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Trek Jun 30, 2009

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
14  One Man's Journey with Parkinson's By Adrienne watt
Ian Smith orders his legs to move. They don't always obey.
17 Brain Research Breakthroughs By Melissa Ashman
Big happenings at one of Canada's leading neuroscience research institutes.
18 The Conductor of the Cellist of Sarajevo By John Vigna
Award-winning author Steven Galloway on the painstaking process of writing a novel.
21   Short Game Advisor is Long on Experience By jody Jacob
Golfer Bill McGhee, 89, is the latest addition to the UBC Okanagan golf team.
22    TO Make the World a  Better Place By Herb Rosengarten & Henry Chong
A love of science, and each other, took two UBC grads around the world.
25  No Handmaiden of Medicine By Lissa Cowan
Ethel Johns helped make nursing a profession, then helped build UBC's nursing program.
28    Life iS Long and Art iS Short By Robin Laurence
Painting is like breathing for artist Gordon Smith. But he's not happy with his work.
32   University Town By chns Petty
We revisit UTown and find the view quite charming.
34  Little Known Facts about UBC
Prepare to raise your eyebrows.
5 Take Note
13 Letters to the Editor
38 Alumni News
40 Class Acts
42 Books
44 T-Bird News
47 In Memoriam
Cover image: Opalescent Nudibranch
(Hermissenda crassicornis) photographed by
Calvin Hass, BASc'98, during Alumni Weekend
at a Broughton Point tidepooling event.
Opposite: UBC alumni, family and friends
enjoyed the Botanical Garden canopy tour at
Alumni Weekend in May. Photo: Kellan Higgins.
EDITOR IN CHIEF Christopher Petty, mfa'86
MANAGING EDITOR Vanessa Clarke
ART DIRECTOR Keith Leinweber
CONTRIBUTORS Michael Awmack, ba'oi
Adrienne Watt
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
CHAIR Ian Robertson, BSc'86, BA'88, MBA, MA
VICE CHAIR Miranda Lam, LLB'02.
treasurer Robin Elliott, BCoM'65
MEMBERS-AT-LARGE (06-09)
Aderita Guerreiro, BA'77
Mark Mawhinney, BA'94
MEMBERS-AT-LARGE (07-10)
Don Dalik, BCom, LLB'76
Dallas Leung, BCoM'94
MEMBERS-AT-LARGE (08-11)
Brent Cameron, BA, MBA'06
Marsha Walden, BCom'So
Ernest Yee, BA'83, MA'87
PAST CHAIR (08-09)
Doug Robinson, BCoM'71, LLB'72.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATION REP (08-09)
Stephen Owen, MBA, LLB'72, LLM
Brian Sullivan, AB, MPH
AMS REP (09-10)
Tom Dvorak
CONVOCATION SENATE REP (08-09)
Chris Gorman, BA'99
YOUNG ALUMNI REP (08-09)
Carmen Lee, BA'01
OKANAGAN REP (08-09)
Catherine Comben, BA'67
APPOINTMENT TO BOARD (08-09)
Rod Hoffmeister, BA'67
APPOINTMENT TO BOARD (09-10)
Ian Warner, BCoM'69
EX-OFFICIO
PRESIDENT, UBC
Stephen Toope, ab, llb and bcl, phd
PRESIDENT'S DESIGNATE
Barbara Miles, ba, postgrad certificate in ed.
CHANCELLOR, UBC
Sarah Morgan-Silvester, BCOM'82
ASSOCIATE VP, ALUMNI / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Marie Earl, ab, mla
Trek Magazine (formerly the UBC Alumni Chronicle) is
published three times a year by the UBC Alumni
Association and distributed free of charge to UBC alumni
and friends. Opinions expressed in the magazine do not
necessarily reflect the views of the Alumni Association or
the university. Address correspondence to:
The Editor,
UBC Alumni Affairs,
6251 Cecil Green Park Road,
Vancouver, bc, Canada v6t izi
e-mail to chris.petty@ubc.ca
Letters published at the editor's discretion and may be edited for
space. Contact the editor for advertising rates.
CONTACT NUMBERS AT UBC
Address Changes
via e-mail
Alumni Association
toll free
Trek Editor
UBC Info Line
Belkin Gallery
Bookstore
Chan Centre
Frederic Wood Theatre
Museum of Anthropology
604.822.8921
alumni.association@ubc.ca
604.822.3313
800.883.3088
604.822.8914
604.822.4636
604.822.2759
604.822.2665
604.822.2697
604.822.2678
604.822.5087
Volume 64, Number 2.  I Printed in Canada by Mitchell Press
Canadian Publications Mail Agreement #40063528
Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:
Records Department
UBC Development Office
Suite 500
5950 University Boulevard
Vancouver, bc v6t IZ3
Summer 2009    Trek    3 BABIES,
FRENCH FRIES AND
THE OPALESCENT NUDIBRANCH
The image on the cover of this issue of Trek Magazine is of a marine slug
called the Opalescent Nudibranch. It was taken during Alumni Weekend
by alumnus Calvin Hass, BASc'98, at the tidepooling event presented by
UBC biology professor Chris Harley. There isn't an article about the slug
in this issue, nor is there one about Chris Harley, although he would be
a good topic for an upcoming issue. There is a pictorial presentation
about Alumni Weekend on page 3 6, but the slug isn't really a featured
performer there either.
The decision on cover images is always a difficult one. William
Randolph Hearst insisted that his magazines have compelling images on
their covers ("a pretty girl, a happy family or a cute dog") to make it
more likely that potential readers would pick them up at the newsstand.
Over the years we've tried hard to make our covers interesting. We've
had historical photos, a baby (#2), an actor from the 1930s, a running
skeleton, a seahorse, an oil painting, a tree illustration with people as
roots, a little girl in a bunny mask and a plate of french fried potatoes,
among others. We always hope we'll find an image that has some
relationship to an article in the mag, even if it's just a Take Note, but it's
not always possible, nor is it necessary. For the first few issues we tied the
image to a word on the cover such as ingenuity, performance, creativity
and my favourite, renascence, but that became too precious after a while,
and we ran out of cool words.
As long as there's some slim connection between the cover and
something UBC, our bottom line when it comes to choosing a cover shot
is this: it has to be a great image.
People sometimes ask why we don't have photos of important people
on our covers: big donors, exceptional researchers, top students. Our
problem here is twofold: how on earth could we ever pick one exceptional
person over another, and how could we be sure to get a spectacular
picture? Nothing's worse than a magazine cover with a bad snapshot of
some VIP. We did have an important person on our cover once: Amy
Gyori, BSN'06, on issue #15, who had just graduated at UBCO's first
convocation. The photo was OK, but Amy had such a triumphant look
on her face we thought it captured an important moment of university
life. It's still one of my favourite covers.
Some of our covers come from a commercial stock collection and cost
upwards of a thousand dollars (#18, for instance, the face of an older
swimmer). Some come from a UBC collection and cost nothing (#21,
from the University Vault). Some come from the university archives (#s 3
and 22, for example), and some come serendipitously (#s 4, 5 and n).
And some, like the one from #23, come from talented people who work
on the magazine.
We chose the photo of the slug because we thought it was a great
picture, and because we realized that the last few covers have been
somewhat dark and dour (a head-tax certificate, marching soldiers in gas
masks and a convict illustration) and we wanted to be light and pretty
this time. We also chose it because underlines UBC's amazing diversity:
someone on campus knows a hell of a lot about the nudibranch.
And that's what we try hardest to achieve with our covers, and with of the
rest of the magazine, for that matter: UBC's uncanny ability to create wonder.
Chris Petty, mfa'86, Editor in Chief
4    Trek    Summer 2009 take note
5_,
i/ith the help of a functional MRI scanner, Kalina Christoff
observes what happens in the brain when we daydream.
Dream On
Ufa Daydreaming is often associated with
idleness: a wandering mind failing to concentrate
on the task at hand, the lazy sprawl of an
undisciplined brain. However, a UBC study
shows that daydreaming causes increased
activity in certain areas of the brain, including
those associated with complex problem solving.
"This study shows our brains are very active
when we daydream, much more active than
when we focus on routine tasks," says psychology
professor Kalina Christoff, lead author.
Researchers used a functional Medical
Resonance Image scanner to monitor subjects'
brain activity as they performed a very simple
task, then measured their level of attentiveness
using the scans to track performance on the task,
and recording subjects' reported experience.
The study results also challenge the popularly held idea that certain areas of the brain
aren't active at the same time. The brain's
default network is associated with routine,
straightforward thinking, and its executive
network with more complex thought processes.
