not my purpose until suitable housed,
fed, clad, and otherwise rewarded. I am not even
being paid for this little article, such being the
policy of your otherwise admirable journal. Still,
if I have made you curious enough to pay for more,
no harm is done. On the contrary. Far otherwise.
Anything (as they say) but.
• Flowers   for
racious
Li
ving
Jos. F, Brown, Arts '23
MARCH, 1951
Page 21 SCIENCE   30 HOLDS 1950 REUNION
"At ease and leisure; all night we did talk."
As evening shadows fell, one by one, we found
our way to Pike's Retreat in the Devonshire Hotel
(November 3rd). Then meeting each other the
strange grins and grimaces dissolved into familiar
faces, some less old than others; some with the
spacious brow and some with gorgeous grey. Yet
all were unanimous about our honorary president,
Professor Vernon. "Wrhy, he looks hardly a day
older!"
With spirits high and eager tongues we toasted
and talked an hour and more until the stragglers
arrived, then all posed for a happy photographs.
Dinner for 19 was served just right and steaks supreme melted away while tongues kept on waggling
merrily as stories were told.
Then Jim arose to toast The King and to extend
a hearty welcome to all. Then, as the names were
read of those who have passed along—7 in all—a
deep silence descended. A toast to our Alma Mater
and Sc. '30 was warmly responded to by Prof. Vernon who paid great compliment to the resurgence of
Sc. '30 and their unquenchable spirit which has
never been equalled by any class in recent years	
The names of all classmates were read aloud and
their history recited as best we knew. Then one
by one the fellows arose and gave their record of
family and station, and letters and telegrams were
read from far afield. So the hours slipped swiftly
away until . . . some say we were asked to depart!
But Hugh Macdonald offered a retreat and his lovely wife came gallantly to serve us with coffee and
food till past 3 a.m. (All of us were pleased to
discover so many charming wives.)
On Saturday we joined the crowd to bask in
sunshine at the football game and admire parading
beauties. Later all who were able enjoyed cocktails
at the Thornber's; dinner at the White Spot and
"A Happy Honeymoon" sending off at the C.P.R.
dock. Then on Sunday the Hadwins gave a popular
tea in their lovely West Vancouver home.
It was a grand reunion, fellows, and all the more
exceptional because of the sparkling presence of the
ladies, who, by all reports, want to be included in
plans for our next reunion in '55. We hope that all
of you will be with us, and your lovely wives, too.
Best regards.
Ted C. Hay.
In attendance: Abernethy, Bailey, Barclay,
Hadgkiss, Hay, Harrower. Hrennikoff, Hadwin, Al
Macdonald, Jack Macdonald, Hugh Macdonald,
Matheson, Somerton. McDiarmid, Unsworth, Woodland, Lunn, Pike, Thornber, Vernon.
P.S.—Photo is good! 4x5, 10c; 5x7, 50c; 8x10,
$1.00.   Send your order now!
Compliments
SHARP & THOMPSON
ARCHITECTS
1553 Robson St.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
U.B.C
on your expansion program,
in which we have been
privileged to build
Roads & Sidewalks
CITY CONSTRUCTION Co. Ltd.
107 EAST 1st, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Page 22
THE U.B.C. AtUMNI CHRONICLE *
S P O R T - Ole Bakken
#
FRANKLIN NEW QUARTERBACK PREXY
Harry Franklin, former Thunderbird and Clover
Leaf basketball star, was elected president of the
yuarterback Club for the 1951-52 term, succeeding
Art Monahan, at the annual meeting held in February. Elected to the executive were Art Biernes,
Vice-President; Bill Pearson, Treasurer; Gardy
Gardom, Secretary, and Luke Movies, editor of the
Quarterback Bulletin. Art Monahan remains for
another term as chairman of the Board of Trustees.
Chairman of the Membership Committee is Paul
Plant. During the 1951-52 term four types of memberships are available to those who wish to make
application. Schedule of fees is as follows: Associate Member $2.00, Active Member $10.00, Junior
Honorary Member $25.00, Senior Honorary Member, $100.00 or more. Only members in the Active,
Junior Honorary and Senior Honorary categories
have voting privileges. In addition, the Active
Member receives one season football ticket with his
$10.00 fee, the Junior and Senior Honorary Members receive two tickets. Membership cheques
should be made payable to the Thunderbird
Quarterback Club and mailed to Paul Plant, Chairman, Membership Committee, No. 513 Metropolitan
Building, 837 WTest Hastings.
The purpose of the Quarterback Club is to aid,
support and promote U.B.C. sports. Said Harry
Franklin, "It is our hope that we can encourage our
Canadian athletes who desire a college education,
to remain in Canada and, preferably, at the University of British Columbia. To this end, we hope that
graduates throughout the province will do their part
in encouraging all student athletes in their area to
attend U.B.C.
