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The UBC Alumni Chronicle Nov 30, 1952

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 ^UK.IZ.e. ALumu
WINTER ISSUE
NOV. - DEC, 1952
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. TO YOURSELF
It's the streamlined way to make financial progress.
Some of our most successful customers use this system.
It means putting yourself on your own pay-roll . . .
making up your mind that you yourself have a claim on
your income just as much as the landlord, the butcher
and the tax-collector.
You'll do this, of course, because you have a definite
objective — a strong reason for saving. It may be a general
goal like family security ... or it may be something specific
like a new refrigerator, a house, or even a place in the
country.
If
TO A MILLION CAHADIAHS
GpJ
You can go into debt to yourself in two ways — by
saving and by borrowing.
Saving comes first, of course
oiling to yourself.
so much a pay-day
A bank balance gives you personal confidence as few
other things can. It gives you a good foundation for your
financial plans . . . and it makes it easier for your B of M
manager to lend you money when you want to realize an
objective sooner than you otherwise could.
» When you have a sound financial program, but need
money for some useful purpose, borrowing at the B of M
is just as sound as systematic saving. Indeed, it is another
form of saving. It is the B of M's business to lend you
money, when it's good business for you to borrow.
A B of M Personal Loan simply enables you to enjoy
sooner the things you plan for, and you pay it off in
regular instalments just as you have built up your savings
balance.
Why not make up your mind to get what you want
this streamlined way — and open your special-purpose
savings account at "MY BANK" tomorrow. And while
you're in the Bank, have a chat with the Manager or
Accountant. You will find them ready and interested to
discuss your plans and problems.
Bank of Montreal
fiuutda'd 'pin&t ^><m&
WORKING    WITH    CANADIANS    IN    EVERY    WALK    DF    LIFE    SINCE   1817
PiKie
I. B. C. ALL'M.M CHRONICLE LETTERS   TO  THE   EDITOR
4569 West 2nd Ave.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.,
Editor, The Chronicle,
University of B.C.
Greetings to U.B.C. Alumni from overseas.
While on tour this summer I spent a few days
with former graduates of U.B.C.—Dr. and Mrs. Roy
Vollum, Oxford, who wished to be remembered to
all old friends and fellow-graduates.
At one point some great distance up and in the
mountains of Austria the bus was delayed by narrow road and one-way traffic. A query came along
the route—"anyone from Vancouver among the
Canadians?" We hurriedly found the questioner
and discovered her to be a U.B.C. grad of '26—
Vivian Hood—now Mrs. Warth of Huntingdon,
England.
It was my first trip to Britain and the Continent and a wholly delightful experience. What a
thrill to say "Hail, U.B.C." in the Austrian Tyrols!
LORRAINE BOLTON '30
The Editor,
Alumni Chronicle,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Sir:
I am writing you with regard to a small notice
in the October-November, 1952 Chronicle, page 19,
concerning Hugh and Marion Gilmour. There is a
correction to be made. Due to unforseen circumstances (re waiting for certain courses), I shall not
be graduating this Spring. Prelims in June, 1953,
graduation in Spring, 1954.
I might add that I was quite amazed to see the
notice, since the U.B.C. Alumnae Association, as
far as I know, has not contacted me in any way
since I graduated. Were it not for the fact that
Betty Bryson ('52), is here studying in the Classics
Department, and at the time, living with me, the
notice would have quite escaped me. What does
puzzle me, is from whom you received the information.
It might interest you to know that the University of Illinois is actually port to a large number of
Canadians, especially U.B.C. graduates. In the
Bacteriology department alone, out of approxi
mately 60 graduate students, 3 are from U.B.C.:
Doug Gillespie
Bill  Rossell   (spelling?),  '52
myself.
If you are able to correct the error, I would appreciate it.   It could be embarrassing.
Yours truly,
(Mrs.) Hugh S. A. Gilmour,
(nee Marion H. Nyholm, '49)
[-ji-fti for all. occadioni!
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NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page 3 o
ne of the world's great banks
is just across the street
Perhaps you think of your local Royal
Bank as the place where you deposit
money ... or buy occasional money
orders' or travellers cheques ... or
arrange loans.
But it is much more than that.
Your local Royal Bank branch is the
logical place for ybu to go for confidential discussions on all kinds of financial
subjects, from your personal budget to
some major business venture.
When you talk things over with your
ROYAL     BANK
You can bank on the "Royal"
Page 4
local Royal Bank manager, he brings
to your problem a banking knowledge
gained through years of training in many
different branches and communities.
And if necessary he can call on the local
knowledge of 700 other branches in
Canada and j32 abroad, and on the specialized training of experts in many fields.
In fact, all the facilities of the Royal
Bank are available to you through the
branch around the corner, or just across
the street. Its door is your door to one oj
the world's great banking institutions.
OF     CANADA
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE T
The U. B. C Alumni
CHROniCLC
Published by the Alumni Association of
The University of British Columbia
Editor: Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm. '42, LL.B. '48
Women's Editor: Leona Sherlock, B.A., '50
Board of Management:
President Douglas Macdonald, B.A., '30
Past-President Gordon M. Letson, B.A.Sc, '26
First Vice-President Arthur H. Sager, B.A., '3 8
Treasurer G. Dudley Darling, B.Comm., '39
Second Vice-President Jean Gilley, B.A., '27
Third Vice-President—.Da. Harry V. Warren,
B.A., 26; B.A.Sc, '27
Chairman Publications Board Ormonde J. Hall,
B.Comm., '42; LL.B., '48
Executive-Director—Frank Turner, B.Comm., B.A., '39
Degree Reps.: Medicine, Dr. Peter Spohn; Law, Frank
Lewis, B.A. '49, LL.B. '50; Pharmacy, Doug. Denholm,
B.S.P. '51; Commerce, Don Miller, B.Comm. '47; Agriculture, Iain MacSwan, B.S.A. '42; Social Work, Richard
J. Clark, B.A. '41, B.S.W. '46; Home Economics, Audrey
Dunlop, B.H.E. '47; Physical Education, Hugh Marshall,
B.P.E. '50; Architecture, Harry Lee, B.Arch. '50; Applied
Science, Len Stacey, B.A.Sc. '24; Forestry, Jack Roff,
B.Comm. '47, B.S.F. '48; Arts, Margaret E. Clarke, B.A.
'32.
Members at Large: Dr. W. G. Black, B.A. '22; William H.
Birmingham, B.A. '33; Harry Franklin, B.A. '49; Dr. Fred
Grauer, B.S.A. '30; Mrs. Helen Harmer, B.A. '40; Aileen
Mann, B.A. '37.
Senate Reps.: Dr. Earle Foerster, B.A. '21; Dr. W. C. Gibson, B.A. '33.
Alma Mater Society Reps.: Raghbir Basi and Bill St. John.
Editorial Offices:
5th Floor, Yorkshire House
900 West Pender Street Vancouver 1, B.C.
Business Offices:
Room 201, Brock Hall, U.B.C.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
VOL. 6, No. 4
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
ARTICLES Page
Frederic Wood Theatre      7
Do You Owna Canadiana Paint, Ho Ho?   14
President's Report   25
FEATURES
Women   8,  9
Homecoming Picture Pages    15, 16, 17, 18
Frankly Speaking    23
Published in Vancouver, British Columbia, and authorized as second
class mail, Post Office Department, Ottawa.
^J~or the iKecord . . .
Those of you who have wondered what has happened
to the Editorially Speaking feature of this magazine for
the past two issues can prepare yourselves for the worst
... it will be back in the Easter issue . . . the October
editorial was clearly libellous and was yanked . . . and
the one written for this issue fell before the expediency
of getting in another page of ads . . . bloody but unbowed
the editor's views will be on us again come spring. . . .
Move is underfoot to make the Chronicle a little
more literary and a little less chatty . . . we invite your
opinions about the line the Chronicle should take and
hope you write in . . . also we are casting about for
fresh talent to brighten the pages and if you are talented,
well . . . who knows where one might go from a modest
start on the Chronicle. . . .
The Chronicle has always been interested in the
Athletic program at U.B.C. and we print a bit on the
campus scene at page 24 . . . but in the next issue we
promise to run a story that will tell all . . . so look for
the Easter issue . . . copies are free if you support the
Alumni-U.B.C.  Development fund . . . say fifty?  . .  .
COVER PICTURE:
Dorothy Somerset and  Prof.  F. G.  C.
Wood  inspect the
stage  lighting  at the  Frederic Wood
Theatre  .   .   .  story
on the theatre appears at page 7.
♦ ported in*1
This advertisement is not published
or displayed by the Liquor Control
Board or by the Government of
British Columbia.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page 5 John G. Moffatt,
B.A.