The study showed both networks were active
when subjects were daydreaming. "This is a
surprising finding," says Christoff. "Until now,
we thought they operated on an either-or basis;
when one was activated the other was thought
to be dormant." The less aware a subject was of
his or her mind wandering, the more active
were both brain networks.
The study results, and the fact that the
average person daydreams about a third of
their waking life, suggest that daydreaming
may play an important function. "When you
daydream, you may not be achieving your
immediate goal - say reading a book or paying
attention in class - but your mind may be
taking that time to address more important
questions in your life, such as advancing your
career or personal relationships," says Christoff.
Tapping into Safe Water
tile Travel advisories for many developing
countries typically warn us not to drink local
tap water. Many Canadians would be surprised
to know that that such advice is also applicable
to areas of Canada. In fact, six million
Canadians can't get clean water from their
domestic taps. This has major health repercussions
that dwarf headline-grabbers such as the 2000
Walkerton tragedy in Ontario, when seven
people died as a result of E. coli contaminating
the water supply.
"Health Canada says that unsafe drinking
water causes 90,000 illnesses and 90 deaths every
year. That's the equivalent of 13 Walkerton
tragedies," says water purification systems
specialist Madjid Mohseni. "Water quality in
1,700 small and rural communities across
Canada, some as close as half an hour drive
from a major metropolitan area, can be as bad,
or worse, than that in developing countries. For
example, nearly 100 First Nations communities
live under permanent boil-water advisories."
Even urban areas such as Vancouver, which
has high-quality and closely monitored water
supplies, are not immune to boil-water
advisories. But outlying communities lacking
comparable infrastructure and resources are the
most susceptible to contamination. More than
75 per cent of Canada's water treatment
facilities are based in rural areas. "We simply
cannot afford to allow the existing challenges
to exclude millions of our citizens from access
to a vital requirement for their survival and
advancement," says Mohseni, an associate
professor in chemical and biological engineering.
"All Canadians have the right to easily access
clean water, regardless of where they live."
Mohseni is part of a 14-member team from
seven universities working to develop the
technology to remedy this situation. This
research network, known as RES'EAU-
WaterNet, is supported by a $5.2 million grant
from the Natural Sciences and Engineering
Research Council of Canada. Over the next five
years its members will conduct 18 research
projects. Industry and government partners will
be responsible for implementing new or improved
technologies as they become available.
Photo courtesy of Kalina Christoff
Summer 2009    Trek    5 take note
Mohseni and four UBC colleagues (Pierre
Berube, David Wilkinson, Elod Gyenge and
Rehan Sadiq) will explore which technologies
are best for use in rural areas. Ultraviolet light
photocatalysis, for example, uses UV light to
combat contaminants. While prohibitively
expensive to use on a large scale, this method
may be better suited to smaller communities.
"We plan to bring the technologies past the
initial proof of concept to the on-site validation
stage," says Mohseni. "We will evaluate the
technologies onsite using real water and operating
conditions. This would make the technologies
ready for adoption and implementation by
industry and small communities."
A Rose By Any Other Name
Having an English surname, as opposed to a
Chinese, Indian or Pakistani one, means a
greater likelihood of being invited in for a job
interview in Canada. This discrimination was
revealed after UBC researchers mailed out
thousands of mock resumes. It would seem that
the Jill Wilsons and John Martins of this
country are invited for interviews 40 per cent
more often than the Sana Khans and the Lei Lis.
"The findings suggest that a distinct
foreign-sounding name may be a significant
disadvantage on the job market, even if you are
a second- or third-generation citizen," says
UBC professor of economics Philip Oreopoulos,
who authored the working paper. "If employers
are engaging in name-based discrimination,
they may be contravening the Human Rights
Act," he says, although more research is
required to find out if the phenomenon is a
result of intentional behavior. "They may also
be missing out on hiring the best person for the
job," he adds. The paper was released by
Metropolis BC, part of an international
immigration and diversity research network.
The 6,000 resumes, representing recent
immigrants and Canadians with English and
non-English names, were composed to apply
for 2,000 jobs posted online in 20 categories in
the Greater Toronto Area. While the level of
education and length of work experience were
the same across all resumes, names were
randomly assigned, and education and work
experience were either domestic- or foreign-
based.
A second key finding from the study was that
Canadian work experience greatly improved
chances of an interview, and that employers
deemed this more important than a Canadian
education. For resumes with non-English names
and an education based abroad, the addition of
just one job experience in Canada almost
doubled interview prospects. "This suggests
policies that prioritize Canadian experience or
help new immigrants find initial domestic work
experience might significantly increase their
employment chances," says Oreopoulos.
Stepford Shoppers
Although opinions differ on whether
subliminal messaging can influence the
opinions and behaviour of those subjected to it,
subliminal advertising was outlawed in the UK
and Australia, largely because of the public's
response to the idea of such an underhand
method of influence and its potential for more
sinister uses. In the US, the Federal Communications Commission adopted a policy in 1974
based on subliminal advertising being contrary
to the public interest.
But efforts to understand the human brain
and how it might be manipulated to encourage
certain consumer behaviors are still in the
works. A new generation of industrial scientist
is literally peering into the human brain to see
what makes it tick. Or, more importantly, what
makes it buy. And right on their heels is
neuroethicist Judy Illes, who is concerned with
the ethical implications thrown up by this
work.
Illes, who directs the National Core of
Neuroethics at UBC, believes a code of ethics is
required as advances in neuroscience inform
neuromarketing research efforts. "The field of
neuroscience is evolving at a rapid rate," she
says. "Advances in scientific technologies can
give us intimate details of the inner workings of
our brain. Neuroethics considers the social,
cultural, personal and religious implications of
these advances."
The relatively new field of neuromarketing
looks at how consumers respond to marketing
elements such as packaging, jingle, logos and
ads: how we make consumer decisions. Instead
of relying on self-reporting, it uses functional
Medical Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to measure
what goes on in the brain when the subject is
exposed to such elements.
Illes points to three issues. "First, we must
protect parties who may be harmed or exploited
by neuromarketing. Second, we must protect
consumer autonomy if neuromarketing reaches
a critical level of effectiveness and third, we
must protect scientific integrity," she says.
The first issue deals with vulnerable people
such as children or those with psychological
disorders or addictions, who may be adversely
affected by neuromarketing. Research subjects
who volunteer for imaging may also be
considered vulnerable if standard safeguards
are spotty or lacking.
"The loose restrictions around marketing
studies outside the academic sector are especially
worrying," says Illes. "Subject protections
should be equal to those required by academic
and medical research centres." She also feels
that scientific integrity is threatened because
neuromarketing research is not held up to the
strict rigours of peer review. It could misinform
the public, damaging public trust in science.
A potential threat to autonomy is perhaps
the creepiest ethical consideration. "Insights
from advanced technology in the neurosciences
might allow corporations, governments and
others to influence decisions and actions
regarding brand preference without the
individual being aware of the subterfuge," says
Illes. "Such stealth neuromarketing is not
possible with current technology, but if
developed would represent a major incursion
on individual autonomy."
"The adoption of a code of ethics generated
by the neuroscience community, neuroethicists
and marketing companies is justified on moral
grounds," she says. "It would also serve to
insulate this young and dynamic industry from
accusations of irresponsible behaviour."
6    Trek    Summer 2009 i extinct relative of today's seals, Allodesmus is one of the many fossil vertebrates
preserved in the Sharktooth Hill bonebed in Kern County, California.
Graveyard Shift
Kk The origins of a massive bonebed in
Southern California have been causing
scientists to scratch their heads ever since its
discovery more than 150 years ago. The
Sharktooth Hill bonebed stretches over 100
square kilometers and contains approximately
200 fossils per square metre embedded in a
10-50 centimetre layer of sediment, some of it
exposed. It contains a high concentration of
marine vertebrates including extinct species of
whale, sea turtle, seal and shark.
Some hypotheses point to a sudden, one-off
event as the cause of the bonebed's formation,
bonebed formed over a long period of time.
New research by paleontologist Nick Pyenson,
a post-doctoral fellow in the department of
Zoology, and his team has now laid to rest the
catastrophic event hypotheses.
"Our evidence suggests that the bonebed
formed over a 700,000 year time-span
approximately 15 million years ago," he says.
An examination of the bonebed, the fossils and
contextual geology allowed them to eliminate
some longstanding theoretical explanations.
