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Graduate Chronicle Apr 30, 1931

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 The University of British Columbia
GRADUATE
CHRONICLE
Editor: Isobel Harvey
Assistant Editors:
Sadie Boyles Kathleen Lawrence A.
To the President and Members of the Faculty
of the University of British Columbia
this first number of the Chronicle
is inscribed EDITORIALS
THE Editorial Board regret that they must preface the first number
of The Chronicle with apologies for inaccuracy. But such is the case.
Alumni information is very seldom obtained first-hand, and so we ask you
to pardon us for printing facts the truth of which we were unable to verify
personally. This remark is particularly applicable to the directory section.
From what we hear, it is also applicable to any university directory. We
also apologize for omitting to mention large numbers of the Alumni Association either individually or in groups; we apologize, because we believe that
it is always simpler to take the blame in cases like this. The omission, we
must confess, occurred because we felt that too great a use of the imagination should not be allowed in a publication of this nature. Being thus
restricted, we had to confine ourselves to the use of alleged facts. There are
a number of other things wrong with this number of The Chronicle, but we
feel it is unnecessary to point them out. We expect to hear about them
in due course.
We acknowledge with thanks the contributions of news and material
sent in by various graduates, and the help given at all times by Mr. Matthews
and his staff. We also thank most heartily the members of the Faculty
whose personal contributions will be read with much enjoyment by the members of the Alumni Association.
If you think the effort involved in publishing The Chronicle is worth
while, say so. Expressions of opinion will always reach the Editor if sent
in care of the Registrar's Office, University of British Columbia.
The Editorial Board wishes to call attention to the fact that there is no
definite article devoted to the achievements of the graduates in Arts. This
may seem odd, to say the least, because these graduates compose the larger
part of the Alumni Association. They also are, however, among the worst
sinners in regard to keeping the University in touch with their life and work.
There are only a few, comparatively speaking, who bother to send in anything about themselves for the records. For this reason the Board felt that
it would be unfair with the information at its disposal to publish such an
article in this number of The Chronicle. Strong hopes are entertained that
the omission of the article this year may bring a stream of information in
the direction of the Records Office. The Board, however, has substituted
instead of a general article, several short accounts of Arts graduates who
have brought special honor to their Alma Mater. Much information regarding others may be found in the letters and in General Information. LIFE MEMBERSHIPS
The policy of granting life membership in the Alumni Association on
payment of a fee of $10 has been adopted by the Alumni Executive this
year. It is felt that now since the number of graduates is so large and the
graduates themselves so widely scattered, matters would be considerably simplified if graduates, as soon as they are able, would pay the fee which will
entitle them to receive such publications as the Alumni may issue and such
other privileges as are accorded to Alumni members. There is no doubt that
this announcement will draw forth groans and bitter comment from such
graduates as have in the past felt that their dollars were wasted by the
Vancouver branch of the Alumni Association in riotous living. There are
others, however, who will rejoice that a ten dollar bill will solve this part
of their Alumni troubles.   It is from these that the fees will probably come.
As for the others, we would like to point out to them that any riotous
living that has been done by Alumni in Vancouver has been done at the
expense of the Vancouver Alumni, not on the few dollars that have drifted
in from the Alumni living outside.
This new publication is being financed practically by the members of
the Alumni Association living in Vancouver, by means of life membership
fees and some money-raising activities. Copies of the publication, however,
are being sent to every member whose address we have (there are 132 which
have disappeared). This has seemed the fairest arrangement for the first
number. Unfortunately, this free distribution cannot occur again. So if
you want The Chronicle, which will be issued yearly, send in your fee (yearly
$1.00; life, $10.00) to the Alumni Secretary, Registrar's Office, University
of British Columbia.
exo> THE WHY AND THE WHEREFORE
WHEN Henry Ford became so rich
that he did not need an education,
any nonsense he spoke was transmuted
into wisdom as it passed his lips. One
such piece of colossal folly was his statement concerning history.
In the University of British Columbia
our "new" problems come up one after
the other and so familiar are their faces
that I wonder whether they have not
slipped out of the window and come in
again at the door. Then I remember
that it was at X, fifteen years ago, or at
Y, twenty years ago that I first met them
and thought they were new. Far from
being "bunk," history appears to me an
essential guide in our own day, for it
deprives every "new" bogey of most of
its terrors. Some such thing has probably happened before. Why did it happen? What remedies were applied? How
far were they successful?
Of recent years I have heard much
lamenting about the lack of interest
shown by graduates in this University.
I have been assured that they are quite
different from others in this respect. It
appears that they lose touch with the
institution, that their addresses, in some
cases, are not known, that they do not
contribute to the funds of the graduates'
society and do not attend its meetings.
In this they are unique and I am reminded, in sepulchral tones, that the
University is only fifteen years old.
This last statement is meant to chill
my marrow, for the assumption is that if
these graduates have already lost touch
with the University they will drift farther and farther into oblivion as the
years roll by.
Now let us ignore Mr. Ford and glance
at the past. What has happened elsewhere? I suppose I must apologize if I
go to England for information and
hasten to assure you that it is simply
because I know Cambridge better than
Chicago. Far be it from me to suggest
that the former is older and more representative of the spirit of our race.
My own college made its first appeal
to me ten years after graduation and the
writer of the letter stated that it was an
established custom not to make an appeal
to a graduate until that period of time
had elapsed. Cambridge has discovered
that there is a period after a man goes
out into the world during which the effort
to establish himself in life, the growing-
up process, is so intensive that the University is forgotten. Then memory
begins to play tricks, to idealize the days
of youth and early manhood and one
begins to wonder what old Jones or
Smith or Robinson is doing, whether
Sykes went to Central Africa as he proposed, whether one's old tutor is still at
college, whether we could not all get
together and be young again. (This
would, of course, include the process of
showing all these people that you have
grown up and succeeded in life and are
not such a fool as they thought you
were).
So if this experience of the past is of
any value the University of British Columbia at present has five years' graduates
to draw upon, and these are the men and
women who never saw Point Grey.
Their thoughts go back to the hospital
site where no University exists. That is
a special University of British Columbia
problem, but even that is not a new one.
It is essential that, for these people
and for their successors, a rallying point
be prepared. It is difficult for them to
get into contact with such an abstraction
as a University. Even if they visit it,
whom can they see? Surprise has been
expressed that they write to and call
upon a janitor. This is not, however,
surprising. He represents continuity—
history. He was known to all and was
of no Faculty or Department. He can
give news of other and contemporary
graduates.
Now we are at the heart of the matter.
The rallying point for graduates must
not be an abstraction, nor must it be a
hand-clasping, back-slapping official with
a  pepsodential   smile.    It   must   receive Two
The University of British Columbia
and be able to give information about the
recent doings of graduates of all years,
and, while matrimonial successes may be
important in a career, it should be remembered that graduates do many interesting things besides marrying. In fact
the number of graduates who make a living by marrying must be relatively small.
Hence this publication. Its aim is to
collect information of interest to former
students of the University of British
Columbia, and you can scarcely expect
to have news of other people unless you
supply some about yourself. If you
have not reached the stage of renewed
interest in the University of British
Columbia it might be well to keep in
touch until you do. It is surprising how
we appreciate news of contemporaries as
middle-age approaches. A recent publication of this nature brings me news of a
former student of mine in Tanganyika,
of another, headmaster of a well-known
London school, of a contemporary
elected to a chair in Birmingham. I note
that the architect of the new Students'
Union building is the son of a former
professor of mine who, in turn, is a contemporary of my father's—about 1870.
The publication is received with pleasure
and thoroughly read.
But if the graduate has a duty to his
Chronicle it should not be forgotten that
the Editorial Staff has a real responsibility. It is not enough to gather "copy"
sufficient in bulk. Every effort should be
made to give information of interest—
personal as well as general. One recent
publication I have received gives in each
number a "local list" of graduates—London, Birmingham, Manchester, Dominions, Colonies, Foreign. This, of course,
takes time, but it renders a real service.
Suppose, for the moment, that I am leaving for England. I should like to get
into touch with our graduates there. If
I could look up a number of the Chronicle giving a Great Britain list of graduates I could easily write to verify the
addresses and get into touch with ex-
students I wish to see. The same would
apply to a visit to Toronto, Montreal,
Ottawa or Chicago.   Annual lists of Uni
versity of British Columbia students
working at certain universities would be
equally useful. A permanent list of those
with whom we have lost touch should
also be included in the hope that information would be forthcoming.
Other features of interest will suggest
themselves to graduates and they could
render no better service than to note
them at once and send them to the
Editor. Illustrations should find a place
in this publication. We have many excellent photographs of the history of the
University from the first tent at Point
Grey and the Hottentot Huts on Tenth
Avenue to the permanent temporary
buildings grouped around the smokestack on the present site. These might
be reproduced to make a record of our
progress. We might include, from year
to year, a photograph of the flag pole
lying near the Science Building. I
believe it is the longest horizontal flag
pole in the world.
A publication of this kind will not only
keep graduates in touch with each other
and with the University, but will bring
them to an understanding of their continued relationship with its work. As
they succeed in life—by reason probably
of the training received here—they
should make it their business to ensure
that similar opportunities are given to
their children or to those of their
comrades.
The Dartmouth Alumni Magazine
recently declared that President Hopkins
had put into words an idea that had been
lying unexpressed in the minds of nearly
all Dartmouth men. It described it as
"a magnificent thought." It was the
obvious truth that "the alumni body of a
college is the college."
It is so in Great Britain, and when the
University of British Columbia was
founded, an Act was passed ensuring that
it should be so here. It is the duty of the
graduates to elect fifteen members of our
Senate. It is assumed that, in due course,
fifteen graduates of this University will
be chosen. An elector who has not kept
in touch with the University and with
other graduates cannot vote wisely. Graduate Chronicle—April, 1931
Three
In addition, the graduates throughout
the province already constitute an important body of electors to the Provincial
Parliament and are generally persons of
considerable influence in their community.
It may be necessary for them to stand
behind the University and to declare the
value of the work it has been doing during the last fifteen years. No one can
speak   with   more   authority.     Nothing
could be more comforting for those
whose life-work is the University than
the thought that a united body of graduates is in sympathy with their work and
ready to ensure its continuation under
fair conditions.
I shall follow with interest the development of the University of British Columbia Chronicle, and hope to see it become
of real service to graduates throughout
the world. H. ASHTON.
Februarv 3, 1931.