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^^^^^-   * .     l^tfnE^^''H!L ffi^w/k
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ii^A jy<?^r, Standard of B. C. Provides a Fellowship for graduate
studies to expand the field of chemical research. To John G. Moffatt,
the winner in 1951, who is now working to his M. Sc, we extend
congratulations and best  wishes for   continued  success.
STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIMITED
MARINE BUILDING
VANCOUVER 1, B.C.
Page 6
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
ma Frederic Wood Theatre
On August 7th, 1951, Dean Gage nearly stopped
the opening night performance of the Summer
School of the Theatre's production of Bernard
Shaw's "You Never Can Tell". Ten minutes before
curtain time, he drove up to the stage door of the
Auditorium and commandeered Dorothy Somerset,
director of the School: "I want to show you something.    It will only take five minutes".
Sensing that something of top importance was
in the wind, she went—went to the old Totem
Coffee Bar, to learn that the Board of Governors
had just turned it over, with a grant, to be converted into a theatre for academic work in dramatics.
Perhaps, at that moment, symbolically speaking, was laid the cornerstone of the Frederic Wood
Theatre. But its beginning stretched back to the
year 1915, when Professor F. G. C. Wood —
"Freddie" — founded the Players' Club and thus
started all dramatic work at the University. And
its realization was over a year away, to the date,
December 6th, 1952, when it could be declared
officially open.
TOTEM CDFFEE BAR
Between August, 1951, and December, 1952,
the Totem Coffee Bar was converted into a theatre.
Additional monies were needed. Friends of the
University and of the theatre generously subscribed
to the building fund. The Alumni Association included the new theatre among its projects for the
year 1952. The work went ahead. From the beginning, the theatre won the sympathetic and enthusiastic support of all those asked to assist.
Faculty members contributed advice and many
hours of work on colour schemes, seating arrangements and landscaping. Every section of the Department of Buildings and Grounds was involved,
and to a man, all those concerned took a personal
interest in the progress and success of the work of
conversion. The Purchasing and Accounting Departments made the funds available stretch as far as
possible. And Alumni members of the Players'
Club advised on lighting, stage design and seating.
Before ever the theatre was completed it was
already in use. The Summer School of the Theatre
used it regularly for classes during the summer
session of 1952. It presented there, with temporary
seating accommodation, one of its major productions, "The House of Bernarda Alba". Three
winter session courses in theatre meet there regularly, and as part of the "Frederic Wood Theatre
Workshop Programme", there were presented, in
November, six performances of Bernard Shaw's
"Candida", for Freshman, since they must study
this play in English 100.
Finally, on December 6, 1952. with permanent
seating accommodation completed, with only the
permanent dimming switchboard and a front curtain
still to be installed, the Frederic Wood Theatre was
officially opened by President MacKenzie. He,
and all those who have joined together to make
possible the theatre, were there to pay tribute to
the man "who started it all", Professor Emeritus
F. G. C. Wood. And in honour of the occasion,
since one of the objectives of the theatre is the
production of Canadian plays, a group of well-
known actors presented a reading of a new play
by the University's own distinguished poet and
playwright—"Trial of a City", by Earle Birney.
When the question of a name for the new
theatre came up, there was only one answer. It
must be "The Frederic Wood Theatre". It must be
named in tribute to the man who started all theatre
work at the University, who took "theatre"—and
the name of the University—on tour throughout
the province, and whose students and their descendants have played a major part in developing theatre
in British Columbia.
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NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page 7 *
WOMEN
By LEONA SHERLOCK
Time out from Christmas shopping to wish all
the Chronicle readers a very merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year—and may they have all sorts
of successes for us to write about!
Speaking of successes, we have a few rather
different "success stories" this issue. One is of
Lorraine Johnstone, that very clever Vancouver
lawyer who's up to her ears in politics right now.
Lorraine is running as a Conservative Federal
candidate for Vancouver South.
Very proud to have joined the ranks of alumni
is Mrs. G. Frank Lane, who graduated this Fall.
For the ceremony she wore her son Bob's hood and
her daughter-in-law Jean's gown. B oth Bob and
Jean (nee Mowatt) are UBC grads and are now
living in Toronto where Bob is in fourth year medicine at the U. of T. Mrs. Lane's other son, George
will enter UBC next Fall to complete the UBC
family picture. Not content with completing her
Arts degree—she majored in Russian—Mrs. Lane
now wants to go on to a Library School.
*      *      *
In the romantic vein Muriel Scott of Cloverdale,
a graduate of the Vancouver General Hospital as
well as UBC, was married this Fall in Scots, Kirk,
Rangoon, Burma to Ivor Brodie, an Englishman
who has spent the past two years in Rangoon.
Muriel hit the newspapers in September when she
acted as midwife to Mrs. Chinn Daniel Yu Kai and
delivered her with a baby girl aboard the CPA
plane out of Tokyo. Doctors told her she did a
"first-rate" job. Muriel has been with the World
Health Organization for some time now.
*      *      *
Joining those lucky (and they've worked for it)
people studying abroad is Mary Horton who
was the winner of a coveted scholarship to the Sorbonne. Mary won the Canadian Club scholarship
last year, by the way . . . Waving goodbye to UBC
and their Point Grey home for awhile are Earle
and Esther Birney. Earle is on a writing scholarship and will set up housekeeping somewhere in the
south of France. Esther and their son will spend
some of the time in England with her family.
"VANCOUVER'S   MADE-TO-MEASURE   SLACKS   HOUSE"
THE
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SPORT SLACKS
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\yur Compliments
r
TO THE
U.B.C. ALUMNI
Working together towards a better
future are trained men and women
from U.B.C. In all occupations and
professions ... in every walk of life.
We are proud to serve you!
ott^TDati (Lumpann
INCORPORATED   2*?    MAY   1670.
Page 8
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE WOMEN
ft
Lucky enough to get posted to London on the
teacher's exchange was Cathie Shaw. When last
heard from she was in the delightful position of
having run out of plays to see.
Winner of the Community Arts Council's one-
act play contest was Yvonne Agazarian Maartman
whose play "A Son is Born" was the one chosen.
One of the most interesting weddings of the
Fall season was a strictly University of B.C. affair,
linking two of the University's most prominent
families. The bride was Elizabeth Mary Stirling
Brock and the groom Struan Robertson. The bride
is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Byron Britton
Brock of Johannesburg, South Africa and granddaughter of the late Dean and Mrs. R. W. Brock
and of Hon. Grote Stirling, an MP for many years
and at one time Minister of National Defence.
Struan is the grandson of Dr. F. F. Wesbrook,
first President of UBC. The reception was held at
the Dave Brocks' home in West Vancouver.
. ^Jne^rroilled
for your
Wedding Reception
All the gracious appointments of a lovely, spacious home
with luxuriously furnished reception room, lounge, living-
room and dining-dancing room for your wedding guests.
Because of the popularity of "The Hollies" reservations
are  now being  taken for Spring and  Summer weddings.
Mr.  and Mrs. J.  B.  Campbell  will  be  pleased
to assist you in planning the details.
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NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page 9 FORESTRY  ALUMNI  MEETING
Cold deck and cruise line, stumpage and sawdust mixed in harmony with insect and fungus
when 103 Forestry Alumni of U.B.C. assembled in
Victoria on December 11th.
Welcomed by Chairman Ed. Bassett, the meeting led off with a roll call of graduates since 1923,
events of the past thirty years recalled by Mike
Gregg of the first class, George Allen of '33, Ray
Foster of '43 and Frank Maber of '53, followed by
a history of the Department of Forestry by Professor Knapp. The U.B.C. Research Forest at
Haney was described by Ian Schiedel.
Dean Besley pointed up recent developments in
the curriculum since the formation of the Forestry
Faculty in 1950 which stress the realistic approach
to problems, enabling the graduate to appreciate
the forest situation in all its parts before tackling
any one of them.
Jim McWilliams, President of the U.B.C. Forest Club, emphasized the influence of the Club, both
in publicizing forestry aims and accomplishments
through the Research Notes and annual U.B.C.
Forester and in maintaining contacts with forestry
alumni.
Frank Turner, Executive Director of the U.B.C.
Alumni Association, and Jack Roff, Forestry Degree
Representative, outlined the work of the organization in co-ordinating the activities of alumni groups
throughout the continent.
Alums Bert Gayle and Harry Smith are to be
congratulated on the able organization of a most
successful reunion.
OTTAWA  ALUMNI   BRANCH
The U.B.C. Alumni Association of Ottawa made
a fine start at its first meeting of the 1952-53 season,
held in the Prescott Hotel Banquet Room, on November 14. Approximately 100 graduates were
present to dine on "petite pate au poulet' 'and to
hear Robert McKeown (Arts '36) speak on the
United States election.
Mr. McKeown, introduced by Dr. George F.