There was no evidence of ash to support the
volcanic eruption theory; the fossil bones
betrayed little evidence of shark bites; and the
such as a volcanic eruption, a toxic algal bloom presence of land mammals as well as marine
or even the predatory activities of a huge vertebrates lent credence to the idea of the
ancestor of the Great White Shark. Other bonebed being formed over time,
explanations are less dramatic, suggesting the "The bonebed formed during the Middle
Miocene, which coincides with a prolonged
period of exceptionally warm global temperatures," says Pyenson. "The associated changes
in sea levels played an important role in
forming the Sharktooth Hill bonebed, which
explains its marvelous richness and expanse.
More importantly, we now have a better handle
on the kinds of factors, both geologic and
biologic, that bias our interpretation of this
snapshot of the ocean life from the Middle
Miocene."
Team members include Randall Irmis and
Jere Lipps (graduate students at the University
of California at Berkeley at the time of the
research) and paleontologists from the Natural
History Museum of Los Angeles County. The
research findings were published in the June
issue of the journal Geology.
World Wide(ish) Web
In the information age, literacy is no
longer just about reading and writing. It's
about being digitally savvy: having access to
and understanding of the wealth of resources,
tools and information available online.
But while kids in the West are growing up
surrounded by technology, that's not the case
in other parts of the world. The faculty of
Education is involved in a project to advance
digital literacy in East Africa.
Professors Bonny Norton and Maureen
Kendrick of the department of Language and
Literacy have concentrated their research
efforts in Uganda for the past six years. They
hope the programs they've initiated there have
impact and lasting effect. "We don't just
parachute into places, take a few pictures,
do a few interviews and leave," says Norton.
"We've established a very strong network
because people see we want sustainability."
As well as theoretical work in learning,
development and education, the research
includes working with rural communities that
have limited access to and knowledge of
technologies. Ugandan teachers explain the
challenges of the local context, which informs
Norton and Kendrick's efforts.
One valuable access solution has been the
eGranary Digital Library, hard drives filled
with digital resources such as books and
Photograph: David Smith, University of California Museum of Paleontology;
Eric Scott, San Bernardino County Museum; San Diego Museum of Natural History
Summer 2009    Trek    7 Juliet Tembe teaches computer basics to Ugandan teachers from rural schools.
reference websites that can be accessed via a
local area network. "People are learning search
and browsing skills so when technology becomes
more accessible, the transition to a knowledge-
based economy is easier," says Norton.
Another key focus is helping to produce
highly-qualified people who can equip the
upcoming generation with the skills they need.
Sam Andema is a UBC master's candidate from
Uganda who is involved in the project.
"Uganda is on the move to development,"
he says. "The country wants to become a
knowledge-based society, and one of the tools
to achieve that is modern technology."
Another Ugandan involved in the project is
UBC PhD grad Juliet Tembe. She has been
teaching computer basics to Ugandan teachers
based in rural schools, together with skills for
analyzing online resources.
Links with classrooms in Africa and to local
expertise there means BC educators can learn
effective strategies for teaching students who
are refugees from countries in crisis.
Barriers to digital literacy in rural East Africa,
such as poverty and power outages, still exist.
But the stronger the program's partnerships
grow, the more its benefits will spread. "The
trickledown effect allows the students to leave
school with the ability to access information, to
process information and to articulate their
own ideas and knowledge," says Andema,
who wants to help Uganda secure its aspiration
to be a regional leader in digital literacy.
"Definitions of literacy are changing
globally," says Kendrick. "What it means to be
literate now has everything to do with digital
technology. Whether you're in rural Uganda or
Vancouver, there's a global conversation that
people want to be part of."
World Wide Web of Deceit
"Deception is one of the most significant
and pervasive social phenomena of our age,"
says professor Michael Woodworth, a forensic
psychologist at UBC Okanagan. "On average,
people tell one to two lies a day, and these lies
range from the trivial to the serious."
Although lying is not uncommon, the more
serious ones can be accompanied by physical
cues that make them easier to detect. But what
happens if the fibber is communicating to you
via the Internet? "When people are interacting
face-to-face, there is something called the
motivational impairment effect, where your
body will give off some cues as you become more
nervous and there's more at stake with your
lie," says Woodworth. You may sweat, your
vocalization might be affected, your physical
Michael Woodworth is studying deception
in computer-mediated environments.
gestures and facial expressions might not match
your words, or even more subtle signals may be
generated. But no such alarm triggers exist in the
online world of emails, texts and chat-groups.
Woodworth is studying deception in
computer-mediated environments. Digital
deception is defined as any type of technologically
mediated message transmitted to create a false
belief in the receiver of the message. He and
colleague Jeff Hancock of Cornell University
have described what they refer to as the
motivational enhancement effect: that the more
people are motivated to lie in a computer-mediated
environment, the less likely they are to be
detected and the more successful they are at it.
It would seem that the Internet is the
territory of choice for the modern day conman
who wants to get ahead, as anyone who uses
email can testify. We also have to warn our kids
not to talk to strangers, even online.
"By learning more about how various factors
affect detecting deceit in online communication,
our research will certainly have important
implications in organizational contexts, both
legal and illegal, in the political domain, and in
family life as more and more children go online,"
says Woodworth, whose research is supported
by a grant of $87,055 from the Social Sciences
and Humanities Research Council.
Trek    Summer 2009
Photographs: Left, Bonny Norton. Right, Tim Swanky Prehistoric Pine
ik A unique tree that dates back to the Jurassic
era has found a new home at UBC. A Wollemia
nobilis (Wollemi pine), one of the oldest and
rarest plants in the world, was unveiled in May
at the Botanical Garden.
The Wollemi belongs to a plant family more
than 200 million years old and long thought to
be extinct. But a hiker found a stand of the
prehistoric trees in 1994 in a rainforest 200 km
from Sydney, Australia. Fewer than 100 adult
trees of this species are known to exist in the
wild in their native Australia.
"Our tree is a first-generation cutting from
the King Billy tree, the largest Wollemi pine in
the wild and estimated to be more than 1,000
years old," says Douglas Justice, associate
director and curator of collections for the
Botanical Garden. The three-metre tall tree,
affectionately known as Little Billy, is a conifer
with attractive dark green foliage with flattened
needles (more reminiscent of a fern than a
pine), bubbly bark and multiple trunks. It is
closely related to the Monkey Puzzle and can
grow to about 40 metres in height.
Little Billy is the showcase piece for the
garden's new self-guided Prehistoric Plant tour.
"The family-friendly tour takes visitors back in
time to see a number of fascinating plants
along the path of evolution," says Justice. The
experience should take visitors approximately
40 minutes to complete.
Great Northern Way Gets Digital Grads
it Established in 2007, the Master's of Digital
Media is a ground-breaking program in
entertainment technology and digital media.
For 20 challenging months, the program offers
team-based experiences focused on project
learning in close collaboration with BC's
vibrant games and digital media industry.
It is interdisciplinary in approach, accepting
grad students from Fine Arts, Computer
Science, Philosophy, Engineering and other
related disciplines, and helping them to emerge
from the program with a well-rounded set of
skills. In addition to classes, students work on
industry-funded projects that require them to
liaise with clients, and deliver products on time
and on budget.
The first class of 21 students graduated this
spring and they are already making an
impression on the industry. "This first group of
Master's of Digital Media graduates have
proven themselves to be true innovators and
entrepreneurs," said Gerri Sinclair, program
director and CEO of the Centre for Digital
Media. "In addition to the numerous nominations and awards they've earned for their work,
the graduates have developed a number of
exciting digital products and applications that
have caught the attention of industry clients
and affiliates."
For example, a digital, interactive and
gesture-based system for storefront advertising
(D-Sign) is now a fully-fledged company that
has secured contracts with Jugo Juice and the
Vancouver International Airport Authority.
Another student project set out to create an
astonishing 16 video games in three months.
This rapid-prototyping approach to making
experimental games led to the creation of a
new company, Big Hadron Games, Inc. The
start-up was recently nominated for a New
Media BC PopVox award.
The degree is jointly awarded by Great
Northern Way Campus' four major public
post-secondary institutions: UBC, SFU, Emily
Carr University of Art and Design and BCIT.
Advisory board members for the program
include Art Spiegelman, Will Wright, Don
Mattrick and William Gibson. Industry
partners include EA, Annex Pro, Autodesk,
Microsoft and Nokia.
Camp Fyrefly
m. For young people growing up outside the
heterosexual mainstream it can be lonely and
sometimes frightening, especially in remote
communities with few relevant references or
little support. A new summer camp for BC youth
provides a safe environment for participants
to explore the personal and external issues
surrounding their minority sexuality.