**
A LAY SERMON
FIRST of all I must assure you, my
friends of the University of British
Columbia alumni, that I am not appearing before you uninvited. I do not believe that you wish to hear anything I
may have to say, for you have already
heard more than enough of my doctrine.
In fact I do not really believe that any
of you will be so foolish as to read this
effusion. It is here only because a certain editor is the sort of person known
to law as "a sturdy beggar." There was
a woman, told of in Scripture, who wore
down an unjust judge because of her
much speaking. I am in the position of
the unjust judge.
Since this piece is going to be left
unread in any case and since it is being
written on a Sunday, it will take the form
of a sermon on some of the Functions
and Obligations Appertaining to the
University of British Columbia. Degree.
It is as if the orator of Congregation
were speaking to an Auditorium suddenly gone empty—as on such occasions
the Auditorium has sometimes wished
itself to be—but speaking as if he still
had a large and reverent audience.
I suppose that most of you wearers of
the University of British Columbia
degree know that the University is experiencing hard times like the rest of the
world. It needs all the friends it can
muster just now, and considerably more
of the equipped and intelligent sort than
it is likely to get. There is a far too
common assumption that, like St. Paul
and the Ephesian Church, we are warring chiefly "against principalities,
against powers, against the rulers of the
darkness of this world, against spiritual
wickedness in high places." There may
be some little truth in this assumption.
But I am sure that the chief foes of this
University are plain ordinary hostility
and, what is worse, plain ordinary indifference. After all, the rulers of wickedness in high places are subject to the
beneficent forces of Change and Death.
But public indifference is a long-lived
plant; "the fat weed That roots itself in
ease on Lethe wharf." In face of this,
it is all very well to say that the graduates of this University are young and not
yet very numerous or powerful. But are
you yourselves quite awake to the business and the life of your own institution,
and can you altogether deny the charge
of being lukewarm Laodiceans? (You
will find the reference explained in the
third chapter of Revelation).
One Obligation, then, that should
weigh heavily upon all of you is to know
what can easily be learned about the
affairs of the University and to disseminate the truth about them, quietly perhaps but nevertheless persistently. Let
me cite a pair of illustrations. Four
The University of British Columbia
It is astonishing and discouraging to
learn how many of the "important" as
well as of the ordinary people of this
province believe that the governors of the
University of British Columbia are
directly responsible for the project
known as the University Endowment
Development at Point Grey. This scheme
is solely and wholly a responsibility of
the Provincial Government. I feel bound
to say this here and now, for I have
actually met graduates who were ignorant of the fact. Now it matters very
little whether or not you approve of the
scheme: there is doubtless much to be
said on both sides. But it does matter a
great deal that there should be so much
public misunderstanding about the scope
of the University's powers and activities.
Or again: it seems to be the unshakable belief of a great Vancouver paper
that one-half, or thereabouts, of the
Freshman class annually "graduate at
Christmas" or fail utterly in the spring.
This belief has been voiced repeatedly,
the last occasion being within a fortnight.
Heaven knows the Freshmen do badly
enough. But it really should be needless to say, even to a newspaper, that the
gross notion set forth above is not the
truth or anything like it. Yet I have
recently talked with intelligent graduates
who thought that it was.
These are random examples of a distressingly common kind. Obviously it is
going to be difficult for the University to
make intelligent progress in the face of
such widespread ignorance, especially on
the part of her own children. She may
well have cause of complaint far more
bitter than the words of the prophet:
"What are those wounds in thine hands ?
.... Those with which I was wounded
in the house of my friends." Is it true
that graduates of Alberta and Saskatchewan are better informed about their
respective institutions than we are? It-is
certainly true that those universities do
not have to contend with any such large
measure of public hostility and indifference. Is it premature to suggest that the
University of British Columbia alumni
try to establish this present publication
on a permanent basis with a paid and
permanent editorial staff? And that this
staff be charged with the duty of keeping
at least the University community properly informed about its own affairs?
As to two other Obligations I can do
no more just now than state them in bare
outline.
One of them may be brought sharply
into view by a single bleak statement:
the University of British Columbia is
the only Canadian collegiate institution
of any importance that offers no instruction whatsoever in the fine arts. These
years are indeed lean years: the very
best we can hope to do in them is to keep
hold of what we have. But, lean year or
fat year, we must surely be ashamed of
that barbarous and dreadful inadequacy.
I am one of these unpractical persons
who believe that "material interests" can,
in a pinch, be trusted to look after themselves with some success. But, whether
in the pinch or out of it, this University
is doing nothing and has done nothing to
support provincial life at its weakest
point. Every humanist at Point Grey
knows that the grave weakness of a
student body otherwise excellently sound
is this: it has been moulded by an environment very unstimulating in the main
to artistic knowledge and taste and
imagination. An environment, in other
words, that turns out a product lacking
half of the ordinary furniture of the educated mind. In some mysterious way
many, perhaps most, of you graduates
become aware of this fact. How you find
it out I do not know, for the University
does little or nothing to enlighten you.
The point is that, being aware of your
own misfortune, you are under obligation
to try to make good the deficiencies in the
University life and the general environment that are responsible for that misfortune. You must deliberately place
your influence behind any movement
that tends to the enlargement and enrichment of public taste and public culture.
And if no movements of the sort exist,
you must initiate them.
And now finally—for even a sermon
comes to an end—you graduates really Graduate Chronicle—April, 1931
should be more fully and proudly aware
of what your University has done in spite
of its youth and in spite of all its bad
fortune. Not all the plagues of Egypt
nor all the limitations of our culture
have availed to prevent this institution
from doing a great deal of noble work.
I shall not labor the point, for I am told
that many honorable exhibits will be set
forth in this publication.   But you should
be warned that it will not be able to display more than a fraction of them. Like
Saul of Tarsus you are citizens of no
mean city. And like that same apostle,
you should refuse to allow "the rulers of
the darkness of this world" to blind your
eyes to the fact or to keep other men in
ignorance of it.
G. G. SEDGEWICK.
&
GRADUATES IN ARTS
WILLIAM ARGUE—He graduated
in Agriculture at the University of
British Columbia and proceeded to Ames
on a graduate fellowship. At the end of
two years he returned to University of
British Columbia and completed his Arts
course with honors in Botany. He was
awarded a teaching fellowship in McGill
and held it for two years, working toward his doctorate in Botany. In the
spring of 1930 he was appointed Professor of Biology and Head of the Department at the University of New Brunswick.
* * *
DOROTHY BLAKEY —Dorothy
Blakey's scholastic career has been one
of exceptional brilliance. She accomplished the unusual feat of winning all
three medals presented annually by the
Governor-General for High School Entrance, for Matriculation and for University graduation. She received her
Bachelor's Degree with Honors in
English Language and Literature in
1921. In 1922 she received her Master's
Degree from the University of British
Columbia. In 1925 she received a scholarship from the University of Toronto
and obtained a Master's Degree there.
The following year she held a teaching
fellowship in the same institution. Since
that time she has been on the teaching
staff of the Department of English, University of British Columbia. In March
of this year she was awarded the Travel
ing Scholarship given by the Canadian
Federation of University Women. This
scholarship is open to all women graduates of Canadian universities and is one
of the most sought after in the Dominion.
Miss Blakey plans to work toward her
doctorate at the University of London.
HOMER THOMPSON "25 —The
honor of personally supervising some of
the most important excavations in Greece
has fallen to this brilliant graduate of
our University. Dr. Thompson has now
started on his second year of the Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship which took
him to Greece. After his graduation in
1925, Dr. Thompson taught for two years
at the University of British Columbia
then went to the University of Michigan
on a fellowship for two years. In 1929,
he took his Doctor's Degree and shortly
after won his archaeological  fellowship.
In a letter to Dr. Todd, Dr. Thompson
says: "I wonder if you were able to complete your work on Aristophanes last'
year. That gentleman has led me into
some deep water of late. Ever since
reading the Acharnians (a play produced
B.C. 425) I have been interested to
know more of the setting for the opening
scene. Last fall, when I had a breathing
spell, I set about gathering together all
or the little, that was known of the Pynx
(hill that was used by lower branch of Six
The University of British Columbia
the ancient Athenian legislature). In
talking it over with Mr. Korouniotes,
minister of antiques, who had done a
little digging there in 1910-11, I learned
that he was still interested in the
problem.
"He proposed that we do a little more
digging, and undertook to furnish funds
through the Greek Archaeological Society, if I would take charge.
"So we set to work on December 8th
and have been digging steadily ever
since, with about twenty men. We hope
to finish this week (February 25). I
imagine it will be rather surprising to
most people to learn^that the great retaining wall, and most of the visible remains,
are to be dated to the time of Hadrian,
and that the old place had at least one
rebuilding before that time."
ARCHIE FEE—We feel that The
Chronicle would be incomplete if it did
not embody in its first number an appreciation of a graduate who in his short
life brought enduring honor to his Alma
Mater. By the death of Dr. Archibald
Roderick Fee the University lost one of
her most distinguished graduates.
During his undergraduate days, while
taking an active part in student activities,
he found time for considerable research
and before he graduated had prepared
for publication two papers. In recognition of his research abilities, when, in
1925, he graduated with first class honors
in Zoology, at the age of nineteen he was
awarded the 1851 Exhibition Scholarship
for two years' research in Britain. Upon
going to University College, London, he
had the good fortune to get the opportunity to work with the physiologist, Dr.
Starling, and was granted his Ph.D. at
the end of two years at the age of
twenty-one. A Beit Fellowship permitted him to continue his work and, in
the spring of the same year, the Royal
Society of London asked Dr. Fee to
carry on the special work in which Dr.
Starling was engaged and provided him
with assistants and facilities to make it
readily possible.
Since that time, Dr. Fee had had a
large measure of success in his research
and had published several important
papers in Physiological journals. He had
intended taking a complete course in
Medicine and had already done some
work toward that end. He had also
completed a good deal of work toward
a D.Sc. degree.
At the time of his death Archie Fee
was only twenty-four years of age, but
he had accomplished more than most of
us in a lifetime. His name is written in
University records for all time in enduring letters.
* « *
HUGH KEENLEYSIDE—Few graduates of the University of British Columbia have made more rapid progress,
or achieved greater distinction than
Hugh Keenleyside of Arts '20.
After receiving his degree he was
awarded a History Scholarship and went
to Clark University, where he obtained
his Ph.D. Following this he taught history, first in Syracuse University, New
York, and later at the University of
British Columbia.