Davidson, the new president, gave a most interesting "post mortem" of the U.S. elections, in the light
of his visits to both the Republican and Democratic
conventions. The speaker stressed the important
role of television both at the convention and during the whole campaign. He attributed General
Eisenhowers' landslide victory to a number of
causes, the most important in his opinion being:
a general feeling of frustration felt by the American
people as a result of suddenly having to bear the
cost of world leadership; the Korean war; corruption in government as exemplified by such easily
recognizeable items as deep freezes and mink coats;
and the fact that the General was a war hero and
trusted man without a political background. At the
same time, he remarked on how Adlai Stevenson
had impressed the correspondents with his ability
to face issues squarely. At the conclusion of the
speech, Mr. McKeown was thanked by Mr. Les
Brown.
Best wishes for the season from us all in
Ottawa.
PAT COCKBURN
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Page 10
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE 35th ANNUAL ALUMNI MEETING
The University of B.C. Alumni Association celebrated its thirty-fifth birthday at its annual meeting held in Brock Hall on 13th of November. In
conjunction with the meeting was held the 40th
annual gathering of Convocation and it was the
first time in history the two bodies held a joint
meeting.
Speaker of the evening was His Honor Judge
Joseph B. Clearihue of Victoria who addressed the
gathering with a talk that covered the history of
the University from its earliest days.       ,
Attending the meeting were several members
of the first Convocation forty years ago whose pictures appear in this issue on other pages. Also in
attendance were members of the first class of Victoria College, the forerunner of the University of
British Columbia.
Chancellor Sherwood Lett paid tribute during
the evening to another Judge, His Honor Arthur
E. Lord who was named this year winner of the
"Great Trekker" award by the student body of
U.B.C.
At the meeting a cheque in the amount of
$18,000 was presented to the University by the
Alumni Association, being the proceeds of this
year's Alumni-U.B.C. Development Fund collected from 2200 donors.
Douglas MacDonald, B.A. '30, was elected
President of the Alumni Association for the forthcoming year, taking over from retiring President
Gordon M. Letson.   Also elected were:
Dr. Peter Spohn, Frank Lewis, Doug Denholm,
Don Miller, Iain MacSwan, Richard J. Clark, Audrey Dunlop, Hugh Marshall, Jack Roff, Margaret
E. Clarke. Dr. W. G. Black, William H. Birmingham, Harry Franklin. Dr. Fred Grauer, Helen
Harmer, Aileen Mann.
FLASH 11
ATTENTION SOCIAL WORKERS
ANNUAL DINNER
Monday, January 5th, 1953
Notices will be mailed
FLOOR COVERINGS...
ARMSTRONG'S ASPHALT TILE
ARMSTRONG'S RUBBER TILE
ARMSTRONG'S LINOLEUM
GOODYEAR VINYL TILE
STYROTILE  PLASTIC WALL TILE
FLOORCRAFT  LIMITED
In the middle of the 1900 block West Broadway
FOR     \ PHONE
ESTIMATES j   CE6210
FOR
ADVICE
IT'S   FROM   BIRKS
45.00
Designed and handcrafted by
Birks own silversmiths . . . assuring
unrivalled value.
Although every piece may be purchased
separately, the prices quoted here are for
three-piece sets; mirror, hair brush and comb.
BUDGET TERMS:
10% DOWN, balance in
convenient monthly
payments with email
carrying charge.
BIRKS
SILVERSMITHS
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE
VANCOUVER, B.C.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page It Placel to. Qa .. . ^
for the Best in
CHINESE
FOODS
JtosuudSi Qtaauatel...
Yes, MING'S chefs are honour
graduates in the art of preparing
authentic Chinese dishes.
No wonder our patrons
tell their friends: "Go to
Ming's for the finest in
Chinese foods . . . they're
simply delicious". You'll
like our moderate prices,
too . . . the friendly
service . . . and the lovely
surroundings.
NEXT TIME—TRY . . .
up the red-carpeted stairway
at
147  E.  PENDER
BEFORE OR AFTER THE THEATRE
Visit the
"CHINESE CUISINE AT ITS BEST"
Located in the heart of Vancouver's Chinatown, this
distinctive Chinese restaurant is the rendezvous of
the movie, radio and concert artists.
155 East Pender St. MArine 1935
Entertain Your Party at
The"SMILIN" BUDDHA
RESTAURANT & CABARET
DINE AND DANCE
featuring  the
"Smilin' "   Buddha  Orchestra
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
Open from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m.
(Sundays - Special  Family  Dinners
5 to 12)
109  East Hastings
Reservations TA. 3821
,|pimiinirnn-n
DINE AND DANCE AT
W. K. GARDENS
in the heart of Chinatown
beautifully decorated,
specializing in choice
Chinese Foods
Dinner Served from 5 P.M. to 4 A.M.
Open Every Night
127 East Pender St. PAcific 6642
UB.C's "YOUNGEST" GRAD
By Bill Dunford (Arts '32)
RESEARCH DEPT.—A recent magazine article, telling of how Air Commodore Allan Hull
went to Varsity after retirement and graduated in
law, has caused Mrs. Nat Cornfoot to do some research and to pen me a note.
Story of the high-ranking Air Force officer becoming a freshman at age of 52, also said he was the
oldest UBC graduate. Not so, says the wife of
the veteran golf pro who was Marion Wright before her marriage.
Her father was Rev. T. H. Wright, who received
his degree in May, 1921. He had been 58 in February of that year.   Mr. Hull is nearing 58 now.
Here is a quote from The Province of May 14,
1921:
"Age being by no means a matter of years, he
was one of the youngest and one of the proudest
of the 129 members of the graduating class who
bowed their heads to receive the "Admitto Te" of
the chancellor . . . And to him was the greatest
measure of applause accorded as he stepped from
the platform."
During the time Mr. Wright attended UBC he
carried on an active ministry, adds Mrs. Cornfoot,
who now resides in Alberni, where Nat is pro at
the fine Alberni club course.
—Reprinted from the Vancouver Daily Province, "Talk of the Town"
SUMMER  SCHOOLS AT
BRITISH UNIVERSITIES
Graduates who are planning a trip abroad might
be interested in the opportunity provided by the
British Council to attend a short course in one of
the British Universities. Courses run from three to
six weeks (the three week period may usually be
chosen by Canadians). The courses are given in
the college buildings, and students live in university
residences. As the students enrolling come from
all over the world, residence life is that of an International House.
The universities giving courses vary from year
to year: three or more of London, Birmingham,
Edinburgh, Glasgow, Oxford or Cambridge in any
given summer.
The courses are on general topics e.g. in 1951,
the course at Edinburgh was titled "The Growth of
European Civilization", and the course at London,
"Literature and the Arts in Britain Today." The
London course that year was arranged to take
advantage of special features of the Festival of
Britain.
Lectures, discussion groups,
talks compose the study program,
trips and excursions are optional.
U.B.C. graduates who have attended one of
these courses in recent years include: LILLIAN
WILLIAMSON, HELEN BARR, '31; MARION
LANGDIDGE, '29; MARY FALLIS, '32; NORMA SMITH, '31, and STELLA SHOPLAND.
Applicants in Canada should write to Mr. T. H.
Matthews, Secretary, National Conference of Canadian Universities, McGill University. Montreal.
and   illustrated
Interesting side
Page 12
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE *
PERSONALITIES
*
Keith MacDonald, B.Sc. A. '47, Public Health
educator for Victoria and Esquimalt, has left for a
two-year post with the Royal Health Organization
at Kuching, Sarawak on the Island of Borneo . . .
His wife is the fomer Gwynneth Griffith, B.A.,
B.S.cA. '49.
G. Ross Ker, has been appointed private secretary to the Honourable Ralph Campney, Q.C., who
was recently appointed Canada's Solicitor-General.
Featured in an ad in the November issue of
Chatelaine were Joan McLean and Barry Sleigh . . .
They were featured as the bride and groom in a
Woodbury Facial Soap ad.
Brig. Joseph W. Bishop, U.B.C. graduate, and
vice-adjutent general in the Canadian Army has
been named Canada's military attachee to Washington .. . The 45-year-old soldier is a 1929 U.B.C.
Arts graduate.
Dr. Howard O. McMahon, science director of
Arthur D. Little Inc. received the Frank Forest
Award for 1952 at the Fall meeting of the American
Ceremic Society . . . Dr. McMahon received the
award for his paper "Thermal Radiation Fram Partially Transparent Reflecting Bodies" ... He graduated from U.B.C. having his B.A. and M.A. degrees
in Physical Chemistry and further went on to receive his Ph.D. from M.I.T.
Poet-novelist Earle Birney of the University of
British Columbia leaves in January for a year in
France on a $4,000.00 scholarship from the Canadian  Government.
Beatrice E. Brandt, graduate of the University
of British Columbia and School of Library Science,
University of Toronto, has been appointed to the
staff of Massey Library, Ontario Agriculture
College.