Camp Fyrefly is for lesbian, gay, bisexual,
trans-identified, Two-Spirit, queer, intersex and
allied (LGBTTQI&A) youth between the ages
of 14 and 24. As well as a camp, it is a form of
social outreach targeting these sometimes very
vulnerable young people. "We know these
youth are experiencing significant sexual health
inequities, compared to their heterosexual
peers," says camp organizer Rod Knight of
UBC's School of Population and Public Health.
"They're also far more likely to have thoughts
of suicide and more likely to get a sexually
transmitted infection."
Drama, dance, painting, writing and
interactive workshops are used to examine
themes like health and sexuality, the law as it
pertains to sexual minorities, addiction,
discrimination and safety. The experience of
open discussion can be powerful. "I've seen a
lot of youth coming from a really remote
community, and they'll say to us, 'I've never
seen a gay person before. I'm the only one I
know,'" says Knight. "It can be very emancipating
for them." The participants come from more
than 30 communities across the province.
Participants also learn how to fend for
themselves politically and can take some of
what they learn from camp back to their
communities with a new network of support to
back them up. One workshop, for example,
discusses strategies for setting up supportive
student organizations in schools. "If we give
these youth the networks and resources to go
to their school administrators, and show these
clubs are a normal practice, they can tell the
people in charge, 'This is about social justice,'"
says Knight. "We want them to go back to their
communities and have not only the skills
they've learned, but also this vast network of
experts and friends," he says. "These youth will
leave with sense of pride, and a willingness to
step up and enact change."
Camp Fyrefly originated at the University of
Alberta five years ago, was emulated on the
east coast, and offered for the first time in BC
this summer in a Howe Sound location.
Counting Carcinogens
life Although cancer-causing agents are known
to exist in the environment, there are no
statistics on Canadians' exposure to these
carcinogens. Enter CAREX Canada, a multi-
disciplinary team of researchers based in UBC's
school of Environmental Health. Its objective is
to estimate how, where and to what degree
Canadians are exposed to carcinogens in
Summer 2009    Trek    9 Building a
Sustainable Budget
Stephen J. Toope, President, UBC
In the last issue of Trek Magazine, I outlined how prudent
management and exceptional support from our alumni
and friends have insulated UBC's endowment fund
from the worst effects of the current global economic
crisis. Many university endowments have suffered much
deeper declines than has UBC's, and plans to rebuild the
endowment are on track and proving successful.
Operating budgets have been no less affected by the
challenging economic times. Many universities have
been forced to lay off faculty and staff, reduce programming
and limit student aid. Again, UBC is in much better shape than many other institutions for
the same reasons that shore up our endowment, as well as strong provincial and federal
support, record enrollment and UBC's expanding reputation as a first-tier academic and
research university.
But UBC's Vancouver campus has an expected $20-25 million budget shortfall for the
2010-2011 fiscal year. The university must deal with this while delivering on our strategic
commitment to enhance learning and research.
The traditional budget-setting process at UBC was based on historical figures and did not
adequately reflect variations in enrollment numbers. In the planning stages is a model that
would link faculty budgets to undergrad and graduate enrollment, which would encourage
faculties to increase their graduate populations. The university's renewal of the Strategic Plan
(Place and Promise: The UBC Plan) focuses on an increase in UBC's graduate student numbers
as a way to strengthen the institution's research leadership and help BC close the graduate
student gap with the other provinces in Canada.
We have created a cross-campus task force to examine a number of budget-trimming
opportunities in administration, faculties, ancillary services and financial structures. The task
force will report at the end of August. The administration team will then engage multiple
stakeholders, students included, to finalize a course of action and lay the foundation for the
2010-2011 budget.
Other areas of budget analysis will include an investigation of new sources of income for
the university. UBC's international reputation provides significant academic and financial
opportunities, and more of our energies will be focused in those areas. Also under consideration
are radical changes to the operation and maintenance of campus infrastructure by simplifying
organization and processes, and by adopting a more customer-oriented approach.
In reviewing all budgetary functions, UBC will ensure that resource allocation is based on
student needs and academic and research priorities.
Implementing these initiatives will require significant commitment, innovation and flexibility
from all our stakeholders. The university community is rising to this challenge. I look forward
to working with the UBC community on these initiatives, which will help make UBC a stronger,
more versatile institution.
aul Demers directs UBC's school of
Environmental Health, which is calculating
Canadians' exposure to carcingogens.
workplace and community environments.
The group is gathering data from government
agencies, universities and the private sector to
create a database that will help in creating
policies to reduce exposure and direct cancer
research and prevention efforts. The team will
complete the work in 2012.
"We want to know who is exposed, what
they're exposed to, and how to set policy to
address this," says Demers, a professor and
director of the school. "The impetus behind this
is cancer prevention. We need to target groups
that have the highest levels of exposure and
know which carcinogens to target."
The team will look at location and occupation
as determining factors in exposure to carcinogens
and identify high-risk populations. It will
include substances long recognized as being
linked to cancer, such as benzene and asbestos,
as well as others that are under suspicion. It
will also examine substances and procedures
associated with specific professions to which
practitioners are habitually exposed. These
include healthcare workers who administer
chemotherapy, and auto repairers and dry
cleaners who use commonly available materials
in their work.
The team is keen to share the results of its
research with policy makers, researchers and
health and safety professionals. The project is
funded through a $4.1 million commitment from
the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, an
independent agency funded by Health Canada.
10    Trek    Summer 2009
Photograph: Martin Dee How Now, Milk Cow?
life When dairy cattle are stressed they are more
vulnerable to illness and injury, which costs the
farmer in terms of decreased milk production
and veterinary bills. While the bulk of dairy
research is devoted to nutrition and production
- input and output - the faculty of Land and
Food Systems' Animal Welfare Program takes a
more holistic approach by considering the
animal's psychological state.
Whether the motivation is animal welfare or
milk production, establishing the animal's likes
and dislikes in terms of surroundings and other
conditions can only be to the benefit of both
cattle and industry.
UBC's Agassiz-based Dairy Education and
Research Centre (DERC) has the capacity for
observing more than 300 cattle. "How dairy
cattle eat, sleep, rest and interact speaks volumes
about their preferences," says associate professor
Marina von Keyserlingk. "By analyzing their
behaviour, we can help producers avoid costly
problems such as lameness and other common
illnesses." Food and water intake is automatically monitored for each animal and their
movements and choices are closely recorded.
Sophisticated software is then used to analyse
the data. The researchers are particularly
interested in key phases of the life cycle when
the animals are most susceptible to illness, such
as the start of lactation, the end of lactation
and the weaning process for calves.
To support their research, von Keyserlingk
and her colleagues, professors Dan Weary and
David Fraser, received a $1 million Industrial
Research Chair joint award from the Natural
Sciences and Engineering Research Council and
eight Canadian dairy farming organizations.
The faculty has an international reputation
for this approach to dairy research, which is
concerned with animal welfare but accompanied
by recommendations and solutions that make
sense for industry. This expertise has been
sought out by industrial partners in Brazil,
Chile, Germany and other counties.
Andreia Vieira, a Brazilian veterinarian
sponsored by her government to study at UBC, is
a PhD student in the faculty. She is concentrating
on the social enrichment and cognitive
development of weaning calves. Today's practices
inc Kesler wants to see Aboriginal involvement at all levels of post-secondary education.
involve removing a calf from its mother shortly
after birth and rearing it in isolation. Her
research shows that stress at weaning is greatly
reduced if the calves are reared in pairs. "Brazil
has major beef and poultry industries and
there's a huge interest in what UBC is doing in
this relatively new science of combining animal
psychology and production," she says.
In Canada, a new code of recommended
practice for the care and handling of dairy
cattle, published in March by the Dairy
Farmers of Canada, drew heavily on DERC
findings, such as pain control methods during
dehorning, improved calf housing, feeding
practices and lameness prevention.
"We have the strongest group of cattle
welfare researchers in the world," says Weary.
"A long history of collaboration with the dairy
industry also keeps our research current. The
changes we suggest are grounded in the
constraints of modern dairy farming while still
improving the lives of animals."
New Aboriginal Strategic Plan
life For a number of reasons, Aboriginal
learners have long been under-represented in
Canadian universities. UBC is developing a new
Aboriginal Strategic Plan to address this lack of
involvement not only in the classroom but at
all levels of post-secondary education, including
the design and delivery of curricula.