SPORT SHORTS
Dmitri Goloubef.
former U.B.C. footballer, has recently
been appointed secretary - manager of
the "Trail Athletic
Association. A physical education graduate from the University of British
Columbia, Goloubef
has worked for the
Kdmonton Recrea-
tion Commission
during the past two
y ears, combining
these duties with
football as a member
of the Edmonton
Eskimo squad.
Watch the Thunderbird basketballers next year.
After being cellar dwellers during the past three
years the 'Birds seem to be due for a comeback.
Coach Jack Pomfret will have every man returning
from this year's squad and two or three freshmen.
a half dozen Chiefs and Braves.
King pin of the California rugby three-line is
Bill Sainas, former U.B.C. grid and rugby star, who
is taking his master's degree at the Berkeley institution. Sainas holds a P.E. degree from U.B.C.
Another U.B.C. grad. Russ Latham, is currently the
starting 5/8 on the Stanford Indians rugby squad
. . . American colleges in the Evergreen Conference,
hard hit by budget economies caused by decreasing
(Continued over page)
▼ *#
Congratulations to the University of British Columbia on the construction of their new
buildings in which we are proud to have taken part.
BARR & ANDERSON LTD.
LOCKERBIE and HOLE (B.C.) LTD.
PLUMBING AND HEATING
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MARCH, 1951
Page 23 (Sport, continued from page 23)
enrollments due to the draft, have cut their spring
sports programs in baseball, golf and tennis. Member schools will still compete in track . . . U.B.C.
may enter the Coast League Soccer fold provided
that satisfactory arrangements can be worked out
with league officials . . . The U.B.C. swim team
swam off with conference honours in the first annual
swim meet in Cheney, Washington, in February.
The squad was paced by Bob Thistle, backstroke
and free style artist: Dick Stobers, individual medley and free style; and Gordon Potter, middle distance and free style champ . . . Led by John Hudson, intramural and inter faculty gymnastic champ,
the U.B.C. gym team will compete in the Pacific
Northwest gymnastic championships in Vancouver
and the Dominion gymnastic championships on
May 26th in Vancouver.
THUNDERBIRDS WIN FREE PRESS
HOCKEY TROPHY
The U.B.C. Thunderbirds hockey team ended
the 1950-51 season by winning the Free Press
Trophy, emblematic of the Pacific Coast Senior "B"
championship. By scores of 10-4 and 9-3, the 'Birds
easily defeated the Nanaimo Native Sons in a best
of three series. An impressive record was set by
the team this season, winning 10 games, tying twro,
and losing only two. One of the losses was sustained
in Edmonton during a two game series with the
University of Alberta Golden Bears, for the Hamber
Trophy, emblematic of the Western Canadian University Championships.
This season marks the end of University hockey
for five of U.B.C.'s outstanding players who will
graduate at the end of the term. These five players
have formed the backbone of the club for almost
three seasons and they will be sorely missed. Clare
Drake, outstanding rookie of two seasons ago; Hass
Young, top scorer of the team and Bob Lindsay,
hustling left-winger, who form the first and high-
scoring line this season, will all graduate. Another
graduate and outstanding defenceman for three
seasons has been Ken Hodgert. Ken's defensive
ability, plus his bruising body-checks, have been a
bulwark in the 'Birds defence. The last of the
graduates, and probably the greatest loss to the
team, will be goal-tender Don Adams. Don has
turned in some outstanding performances in goal
and his persistent thwarting of opposing team's
scoring efforts has contributed immensely to 'Birds'
success during the last three seasons. Don will be
sorely missed and his position will be a hard one to
fill.
VVILLSON E. KNOWLTOIM
a
'ptometriit
MARINE 801 1
823 Birks Building Vancouver. B. C.
We are proud to hare taken part in the construction of U.B.C.'s
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE  BUILDING
Above is the artist's conception of the Preventive Medicine Building. A three storey structure, one wing
contains animal laboratories, and research for the study of bacteriology. The other contains the Department of Nursing and Health, an infirmary and a student health service. In addition, there is a students'
lunch room, a large lecture theatre, two large laboratories, conference and small lecture rooms, staff common rooms, a large reading room and a library.
COMMONWEALTH  CONSTRUCTION Co. Ltd.
Victoria
Vancouver
Winnipeg
Page 24
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE FIRESIDE   CHATS
Another program of Sunday Fireside evenings
has been completed by the University of British
Columbia Alumni Association.
In the fall three such evenings were held and
after the New Year four speakers were guests every
two weeks from February 11 through March 18.
On February 11th Dr. George Michael Volkoff,
who has won top honours in the scientific world
and particularly in connection with research on
Atomic energy, was the guest speaker, and on
February 25th, Dr. Lowell Besley. Dean of University of B. C.'s recently established faculty of
Forestry, discussed the forest situation in British
Columbia  before  an   enthusiastic  gathering.
On March 11th, Bob Osborne, who is the men's
director of U.B.C.'s Physical Education Program,
discussed athletics at the University of British Columbia. Mr. Osborne was a member of the Canadian
Olympic basketball team of 1936. and was active in
sports at the University of B.C.. U.S.C., Oregon
State College, and the  University of Washington.