In 1927 he left for Toronto to take
charge of the Educational Department of
Macmillan's Publishing Company, and
the next year he was appointed to the
position of Under Secretary of State in
the Department of External Affairs at
Ottawa.
In 1929 he brought out a book entitled
"Canada and the United States," dealing
with the economic relations between these
two countries. This work was well received and reviewed favorably by leading
American and English newspapers.
His most important promotion came in
March, 1929, when he went to Japan as
Charge d'Affaires at the Canadian Legation, Tokyo. Since taking up his position
there he has travelled extensively
throughout the country, and made a
study of social conditions in both China
and Japan. Graduate Chronicle—April, 1931
Seven
DR. ROY L. VOLLUM—A graduate
of University of British Columbia who
has done really outstanding work in the
field of bacteriological research is Dr.
Roy L. Vollum of Oxford. Dr. Vollum
graduated in 1919, gaining second place
in his class. For two years after his
graduation he worked on a grant from
the National Research Council of Canada on the Bacteriology of Butter. In
1921 he received his Master's Degree
from the University of British Columbia
and was elected Rhodes Scholar.
He proceeded to Lincoln College, Oxford, where he continued his work under
Professor George Dryer of the Department of Bacteriology and Pathology and
obtained his M.A. and Ph.D. He has
remained at Lincoln College, associated
with Dr. Dryer in important Bacteriological Research, mainly in the study of
tuberculosis. Some of his work with Dr.
Dryer was financed by the British
Medical Research Council. Dr. Vollum's
most outstanding scientific publication
was "The Bacteriological Aspects of the
Dairy Industry." He also collaborated
with Dr. Dryer to bring out a book on
"Mutation and Pathogenicity Experiments with B. C. G." He is now on the
permanent staff of Oxford University.
In the summer of 1929 he married Ella
Crozier of the class of '21. an Honors
graduate in English.
DR. BLYTHE A. EAGLES is another
prominent graduate of the University
of British Columbia who has done much
valuable work in research, and written
many scientific papers. After receiving
his B.A. in 1922 he proceeded to Toronto
where he obtained his M.A. and Ph.D.
He was associated there with the Department of Biochemistry and the Department of Pathological Chemistry, and did
research and tutorial work in the Toronto
Medical Faculty under Professors Andrew Hunter, V. J. Harding, and George
Hunter.
Dr. Eagles was the first "Sterling
Fellow" from Canada to go to Yale
University, where he worked under Professor T. B. Johnson. While there he
was loaned by Prof. Johnson to the
United States Department of Agriculture
for research work extending over several months.
Subsequently he worked with Dr.
Dudley, the Head of Biochemistry in the
British Medical Research Council Laboratories at Hampstead, London.
Since July, 1929, Dr. Eagles has been
working with Professor W. Sadler of the
University of British Columbia Department of Agriculture. They have been
engaged in the protein study of processes
of cheese-ripening, under the Empire
Marketing Board grant. Several papers
on the research now proceeding have
been published.
DR. VIOLET DUNBAR EAGLES
is regarded as one of the leading enzyme
chemists in the country. She graduated
from University of British Columbia in
1921, and went to Toronto where she did
tutorial work, and was associated in the
Department of Biochemistry with Professor Andrew Hunter, and Professors
Wasteneys and Borsook. Her special
work with Professors Wasteneys and
Borsook was research in pure proteins
and enzymes, and several papers were
published. /&
Since October, 1929, Dr. Violet Eagles
has been engaged, with others, in research made possible by the Powell River
Company grant. The work is being done
in the Faculty of Agriculture at the
University of British Columbia. Eight
The University of British Columbia
APPLIED SCIENCE GRADUATES
AT the moment, when taxes are going
up and ability to pay them still going
down, and the public is scrutinizing
administration expenditure with unwonted care in the hope of discovering
possible economies, it is natural that the
University should receive some attention
and that the question should be asked,
"Is the outlay made upon the University
a necessary and profitable investment?"
Based on lack of knowledge the answers
furnished on the street are scarcely satisfactory. There is only one adequate way
of judging universities and that is by
their graduates. "By their fruits ye shall
know them."
While in the East last summer, I met
professors from most of the large graduate schools which draw their students
from all the great universities of the
continent. I think I must have run
across one from each branch of study.
The conversation was so similar at each
meeting that, to me, the repetition became
almost ridiculous. "Oh, you are from
the University of British Columbia.
Well, of course, I don't know anything
of the University of British Columbia
except in my own subject, but the very
best graduate students we get in my
Department come from your University.
You must be very strong in that particular subject." Putting all these testimonials together, in so far as the quality of
its graduates is concerned, the University
of British Columbia must be about the
best undergraduate university on the
continent. Tangible evidence of this is
afforded by the huge sum—nearly half a
million dollars—won by its graduates in
competition with other Canadian and
American universities. This most enviable reputation, won for the University
by its graduates, is not confined to the
continent of North America. In Britain,
France, Rhodesia and many other parts
of the world, a similar reputation has
been established.
Applied Science was the last Faculty
to be organized after the return of the
men from the War. Some of its Departments were not completed until after the
move to Point Grey in 1925. Most of its
students, immediately after graduation,
enter a profession or industry in the
province. But those who have taken
post-graduate work have done their share
in building up the enviable University
reputation abroad. Similarly, those who
have entered the professions and industries have gained the reputation of being
the best graduates employed.
The greatest scientific prospecting and
development project ever undertaken is
that now going on in the mining concessions of Northern Rhodesia under the
direction of a former Professor of
McGill. On this work he is using the
graduates of almost all universities, including ten from the University of
British Columbia. When the Empire
Mining Congress visited these operations
last spring, he told one of the delegates
that if his own son Wanted to be a
geologist, he would send him to the University of British Columbia as first
choice, and to Cornell as second choice.
The graduates of other Departments
have made equally good impressions.
But admitting that the graduates are
first class, the question remains, are they
repaying the province for their education? A study of the list of graduates
in Applied Science will show that the
vast majority are engaged in the industries of the province or in its development. Although it is but a few years
since their graduation many have already
obtained high and responsible positions,
such as superintendent of the Britannia
Mines and assistant superintendent of
the Sullivan Mine, to mention only two.
Of the thirty-seven graduates in
Nursing and Health, practically all are
engaged in work in the province. One
has since been enticed to New York and
twelve are married, but the remainder
are in child welfare work, public health Graduate Chronicle—April,  1931
Nine
work and supervisors or instructors of
nurses in hospitals. One is on the staff
of the University.
Electrical Engineers have to specialize
after graduating and for this purpose
they enter the large electrical companies
in the East that give such specialized
training. Having secured it, they seize
the first opportunity of returning to
British Columbia. More Mechanical
Engineers would be employed in the
province were it not for an old law
which, in British Columbia, has not been
repealed. This law, framed before universities turned out technically trained
men, requires the companies using steam
power to employ non-technical engineers.
They must employ a certificated engineer,
and to get this certificate one must have
shoveled coal for six years! This is a
millstone round the neck of industry in
this province.
When the University started, mining
was the only industry in the province
looking for college graduates, with the
exception of an odd company in some
other industry, and such a company was
considered odd. Consequently the graduates have had to make places for themselves. Today while British Columbia
industry is not looking for graduates to
the same extent as its competitors elsewhere, the man in the street no longer
considers the engagement of a technical
graduate altogether an oddity.
Of forty-seven Mining Engineers, ten
have gone into Geological Engineering
and are accounted for in it; four are
mining in other provinces; three are in
foreign countries; three are in Rhodesia
(but returning to British Columbia) but
all the rest are developing British
Columbia.
Of the twenty-four graduates in
Forest   Engineering,   three   are   in  the
United States but the others are engaged
in this province.
In Civil Engineering, of forty-three
graduates, three are in foreign countries.
All the rest are working in British
Columbia.
Of forty-four Geological Engineers,
seven are taking graduate work, seven
are in Rhodesia but will be returning,
five are professors in the United States,
four are in economic geology in foreign
countries, one is a professor in Canada,
nine are on the Geological Survey of
Canada, (the majority working in British
Columbia). All the others are in economic geology in the nrovince. In view of
their importance in the development of
the resources of the province, it may be
noted that, according to a Princeton professor who investigated the subject, the
University of British Columbia is turning out more geologists than any other
University in America.
Chemical Engineering does not offer a
wide field in British Columbia, yet of the
seventy graduates, sixty per cent are in
British Columbia industries.
The graduates have found places in
practically all the industries, but the
larger industries naturally have absorbed
the majority, such as oil and sugar refineries, pulp and paper companies, the
B. C. Electric, Engineering Companies
and Mining Companies. The Britannia
Mining and Smelting Company has ten
of them on its staff and the Consolidated
Mining and Smelting Company twenty,
and these graduates have done their share
in keeping these industries operating successfully despite the low price of metals.
The graduates seem to be doing
fairly well in their task of repaying the
province. The University is beginning
to look like an asset.
R. W. BROCK. Ten
The University of British Columbia
ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF OUTSTANDING GRADUATES OF
THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
T^HE first class in Agriculture to enter
the University was in 1917. The
students, seven in number, were drawn
from Chilliwack, Larkin, Victoria, Clov-
erdale, Marpole, Vancouver and Sum-
merland. They were once referred to
(by a Professor in another Faculty) as
a little menagerie. But they were a
beginning. Three of this number eventually received the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture; two failed to
complete, and two transferred to Arts
and Science, one of whom went to Cambridge to complete. The one who completed in Arts and Science at the University of British Columbia, Mr. J.F.K.English, is now Principal of a High School
in British Columbia. The one who went
to Cambridge, Mr. R. C. Woodward,
B.Sc, Ph.D. (Cantab.) of Victoria is
now a Professor of Mycology in the
School of Rural Economy, Oxford. F. F.
McKenzie, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph. D.
(Missouri) is also outstanding. His work
with the Pituitary Gland in relation to
the production system in farm animals
has been internationally recognized. Mr.
Cecil Lamb, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), M.S.A.
(McGill) was for two years Assistant in
the Department of Agronomy in the University of British Columbia. His work
has been of a high order and he is now-
completing work for the Ph.D. degree at
Cornell. The small menagerie has already been heard.
A year later saw the advent of a further departure from tradition in other
Agriculture Faculties. Two young women
registered in the Faculty. Miss Martha
McKechnie and Miss Marion Mounce,
B.A., were real acquisitions and the tra
ditions established by the class to which
they belonged are still strong within the
Faculty. Both graduated. Miss McKechnie was for a time High School
teacher at Armstrong and is now Mrs.