The plan builds on foundations that have
already been established. One of the major
architects of those foundations as well as current
developments is Line Kesler, who earlier this
year became director of UBC's First Nations
House of Learning and senior advisor on
Aboriginal Affairs to university president Stephen
Toope. He joined the university in 2003 to head
its new First Nations Studies program. Prior to
joining UBC, he oversaw the introduction of an
Ethnic Studies department and an Indian
Education office at Oregon State University.
Kesler is keen to attract faculty who can
remedy a lack of Aboriginal representation by
developing courses reflective of Aboriginal
history and perspectives. "They can bring attention to areas in which we have real gaps in our
understanding and what the university is able
to offer," he says. "That's very significant in
terms of what kind of understanding Canadians have of issues such as land claims disputes,
and their role in Canadians' own history."
He also advises early contact with young
Aboriginal learners to help make them aware
of what university can do for them. "We can
build a really good curriculum at the university
level, but as scholars we must also engage with
Aboriginal students at a younger age," he says.
"For many reasons, too few Aboriginal
students complete high school with university
prerequisites."
Kesler is anxious to start acting upon the
ideas outlined in the plan. "Native people are
very accustomed to seeing plans and initiatives
announced with great fanfare, but not always
seeing positive results follow," he said. "Our
goal is to make it real."
Photograph: Martin Dee
Summer 2009    Trek    11 The Social Value of Education
Ian Robertson, BSc'86, BA'88, MBA, MA, Chair, UBC Alumni Association
Studies in the US have shown a remark-
able correlation between the amount of
education a person has and the level of
their social, economic and physical we
^k being. Individuals with a university de
gree have, in general, better coping skills,
more financial resources and make better
health choices than individuals with a
high school education. Those individuals
with less than high school completion do
even worse on these scales.
One of the difficulties of promoting these statistics is the charge of elitism:
are university students better off to begin with because of family resources?
Did university students have access to better high schools, better scholarship
and bursary opportunities, more stable family situations, etc.? While it's true
that access to a post secondary education does favour the middle and upper
classes for those and other reasons, similar studies show that the advantages that accrue from a university degree (of any kind) flow as well to
graduates who came from less advantaged families. And with universities
like UBC declaring that no qualified student will be turned away for lack of
financial resources, this differential is fast disappearing.
While the Canadian educational landscape is different from that of our
neighbour down south (39 per cent of Americans aged 25-34 have a post
secondary degree, while the Canadian figure is closer to 55 per cent), similar
studies in Canada show that the benefits of a degree are just as dramatic.
But those benefits aren't just personal. A well-educated population is
more tolerant; is better-equipped to sort out the electoral choices a democracy offers; puts less strain on police, health and social support systems; and
is more likely to offer volunteer and philanthropic support to community
causes. A well-educated population is less likely to be swayed by hysteria
and demagoguery, more likely to question baseless authority and more open
to new technologies, ideas and lifestyles.
There's no magic to this. To be successful at university a student must
learn to question facts, investigate options, work in teams and provide leadership. A student has to learn to think ideas through to their conclusions, to
weigh one opinion against another, to express thoughts clearly and be absolutely open to the new. While there's no doubt that four years at university
requires that a student jump through many hoops, conform to rigorous rules
and regulations and spend many hours at tedious labour, it also provides a
student with one of the most compelling, inspirational and motivating experience he or she is likely to have.
We are extremely fortunate to have governments, corporations and
individuals who are convinced of the value of post secondary education and
continue to invest in UBC's success. Our task as alumni is to ensure that our
elected leaders maintain this commitment and recognize that - in good
economic times or bad - a strong university is the hallmark of a strong society.
My heart goes out to Alumni Association Vice Chair Gayle Stewart's family
in this time of her passing. Her strength, good humour and unfailing enthusiasm
for the Association and its work was an inspiration to us all.
Role Models
Marie Earl, Associate Vice President, Alumni; Executive Director, UBC Alumni Association
Yesterday Vancouver presented itself in
all its soft, wet, sublime Pacific Northwest
glory. I had been hoping for sunshine
from the weather gods for our celebration of life for friend and volunteer leader
Gayle Stewart, BA'76, MA'08. But Gayle
hadn't been catching the breaks of late.
And, truth be told, we were struggling to
find our way to a celebration frame of
mind. So perhaps rain was fitting.
I may have gotten to know Gayle first
through her volunteer leadership work for the UBC Alumni Association, but
our relationship extended well beyond the professional realm to become a
friendship marked by social dinners, sitting in the stands cheering on the
UBC basketball teams, ski weekends and other such activities involving her
husband Bob Philip (UBC Director of Athletics) and mine. Gayle seemed to
form lifelong friendships pretty much everywhere she ventured, judging by
the crowd that packed Cecil Green Park House to share stories, shed tears,
and mourn Gayle's passing.
Gayle had an uncanny ability to "see around corners," no doubt cultivated from her years as a corporate communications executive. I know I
came to rely mightily on her honest counsel, reliable good cheer and determination. In turn, I encouraged her to pursue her second UBC degree thirty
years after completing her Bachelor of Arts degree and to consider devoting
her considerable talent to the post secondary education sector by heading
up UBC's 2010 Olympic & Paralympic Secretariat rather than returning to the
business world. While Gayle got the Secretariat off the ground, she was
forced to devote the better part of the last ten months to her battle with
cancer. There is no way around it - 54 years is just too short a life. And
particularly for someone who lived life with such grace and generosity.
Alas, we learned this week about the death of Dr. Bill Gibson, BA'33,
DSc'93, MSc, MD, PhD, as well. A past president of the Board of the Alumni
Association, Bill was one of the "elders" on whom I paid a call when I first
arrived at UBC four and a half years ago. He warmly welcomed me into the
fold, schooled me on a few of the highlights of UBC history, and promised
to be of help whenever needed. By any reckoning, Dr. Gibson rendered remarkable service to a great many within British Columbia, Canada, and the
world over the past 95 years. Tuum Est.
12    Trek    Summer 2009 letters to the editor:
Grads Know Their Plants
In looking through my Spring 2009 issue of
Trek, I noticed the plant image on page 28 and
was immediately interested. It is labelled
Curcuma roscoeana. I am afraid that is not
correct. Curcuma roscoeana is a beautiful
flower to be sure - quite variable in form and
colour and, as you say, is usually quite brilliant.
I believe it is what we commonly refer to as a
Ginger. The flower form is much different than
that depicted. The image on page 28 is that of
an Orchid, which is what drew my interest in
the first place. It is a Dendrobium nobile type,
to be more specific.
Russell J. Volker BCom'55
. . . And Their Genders
I always enjoy my Trek and from time to
time wave a brilliant piece in front of colleagues
at Queen's whose "who-married-who" alumni
magazine I also receive. The Library Vault is
very exciting and I applaud the initiative. I
now teach History of Photography at Queen's
after almost 30 years in the Photography
Acquisition and Research area of the National
Archives of Canada. Any effort to make such
material available is a move in the right
direction, but I must point out that number 5,
A Mad Tea Party (page 28) contained a blooper.
Dante Gabrielle Rossetti is a guy, hence it
should read Gabriel, NOT Gabrielle. Keep up
the good work.
Joan M. Schwartz MA(Geography)'yy, PHD
Clarification from the Chief of Police
Your Spring 2009 cover story on miscarriages
of justice (A Question of Conviction) is missing
important contextual facts. The article begins
with the description of a 1982 police line-up
photo of Mr. Ivan Henry, who was convicted
by a Supreme Court jury of multiple counts of
rape and gross indecency. A reference is made
to a Vancouver Sun headline of "Who looks
guilty here?" which headlines a jail line-up
photograph that depicts Mr. Henry being
restrained by police jail guards.
Your article notes that his identification from
this highly problematic line-up helped "seal his
fate." What is not noted is that Mr. Henry, a
previously convicted rapist, actively resisted
participating in the line-up and hence was
physically restrained. This conniving and
obstreperous behaviour of course totally
disrupted an unbiased opportunity to secure
victim identification evidence that could support
his innocence as well as his guilt.
Because Mr Henry physically disrupted
the line-up, the Crown prosecutor decided to
not introduce this now infamous photograph
as evidence, recognizing that it was too
prejudicial. Mr. Henry later fired two
consecutive Legal Aid defence lawyers and
opted to represent himself at the trial. For the
female victims, this meant that they were
placed in the perverse predicament of being
cross-examined in an open courtroom by the
man charged with their traumatic sexual
assaults, which he did in great detail. And
it was Mr. Henry himself who surprised
the court and introduced the photograph in
his trial, and it was the instructions given to
the jury regarding this photograph that, in
part, have now raised questions as to trial
fairness, which will be the focus of future
legal proceedings.