The series wound up on the 18th of March when
well-known Prof. Henry F. Angus, head of U.B.C.'s
Department of Economics. Political Science and Sociology, and the Dean of School of Graduate Studies
was  the guest  speaker.
a
ampion
&   White   jCtd.
Congratulate
the
Commonwealth Construction
Co. Ltd.
on the construction
of U.B.C.'s
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
BUILDING
Champion & White Ltd.
READY-MIX  CONCRETE
1075 Main Street PAcific 9171
Always
worthwhile
Young business men of today on
the way to the top have their
share of problems.   Many are
financial . . . and that's where
we can help.   For thousands of
Canada's  most successful  men
have found a visit to The Dominion
Bank  always worthwhile.
THE
DOMINION
BANK
Est.  1871
BRANCHES   THROUGHOUT
CANADA
New York Agency
49 Wall Street
London,  England,  Branch
3 King William St., E.C. 4
MARCH, 1951
Page 25 JAMES "JIMMY" LAMB
VETERAN U.B.C. POSTMAN
JAMES LAMB   RETIRES
The man who put his stamp on UBC when the
present campus was just a rock-field will retire from
college life in March.
Postman James Lamb, Jimmy to most, was
sorting campus mail in 1919 when the big businessmen of today were studying on apple boxes in the
Fairview shacks.
The first time he sorted the mail, after spending
five years in the First World War artillery, there
were two sacks of letters. It's closer to 20 sacks
now.
"I've seen thousands come and go, but nowadays there are more students coming than there are
going," he said.
Jimmy has been asked to stay on at his old post,
but officials agree that after 32 years a 68-year-old
man could stand a rest.
Since he can't sit still in his spare time he will
probably go on winning local, city and provincial
championships at lawn bowling.
Page 26
STATISTICS
BIRTHS
To Mr. and Mrs. Rudy Paradis (Betty Bird), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth O. Macgowan, a daugh-
ther.
To Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Henderson, a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Grauer, a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Shirley Armstrong King Logan
(Beatrice Healey), a daughter.
To Dr. and Mrs. John Davis (Marg. Worthing), a
daughter.
To  Mr.  and  Mrs. G.  Roger Wood  (Dorothy Mc-
Donell), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Ken Watt  (Jean Dalrymple), a
daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. James Lyder, a daughter.
MARRIAGES
Dr.   Everett   Day   Hawkins   to   Kathleen   M.
Greenwood.
Albert Clair Mitchell to June Rose Blundell.
Dr. S. Allan Sully to Mary Cruickshank.
Eugene Trademan to  Shirley Eleanor Frances
Bookman.
Frederick James Patterson to Margaret Murray
Brown.
Donald Henry James to Alice Thorne.
Paul Whitmore Wright to Vida Jean MacFar-
lane.
John Harley Dawson to Virginia Carolyn Wil-
banks.
Luard   Joseph   Manning   to   Elizabeth   Edith
Skelding.
Edward   Thomas   Cantell   to   Elizabeth   Coffin
Taylor.
Frederick G. Hubbard to Phyllis Annette Sanderson.
Merwin Chercover to Sharon Mariam Fox.
John James Stewart McRae to Opal Eulala
Clarke.
Robert Maynard Mills to Margaret June  Day.
Malcolm Gordon McLeod to Dorothy Catherine
Ellis.
Robert Curie to Lois Easton.
Trevor Charles to Constance A. Liddell.
Dr. Harold Krivel to Rita Diamond.
George Martin Greer to Hazel Janne Crofts.
Ross Johnson to Olive Skene.
Charles Velay to John Patricia Laird.
Lamond Alexander Milne to Claire Eleanor
Lord.
Frederick Harrison Brooks to Ethel Ada (Billie)
Wadds. '
Gerald Francis O'Connor to June Phyllis Elizabeth Gava.
A. Arthur Knight to Marjorie Evelyn May
Rowlings.
James Fraser Lynn to Nanvy Isobel Baker.
Wilfred Michael Calnan to Gladys Geraldine
Soule.
Henry Basil Oswin Robinson to Elizabeth Anne
Gooderham.
Donald A. Scott to Mildred Boissonneault.
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE EATON'S
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Consult EATON'S Interior Decorating Salon soon ... in
Vancouver or Victoria. Towards an Even Greater Canada
GENERAL
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is helping to shape our country's future
New power developments by Canada's
electric utilities, using G-E equipment, will
provide millions of additional horsepower.
The ever-growing use of electric power in Canada is a
primary reason for the rapid expansion of our industries
. . . largely responsible for the high individual output of
our workers.
Canadian General Electric has for fifty-eight years built
much of the equipment that makes possible this
"electrical way of living."
Mine hoist driven by two motors totalling
4500 hp. Electric motors increase the output and earning capacity of workers.
This company manufactures much of the
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C.G.E. designs and manufactures lighting
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