Johnny MacLeod of this city. Miss
Mounce was for a time Assistant in the
Department of Dairying and is now Mrs.
Howard Green of this city.
So much for the first graduates.
Equally good classes have followed in
quick succession, but even the few can
scarcely be mentioned: Dick Palmer with
his work in fruit storage, Jacob Biely
and his contributions on Pullorum Disease, Howell Harris and his work on the
respiration of root hairs, Jack Wilcox
with his farm and business at Salmon
Arm, Fergus Mutrie with his truck and
fruit farm at Vernon, Jack Berry with
his purebred Holsteins at Langley Prairie
are all widely known men. Art Laing,
Bill Cameron, "Spud" Murphy and Dick
Asher are names that are known in the
business world. They and others are
making excellent progress.
The first class has been emphasized.
The last class is the newest group of
graduates. What are they doing? They
are all working. Four are doing, postgraduate work at Stanford, British Columbia and Alberta; two are in business
and three are doing junior instructional
work.
A close analysis of the personnel of
the first ten graduating classes indicates
that the quality of the product has been
such that it compares favorably with the
best on the continent.
F. M. CLEMENT. Graduate Chronicle—April,  1931
Elev
RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURE to an "Arts man'
means milking cows, sowing that
which must also be reaped, feeding the
hen that lays the golden egg and all
the other farming practices. Agriculture to an "Aggie" means these things
and many other interesting and
valuable phases.
Research work is undertaken seriously and successfully by the Faculty
of Agriculture of the University of
British Columbia.
"Bacteriophage and the Root Nodule
Bacteria," by Dr. D. G. Laird, is the
title of a recent paper accepted for
publication by "Scientific Agriculture."
Docs the bacteriophage represent a
form of life lower even that that of
bacteria or is the agent responsible
for the destruction of bacterial cells
an enzyme or a toxin? Dr. Laird has
recently isolated a bacteriophage or
"race" of bacteriophage from the
young nodules of Trifolium pratense
and Melilotus alba. Is this the cause
or reason for "clover sickness," so
common in many places on the continent? Is it the agency whereby
Nitrogen is liberated for the use of
legume plants? The continuation of
the research may answer the questions.
The respiration of Plant Roots is a
new study. Why is it that one species
of plant can establish itself on a given
soil and another cannot? What is the
relation of the respiration of the roots
to the ability of the plant to establish
itself? Roots do respire and their
respiration bears a relation to the
fertility of the soil for that type of
plant. A series of papers on the
"Activities of Roots," by Dr. G. H.
Harris, has opened a broad field of
study. The results are undoubtedly a
contribution to knowledge and may
have a direct bearing on the problems
of soil fertility.
It has been found by work done in
the Dairying Department that the so-
called "feed-flavor" or stable odor
appearing in milk may be caused by
specific strains of bacteria, so that that
the infection of the milk supply is to
be attributed in many cases to the
temporary relaxing of the meticulous
care that the milker is called upon to
make, and not necessarily to foods the
cow has been eating.
These are but three examples of
valuable scientific work. Fowl Paralysis, the Effect of Hormones on the
Hen's Eggs, the Formation of the
Hen's Egg, and the Effect of Moisture
Supply on the Development of Pyrus
Communis are other types of research
of equal value scientifically and
economically.
The immediately applicable programme of the Faculty is also interesting. The Farm Survey is an
economic study of farms and farm
organizations in the province. It has
been carried on for ten years and it
is gratifying to note that the operator
incomes on the dairy farms—the only
final results tabulated—are about
$1000.00 higher per annum than they
were ten years ago. About one-half
of this amount is due to the farmers'
own efforts, under guidance. A body
of knowledge has been created, the
economic value of which it is difficult
to estimate.
Pullorum disease affects the egg-
laying abilities of the domestic fowl.
It is bacterial and tends to destroy
the ovules as formed. The loss where
this disease is present is about 60
eggs per annum. An agglutination
test has been perfected by which it is
now possible to pick out the diseased
breeders. The test is practical, and, if
carried out fully in the direction the
research indicates, is worth about
$500,000.00 annually to the province. Twelve
The University of British Columbia
The work in poultry breeding, alfalfa breeding, the production of elite
seed, low protein wheat investigations
and similar problems is also playing
a  large  part  in  the  development   of
Agriculture in the Province of British
Columbia.
—L.I.
&
COMMERCIAL EDUCATION IN THE UNIVERSITY
I AM not able to speak with authority
as to the events which led up to the
establishment of commercial studies in
our University, but it is my understanding that there was felt an urgent and
developing need for such studies among
the business men of the community. An
attempt was made to endow a Chair in
Commerce by means of public subscription, but without success. Following on
this, the Provincial and University
authorities arranged for instruction
which should lead to the degree of
Bachelor of Commerce, and this spring
we shall have our first class of graduates
of this type.
We were in the fortunate position of
establishing our method of working
without hampering traditions, and thus
were enabled to determine from the experience of others what was desirable
for, and what it was desirable to keep
away from, the curriculum to be
established.
From the beginning, the University
decided that the claims of higher learning were not susceptible of an interpretation which would allow "vocational training" as it has been developed in many
departments of Commerce in North
America. It was decided that instruction
for the first two years should be essentially cultural — indeed, the first two
years' work was to be that required from
Arts students, but with the insertion of
three pre-requisite subjects (Economic
History; Economic Geography and
Ocean Transportation; and the Mathematics of Investment), success in which
was essential before a student would be
allowed to proceed to the work of the
last two years. The work of the final
years, while avoiding the implications of
"vocational training," is quite definitely
of value in the commercial world, as a
thorough training is given in subjects
which are applicable to every kind of
business activity.
This can best be illustrated by stating
just what these subjects are: Two years
each in accountancy and commercial law
are compulsory; one year in statistics,
with a second year which is compulsory
for honors students only, but is recommended for students of superior capacity,
whether or not they are candidates for
honors. One year each in Money and
Banking and Foreign Trades; with one
year in either Principles of Marketing,
or Railroad Transportation.
It will be observed from the above that
our policy is to have thorough instruction
in few subjects, rather than a less intense
instruction in many subjects. Accountancy and Commercial Law each calls for
more than a "nodding acquaintance,"
and our course is arranged with this
thought in mind. The value of the other
courses as related to a business career
should be apparent to any observer.
It is our confident belief that under
this curriculum, the University of British
Columbia will turn out graduates each
year who will worthily maintain the
reputation which the University has won
in other scholastic fields.
J. FRIEND DAY. Graduate Chronicle—April,  1931
Thirteen
THE FACULTY—NEW DEGREES AND NEW PUBLICATIONS
DURING the past year the following
degrees or honors have been granted
members of the Faculty:
L. S. KLINCK, ESQ.—Officier de
VInstruction Publiquc (France).
H. ASHTON, ESQ.—Chevalier de la
Legion d'Honneur. Dr. Ashton has
been notified recently that the University of Cambridge has authorized the
degree "Doctor of Letters" (Litt. D.)
to be given him on the merits of his
published work in French Literature.
T. H. BOGGS, ESQ.—Ll.D. (honoris
causa) Brit. Col. This degree was
conferred on Dr. Boggs just before his
departure to join the faculty of Stanford University.
H. F. ANGUS, ESQ.—Appointed head
of the Department of Economics to
succeed Dr. Boggs.
D. G. LAIRD, ESQ.—Ph.D. (Wisconsin).
D. C. B. DUFF, ESQ.—Ph.D. (Toronto).
D. BUCHANAN, ESQ.—Ll.D. (honoris
causa) McMaster.
V. S. ASMUNDSON, ESQ.—Ph.D.
(Wisconsin).
Members of the Faculty have published, during the vear September 1st,
1929, to August 31st, 1930, a large
number of papers and articles. A resume
of the list follows:
Dr. Duff of the Department of Bacteriology contributed several articles to
the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical
Medicine; Dr. A. H. Hutchinson of the
Department of Botany published two
papers on the effect of monochromatic
light on certain growths, and four on his
oceanographic studies of the Fraser
River and the Gulf of Georgia.
In the Department of Chemistry the
list of published scientific papers covers
three typewritten pages. A number of
these appear in   the  proceedings of the
Royal Society, and in the Journal of
American Chemical Societies. They are
too numerous to mention in detail.
The Department of Economics, Political Science and Sociology has to its
credit a book by Dr. C. W. Topping,
Canadian Penal Institutions (University
of Chicago Press), and the following
articles: "The Passing of the County
Jail in Canada," C. W. Topping (ed.
1930 Proceedings of American Prison
Association), "The Silver Standard,"
C. F. Drummond (B. C. Mines), and the
following three papers by H. F. Angus:
"The Kyoto Conference" (Canadian
Forum), "A Survey of Economic Problems Awaiting Solution in British Columbia" (University of Toronto Studies
in History and Economics), "Pacific
Relations," a paper read before the
Canadian Political Association, May,
1930.
The Department of English presented
two papers to the Royal Society—both
by T. Larsen. One on "Modern Philology," the other on "The Middle Years
of George Peele, Dramatist." Dr. Sedge-
wick contributed an article on "Wordsworth, Arnold, and Professor Lane
Cooper" to the Dalhousie Review, and
F. C. Walker and T. Larsen published a
book, Pronunciation (Oxford University
Press).
The Department of Geology and
Geography has published reports on the
Pacific Great Eastern Land Blocks by
R. W. Brock, M. Y. Williams, J. N.
Turnbull, and S. J. Schofield. Dean
Brock has also published an article on
"The New Coal Age" and on "Japan,"
while Dr. Peacock is the author of papers
on "Calaverite" and on the "Modoc
Quadrangle, Cal."
In the Department of History, W. N.
Sage and F. H. Soward have a long list
of articles and reviews to their credit;
of especial general interest among these
are Dr. Sage's "The Three British Empires" in The Pacific Area, published by Fourteen
The University of British Columbia
University of Washington press, and
"John Work's First Journal," Canadian
History Association, 1929; and Mr.
Soward's "The Outbreak of the World
War'' (Queen's Quarterly, autumn,
1929), and "The Election of Canada to
the League of Nations Council in 1927"
(American Journal of International Law,
October, 1929).
D. C. Harvey reviewed "Polk: The
Diary of a President" in the Canadian
History Review, March, 1930; and read
to the Royal Society in 1930 a paper on
"The Loyal Electors: the First Political
Society in British North America."