This case is complex and cannot be
summarized in this short letter. The VPD is
committed to supporting this re-examination
but believe Mr. Henry is factually guilty of the
offences for which he was convicted. And our
hearts go out to the victims, who now have to
re-live a painful period in their lives.
Jim Chu MBA'89
Chief Constable, Vancouver Police Department
QltftO (Jlsvffou Mmimwwty 2009
Mark your calendars: Homecoming 2009 is happening on
September 26. UBC Thunderbirds will be butting heads with
the Regina Rams.
Join current students and show some support for your old school.
Get into the blue and gold spirit before kick-off with muflmj
a tailgate party, BBQ, and live music.
Details coming soon: www.alumni.ubc.ca/events
TAILGATE PARTY: Noon-2:00PM     KICK-OFF: 2:00PM
UNDERBIRD STADIUM, UBC VANCOUVER
Summer 2009    Trek    13 M OVI    NG FORW   A RD
ONE
AN'S
JOUR
EY
WI TH PAR
SO
•s
Ian Smith has been
involved in Parkinson's
research at UBC since
he was diagnosed ten
years ago. He hopes
Deep Brain Stimulation
will alleviate his
symptoms.
By ADRIENNE WATT
"Move it Smith, come on, move those legs."
Former Reserve Army Colonel (and my
stepfather-in-law) Ian Smith has barked those
orders countless times over the years, but not
to his troops. Smith is actually yelling at
himself. He is trying to get his legs moving well
enough so he can get into a car.
He also gets stuck walking through doorways.
Literally immobilized. But he can move up and
down stairs at an alarming speed. He says, "If
my world were a series of stairwells I could get
around much more easily." When he's on the
street, he sometimes walks along the curb, up
and down, because he can achieve the same
effect as he can with stairs. For a period of time
he would wake his wife in the middle of night
with distressing screams, but was barely aware
he was doing it. Twenty-five per cent of his day
is often spent immobilized. Sometimes he has
trouble moving from a chair. Another 25 per
cent is spent dealing with uncontrollable
movements. These are Ian's struggles with both
the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and the
bizarre side-effects of the medication.
The four main symptoms of the disease
include involuntary, rhythmic shaking of a limb,
head or entire body; stiffness or inflexibility of
the limbs or joints; slowness of movement or
absence of movement; and impaired balance and
coordination. The uncontrollable movement
(different from the tremors) often exhibited in
Parkinson's patients is called dyskinesia and is
a side-effect of the medication.
Parkinson's is a progressive, degenerative
neurological movement disorder affecting
about 100,000 Canadians. It typically develops
in people over the age of 65, though a small
percentage of people develop young-onset
Parkinson's before reaching 40.
"I was 48 when I was diagnosed with
Parkinson's by a neurologist," he says. "I was
47 when another neurologist specifically ruled
out Parkinson's. I was 44 when I went to my
GP with the first symptom. Now, with the
benefit of 20/20 hindsight, I know that I
actually had the first symptoms when I was
42."
The first symptom he can recall was foot
cramps and general fatigue when running (he used
to log multi-kilometre runs daily). He noticed
unusual stiffness in his knees when bowling one
night, and a few years later he started having
trouble doing up buttons and holding a fork in
his left hand. Parkinson's becomes progressively
disabling, making daily activities like bathing
or dressing increasingly difficult.
Our movement is normally controlled by
dopamine, a chemical that carries signals
14    Trek    Summer 2009 PET imaging provides information about the function of dopamine producing cells in the brain. Warmer
colours represent an increase in function of these cells. Images of healthy subjects (left) show greater cell
function compared to images of Parkinson's disease subjects (right).
between the nerves in the brain. When cells
that normally produce dopamine die, the
symptoms of Parkinson's appear. There is no
cure, but new treatments and research being
conducted at UBC and elsewhere are providing
hope. UBC researchers at the Pacific Parkinson's
Research Centre (PPRC) and the Brain Research
Centre are addressing three overarching
questions: what causes Parkinson's; what
factors contribute to the complications of
Parkinson's and its treatment; and can
Parkinson's be used as a model to understand
how the brain works normally?
Researchers are involved from many
disciplines, including physicists, chemists,
radio-chemists, image analysis experts,
geneticists, epidemiologists and psychiatrists.
Dr. Jon Stoessl, director of the PPRC believes
this type of work can't be done in isolation.
"When we travel we
might want to go on a
tour or for a walk, but
if Ian gets stuck we may
not get back in time. It's
a real worry."
"You really need a team with varied
backgrounds," he says. "We have basic
scientists and basic neuroscientists involved,
but our overall focus is clinical."
For instance, studies are underway in
collaboration with researchers in psychiatry
to understand the psychological problems
associated with the disease. Many people
with Parkinson's may have cognitive function
and mood or depression problems. Under
the influence of medication, some patients
can even develop severe behavioural side
effects including excessive gambling and
shopping habits.
From examining occupational risk factors
with the school of Population and Public
Health to working with geneticists at the
US-based Mayo Clinic (world leaders in the
genetics of Parkinson's), the team approach has
led to many advances. The collaboration with
the Mayo Clinic resulted in the identification of
a dominantly inherited gene that is the most
common genetic cause of Parkinson's.
A key methodological backbone and
common thread for many of the Parkinson's
studies taking place at UBC is Positron
Emission Tomography (PET). This imaging
technique provides insight into the processes
that lead to Parkinson's, as well as the way in
which the brain compensates for having the
condition. Ian Smith has been involved in a
PET research study since 1999. While he knows
that the studies may not ultimately help him, he
sees the potential for improved treatment for
future Parkinson's suffers or even prevention of
the disease altogether.
"Gradually more and more things have been
taken away from me because of this disease,"
he says. "I have less time available in the day to
contribute and do the things I have always
enjoyed." He has always been involved in his
community and is an avid gardener and baker
(he makes delicious Christmas cakes). Never
one to let an obstacle stand in his way, Ian has
found ways he can continue to contribute in his
community. "One thing I can do is donate
blood regularly. The PET study is another thing
I can do that can help others."
Using PET, researchers monitor the brain's
chemical processes, including the creation,
storage, release and breakdown of dopamine,
allowing them to assess how the brain
compensates for its loss. Researchers are also
using PET to understand the bewildering
complications of Parkinson's. Symptoms like
slowness of movement and stiffness respond
well to medication in the early stages, but over
time these benefits drop off.
"Often people have a couple of good hours
and then the medication effect washes out,"
says Stoessl. "But when the medication is
working, patients often suffer squirming,
writhing or involuntary movements. We are
using PET to understand the mechanisms
that contribute to those complications and to
understand what is happening to dopamine
once it's released."
It's this ping-pong effect that has been the
most frustrating for Ian. Both Ian and Angie
(my mother-in-law) express frustration with the
inability to plan their days. Ian thinks he is
"on" about 50 per cent of any given day, but
when this "on" time will be or when he will not
be functioning well due to the dyskinesia or
rigidity is totally unpredictable.
"The only thing that is predictable is that I
will have some of each (rigidity and dyskinesia)
every day." From simple tasks like making
dinner to planning elaborate vacations, Ian and
Angie face uncertainty on almost a daily basis.
"It's really difficult to plan," says Angie.
"Sometimes Ian makes plans for lunch with a
friend and then he is unable to go. When we
travel we might want to go on a tour or for a
walk, but if Ian gets stuck we may not get back
in time. It's a real worry."
Summer 2009    Trek    15 In the past he was bothered that he would be
perceived as disabled, but not any more.
"I tried to avoid being seen as disabled but
now it doesn't bother me. I'd just as soon get
out and do stuff."
Ian hasn't had any cognitive function or
mood problems. In fact in my experience he
never appears down or depressed. Finding a
balance through medication with the symptoms
of Parkinson's and the side-effects of the
medication is a common struggle for many
Parkinson's patients. He currently takes 15-20
pills a day, one of which alone costs $8. But
because of unpredictable results, it often feels
like a crapshoot. He has tried a number of
alternative therapies to help manage his
symptoms including acupuncture and shiatsu
and he regularly uses meditation and Qigong
exercises to help when he is really immobile. It
was his acupuncturist who told him about the
work being conducted at UBC.
He has been open to experimental and
alternative therapies since his disease was
diagnosed. This summer he will undergo one
of the most nerve-wracking to date. An
electrode, similar to a pacemaker, will be
implanted in his brain through a small opening
in his skull and then attached to a power
source implanted in his chest. The operation,
called Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), will be
lead by Dr. Christopher Honey, UBC associate
professor of Neurosurgery and director of
research for the division of Neurosurgery.