Eight of the 100 books selected by the National
Book Week Committee were written by members
and former members of the U.B.C. faculty and student body . . . three were written by Earle Birney
of the English Dept., two by illustrous grad Eric
Nicol, and one each by Roy Daniels of the Dept.
of English, Dorothy Livesey and Lister Sinclair,
both graduates.
The U.B.C.-Alumni Development Fund ranks
high in popularity out on the campus since the contribution by that organization of $5000 toward the
University Gynasium Debt.
U.B.C.'s contribution to the Arts received more
publicity recently when it was learned that three
of our graduates appear in the Oxford University
Press "Anthology of Canadian Short Stories" . . .
they are Dorothy Livesey, Ernest Perrault, and
William McConnel.
.    STEEL
-k  BUILDING SUPPLIES
*  McLEOD RIVER COAL
MNSCOWWNSEVans
<*&Zm/£e<iL
B.C.'s Largest Builders' Supply House
Foot of Columbia St.
MArine 3171
Vancouver, B.C.
North 3020
Dunn's...
Announce the
Op
ening
of a new store at 2853 South Granville
Featuring
Ladies' Tailored-to-Measure
SUITS — TOPCOATS — SKIRTS
SLACKS and JACKETS
Men's Tailored-to-Measure and Ready-to-Wear
SUITS — TOPCOATS — SLACKS
JACKETS and a complete line of Men's fine
Accessories!
Easy Credit Terms Available
D
unn s
"Where You Dress for Success"
2853 South Granville CHerry 8232
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page 13 Do You Owna Canadiana  Paint, Ho Ho?
By Davide Brocca
A short time ago, the Vancouver Art Gallery
held its annual remnant sale called "Do You Own
A Canadian Painting?", and several of us were
strangely moved. In fact, we did some moving
ourselves. We moved a vote of no confidence.
After which we moved rapidly away, for two reasons. For one thing we'd seen enough (amusing
though the enthusiasts were). For another, we had
to save our lives if we didn't want the enthusiasts
to tear us into remnants. Heavens, if they'd torn
us limb from limb, we might have been sold as
fragments of Canadian sculpture, or been used as
models for some very still life indeed, and that
would be a hell of a fate for an innocent bystander,
as even the most impassioned enthusiast must
admit.
SALESMANSHIP
Mind you, there's nothing wrong with Canadian artists (or any other artists) wanting to earn
a living. Neither is there anything wrong with
the old salesmanship and pep and zip. It's just
that there is something ever so slightly provincial
and embarrassing about being too self-consciously
Canadian. If our painting is to stand on its own
legs, or its own easel (so to speak), it had better
stop saying (a) that it is highly competitive and
can hold its own anywhere, and (b) that we should
loyally protect it as a weaker vessel. The two
statements are hardly compatible. And in any
event, while loyalty is a splendid thing when you
keep your mouth shut and just act on it, it becomes
a little ludicrous when you try to whip it up in
yourself and others . . . when you go round soul-
searching and evangelizing and saying "Oh dear,
I do hope we are being Canadian enough!"
In the course of our soul-searching, we often
ask each other what a Canadian really is. I am in
a position to tell you. A Canadian is a man who
goes round asking if he is Canadian. This is
phenomenal, and almost unique. The only thing
like it is the American habit of calling things un-
American, and the British habit (less widespread
and quite commonly mocked) of calling a very few
things un-British . . . and un-British refers only to
low codes of conduct, not to culture. Probably the
Russians have decided to call practically everything
un-Russian, but that is a political move . . . even
their culture (such as it is) is highly political. I
think Canadians are unique in worrying about
whether Canadianism is being Canadian enough in
an entirely non-political sense.
Can you seriously imagine a Greek meeting
another Greek and asking "Do you own a Greek
painting?" Or a Frenchman hurling his palette
away (they skim beautifully) because he'd just
heard of somebody who didn't own a French painting? The idea is laughable,and you are laughing
now at so absurd a notion, but you see nothing
funny in "Do you own a Canadian painting?"
That's different. And you are quite right. It certainly is. That's my whole point. Do you own a
Canadian self-consciousness? You do, you do.
God has made you different from all other animals.
Well, shortly after this bargain sale, the Vancouver Art Gallery turned itself into a forum to
boost Canadian books. (If I may indulge in a little
Latinity, all who are not forum are againstum.)
And here again, it is a sweet and very ethical thing
to earn a living. Dulce et decorum est. (Note to
printer . . . for God's sake watch this spelling . . .
we don't want another letter from a professor of
Latin.) Nobody would blame a Canadian author,
even if he called himself a Canadian author as
distinguished from an ordinary author, if he wanted
to boost his sales. He's got to boost them, or
starve. It is hardly a sweet and honorable thing
to starve on behalf of Canadian authors. I mean,
not so sweet that it sickens one.
The "Do you owna Canadian book?" show
differed from the art show, in that no cut-rate stuff
was offered. We Canadians may sell our pictures
cheap (if nobody will buy them at the price we first
thought of and we don't really think they're our
best work anyhow), but by God, we have enough
pride left to price our books high. Even when we
import English books (do you own an English
book?) we have the sense and the guts to double
the fair price before we let people buy them. We
pretend that the pound sterling equals five bucks,
instead of well under three, and then we add
customs duty (which doesn't exist), plus handling
charges (which are included in the original allowance for mark-up anyhow), and so we buy a 16
shilling book for something over four dollars . .  .
(Continued on page 29)
cn
PAcific
9267
1150
_  _ SEYMOUR
7/cm c&H,l)&pendon
BOB  BODIE
(STEERING SAFETY AND
WHEEL ALIGNMENT
BOB BODIE ltd.
1150 SEYMOUR ST.    VANCOUVER, B.C.
Page 14
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE Jf,
ame
Gotnina
FALL   CONGREGATION
•   ALUMNI   ASSOCIATION
ANNUAL MEETING
•   CONVOCATION   MEETING
•   CLASS   OF   '32   REUNION
L to R—Chancellor Sherwood Lett, Gov.-General Vincent Massey and Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie
Page 15 Class of '32 (20th Reunion) Faculty Club U.B.i
H. F. Angus, President Emeritus L. S. Klinck,
Beckett, Mrs. L. S.  Klinck  and Dean  Henry  F.
III. VGEBayne
Ll^ll^Ll^Ll^F -      ^L^[^B;   ■^^^^7^8^50  <rom
I^I^I^I^I^I^I^B '"' y^^^^^^^^-  „   cheque . „     Reti»n9
^^^^^^^^^^H    = >"^    ,7Rr     receive   cl,eq    ,c  fund.
^^^^■■■B .      president,  UBC\  sq  0(   Alumn.-U*^
■^■^^^T77rt   Acttng-*'res,a "Trustees  °'
^      <■    F    H.   Chant,  *   y.     Pres.dent,
Dean  S.   *■ ^ltcheU,  v,ce
r/rs.   Howard     • q|V
His   Honour   Judge   J.
original    U.B.C.    Convoi
guest    speaker,    recall;
struggles.
president i-e
Head Table Guests—His Honour J
Gordon M. Letson, Chancellor Shen
Honour  Judge   Lord.
Page 16 Z. Included in picture of head table. Mrs.
Reunion Co-Chairmen Don Smith and Ken
Angus.
J. Clearihue, one of
ation members and
University's     early
:
:  - ,  ■
'
■   :
;    !■■:
"  ■ i H
Asso
las   Macdonald,
ciat'on's   thank's
-"*>-*«.■■   Presidenf
rus   s""'es   approva/J
idge   Clearihue,   Retiring   President
(ood  Lett, Mrs. G.  M.  Letson,  His
Page 17 TWENTY    YEARS    AFTER   -32    REUNION
GUESTS—head table reservations were made for DON
SMITH, Sc. '32, and KEN BECKETT, Arts '32, co-
chairmen; DR. and MRS. KLINCK, DEAN and MRS.
ANGUS, MARGARET SMITH, ISABEL BECKETT and
FRANK TURNER. Speeches were made by everybody
with added comments by TED BAYNES, ENID WYNESS
and MARY FALLIS. The Committee assisting with plans
included JACK and MURIEL PEARSON, WALTER LIND
and JEAN CAMERON BAYNES.
REMINISCENCES—Dr. Klinck's car . . . EARL VANCE
leading our most famous yell. "Do you remember?" he
said . . . then "My Girl's a Hullaballoo" . . . and Mr.
Noah . . . Those depression jobs . . . Our promise to Dean
Buchanan to give the last $10,000 of our first million
dollars to  U.B.C.
CONFESSIONS—That graduation alarm clock . . . there
it was at the reunion . . . The Sciencemen's supply of
apples for their labs . . . now we know where they
came from.