The Department of Mathematics has
a long list of published articles of which
four are by D. Buchanan and are contained in the proceedings of the Royal
Society, as are also papers by F. S. Now-
lan and Mary Pollock.
H. Ashton, head of the Department of
Modern Languages, has published the
following books during the year:
Moliere,   (Republic  of   Letters   Series)
Routledge, London.
La Princesse de Cleves, Scribner, New
York.
Critical Text of "Cyrano de Bergerac,"
Scribner, New York.
D. O. Evans, of the same department,
published a book, Le Roman Social Sous
la Monarchic de Juillet, (Picard).
A. F. B. Clark contributed an article
to the Canadian Forum, and H. Ashton
articles to The Fremh Quarterly and
The Modern Language Review.
Department of Zoology: Papers were
published in the proceedings of the Royal
Society by Miss M. H. Campbell, C. McLean Fraser, and Miss J. F. T. Hart.
C. McLean Fraser also read a paper before the Fourth Pacific Science Congress
in Java on the necessity for knowledge
of plankton content and distribution.
G. J. Spencer has written numerous
papers on entomological subjects, dealing
especially with insect pests indigenous to
the Vancouver area.
The Department of Mining and Metallurgy has published papers by J. M.
Turnbull, "Developments at Owens
Lake," and by G. A. Gillies, "Flotation
Practice at the Duthie and Silver Cup
Mills."
The Department of Dairying has three
papers on "Feed Flavor" and "Stable
Odour" in milk by Lenora Irwin, W.
Sadler and N. S. Golding; another article on milks as mediums for the preparation of starters is by C. D. Kelly; and a
paper by N. S. Golding on ammonium
salts and the growth of P. Roqueforti
in cheese.
The Department of Horticulture:
"Tree Fruit Farming in British Columbia," F. M. Clement and J. C. Wilcox
(College of Agriculture Bulletin, No.
13); and three studies of tree root activities by G. H. Harris.
The Department of Poultry Husbandry : "Inheritance of Plumage and Skin
Color in the Ancona," V. S. Asmundson
and Helen Milne. "Farm Survey Records and Flock Management Problems,"
E. H. Lloyd and W. J. Rilev. "Master
Breeder's Guide," E. H. Lloyd. "Fish
Oils as a Source of Vitamin D for Poultry," V. S. Asmundson, J. Allardyce, J.
Biely. A. M. ANGUS.
c#>c#> Graduate Chronicle—April,  1931
Fifteen
REPORT OF THE TORONTO BRANCH OF THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
THIS group was first organized in the
the fall of 1929, under the Presidency of Dr. Tommy Taylor, Arts '26.
A constitution was drawn tip and a programme of social events outlined.
Since that time the Association has
been very active. In October, 1930, the
new executive was elected as follows:
Honorary President, Dr. Harry Cassidy; President, Douglas Telford; Secretary-Treasurer, Mildred Campbell; Social Committee: Verna Lucas, Margaret
Grant and George Van Wilby.
The Constitution was amended so that
the organization would form a part of
the Alumni Association of the University
of British Columbia and pay a fee of
50 cents per member.
The following is a list of University of
British Columbia graduates in Toronto,
1930-31:
Baynes, Doris, '26; Social Service
Course.
Campbell, Mildred, '26; working toward
Ph.D. in Biology.
Cassidy, Dr. H. M.. '23; Department of
Social Science, University of Toronto.
Cassidy, Mrs. H. M. (B. Peace, Nursing, '24), Children's Aid Work.
Coleman, John. Arts '30; Medicine.
Creighton,  Mrs. John   (Sallee  Murphy,
Arts '23).
Craig,  Ruth,  Arts;  teaching at  Brank-
some Hall.
Cull, J. S., Arts; Medicine.
Daniells,  Roy,  Arts   '30;   Post-graduate
work in English.
Garner, F. O. R.; Medicine.
Graham, Jean, Arts '26; Social Science.
Grant. Margaret, Arts '29; Post-graduate
work in English.
Groves, Ken, '29; Medicine.
Hadgekiss, Nan; Social Science.
Kajiyama, T.; Medicine.
Keenan, T. J.; Ontario College of Education.
Lewis, Dr. Gordon, '24; Western Hospital.
Lucas, Verna; Post-graduate work in
Biology.
Maltby, Mrs. C. (Dr. Lila Coates, '21);
School for Child Study.
Michener. Mrs. R. (Norah Willis, '22).
Morgan, Dr. Lome, Arts '24; Department of Economics, University of
Toronto.
Morgan, Mrs. Lome (Lucy Ingram,
'24).
Murray, Vernon; Medicine.
Pound, Dorothy, Arts '30; Library
School.
Patterson, Dorothy; Social Science.
Riggs, Eleanor P.; Post-graduate work-
in Physiology.
Riggs, Margaret; Post-graduate work in
Biochemistry.
Sharpe, Vera, Arts '25; Art School.
Smith, Harold, Arts '27; Post-graduate
work in Physics.
Steele, David; Medicine.
Taylor, Dr. Tommy, Arts '26; Department of Botany, University of Toronto.
Telford, Douglas, Arts '28; Medicine.
Thomas, Isobel, Arts '20.
Weld, Dr. Beecher, '22; Practicing Medicine.
Whiteside, Betty, Arts '29; Household
Science.
Wilby, George Van, Arts '21; Postgraduate work in Biology.
Simpson, Dr. Wesley; Medicine.
Lees, Everett; Post-graduate work in
Paleontology.
Helliwell, Hilary. Arts '30; Library
Course.
Needier, Mrs. Alfred (Alfreda Berkeley, Arts '26). Sixteen
The University of British Columbia
EDINBURGH BREVITIES
RALPH Stedman, '27, and Mrs. Sted-
man (Margaretta Underhill, '27)
are still thriving in one of the famous
Swanston Cottages which, with its four
feet thick walls and thatched roof, has
withstood the storms of four hundred
years. Here, with good domestic care
and amid surroundings immortalized by
Robert Louis Stevenson, Ralph ponders
philosophically, the result of which pondering being a learned thesis and a well
merited Ph.D.
The beauty of Scotland has inspired
Ralph and Margaretta to undertake
photography with such happy results
that more than one of their pictures
have been reproduced in local press.
fires. A member of four local libraries,
he is ever groaning that the University
of British Columbia library, in system
and stock, is worth all of them. However, the National Library has the odd
valuable manuscript, but the hours are
from ten to five, and no books may be
taken out over night. Re the gas fire—
his digs have these little "penny-in-the-
slot" gas fire places, where one gets a
very little heat for half an hour by putting a penny in the slot—so life is one
adjectival penny after another—except
when he is out of pennies! He is forever embroiled in arguments over the
British Commonwealth, and quotes one
Prof. D. C. Harvey with rare and
vexatious abandon.
May Christison, '29, and some time
member of the Publicity Board, is in a
seventh heaven here. She has two loves
—her Morris car and her "bugs." In
the former she has broken most of the
local traffic regulations and has gear-
changing down to a symphony. As for
the latter, she is taking bacteriology at
the local University and has been granted
£7 for guinea pigs. She has discovered
also that frogs can be bought for sixpence. Recently May took a paper to
one of her profs, and, after reading it,
he looked up with respect to say, "They
must give you a good course at that
University." Besides reading German
the girl speaks Scotch. She springs this
from a clear sky: "Gie us a wee tate o'
oo tae stap i' the neb o' ma shoon, for it's
unco' shaughly and aiblans when I gang
gait it'll gar me cowp i' the glaur."
Frank Morley, '30, I. O. D. E. scholar
1930-31, has two hates—libraries and gas
The fifth contemporary British Columbian, of University connection, is Mable
Slimming, who, after spending two years
in Victoria College, decided to graduate
from Edinburgh University, where she is
now reading Arts.
On Wednesday, November 19, students of Canada, New Zealand and Australia assembled in the Upper Hall of
the Library of Edinburgh University, to
see the Premiers of their respective
countries receive the Honorary degree of
Doctor of Laws.
Preceding the capping of the Gradu-
ands the Dean of the Faculty of Law
read a short resume of the life of each,
showing how he had finally reached the
proud position of Premier. Mr. Bennett
replied on behalf of the graduates.
*#>^ Graduate Chronicle—April,  1931
Seventeen
INSTALLATION OF SIR JAMES BARRIE AS CHANCELLOR
OF EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY
(Contributed by an Anonymous Correspondent, whose identity is shrouded in
mystery. He probably forgot to sign
his name).
CASUALLY strolling down to Mac-
Ewan Hall at 10 a.m. (the installation not being until 11) I was startled
to find myself placed at the end of one
of two queues a block or more long and
several deep. Barrie is popular here.
Upon getting into the hall I managed a
seat three-quarters of the way back, near
a little old Scotch lady of great animation, who kept me informed on the platform celebrities. She pointed out that
Barrie was the only one whose hair was
not grey. That seemed to be the only
sign of age that had passed him by. His
shoulders drooped dismally. His face
was lined and tired. A vest wrinkled
badly down his chest. The long list of
graduates seemed to tire him, and we
feared he would not be able to finish.
The heavy gown was removed as he
began to speak. Even with the loudspeakers about the hall his voice barely
reached me, and it trailed off dispiritedly
at the end of sentences. He was whimsical but without punch, or, for that mat
ter, very much to say. Yet, as I looked
about me, the little Scotch lady was bending forward, eyes alight, and so, too, were
her countrymen. They love Barrie, the
author of Peter Pan.
A startling part of the ceremony was
the noise of the students from the galleries. A University of British Columbia ceremony is altogether solemn. Here
the students interrupted speeches and
pounded with much gusto with both feet
without warning. When Sir James was
putting on his gown, a voice floated down
to Sir Thomas Holland, the Principal of
the University, "Lend a hand, Tommy."
That would be referred to the Student
Discipline Committee at the University
of British Columbia. After the ceremony, a student enquired if they had
rotten-egged the new Chancellor. When
I told him no such thing had occurred, he
sighed and said that it was popular, but
they had probably refrained out of respect for Barrie. In lectures, too, comment is frequent in the form of foot-
stamping. There was recently great
criticism of Glasgow students who so
obstructed the speech of a visiting lady
lecturer that her speech was ruined and
she herself much embarrassed.
**
UNDERGRADUATE ACTIVITIES
AS a mere undergraduate, I approach
the task of "doing my stuff" for The
Chronicle with a proper amount of trepidation. However, may the chronicler
reflect the honor of the times, for this
year's activity has nearly paralleled that
of the great campaign of '22.