There are two stages to the DBS operation.
First, with Ian conscious and under local
anesthetic, Honey will drill two holes into Ian's
skull and then for the better part of the day will
look to find the exact location in the brain that
is the target for the implant. Ian will be an
active and crucial participant in this part of the
procedure. He will answer a variety of questions
and perform certain tests to help confirm the
target. The DBS electrode will then be implanted in the target site.
Is he scared? "Scared stiff."
The second stage of the surgery is the
insertion of the Implantable Neural Stimulator
(INS). While Ian is under general anesthetic, a
wire from the DBS electrode will be tunnelled
under the skin on his neck and connected to the
INS located under a pocket of skin on his chest.
Approximately six weeks later, the stimulator
will be turned on. By delivering an electrical
Jon Stoessl (left) and Tom Ruth with students (now alumnae). The machine in the background is a PET scanner.
"I've made my peace
with the concerns I
have about the surgery,
but it's at the point
where I am so frustrated
that if there's something
that can give me
improved functionality
for even a few years,
it'd be worth it."
stimulation to a precisely targeted area of the
brain, the procedure and device aim to manage
some of the most disabling motor symptoms
of Parkinson's.
DBS is not a cure or even a guarantee. The
operation will help patients function as well as
they ever have on medication, but for longer and
with fewer dosages, giving Ian more "on" time in
a day. According to Vancouver Coastal Health's
last survey of 50 consecutive patients, 90 per
cent reported that the operation was a success.
But the fact is that Parkinson's has no cure, it
is progressive and degenerative. DBS patients
normally feel the positive effects of the stimulation
for two to five years, then it eventually becomes
less effective. Just like medication.
"I've made my peace with the concerns I have
about the surgery, but it's at the point where I
am so frustrated with the disease that if there's
something that can give me improved functionality
for even a few years, it'd be worth it."
Ian's hope? To increase the percentage of
"on" time during the day, allowing him to plan
for something as simple as making his delicious
stuffed chicken breasts.
Angie and Ian are practical people and have
thought about their plans after the operation.
"We will look at our financial resources and
how much time we likely have with improved
functionality and come up with a realistic
program," he says. "Travel will definitely be a
big part of it," says Angie. "Now, we're doing
things that are safe. After the surgery, I'd feel
more inclined to go to the Mediterranean and
hope Ian can take full advantage of being in a
different part of the world."
"Smith" has every intention of continuing to
order his legs to move, but hopes that after the
surgery they will be quicker to jump to
attention.
"If we can count on me being mobile eight
hours a day, I can live with the other stuff,"
says Ian. "Being able to move, walk around
and really see and appreciate everything is
what it's about."
Adrienne Watt is a Marketing and Communications
Officer for UBC Alumni Affairs.
16    Trek    Summer 2009
Photograph: Kent Kallberg THE BRAIN  RESEARCH CENTRE:
A WORLD-CLASS  RESEARCH  INSTITUTE
By Meiissa Ashman
A partnership between Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute and the UBC
faculty of Medicine, the Brain Research Centre is one of Canada's leading neuroscience
research institutes. With more than 200 scientists and clinicians at institutions around
the province, it seeks to advance our knowledge of the brain and explore new
discoveries and technologies with the potential to reduce the suffering and cost
associated with disease and injuries of the brain. Some recent advances include:
Discovery of a genetic defect that
causes a rare Parkinson's-related disorder
The work of Jon Stoessl and colleagues played an
instrumental role in the discovery of a genetic
defect causing a rare Parkinson's-related disorder
called Perry Syndrome. Dr. Stoessl and colleagues
provided a substantial number of the DNA
samples that led to the discovery. Although this
syndrome is extremely rare and only eight families
were studied worldwide, the mechanism
implicated in it may help explain the origins of a
variety of neurodegenerative disorders, such as
Parkinson's and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and
even common depression and sleep disorders that
are also hallmarks of the disorder.
Identification of proteins
involved in neural plasticity
Tim O'Connor identified a set of proteins that
regulate and control the sprouting of neurons, a
mechanism known as neural plasticity. This
discovery helps explain why the brain loses its
capacity to re-grow connections and repair itself,
knowledge that could lead to therapeutics that
rejuvenate the brain.
Discovery that common epilepsy drug can
block formation of Alzheimer's plaques
Weihong Song discovered that a drug used to treat
epilepsy and bipolar disorders blocks the formation
of plaques that cause Alzheimer's disease in animal
models. He found that if Valproic Acid is used as a
treatment in early stages of Alzheimer's, memory
deficit is reversed. These results will help inform the
design of human clinical trials because researchers
now understand the mechanisms and pathology
of how the drug works in animal models.
Determination of the role of a gene
linking schizophrenia and handedness
Ann Marie Craig identified the role and function
of a gene previously found to be linked to
schizophrenia and handedness. She found the
gene is important for synaptic development and
function and for the specialization of developing
neurons. Further investigations to elucidate how
this gene could be involved in the development of
schizophrenia are currently underway.
Development of a new
stroke rehabilitation program
Janice Eng developed a rehabilitation program
that can significantly improve recovery of arm
function in stroke patients. Her work revealed that
patients who participated in the program had
greater arm function at the end of four weeks
compared to the control group. These differences
were retained even five months post-stroke. The
program - called the Graded Repetitive Arm
Supplementary Program (GRASP) - consists of a
set of exercises for the arm and hand that patients
can do themselves with minimal supervision by
therapists. The program can be delivered in a
sub-acute care hospital setting and continued at
home. The ease of the program also allows for
immediate uptake by health care providers, and it
is now being implemented at four hospital sites in
the Lower Mainland.
New program influencing
schizophrenia treatment world-wide
A behavioural intervention and knowledge
translation program developed by Todd Woodward
together with colleagues in Germany is poised
to significantly influence the treatment of
schizophrenia, a psychiatric disorder characterized
by abnormalities in the perception or expression
of reality. The program, which is delivered as a
series of instructor-led group intervention sessions,
seeks to raise patients' awareness of the thinking
disturbances that may lead to delusions, in order
to prevent or dampen the severity of relapse.
The program has been implemented in more than
40 clinics world-wide and has been translated into
14 languages.
Creating a new Centre for Brain Health
While fundamental research remains the engine
that drives discovery research, translational
research is the vehicle that directs discoveries
through the complexities of target identification,
validation, functional characterization, and on to
drug development, preclinical testing, and human
trials. The Brain Research Centre, Vancouver
Coastal Health, the UBC faculty of Medicine, and
the Province of British Columbia have joined forces
to develop the Centre for Brain Health. When
operational, this facility will integrate the
neurological and psychiatric clinics with fundamental neuroscience research, effectively
transforming the landscape of brain health and
care in British Columbia and across the country.
www.brain.ubc.ca
Summer 2009    Trek    17 '/tf/e!^12/k
The music of Steven Galloway's third
novel plays on.
ByJOHN VIGNA
The time after a book's publication can be an
intense, exhilarating, soul-baring experience
for a writer. Book tours, public readings, fan
mail, critical reviews all come in one big
time-compressed period, then the writer returns
to isolation and, hopefully, another book. But
for Steven Galloway, one year after publishing
his third book, The Cellist of Sarajevo, the
accolades and demands haven't stopped.
Galloway's debut novel, Finnie Walsh, was
published when he was a 2 5-year old student
in UBC's creative writing program, and was
nominated for the 2000 Amazon/Books in
Canada First Novel Award. Ascension, his
second novel, was published three years later
and revolves around a 66-year old tightrope
walker who decides to walk on a wire between
the twin towers of the World Trade Centre. It
was nominated for a BC Book Prize.
The Cellist of Sarajevo borrows its title from
the true-life story of Vedran Smailovic, a local
cellist who played the Albinoni Adagio in G
minor at the site of a mortar attack for 22 days
in a row, in May and June 1992, to honour the
22 people killed in the blast. The novel traces
the lives of three characters during the course
of a few days: Arrow, a female sniper assigned
to protect the cellist; Kenan, who risks his life
every day by crossing the city to gather
drinking water for his family; and Dragan, a
baker, who is confronted with the everyday
brutality tearing apart the city he calls home.
The novel has been praised as "the work of an
expert," sparse and pared down with "the
deceptive simplicity of a short story."
The Cellist of Sarajevo has been published in
22 countries, is in its seventh hardback printing
in Canada, and has been on the Canadian
Booksellers Association bestseller list for more
than 30 weeks. It's appeared on just about
every major literary award long list and is a
finalist on the Richard and Judy Book Club in
the UK (think Oprah). It recently received the
13th annual Borders Original Voice Award in the
fiction category. Galloway has spent the last
year in a whirlwind of global jet-setting appearing
at writer's festivals from Australia to Winnipeg,
Edinburgh to Holland.