STATISTICS—We introduced ourselves, 1952 edition . . .
of primary interest and considerable pride, the partner
of the years, the report of the offspring at home. MARIAN
HANES KNOWLES, who had come down from Gibsons
has a family of five . . . ALICE BAKER NIELSON is
also bringing up five . . . and there are a number with
four . . . KEN and ISABEL BECKETT, TED and JEAN
(CAMERON) BAYNES, MARION WALLACE STURDY
. . . junior Is nearly ready for college and thinks he would
like to go to U.B.C.
FROM FAR PLACES—GEORGE HALL was there from
South Africa; GAV DIROM from Salt Lake City,
Tennessee, and southern points; ISABEL BESCOBY, in
town and back to what is now home office, from Montreal
and stop offs through B.C.
WHO'S WHO IN '32—DON MORGAN, permanent class
president, is an executive with Shell Oil in California;
FRED GRIMMETT, now a magistrate in Chilliwack;
FRANK SNOWSELL, M.L.A., elected in the B.C. election
last June; ALFRED ELLIOTT, head of Department of
Ophthalmology,  University  of Toronto;   HAROLD  GIB-
BERD, Head of Department of Sociology, University of
West Virginia; CHARLIE ARMSTRONG, Vice-President
and Dean of Faculty, Whitman College; BOB SHARP,
Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver; DEAN
GOARD, Principal of Vancouver Vocational School; IAN
MCTAGGART COWAN, Department of Zoology, U.B.C,
and a North American Authority on wildlife; BOB WALLACE, Victoria College; HENRY JOHNSON, Director of
Summer Session, Victoria.
_ MARIAN MILES PENNINGTON is now with the
United Nations World Health Organization as an adviser
to the Turkish Government in Ankara; ENID WYNESS,
supervisor, with the B.C. Provincial Department of Health
in charge of the T.B. Division; ISABEL BESCOBY, with
National Selective Service, Personnel Division for B.C.;
GWYNNETH HUMPHREYS, Professor of Mathematics
in eastern U.S.A.
ALSO PRESENT—Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Young (MABEL
BROWN), Mr. and Mrs. R. Taylor (MARY DELONG),
Mr. and Mrs. Clare Willis (MARY MACDONALD), Mr.
and Mrs. Chris Dalton (MARGARET BIRD), (MARGARET CLARKE, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Campbell (MARY
DOOLEY), Mr. and Mrs. BOB SHARP, Mr. and Mrs.
DAVE ELLIS, Mr. and Mrs. PERCY EASLER, Mr. and
Mrs. T. Slinger (AMY ATHERTON), Mr. and Mrs. C. C.
COOKE, Mr. and Mrs. TOM BROWN, Mr. and Mrs. TOM
SOMERTON, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Vick (JEAN WITBECK), Mr. and Mrs. ED RICHARDSON, Mr. and Mrs.
GEORGE NIXON, Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Murray (MARGARET WILSON), Mr. and Mrs. HUGH MCGIVERN,
JANICE GREENLEES, Mr. and Mrs. Lome Ginther
(MARGARET RATHIE), Mr. and Mrs. BRENTON
BROWN (PAULINE LAUCHLAND), Mrs. John Swanson
(GRACE KNOWLTON), Mrs. Ernest Bull (MARGARET
JEAN CARDER), EWALD GORANSON, and Mr. and
Mrs. FRED BOLTON.
One of the husbands remarked, "This is the livest
bunch of relics I have ever seen." The reunion having
been a success, we are planning to celebrate our 25th
Anniversary in '57. If you missed the 20th, send your
right address to the Alumni Office now.
Page 18 r
r
How Can 1 Start An
Investment Programme ?
By Planned Savings
Through Life Insurance.
The basis of an investment plan in
most cases should be life insurance.
It meets in a sound and regular way
the real objectives of investment —
savings for the future, a retirement
income and money for your family
should anything happen to you.
What is more, life insurance
achieves these ends economically
and without worry or risk. Discuss
with a Mutual Life of Canada
representative a life insurance
investment  plan   for   your  future.
UTUALIIFE
T-252
of CANADA
WATERLOO, ONTARIO
P/u>&ctuM<&,y0<o4aue,
^
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
Introducing a Medical
Advisor of Unquestioned
Professional Authority
■■■I!!™ If!   ll!ll!llllll!lll!!ll!llllllllllllllllllll!lll!lllllllllllllllllllll!
DR. WALTER C. ALVAREZ is Professor of
Medicine, Mayo Foundation; Emeritus
Member, Division of Medicine, Mayo Clinic;
Editor of "Modern Medicine". Therefore the
Vancouver Sun is confident that in presenting
his regular articles on the newest in medical
progress and practice it is offering a feature
of the highest value and interest to its readers.
For medical news that is responsible, expert
and up-to-the-minute, look to Dr. Alvarez'
articles in The Sun.
THE VANCOUVER
i
%  31  **
Phone: TAtlow 7141 for Daily Home Delivery
I
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page 19 Styled by
California Inspired
Suits and Coats
that lead the
Fashion Parade
Available at leading retail and fashion shops
Look for the Label ♦. ♦
FREED of VANCOUVER
Your Assurance of Quality
in    High   Grade   Men's   and    Boys   Wearing
Apparel
Sportswear and Work Clothing manufactured in B.C. the
label, Freed of Vancouver, has met with approval and
consumer acceptance.
"Buy B.C. Products—Build B.C. PAYROLLS"
When it's "Play Ball" Time,
it's Fraser Uniform Time!
Growing with B.C. Manufacturers, the Fraser Manufacturing Firm makes baseball  uniforms and all types of
athletic clothing through local Sports Stores.
"Customer Satisfaction with
Quality Materials and Workmanship"
Makers of Laboratory Coats for U. B. C.
Fraser Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
1932 Manitoba Street, Vancouver, B.C.
"Buy B.C. Products—Build B.C. PAYROLLS"
Manufacturing Industries Are
While agriculture, mining', forestry and fishing
are the primary industries in British Columbia, it
is interesting to note the growth of the manufacturing industries in  B.C.
Man)- new companies have started up in the
past five years to make B.C.'s manufacturing industry boom ahead. There are now 4,000 companies engaged in manufacturing in B.C. The overall payroll amounts to $258,000,000. and 85,000
people are employed throughout B.C. As a secondary industry, Manufacturing employs almost as
many people as the combined agriculture, mining,
forestry and fishing industries.
Manufacturers of a pinless baby's diaper—Can-
bri of B.C.—began two and a half years ago with
this novel product. It's the sort of thing that
fathers and baby sitters love because it's so simple
to change. Since launching Canbri with the pinless
baby diaper, the company has expanded as the demand grewr, and now they manufacture just about
everything in the clothing line, for tots to teens.
One of the country's top designers. Horace Colnet
is responsible for the original designs.
Notable among the needle trade industries is
the National Dress Company. They manufacture
suits and coats under the label, "Kaplan". The
suits and coats styled by "Kaplan" are a distinctive Pacific contribution to the fresh, casual type of
clothes that so clearly express our West Coast way
of living. Established over 25 years ago. the National Dress is the largest manufacturer of ladies
clothing on the Pacific Coast.
A comparative newcomer to the Vancouver garment manufacturers is Freed of Vancouver. For-
merely known as the Fit-Rite Manufacturing Company, the plan employs about 35 people in the
manufacturing of high grade men's sportswear and
work clothing.
Another name that has become famous across
Canada in the manufacturing field is the Queen
Bess Dress Company. This company started in
1936 in its own Quonset building. Annual payroll
is about $64,600. They manufacture clothing of
every type for women, girls and children.
A FAMOUS NAME   -   NATIONALLY KNOWN
ALJEAN
Sportswear
• Specializing
in Separates
Originators of Hand Blocked Pleating
Featuring Imported ScottisJi Tartans
and Fine Worsteds
Sold in All Leading Stores in Canada and U.S.A.
Page 20
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE Growing With British Columbia
Sports and specialty clothing and baseball uniforms are made by Fraser Manufacturing Company.
The firm is another newcomer to the Coast and
joins the ever-increasing number of manufacturing
firms in B.C. whose aim is complete customer satisfaction through quality materials and workmanship.
The name, Aljean Sportswear is fast becoming
famous in Canada and the United States. Mr. and
Mrs. Al Guskin design specialty sportswear in their
B.C. factory which is sold in leading fashion shops
and bears the label, Aljean. This versatile souple
are the originators of the art of handblocking
fabrics. Some 46 persons are employed to produce
Aljean lines in the factory which was established
five years ago.
KmK&
PHONE: TAtlow 1275
i         Gaalt- Gnajft
|B IB                \AJkoleiale J^ouueniri,
PHiH
HI! SI        -Jotem J-^olei, Jrndian. Ljooai,
llllllll    rod L^ardi, (-fi-fti, r/oi/ettiei,(Ltc.