I.—ACHIEVEMENT
As this is being written, the $20,000
objective set for the Stadium Fund is
within a few thousand dollars of com
pletion. The students, anxious to emulate the generous example of the Faculty
and Board of Governors, who gave over
$5000 to the fund, threw themselves into
the six weeks' campaign with enthusiasm.
Sales of hot-dogs and candy yo-yos on
the campus, moving picture shows, noon
hour dances and concerts, raffles, and
social events of all kinds abounded—"and
all for the Stadium." Sacrifices were
made, from refreshments at class functions to pledged caution money and fair- Eighteen
The University of British Columbia
sized donations. The city was canvassed
exhaustively. And on the slope behind
the Science building the work goes forward on what will some day be a Stadium
fit for the accommodation of 15,000
people.
North of the Library stands another
monument to student activity and pro-
gressiveness. This is the Gymnasium,
for the purpose of building which the
Alma Mater Society was incorporated
and authorized to float a bond issue. The
$30,000 which the building cost was obtained through student activity, while the
Alumni rose nobly to the occasion by
pledging $3000 for equipment. The
opening of the Gymnasium, last fall, was
a ceremony which will long be remembered.
The dream of a Women's Union
building is yet to be realized. Already
more than $6000 has been raised by
Co-ed enterprise, but the bulk is wanting.
The public campaign met with the heavy
obstacle of the stock market crash, and,
owing to general financial depression, has
not yet been renewed, but in undergraduate life it has been going steadily
on—the most notable feature being the
now well-known institution of the Co-ed
Ball. This building, when completed,
will be a meeting place for graduate and
undergraduate, professor and student,
man and woman student alike.
II.—POINTS OF INTEREST ON
THE CAMPUS
To "old grads" coming back to visit,
the campus is full of interesting
mementoes, old and new. One of the
most outstanding of these may be seen
from the approach along University
Boulevard. It is the 240-foot flag pole
of Douglas fir which, at present, lies
seasoning to the south of the Science
building. It will be, when erected, one
of the four tallest single spire poles in
the world.
On the Mall there stands the stone
Cairn, a memorial to the campaign of '22.
The   Cairn   Service   for   the   Freshmen
class, inaugurated in  1928, has become
a tradition in the University.
The last two totem poles of the Mus-
quiam Reserve now stand in the Botanical Gardens, a gift of the Alumni
Association.
The Library houses the Burnett collection, which is famous as the most
complete representative Polynesian collection in the world. It was given to the
University by the well-beloved Dr. Frank
Burnett, whose death last year left a
sorrowful gap in the lives of undergraduates and alumni alike.
III.—LITERARY AND ARTISTIC
Artistic   endeavors  flourish on the
campus.    Chief   among   these are the
activities of the Players'   Club and the
Musical Society.
Dauntless and ambitious, the last-
named organization this year most successfully attempted Gilbert & Sullivan.
"The Pirates of Penzance" was put on
with a brilliance and verve which would
have done credit to any company. The
Musical Society deserved the more credit
since it only last year broke its tradition
of simple recitals to attempt musical
comedy in "The Garden of the Shah."
The noon-hour concerts which it sponsors are also a feature of interest.
On the Players' Club it is not necessary to expatiate. Its uniformly entertaining and polished productions have
been part of University life almost as
long as the University has existed. Suffice it to say that the standard has been
amply maintained. This year's play,
"The Young Idea," by Noel Coward,
fully lived up to expectations. Breezy
and brilliant in content, it was handled
capably and charmingly by the producer
and the cast, and recalled to old patrons
such successes as "Polly With a Past."
Literary activity has also flourished.
This year the Letters' Club and the
Literary Department of the Publications
Board have been collaborating on a chap- Graduate Chronicle—April,  1931
Nineteen
book of graduate and undergraduate
verse. At the time of writing, the little
book is still in the process of completion,
but when published we are sure it will
prove a worthy successor to the chap-
books of previous years.
IV.—SPORT
Outstanding in University sport this
year has been the performance of the
"Senior A" Basketball teams, men and
women. The men, under the coaching of
Dr. Montgomery, have won both district
and provincial championships, and are in
line for further honors. "Senior A"
women have been victorious ever since
they returned from Prague last year
with the World's Championship.
The "Big Four" Canadian Rugby team
met with defeat, both in the district and
inter-Varsity leagues, but after a long
and brilliant battle. The University was
well represented in Soccer and won a
respectable position on the district league.
English Rugby, the sport which graduates remember as having brought so
much honor to the University, was disappointing this year.
Inter-class sport has flourished as
never before. Soccer and Basketball
leagues have been in progress since
October; Education and Science '31 lead
the way in the former, and Science '33
are at the top of the Basketball series.
A growing interest has been shown in
Track. Early in the spring a small group
of our best Track stars went to the Puget
Sound meet. Bob Alpen, Sc. '31, won
the individual championship.
The athletes at the University of British Columbia have one particular goal,
and that is inter-university competition.
When athletes have developed so that
University of British Columbia can meet
and defeat other universities, we shall be
satisfied that this side of our life is
complete. F. LUCAS.
^
EXTRACTS FROM OUR LETTERS
FOREWORD
IF you cannot visit your friends, the
next best thing is to receive letters
from them. Acting on this theory, we
have tried to get letters from some of
the graduates in "high and far-off
places" of the earth. We wrote to
various groups of graduates asking
them to write us letters for The Chronicle. Some of them did, and we print
such herewith. We must acknowledge, however, our indebtedness to
Harold Henderson of '25, who allowed
us to read and in some cases to reproduce letters from his well-kept and
up-to-date class records. (Other permanent Executive members please
note). Next year we hope that the
Editor of The Chronicle will be inundated with so many letters that he or
she will be a well of information of
Alumni doings.
TO ILLUSTRATE THE JOYS OF
AN EDITOR'S LIFE
Answering one of your questions, I
should not like to write a little letter
about the University of British Columbia people in Ottawa. Take "X",
for instance. All I know about him
would not look well in print. Of
course I could say that he is speaking
over the radio on behalf of the League
of Nations, but could I say that he
wears the most disreputable hat in
Ottawa, that he needs a hair cut, and
that the way he draws cards in contract raises a doubt in my mind if the
universe is really rational and just.
* * *
TOMMY BROWN, in Prince Rupert, knows "there's gold in them thar
hills": "My adopted city seems to need
me every minute. The police ordered
a large part of my clients out of town Twenty
The University of British Columbia
some two months ago, but I have
since that time managed to build up
a very fair business by seizing and
selling abandoned gold mines."
"I saw a lot of Hugh Keenleyside
in Tokyo; also saw a little of McLane
in Kobe and McDonald in Shanghai.
.... You can always get me at 657
Lansdowne Ave., Westmount, Que."
ROBERT W. BALL, who received
his Ph.D. at Illinois, writes: "This has
been a fairly profitable year, in that
I have got myself a degree and a job,
and hope to be married next year."
BRICK McLEOD assures us that he
is still hale and hearty and chasing
the elusive Blister Rust.
HELEN MacGILL HUGHES, who
is now working for her doctor's degree in Sociology in Chicago: "This
summer we missed seeing Geoff.
Bruun and his wife in Vienna, by about
a week, but we did see a lot of Phyllis
Gregory Turner, whose address is 34
Onslow Road, Richmond, Surrey, Eng.
She has a little boy who looks like
herself, and she has not changed a bit.
We also saw Sylvia Thrupp, and Geo.
Riddehough, who has married recently. Last month I saw Charlie Bishop
of Sc. '26. He is in the bond business
here.
CLARENCE NELSON writes from
Colombo: "For the past two years I
have been private seceretary to Gerald
Birks (one of the Montreal brothers
in the jewellery firm), who is practically retired and spends each winter
in the Orient as administrator of the
foreign work of the North American
Y. M. C. A. I knew before leaving
home that, due to shortage of funds
in the "Y" headquarters in New York,
I was going to have to go home when
Mr. Birks had cleaned up his work
proper, which is China, Japan, Korea
and the Phillipines. ... I am now
humming along second class in
Europe.
"AFRICA SPEAKS"
EARL GILLANDERS writes from
Loangwa Concessions, Broken Hill,
N. Rhodesia, Africa, of the joys and
sorrows of a Geologist. He writes in
part:
"The past month I have not been at
my camp at all but have been moving
around all the time. First I went to
visit another area along the east coast
of Lake Mweru and took one of the
chaps from there and went over to
an island in Lake Mweru. We spent
a few days mapping it out, and then
went over to the Congo side and had
a look at the rocks there. We got
back to the Rhodesian side without
particular incident, except one evening we were out in a dugout canoe
after a hippo. We ran across three.
They had evidently been shot at before, for when we tried to get up
close a couple of them started for the
boat. They just kept their eyes out
of the water, and as it was a hopeless
shot we beat a retreat. They upset
a boatload of natives a couple of days
after that, but they all escaped for a
wonder, too, as the water there is full
of crocs.
". . . . Now that the rainy season
has come the roads are terrible. The
only way to "motor" is by lorry,
when you can pack enough boys to
push the car out of the holes and
marshy places. During the rains the
drivers here may leave on a trip that
should only take a day or so, but they
always take along about a month's
provisions.
". . . . At Christmas I'll get Jack
Farrington and whatever British Columbia men I can find to help me drink Graduate Chronicle—April,  1931
Twenty-one
the health of the University of British
Columbia. There is a young fellow by
the name of McKeown, of '30, working in one of my areas here this
season."
DESMOND KIDD is head Geologist
for a large area of the Arctic, and
writes of last summer's work:
"We made an early start north from
Churchill this year, leaving there with
four dog teams on Easter Sunday. It
was a short trip for about three hundred miles up the coast to our base at
Tavane. The weather was wonderful
though, with the exception of the first
few days out, when it was about ten
below and drifting. We played Con-
necticutt Yankees at the end of April
with our Eskimos, and told them that
there would be a partial eclipse of the
sun. We made a mistake of two hours
in our calculations, however, and
looked very foolish when nothing
happened at the prophesied time.
"At Tavane I made some trips inland
by clog team and laid down caches for
the summer's work. I also had an
interesting trip by canoe down the
coast for a hundred miles along the
floe edge.
"After the spring break-up we separated and I went inland for July and
August with three Eskimos. They
were a funnily assorted trio—Nigvik,
a splendid old chap with liberal views
on everything; Kaliguak, a pagan and
a very good hunter, and Oolybuck, a
devout Anglican and a thorough scalawag. He had to have a workless
Sunday every so often, so whenever
the weather was very bad, I made it
Sunday.
"The Eskimos did all the cooking
and dishwashing, generally quite satisfactorily. They needed checking up
occasionally. I didn't mind a dishcloth being used as a towel, but its
use as a pocket handkerchief was go-
insr a little too far.
"One day we shot a fresh water
seal. They were going to cache the
whole thing. I expressed a liking for
seal liver, so they cut it out and
cooked it for me specially. They now
think I consider liver of all kinds an
especial dainty. I have had cariboo
liver, trout liver, a relic of liver recovered from the oily water in the bottom of the canoe. My summer was
haunted by thoughts of what kind of
liver I would next be called upon to
consume.
"We didn't see any signs of human
life all summer, with the exception of
two planes which passed far overhead
one sunny day.
"We found two new tributaries of
the Ferguson River, one draining a
whopping big lake forty miles long.
A rather gruesome discovery on this
lake was that of an Eskimo who had
apparently been frozen to death. Game
was scarce all summer, but we had a fish
net and did pretty well. Apart from the
natives all getting taken ill, a canoe being
swamped, and an engine break-down, we
had no troubles.
"At the beginning of September I
returned to Tavane and we got our
good ship "Lady Logan" afloat and
ran down the coast to Churchill. It
was a rough trip and we nearly lost
her once when she was driven ashore
in a gale, but we got her off and
patched her up and reached our destination."
Dear Editor:
Paris, France.
Summer time sees many British Columbia students in Paris, but few of them
have the good fortune to prolong their
stay into the winter months. This year,
however, the permanent colony is more
numerous than ever before. "We are
seven," to be exact—Dorothy Dallas
(Arts '23), who is deep in the 17th century French novel; Phyllis Partridge and
Geoffrey Riddehough (Arts '24) ; Wessie Twenty-two
The University of British Columbia
Tipping (Arts '25); Kaye Lamb (Arts
'27), and Jean Macintosh and Harry
Hickman (Arts '30).
Three of us, Harry, Jean and Phyllis, are working hard at Ecole de
Preparation des Professeurs de Fran-
qais a l'Etanger, at the Sorbonne.
The remaining four are engaged in
research work in French History or
Literature and are habitues of the
Bibliotheque Nationale, the Arsenal
Library, etc.
Other graduates have made sojourns of varying lengths in Paris
during the past few months. Dorothy
Taylor (Arts '25), after an extended
stay, left recently for South America,
where she is visiting Bertha Coates,
who, since her marriage, is living near
Buenos Aires. After spending eight
months in Europe, Dorothy McKay
(Arts '28) is leaving very shortly for
home, via the Cote d'Azur, Rome and
Naples. John Grace (Arts '26) spent
the summer in Paris, and also paid us
a short visit just before Christmas.
Joyce Hallamore and Doris Fee
breezed in to Paris for a few days on
their return from Oberammergau.
Madge Portsmouth travelled quite extensively last summer. Phyllis McKay
('24) spent part of her summer doing
postgrad work at the Sorbonne.
We have periodical reunions quite
frequently and would very much appreciate news of other British Columbia
students in different parts of the world.
Also we would be only too pleased to
give any information in our power to
other students contemplating study in
Paris.
In answer to the inevitable question as to our impressions, we might
remark that, although Paris has given
us much that only the Old World can
offer, our increased admiration for the
University of British Columbia is
prominent among our new appreciations.
—THE  PARIS ALUMNI.
We enclose extracts from two letters written by Homer A. Thompson
from The American School of Classical Studies, Athens, Greece:
May, 13, 1930.
' ' ' . There were only 20 students
in the school this year—all grads, so
we five of us travelled "Deck" to
Egypt, sitting up by night on Egyptian trains and by day riding the sands
on camel back.
Since March 1 a friend and I have
been working together on a small
"dig" at Corinth, where the American
School has been excavating for the
past 30 years, we being chiefly occupied in digging Roman graves and
tombs, which yield a fair amount of
vases, coins, lamps, figurines, etc. One
feels that he is getting the "inside
dope" on the ancients by the time he
has pulled apart a half-dozen skeletons in the course of a day's work.
The past few days we have been
cleaning out a 15 meter well which
had been filled in about 2000 B.C.
In the fall we expect to commence
our real work—digging the ancient
Agora or Market Place of Athens.
We have just returned from a
week's breather—a visit to Delphe and
the festival held there, at which two
plays of Aeschylus were presented in
the Ancient Theatre, and games, field
sport, horse racing and riding in
armor were given in imitation of the
ancient athletic meets held there. We
went up by boat, but returned doing
a two days' tramp through the mountains to the railroad, passing the night
at one of the most interesting of the
many monasteries of Greece. It is
most interesting to see the black-
robed, bearded monks moving about
their church services and tending their
garden plots, orchards and bees, as
monks have done there for the last
seven or eight centuries.
November 11.
My last letter was from the Roman
tombs of Corinth. July I spent in
tramping    about    in    the    north—in Graduate Chronicle—April,  1931
Twenty-three
Aitolia and Acharmania and on the
island of Ithaca, where I saw the beginning of the Greek excavation
which has since claimed to have discovered the home of Ulysses. The
only difficulty is that a party of English archaeologists digging in the
northern part of the island this same
summer claim to have discovered the
palace of the same gentleman. But
that is all in the game.
Back in Athens we are awaiting a
start on our excavation of the ancient
Market Place. Early in the new year
we hope to see the first of the modern
houses come down and the first of the
ancient buildings come up.
* * *
We  regret  that we cannot print in
full an account of the Oriental Culture
Summer College held in Tokyo. This
account, sent by Carol Coates, now
MRS. EUGENE CASSIDY, deals with
a fascinating five weeks' course of lecture
and travel. By the end of the five weeks
"everyone had seen Japan for himself
and had been afforded a bird's eye
view, not only of Japan's ancient art
and life, but also of her new modern
life, so complex with its social, economic and moral problems."
Anyone going to the Orient, and
who would like to avail himself of the
unique privilege of this school, should
write to: The Oriental College, Mr.
Kaju Nakamura, Sankaido Building,
N. Tameike, Akassaha, Tokyo, Japan.
&
GENERAL INFORMATION
LLOYD WHEELER, Arts '24, is
in the Department of Comparative
Literature, University of Wisconsin.
He has done very successful work
there under the head of the Department. He has almost completed the
work  for  his doctorate in  English.
HELEN WHEELER (Helen Bennett, Nursing '25) is head of the
Maternity Division of the University
Clinic in Madison. She has been very
successful in her work, having had
three promotions in three }^ears.
HARRY PURDY, '26, has been
teaching this year in the Economics
Department, University of Chicago,
and working for his doctorate. He
goes back to his own job at Dartmouth in September.
BRUCE MacDONALD, Arts '26, is
Junior Trade Commissioner at Shanghai.
LES. BROWN, Arts '27, is a Junior
Trade Commissioner in Mexico.
ELMER ANDERSON, '29, and
KENNETH MORE, '29, have won
teaching fellowships in Physics at the
University of California. There were
six fellowships open to graduates anywhere on the continent. University
of British Columbia graduates took
two.
MALCOLM HEBB, Arts '31, has
won a fellowship in Physics at the
University of Wisconsin.
ALBERT POOLE, '29, has been
appointed to an assistantship in the
California Institute of Technology.
He will receive his Master's degree
this spring.
DR. and MRS. JACK RUSSELL
(Ruth Fulton. '18) are living in
Rochester, New York, where Dr. Russell is with the Eastman Kodak Co.
MADGE GILL, '19, is Librarian for
the Research Council of Canada.
D'ARCY MARSH, '26, is now
editorial writer on "The Albertan,"
Calgary. Twenty-four
The University of British Columbia
GEOFFREY BRUUN, Arts '24, is
Assistant Professor of History at New
York University. Dr. Brunn has already published one book, "The Enlightened Despots," and is at present
working on two others.
MARION MITCHELL, Arts '26,
spent 1929-30 at Columbia University
on a scholarship, and completed one
year's work toward a Ph.D. This
year Marion is teaching History and
International Relations at the Linden-
wood Ladies' College, St. Charles,
Missouri.
EARLE GILLANDERS, Arts '25,
and CLIFFORD LORD, Science '29,
are with the Anglo-American Mining
Company in Northern Rhodesia, doing
geological survey work.
THOMAS WARDEN, Science '29,
returned from Africa last summer and
took a position with the Royalite Oil
Company in the Turner Valley, Alberta.
WALTER GAGE, Arts '25, is Professor of Mathematics and Registrar
at the Victoria College, Victoria, B. C.
WILLIAM CHALMERS, Arts '26,
received his Ph.D. at McGill in 1930,
also the Governor-General's silver
medal for research. At present Dr.
Chalmers is in Germany on a fellowship of the Canadian Research Council.
He is at the Freiburg University
studying under Dr. Hermann Staud-
inger, the eminent chemist.
LOUIS SMITH, Arts '26. For the
past few years Louis has been connected with the Dominion Biological
Experimental Station at Prince Rupert. He has been very successful in
his research work and has perfected
a process by which glue may be inexpensively manufactured from fish.
HARRY GUNNING is in charge of
a geological survey in the Arctic circle.
HARRY ANDREWS is now head
chemist at Powell River.
LORRAINE BOLTON is taking a
secretarial course at Heald College in
San Francisco.
CHARLIE BISHOP is manager of
the Chicago office of Cooper, Dysart
and Kuh, brokers.
BOB MUNRO is secretary and
director of several telephone companies, of which the B. C. Telephone
is one. His wife was formerly Dorothy Hopper.
MRS. CHAS. B. CRITTENDEN,
formerly Lucy Edwards, has been
travelling over the Eastern States
with her husband, who has been doing
special work in public health.
ERNEST KNAPTON of '25, who
took his B.A. at Oxford while a
Rhodes scholar, has been awarded the
Francis Parkman Fellowship in History and Economics for 1930 and 1931.
HARRY DUNLOP, '19, is Assistant
Director of Investigation in the International Fisheries Commission at
Seattle.
VERA MATHERS, '25, is studying
medicine at Johns Hopkins University.
GRETA MATHERS, '24, is director
of the Personnel Department for several business concerns in Seattle.
BERT PETRIE is working for his
Ph.D. in Astronomy at the University
of Michigan.