Convention  Work  a  Speciality
310-11
VICTORY BLDG.
319 WEST PENDER STREET            VANCOUVER 3, B.C.
NOW- ODOR-FREE
Yes — a genuine flat oil paint with no objectionable
odor! Covers with one coat, goes on like magic with
either brush or roller. Next time you buy interior paint,
make sure it's MONASEAL, the sealixed oil finish.
British Columbia Industry
QUEEN BESS
Manufacturers of
PRIVATE SCHOOL UNIFORMS
AND BLAZERS
Worn in B.C.
Also  makers  of  women's skirts,  blouses,  vests,  jackets,
shorts, playclothes, slacks, and nightgowns.
Girls' slacks, slips,  uniforms, blazers.
Boys'  rompers, and infantswear.
Available at Retail Stores throughout B.C.
and Across Canada
QUEEN BESS DRESS COMPANY LTD.
3704 Main Street, Vancouver   B.C.
CANBRI
Manufacturer's of
NANCY DIDEE PANTS
The Famous Pinless Diaper Holder
and Other B.C. Products
• MATERNITY LINGERIE
• FADED SPORTS DENIMS
• PLAYCLOTHES
• CORDUROY SPORTS JACKETS
Warner Bros.  Cartoon Characters
reproduced on Children's Clothes
EVERYTHING     IN     CLDTHING
FDR    TOTS    TD    TEENAGERS
Ask for them at your favorite store
CANBRI (B.C.) LTD.
162 Water Street
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page 21 POETRY
CHRISTMAS
Anno Christi 1952
There came a wise man from the east
Who stumbled in upon our feast.
Our host, a genial bloke and hearty,
Said in a reassuring' bellow:
"Come in, then.    Come and join the party.
Come in and have a drink, old fellow."
With puzzled stare the stranger gazed
At all our lovely Christmas trappings.
He listened to the shouts and clappings
And saw the whirling dancers spin.
He stood there like a man amazed
To see the maidens mixing gin.
He looked upon our happy trees
Fruited with gifts  and coloured lights
And while the band played "Pretty Knees".
He watched old Santa Claus come in
At length he said, with bashful grin:
"Forgive me.   These are novel sights.
"Forgive my stare.    They are so gay!
What spirit can thus gladden them ?
What is their frolic holiday?"
Our host coughed most discreetly.    "Oh,
But . . . can it be you do not know
That Christ is born in Bethlehem?"
—David Brock.
Letter to the Editor
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I wrot a leterh tto th Cronickel.
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Yrs. ffly.,
Ex-contributor.
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Page 22
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE FRANKLY   SPEAKING
One of the very few institutions which has survived economic and governmental systems, wars,
famines, etc. ... in the worlds' history is the University being, in perhaps overly-simple terms "a
congregation of people of a scholarly-bent and enquiring mind searching after truth." For many reasons—some of them good—the modern North
American University provides other services and
performs additional or other functions.
Fundamentally, however, the great institutions
on this Continent or elsewhere are those which have
wandered the least from the original reason why
a University fills a basic human need. And—surprisingly enough—those same institutions, for the
most part, are the ones who receive the greatest
continuing personal support from members of the
"University family" — students, parents, alumni,
Faculty and administration, alumni and other University friends.
DUTY
Endowments. Bequests, annual gifts, legislative
support, personal interpretation of the institutions'
needs, problems and progress in every group, in
every walk of life, in every Community by interested friends who know the institution and understand the needs because they have been taken into
the confidence of those currently in charge—these
are the tangible, intangible and quite natural from
the voluntary, and to some extent, organized efforts
of intelligent citizens with a deep belief in the
worthwhileness of higher education generally and
their own Alma Mater in particular. Thev have a
high sense of duty—a seemingly old-fashioned idea
in many modern quarters!
Then, too, faith in an institution's future—and
in our case, U.B.C.'s—is absolutely vital to that
future. Upon what does the future depend, besides
the belief in the fundamental idea of an University?
Well, I believe it depends upon the foundation laid
at the start and U.B.C.'s was sound), the progress
to date (which has been steady and satisfactory),
and the calibre and character of all those directly
and indirectly connected with the University today.
Thus far, hundreds of U.B.C.'s Faculty members, thousands of her students, alumni and other
friends, have already demonstrated that they are
willing to "put themselves out" more than a little
to be help build a better U.B.C. Governmental
authorities have also shown a remarkable amount
of foresight, in addition to giving practical support
over the years.
"Much has been accomplished. But if each and
every one of U.B.C.'s friends—who are actually
full and equal partners in this important business of
higher education—developed a greater sense of personal loyalty to and responsibility for U.B.C.'s development—then our Alma Mater will fulfill its
great destiny.
ALUMNOTES
Glad to be back in Vancouver is O. K. (Os)
Miniato (M.A.Sc. '47) after two years in the U.K.
followed  by three years in  Caracao,  B.W.I.  "Os"
BY
FRANK J. E.TURNER
EXECUTIVE-DIRECTOR
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
said at least a dozen friends clipped and sent him
alumnus Bill Dunford's "Talk of the Town" column
in the iProvince, wherein mention was made of one
Miniato! ... A future alumna arrived at the home
of Betty (Clugston) and Charlie Long (B.Com. '43,
LL.B. '48) recently. Miss Long and her parents
are all fine! . . . From Williams Lake came this welcome "Hello": . . . "Haven't received a 'Chronicle'
for a short coon's age and suddenly it occurred to
me I hadn't sent in a Fund contribution lately, nor
even a card giving vou 1113' new address . . ." Thanks
Ed. (Ed. Pederson, B.A. 51'), Teacher, General
Delivery, William Lake . . . Still engaged in teach-
(Continued on page 28)
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Page  23 Ute. WoM
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Students Rebel at U.B.C. Athletic Set-up
There has been great controversy on the campus
of late with regard to the athletic set-up there and
several meetings have been held involving the Alma
Mater Society, The Men's Athletic Directorate, and
The Men's Athletic Council.
The gist of the feeling on the campus is that the
University students are dissatisfied with the kind of
football team they have been getting and have decided they wish to control the hiring and firing of
the Director.
Up to this time control of the Athletic Director
has been in the hands of the Physical Education
Department headed by R. S.  (Bob)  Osborne.
Students wish to remove the Athletic Director
from under the control of that body, and at a special
meeting of the student body held last month, a
motion was passed calling for the Athletic Director
to be made directly responsible to the Students'
Council and the Men's Athletic Council.
The following are the resolutions passed at a
general Alma Mater Society meeting on Thursday,
November 27, 1952.
WHEREAS the Senate has set standards of age
and education for admittance to the University,
and
WHEREAS students meeting this standard are
sufficiently mature to decide for themselves how
much time to devote to studies and to extra-curricular activities, and
WHEREAS, in a democratic society it is of the
greatest necessity that the University develop individual responsibility, and
WHEREAS the prime responsibility should be to
provide the best in educational facilities and to
maintain the highest possible educational standards
rather than to concern itself with how any particular minority group of students are succeeding in
their studies.
THEREFORE, we, the students of the University
of British Columbia in general meeting assembled,
respectfully request the Senate to promote, as far
as possible, student responsibility for their actions,
1. To instill in students a desire for education by
means other than legislation
and
specifically to withdraw the regulation respecting eligibility of freshmen to play in inter-collegiate athletics.
2. "THAT Athletic competition with other Canadian universities be investigated, by supporting
the reformation of the Western Inter-University
football union, and the playing of games with
other Canadian Universities when and where
feasible."
3. "THAT the Athletic Director shall be appointed
on the recommendation of the Men's Athletic
Council with the approval of Students' Council."
WILLSON E.
KNOWLTON
\Jplometri6t
MARINE
801 1
823
Birks Building
Vancouver. B. C.
Page 24
U. B.C. ALUMMI CHRONICLE Best Wishes
for
Christmas
and the
New Year!
It may be a few days early to express
these sentiments but on the other hand
it will be almost Easter before the next
issue of the Chronicle reaches you. Meanwhile we at The Dominion Bank all join
in wishing you the very best for the
Christmas season and prosperity for 1953.
THE
DOMINION
BANK
Established 1871
BRANCHES   THROUGHOUT   CANADA
New York Agency
49 Wall Street
London, England Branch
3 King William St., E.C. 4
Col. The Honourable E. W. Hamber, C.M.G., LL.D.
Director
R. F. J. Ford, Manager, Vancouver, B.C.
PRESIDENT'S  REPORT
November 13th, 1952
As retiring President of the Alumni Association, it is my privilege to report on the activities
of the past year. This year marks the 40th Anniversary of the inaugural meeting of Convocation,
when the foundation for our University was laid,
the 35th Anniversary of the founding of the Alumni,
and is the first joint meeting of these two bodies. I
bring you a special greeting from our executive
and myself aid join with you in celebration of this
important occasion.