At Queens University, H. CLARE
HORWOOD, Science '30, is working
for a Master's degree in Geological
Engineering. NEIL McKECHNIE is
also in Science, and BILL CLARK is
studying medicine.
SYDNEY INGRAM, after two years
at Michigan as National Research
Fellow, has taken a position in the
laboratories of the Bell Telephone in
New York.
AL. HEMINGWAY has his Ph.D. in
Biophysics and is on the staff of the Graduate Chronicle—April,  1931
Twenty-five
Department of Physiological Chemistry of the University of Minnesota,
where he is also working for his M.D.
GILBERT CARPENTER, since
graduation, spent two years doing
post-graduate work at McGill with a
Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry at the
end; V/2 years at M. I. T. as research
assistant in Applied Chemistry, and
since January, 1930, has been employed on high-pressure research in
the Du Pont Ammonia Corporation in
Wilmington, Delaware.
MARY HARVEY, '25, has a lending
library and gift shop, "The Harlequin,"
at the corner of Davie and Bute
streets Vancouver.
KATHLEEN CLARK, '26, is at
home this year from Merritt, convalescing from a very serious illness.
GORDON McLAUCHLAN, Science
'25, for the past two and a half years
has been mill superintendent at Nor-
anda Mines, Ltd. He has received
the 1930 award of the Leonard Gold
Medal of the Engineering Institute of
Canada for his paper, "A Year's Milling at Noranda."
ALFRED RIVE, recently Assistant
Professor of Political Economy at
Yale University, has been appointed
third secretary in the Department of
External Affairs at Ottawa. He is
now "rolling down to Rio" with the
Canadian delegation to attend the
British Empire Exhibition at Buenos
Aires, as secretary to Sir George
Perley.
DOUG. RAE is manager of the B.
C. Silver Mine at Premier, B. C.
JOHN ALLARDYCE is at McGill,
where he is working for his PhD. in
Chemistry.
RALPH BALL is also studying for
a Ph.D. in Chemistry at McGill.
FRANK EMMONS—After obtaining his B.A. at University of British
Columbia he went to McGill and got
his M.Sc, M.D. and Ph.D. Dr. Emmons has now been two years at Mayo
Clinic, where he is specializing in
surgery with research as a side line.
While at McGill he was co-author of
several papers on pernicious anaemia
with Professor Tait of the Department of Physiology.
JEAN DAVIDSON, '25, has a fellowship at the University of Michigan,
working towards a Ph.D. in Botany.
"AB." RICHARDS has been appointed to the staff of the Agricultural
Economics Branch of the Department
of Agriculture at Ottawa, and provides direct representation for British
Columbia in this important phase of
the Department's activities.
HOWARD GOODWIN is making a
success of his work for the Vancouver
Community Chest.
JOHNNIE BURTON and WALTER
HODGSON are partners in law in
Vancouver.
Mrs. H. H. Hemming, formerly
ALICE WEAVER —The work of
translating Siegfried's new book on
the Economic Condition of England,
on which she has been collaborating
with her husband, is now completed.
DR. W. SWANZEY PECK is married and living in Chester, Pa., where
he is very successfully engaged in research in dyes and dye-woods.
G. E. WOOLLIAMS, who graduated
with honors in Botany, obtained his
M.A. from the University of Idaho.
For three years he has been Assistant
Plant Pathologist in Summerland.
Next fall he plans to go to Toronto to
work toward his Ph.D. in Botany.
CECIL GARWOOD holds a fellowship at Perdue University and is pursuing work towards his Ph.D. in Plant
Pathology. Twenty-six
The University of British Columbia
MARGARET KEILLOR is completing' her course in Dietetics in the Vancouver General Hospital.
DR. ALLAN PEEBLES, Arts '20,
formerly on the staff of Columbia
University, New York, is one of the
six research men engaged on a committee headed by Roy Lyman Wilbur,
Secretary of the Interior in the Hoover Cabinet, and organized to study the
economic aspects of the prevention
and care of sickness. This committee
is financed by the Rockefeller, Carnegie, and other foundations.
RALPH HULL and RALPH
JAMES, graduates of University of
British Columbia, have recently been
awarded two of the largest fellowships in Mathematics at the University of Chicago. After receiving their
M.A. degrees here in 1930, both
students won fellowships of $1000,
and proceeded to Chicago University
to begin their studies for their
doctorate.
GEOFFREY COOPE, Arts '22, is at
present engaged in special work in
English at Birmingham University,
England. He plans to return next
year to the University at Moscow,
Idaho.
LINDSAY BLACK, B.S.A. '29, was
an assistant in the Department of Botany, University of British Columbia,
for one year. He received a fellowship in Plant Pathology from Cornell,
and is now pursuing work there towards his Ph.D. degree.
THOS. TAYLOR, after graduating
from the University of British Columbia
with honors in Botany, proceeded to
Wisconsin, where he held a fellowship.
He is now on the teaching staff, Department of Botany, University of
Toronto.
B. GRIFFITH, who graduated from
the University of British Columbia with
honors in Botany, received his Master's degree in Forest Botany from
Yale, where he held a scholarship. He
is now employed in Forest Research
in the Department of Lands, Victoria.
JAMES DAUPHINEE—In 1929 he
received his medical degree from Toronto, with the medal for the highest
standing in his class, also his Ph.D.
After this academic orgy he was married. The events recorded all took
place within two weeks.
MARGARET HURRY, '27, is assistant librarian to Dr. Helen Stewart in
the Fraser Valley Rural Library Experiment.
GEORGE VINCENT. '26, won the
I. O. D. E. prize of $200 for his short
story, "Gold in Wolverine."
* * *
There is a group in the Alumni Association whose clarion call for some
years, in fact ever since they became
members, has been, "What is the matter with the Alumni?" Without going
into detail on the subject of the
functions of an Alumni Association,
we are going to suggest that if you
belong to the above group and feel
growing upon you the desire to voice
your complaints once more, that you
read what has been accomplished by
some of your fellow-graduates and
then turn your attention to yourself
and your value as a graduate of the
University, remembering that a chain
is no stronger than its weakest link.
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§   s: Thirty-eight
The University of British Columbia
BIRTHS
To Mr. and Mrs. Orson Banfield, a
daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. R. F. V. Cooper
(Bertha Coates), a son.
To  Mr. and Mrs.  C.  Maltby  (Lila
Coates), a son.
To  Mr. and Mrs. Norman Robertson, a daughter.
To   Mr.   and   Mrs.   Walter   Owen
(Jean Dowler), a son.
To  Mr. and Mrs.  Percy  Southcott
(Bonnie Clement), a son.
To  Dr.  and   Mrs.  Gordon   Schrum
(Oenone Baillie), a son.
To   Mr.   and   Mrs.   Sherwood   Lett
(Evelyn Story), a daughter.
To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  George  Futcher
(Winks Hall), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. John Grace, a son.
To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gosford   Martin
(Marjory Martin), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. James Lawrence
(Kathleen Peck), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. George Robertson
(Helen Wesbrook), a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hoy (Mar-
jorie Day), a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Jack Grant (Helen
Turpin), a daughter.
To   Mr.   and   Mrs.   Britton   Brock
(Barbara Stirling), a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Art. Woodhouse
(Muriel Wright), a son.
To  Mr. and  Mrs.  John  Creighton
(Sallee Murphy), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Keith Shaw
(Gladys, Weld), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Fournier
(Dorothy Brenchley), a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Giegerich
(Catherine Maynard) twins, boy and
girl.
MARRIAGES
Jessie Caspell to Mr. Glen Murdoch
Beemon, of San Francisco.
Isobel McKinnon to George Dixon.
J. Dadwell, of Trail, to Miss Mar-
jorie Hastings, of Victoria.
Fergus Mutrie, of Vernon, to Grace
Meredith.
Cora Metz to Lester McLennan.
Alice Weaver to Major Henry Harold Hemming, M.C., R.F.A.
Bice Clegg to Kenneth Caple, Sum-
merland.
Lillian   Agnes    Robinson,    '27,    to
Philip Bateman Stroyan, Sc. '24.
Carol Coates to Eugene Cassidy.
Helen Peck to Harry Furniss.
Mona   Miles,  Arts   '22,  to  Alan  J.
Napier.
Marjorie Edwards, Arts '27, to John
Macdonald.
Hope Leeming to Kenneth J. Salmond.
DEATHS
Davies, Dermot—In Montreal, in
March, 1931, Dermot Davies, husband
of Elsie Rilance, and son of Dr. and
Mrs. A. H. Davies, of Vancouver.
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fafa> E5 jVkmm j&rctttg of Wep ffifaexstrfy of Pntfetf (Eolumbta
Rboistbab'S  Office
TJmTKBSrrr of British Columbia
VANCOUVER, B. C.
May 1st, 1931.
Dear Alumnus:
This publication has "been prepared "because of popular demand.  Many
graduates have asked for a magazine which would give them more information about
the University than was possible in the "Ubysseygrad", and it has been said that
the time has arrived to undertake such a project.
During the past year a strong committee, headed by Miss Isobel Harvey,
has been engaged in collecting and preparing material which would be both
interesting and valuable.  The result is the "Chronicle".  I am sure you will
agree that the Publications Committee has reached its objective.
When the editorial task had been completed, it was found that there
was not enough money in the treasury to publish the "Chronicle", that is, an
insufficient number of graduates had paid the annual fee of one dollar.
However, it was decided to go ahead with the printing and to mail copies to all
graduates whose addresses are known to us, having every confidence that those
who have not paid the fee (one dollar) will immediately remit the sum of one
dollar for the current year's membership in the Alumni Society.
We know that in the great majority of cases the only reason that the
fee has not been paid is that it is such a small item, and one does not think of
it at an appropriate moment.  Consequently, facilities are being provided to
enable you to meet this obligation with the minimum of trouble.  Please complete
the attached cheque-form and mail it to The Treasurer, Alumni Society, Care
Registrar, U.B.C., Vancouver.
Of course, you may obtain a life membership on payment of ten dollars.
We are relying on your support.  Please do not fail us.
Yours truly,
(Signed)  H.   B.   SMITH,  President,
Alumni  Society  of U.B.C.
W
9
a
W
O
K
a
H
O
o
TO-
(Namk of Bank)
-MAY,   1931
 (Bhanch)
PAY TO THE ORDER OF
TREASURER, ALUMNI SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF B. C.
&I.OO
ONE
jjbo Dollars

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