The relationship of these two groups which in
most instances is merely a matter of "changing
hats" is under study by one of the committees of
our Board of Management. It is presently considering the consolidation of these groups bearing in
mind the special duties and responsibilities of convocation and those of the Alumni Association. Their
relationships will be viewed from all angles. It is
hoped that constructive suggestions will be received
which will make changes in the Universitv Act
acceptable to both bodies if and when it is reopened for revision.
During the past year certain fundamental
changes in our higher educational system were proposed which, if implemented, would ultimately have
an effect on our University. It is felt that the
representation of the Alumni Association to the
Government ensured that no changes would be considered without an opportunity for all interested
parties to be fully represented and their views made
known. The right and ability of the Association
to initiate such actions now or in the future, is in
my opinion, sufficient justification for its existence.
A committee is presently studying the proposed
changes in our University system and it is expected
that recommendations will be forthcoming for your
consideration during the year.
UNIVERSITY  HOSPITAL
Another committee is considering the possibility of establishing a University Hospital on our
Campus as part of the Medical School. This has
been the subject of considerable discussion during
former years and the Board of Management has
approved in principle the following recommendation which was submitted by that committee.
"that a non-profit society be incorporated under
the Societies Act with the aim and objects being
the fostering and promotion of a hospital at the
University to be incorporated under public statute
and the further object be the actual raising and
arranging for capital funds for the Hospital."
The Committee is anxious that the proposed
Society be able to direct such funds as may come
its way through the .Alumni-Development Fund.
In referring to our Development Fund may I
say this year is its fourth year of operation and we
have reached the highest point in number of individuals participating and also in the amount contributed. It :s felt, however, that there is room
for a greater conscoiusness of its scope and opportunity for individuals, whether Alumni or not, to
give money in trust to the University for whatever
purpose the donor may elect. We feel that at least
some of the monetary support presently enjoyed by
the University is attributable to the influence of
its graduates. (Continued on page 27)
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1952
Page 25 CLASS OF '22 REUNION
The 30th Reunion of the Class of '22 was held at
the University on July 4th and 5th. The committee
was delighted to find that during the day 70 joined
in Reunion activities and scarcely one missing member failed to write a note.
We met in the Library and toured the building
with Mr. Harlow. We were proud that one prized
possession is a copy of "The Biography of Thackeray" by Dr. Lionel Stevenson, '22, who was here
from the University of Southern California, in the
Reunion.
Other Californians were Dr. Lester McLennan
and his wife Cora. Another visitor from afar was
Clifford Kelly, here from McGill.
A conducted tour of the Campus arranged by
Dean Eagles, Chairman, proved very interesting
not only to visitors but to Vancouver Grads.
Les McLennan presided at the dinner and inspired a true reunion spirit. Dean Eagles read the
many letters received  following which Les called
on the 12 members of the Faculty present, many of
whom recalled highlights of the old Fairview days.
It was the last function Dr. Ashton attended and
no one was gayer or more full of University History
than he was.
Paul Whitley, who was president in our Graduating Year made a witty speech and other members
of the year added to the story, including Dr. Klinck,
next Gordon Letson. '22, spoke for the Development Fund.
Saturday afternoon out-of-town visitors gathered in Dean Eagle's garden for one of Mrs. Eagle's
delectable buffet suppers.
The week end was voted a success and some
money found its way into the Development Fund.
It was good to see so many former faculty members, Freddy Wood, Dr. Todd, Prof. Barss, Prof.
King, Dr. Klinck, Dr. Ashton, Dean Clement, Dr.
Sage and to hear from many others.
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Page 26
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE FORTY   YEARS   ON
BY  PROFESSOR  F. N.  SOWARD
Congregation and the Alumni Association are
honouring to-day those veterans of the First Convocation of this University who met on August 21,
1912, to elect the first Chancellor and fifteen members of Senate. By the terms of the University
Act, passed four years previously, the first Convocation was to consist of twenty-five members
selected by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, and
all graduates "of any University in His Majesty's
Dominions" who had resided for at least two years
in the province, registered with Provincial Secretary
and paid the required fee. It is impressive testimony
to the interest shown by these men and women in
the future of higher education in British Columbia
that some 800 enrolled between May 1 and July 31,
1912. From Edward Charles Arthur. B.A., Victoria
College, Coburg, of Nelson to Byron Yandall Hill,
B.A., University of New Brunswick, of South Hill,
alumni of every Canadian university and their
brethren from Oxford, Cambridge and London,
Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen, Manchester and
Durham, the Royal University of Ireland and
Trinity College, Dublin, responded to the call of
help to launch Canada's youngest university. To
turn the pages of the first register and read their
names is like unfurling an honour roll of British
Columbia's leaders in church and state and the
professions. Blaylock of Trail and Wade of Kamloops, Wolverton of Nelson and Howay of New
Westminster, Brewster and Tolmie, McKechnie and
Brydone-Jack, Sanford, De Pencier and McLaren,
E. P. Davis, Aulay Morrison and Denis Murphy,
Annie Jamieson, Lily Laverock, Evelyn Farris and
Rosalind Young, E. B. Paul and G. E. Robinson,
S. J. Willis, and L. F. Robertson—they are all there.
Some of them—as many as are available—will be
with us tonight; one of them, H. T. Logan, is
present here with the faculty as chairman of the
Department of Classics.
FIRST WAR
Forty years is not a long time in the life of a
University, which must by the very nature of things
be timeless and ageless. But The University of
British Columbia can claim as eventful a first forty
years as any of its peers. Its first classes met under
the grim shadow of the First World War. Of the
342 students who gathered in "temporary" quarters
in Fairview on September 30, 1915, many like our
present Chancellor, were soon to be off to the wars.
It is in their memory that the undergraduate gown
has its yoke edged with khaki cord. The energy and
determination of the students in the early Twenties
made the Government "See the Point," as the college paper happily proclaimed in 1922, but it was
not till three years later that the University was
settled at Point Grey. It had scarcely got used to
its new quarters before the Great Depression put
an end to hopes of expansion and reduced its vitality
to the lowest point consistent with survival.
Scarcely had it begun to move forward again when
a Second World War required the services and
sacrifices of many of its staff and students. Again
when its guns grew silent the University, like a
true Alma Mater, welcomed its sons and daughters
back to academic halls, and turned away no qualified veteran who sought higher education. At the
peak of this period almost 5,000 veterans streamed
across the Cam [His with some 4,400 other students.
They gave to the student body and the faculty the
same example of keenness and sound scholarship
as did the "returned men" after World War One.
To-day with its Faculties and Schools, its new Departments and its expanded facilities the University
is entering upon a second forty years of service.
May it receive from members of Convocation in
that period the same loyal and devoted support that
was given by the Convocation of 1912.
—Professor F. H. Soward.
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
(Continued from page 25)
Following the practice established last year
we have continued with our Fireside Chats by members of the faculty. In this way the Alumni and
their friends are enabled to keep in touch with the
activities on the Campus and maintain a continuing
interest in the affairs of the University. May I
formally thank the faculty for their painstaking
assistance.
As your President I would like to thank our
Executive Director for his untiring efforts throughout the past year and for the inspiration which he
has been to all of us in our efforts to be of assistance
in furthering the interests of the University.
To my committee chairman, members of the
Board of Management and executive may I say
thank you for your sustained interest and help.
We have been fortunate in enjoying the utmost
in cooperation and assistance for the Administration
of the University with particular reference to President Norma i MacKenzie and Chancellor Sherwood
Lett.
May I bespeak for my successor your support
in an interest which I believe to be important both
to yourself and the people of our province.
G. M. LETSON,
President.
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NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page 27 Over faff or*Cztetcfob Fbwei
IS GENERATED BY
WESTINGHOUSE EQUIPMENT
BUILT IN CANADA BY
CANADIANS
• First in the development of alternating electric current, Westinghouse is
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you CAN BE SURE...IF it's
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FRANKLY   SPEAKING
(Continued from Page 23)
ing (mainly slaFstics) as well as a consultant on
research projects is Dr. Bernard Ostle, (B.A. '45)
—but now as Associate Professor of Mathematics,
Montana State College, Bozeman, Montana . . .
From White Rock to Vancouver: Irene Graystone
(B.A. '47) ; new address being 3181 West 2nd Ave.
. . . During the summer (Julv 26) there was a boy
for the Foys! Proud Pa—Lieut. F. C. Foy (B.A.
'50) came in and said so, and also informed us that
his address is now Ld.S.H.(RC), Currie Barracks,
Calgary, Alberta . . . Another Brother-grad-success-
story belongs to Aubrey and Donald Kerr. Aubrey
(B.A. '40 )is now a Geologist with Plome Oil in
Calgary, while Dr. Donald (B.A. '41) is with the
Geography Dept. in the University of Toronto. The
latter, incidentally, wrote a chapter on B.C. in the
new text book: "Canadian Regions" published by
Dent & Sons . . . Alexa Cameron <B.A. '51) informed
us that "at least 17 members of the Teacher Training Class of '52 are teaching in the West Kootenay
and Boundary area" . . . The first Canadian to hold
a staff appointment at the Australian National University, our Ken McKirdy, (B.A. '47) represented
U.B.C. at the official ceremonies held in connection
with the installation of Viscount Bruce as the first
Chancellor of A.N.U. Congratulations Ken! . . .
Former Seattle Branch executive member Walt
Ewing (B.A. '50) has been transferred to his Company's head office—Wm. H. McGhee & Co. in
Brooklyn. N.Y. Walts' sister, Mrs. A. Carmichael,
also has a new address: "Greenbanks". Cartmel,
Grange-Over-Sands, Lancashire, England . . . Now
with TCA in Montreal is Jack McGee (B.A. '35)
. . . and just before I forget ... as if I dared ! May I
say simplv and sincerely: MERRY CHRISTMAS
AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR!
For the Best In
ENTERTAINMENT AND DANCING
ON NEW YEAR'S EVE
and every Nite
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Page 28
U. B. C. AtUMNI CHRONICLE DO YOU DWNA CANADIANA PAINT, HO HD?
(Continued from page 14)
this is to protect the Canadian author, I suppose.
Or the Canadian publisher, who is the fairy godmother of the Canadian author.
At the Giona Book Festa, there were pep-talks
from distinguished dullards and wits and all kinds
of people. There were all types, so they had a
message for us all, as missionaries should. And
although I wasn't there myself (because I was busy
writing a Canadian book), I bet half of them
mentioned their great big juju, Stephen Leacock,
who was born in England. And on one of the
panels of this great panel-truck . . . having truck
with one of the panels was Bruce Hutchison, editor
of the Victoria Daily Times and an author who
needs no special permit as a Canadian, though he
is a wise and observant critic of Canadian phenomena, and a loyal one too. Bruce said in his Victoria
Times column, later, that he loses his voice when
faced by a crowd, and his thoughts get inhibitions.
But when he got home again, he thought quite a
lot.
And one of his thoughts was this: the panel
was asked if Canadian literary taste was improving
or getting worse, and the panel said it was getting
better every minute, and Bruce distrusted this
optimism. After all (he said), our grandfathers on
their farms may have read a certain amount of
sentiment, but at least they did read, and they read
Dickens and Scott and other solid works . . . works
that didn't leave a tired grey smear across the wall
of you mind, with all the artistic effect of dirty
wallpaper. And what does the farmer read to-day ?
He doesn't read at all. He listens to the radio,
and he will soon watch TV. Some of his children
read. They read the comics. And when they grow
up, they will read the comics still, plus drugstore
thrillers.
And therefore it is our duty to teach everyone
to read. Without literacy we perish, do we? We
do indeed. But there are quite literate men who
cannot read a word, and there are quite illiterate
morons who can not only read glibly but have
university degrees. And I think a new darkness
has covered the earth along with the dazzling
brightness of the universal ability to read Hopalong
Cassidy. To claim we improve as Canadians or as
anything else is rather boastful. And pride is the
greatest of the seven deadly sins, and the toughest
to cure. So as Canadians or as anything else, you
had better walk delicately.
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Specializing in
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BOXING DAY DANCE
will be strictly
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED!
Carleton (Cart) Collard, perennial and capable Chairman
of the Annual Alumni Reunion Dance, announced that
this year's gala affair (back on a one-night "stand") will
be bigger and better than ever.
The date?   BOXING DAY, of course!
The place? Why the
COMMODORE CABARET, naturally!
By returning to the one-night basis, the many dozens
of alumni and their friends who've "gone the wrong
night" to see their former UBC colleagues will no longer
be disappointed—unless they leave it too late to get
tickets and reservations!
And, to ensure that there is a representative all-
Universities' crowd for this traditional Holiday event,
tickets will be available for grads of other Universities—
through the University Women's Club, the Inter-Fraternity Alumni Council, etc.—as well as from genial Cart
Collard himself at the Commodore daily between December 17 to 24th inclusive and prior to that time, from
Executive Director Frank J. E. Turner, at the alumni
office (ALma 3044).
Regardless—one thing is sure—if you want to be sure
to go,  PLEASE get your tickets and  reservations NOW!
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t	
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page 29 STATISTICS
MARRIAGES
Fred Bell to Claire Pollock.
William Cowan to Barnie McDonald.
Arthur Allman to Anna White.
George Puil to Kay MacDonald.
Adrian Beggs to Margaret Patterson.
Struan Robertson to Elizabeth Brock.
Richard Vivian to Arlene Wright.
William Kirker to Beverly Robertson.
Douglas Dewar to IPatricia Henderson.
William Coulthard to Ruth Livinston.
Philip Keatley to Elizabeth Grant.
John Nicolls to Nan Hardie.
Henry Greig to Evelyn Tiers.
Herman Frydenlund to Irene Hodgson.
Mervyn Bradshaw to Carol Grieve.
Kenneth Smith to Ruth Bennett.
Ronald Kelly to Cynthia von Rhau.
John Rose to Patricia Duncan.
Tony Scott to Barbara Wilson.
Dr. Alfred Nelson to Grace McNaughton.
Douglas  Knott,  B.S.A.,  '48,  to Joan Hollinshead,
Albion, Mich.
CUSTOM TAILORED
• SUITS •  SLAX
• TOPCOATS        •  SKIRTS
Made Especially for You!
KENT'S TAILORS
511 Howe Street
49 E. Hastings
424 Columbia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Vancouver, B.C.
New Westminster, B.C.
Call CEDAR 1151
"We Treat Your Clothes White'
BIRTHS
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Mann (Joan Bayne), a son,
Edward.
Mr. and  Mrs. P. D. Mare  (Beverly Sharman), a
daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. Russell Latham (Ann Peers), a son.
Mr. and Mrs.  Richard Wright  (Audrey Craig), a
son.
Mr. and Mrs. John Dawson (Virginia Wilbanks), a
son, Jonathan Harley.
Dr.  and  Mrs.  R.  G.  Wilson   (B.A.   '47)   Marjorie
Weber (B. Hec. '46), a daughter.
Mr. and  Mrs.  Douglas  Knott  (Joan Hollinshead),
a daughter, "Holly".
Mr. and Mrs. Geoff. Woodward (nee Lucy Berton),
a son.
*       *       *
DEATHS
Malcolm McLeod, B.A. '49, died in a plane crash
at Comox, B.C. ... A graduate of U.B.C, he was a
weather forecaster.
Harold Morton Graham, 62, Chemical Engineering graduate from U.B.C. and a holder of a Ph.D.
degree from Oregon State University died in Westchester, Pennsylvania in November.
E. Max Ladner, 48, lawyer, and member of the
family which pioneered the Delta . . . He was City
solicitor for Salmon Arm for the last ten years.
Richard Henry Lawrence, 24, was killed in an
aircraft accident while training with the U.S. Naval
Airm Arm in Florida.
EXPORT
CANADA'S   FINEST
CIGARETTE
Page 30
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
MM
■AkMlMttilM EATON'S
The Friendly Christmas Store
Shop in an atmosphere of brightness and cheer
where assortments are large, quality is con-
sistant, varieties are available in a wide price
range, and every purchase you make is backed
by EATON'S Famous Slogan "Goods Satisfactory or Money Refunded."
J"T EATON C°
■   ■   BRITISH    COLUMBIA    ^^ LIMITED
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1952
Page 31 Mr. L.G.P.. Crouch,
4510 W. Seventh Ave..
Vancouver, B. C.
FOR OUR fiO YEARS
J_ Jsc*—v : - m
by manufacturing equipment for the generation and transmission of electric power
as well as a wide range of products that put it to work
At one time or another, almost everybody
in Canada has been affected, either directly
or indirectly, through some use of a G-E
product—whether it's a giant generator
or a simple fuse plug, an electric motor
which runs an elevator or the electronic
control that speeds thenewspaper presses,
a labor-saving appliance in the home or
a two-way radio that summons a taxi.
Canadian General Electric is proud to
have played a part, for sixty years, in the
ever-growing electrical development of
Canada. It is equally proud that the
wide range of electrical equipment it
produces, the household appliances and
the many types of lamps for home and
industry, are helping to make life easier
and more enjoyable for all of us.
r
CANADIAN    GENERAL    ELECTRIC    COMPANY
LIMITED
Head Office: Toronto—Sales Offices from Coast to Coast
MCGE-552T
CAMPBELL & SMITH LIU., E/feclirt Priming
iiljy

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