I caught up with Galloway at one of his
favourite Vancouver haunts, Helen's Diner on
Main Street. He wore a T-shirt and cardigan, as
usual. He pointed out a vintage car at a gas
station across the street and launched into a
story about electric cars and other modes of
alternative fuel sources, Obama-mania, Stephen
Harper's prorogueing parliament and a brilliant
idea for writing a non-fiction book. He's not
planning to write that book himself, but he
feels it needs to be written.
This is how Galloway's storyteller brain
works. He circles a story from every imaginable
angle, almost tortured with the notion that he
won't get it right. His motto, as friends and
students of his know well, is that too many
novels and short stories lack story structure.
Instead, novels today mask themselves as
lengthy characterizations or lyrical prose,
usually about nature.
Galloway has been a sessional and assistant
professor in UBC's creative writing department
since 2001. He reads his students' fiction with a
storyteller's eye. He hopes that by focussing
students on story structure, he is helping them
produce more relevant fiction at a time in
Canada when lengthy lyrical novels where
18    Trek    Summer 2009 nothing much happens is the norm.
We started our conversation by talking about
how ideas move him as a writer.
What inspired you to write The Cellist of Sarajevo?
During the lead up to the war in Afghanistan
and Iraq, I became interested in how war
affects everyday citizens like garbage men or
doctors. In 1992 I had come across an article
about the cellist and it stuck around in my
consciousness. Why he played wasn't what
interested me, or who he was. I was interested
in the idea that when he played, he had an
audience, that he performed a concert and I
was interested in what effect, if any, his concert
would have on others.
When I was thinking about civilians in war, I
realized I could use the cellist as an entry point
into the story I wanted to tell.
Can you describe your process in
writing The Cellist?
I wanted the war in my novel to be as contemporary as possible. I read everything I could on
Sarajevo, watched as many programs as I could
find on the city, immersing myself in the
country from a research perspective. I met and
befriended ex-pats and experts in Vancouver
and learned more through those discussions.
I don't write well when I don't know what I'm
writing. I need a plan, an outline. I spent one
year staring at a whiteboard, writing and erasing
continually, constantly changing and updating
it according to the research I was doing. I wrote
three drafts before I went to Sarajevo. I knew
that if I went without first writing the story, I
would wander around like a kid in a candy shop
without really delving into the country in a
meaningful way. It was an expensive trip, which
meant I could only afford to go once. I wanted
to go and compare the imaginative Sarajevo
that I had constructed with the real one.
During my time in Sarajevo, I was able to
walk Kenan's route with someone I met there,
who took me through the details of what life
would have been like then. These were the sorts
of details I could not get from books. It was a
three-week trip and afterwards I wrote three
more drafts before getting to a line edit stage. It
took about five years in total to write the book
Did you have a dark night of the soul when
you felt you wanted to abandon the novel?
Nenad Velicaovic, a Bosnian writer, took me
around Sarajevo and started shouting at me one
day. 'Go home and write about Canada,' he said.
'You know nothing about Sarajevo.' And he was
right. I was and am an outsider. But being an
outsider allowed me to write about things I
didn't know and to learn things rather than just
accepting them. The effort of overcoming
ignorance helped me work harder to get it right.
After the trip, when I was trying to write the
book, I'd hear Nenad's words ringing in my
ears and doubted whether I could tell this story.
I had already abandoned a novel 300 pages in,
I had a new-born daughter, bills to pay, both
my father-in-law and my mother-in-law died
and my wife and I moved. Plus, I was teaching.
For a semester, I taught three classes at UBC,
another one at UVIC and one more at SFU -
the equivalent of two full-time jobs.
I got up and wrote from 5:00 to 8:00 AM every
day; sometimes I had until 9:00 AM before the
demands of my life required my attention. The
deal I made with myself was that if The Cellist
didn't make forward growth, I'd turn to
something else. I thought I might drive a cab.
Can you talk a bit about how important story
structure is to your writing?
With each book I've written, I've become more
concerned with large-scale structure. My only
plan when I wrote Finnie Walsh was that I didn't
want it to suck. I had been wait-listed for the
MFA in creative writing program at UBC. In
response to that I wrote a draft over the summer
not knowing if I'd get into the program. Finnie
Walsh was a voice-driven novel. When I wrote
it, I barfed it out, then went on a forensic
expedition to mine out the themes, to see what
was there and work with that.
I thought more about structure when I wrote
Ascension and tried to set the story around a
gypsy folk tale. But to this day I'm still not sure
what I wanted to accomplish or whether I was
successful. The first half is stronger than the
second half. I often think it could have been
another 100 pages long.
For The Cellist I wanted the story to be
structured around a trio sonata, which is three
parts: one melody and two bass lines. Each of
the lines are more or less weighted equally.
They follow the same structure as a sonata, and
each can work on their own as a separate
entity. This structure, which follows the novels
three main storylines - Arrow's, Kenan's and
Dragan's - also helped me divide the characters
into thematic models: food, water, violence.
I can't do as much writing on gut impulse
anymore. I'm hyper-aware of what I'm doing,
how each sentence is used, how the tools are
used. I had the structure for The Cellist in place
before writing one word of it and it turned out
99 per cent exactly the way I wanted it to be.
The idea in my mind matched the final
outcome. That may never happen again.
STEVEN  GALLOWAY
THE  CELLIST
OF  SARAJEVO
I .    .-I.. I 1   ,
Ifjlil-
***
pi
Summer 2009    Trek    19 Does this hyper-awareness come from
the experience of having written two
previous novels?
Probably. In addition to Finnie Walsh and
Ascension, I've abandoned three novels, one
which has been totally destroyed because it was
so awful. The last novel I abandoned came
right after I wrote Ascension. I got to page 300
and realized it was terrible and gave up on it.
Kurt Vonnegut's rule number one: 'You
probably learn more from failed novels than
successful ones.'
By the time you've written three novels,
you've written all the subconscious gut stuff.
Whatever worked for you the last time won't
work the next time. It gets harder because you
(and others) want your book to be better.
Three published novels in eight years and
another three novels that haven't seen the light
of day. Some might say you were bom to write
novels. But that's not quite the truth, is it?
Back in high school, I skipped an English class.
As punishment, the teacher said if I attended a
Young Authors Conference I could make up for
the skipped class. So I attended the conference
and met Ian Weir (UBC playwright) there. After
graduation, I enrolled at UBC as a psychology
major but then I dropped a course, saw that
Ian Weir was teaching an introduction to
creative writing class so I decided to take that.
When I finished the course I applied for the
BFA program but I didn't get in. I applied again
the following year and got in. After my BFA I
applied to the MFA program at UBC but I was
waitlisted before getting in a few days before
the start of classes. I entered the MFA as a
playwright but left as a novelist.
You've recently been named the Arnold and
Nancy Cliff Writer in Residence at UBC and
appear to be on track for a faculty position.
With nearly 14 years in the creative writing
department, as both a student and teacher,
what do you notice about today's generation
of new writers?
It makes me sad to hear writers ask how long
they think they will write until they are done
with a book. If you're writing to be done, why
are you writing? Publication, readers, reviews,
awards and any other so-called good thing are
secondary to the act of writing. You don't
know while writing whether the book will be
lauded. You must be alone and go through the
hellish process. I worry about students who
expect it to be less and who expect more from
their writing.
I can teach students how to make themselves
better but they have to accept responsibility for
it. I don't line-edit their workshop drafts
because I don't think they will learn that way.
All they will do is fix those edits and feel that
the story is done, when it is not. I read as a
reader and critic and offer some notes as to
what's working, what are the patterns and try
to articulate to that person so they can see it in
their own writing. Some are open to it, some
are not.
What's next for you?
I'm not sure yet. I'm done traveling for the
moment. I suppose it's time to stare at my wall
and see what I come up with next.
John Vigna is a Vancouver writer.
UBC and Social Media: Join the Conversation
By MATT ARMSTRONG BCOM'09
twitter      face book       Linked O
A few years ago, some intelligent people took a long
hard look at the way the world was using the Internet
and recognized a deficiency: organizations were using
websites to speak to their audiences, but it was only
a one-way conversation. The audiences were offered
no means of expressing their opinions online and
the organizations were missing out on gathering
valuable feedback.
These intelligent people recognized the opportunity
for two-way communication offered by the web and,
conscious or not of the magnitude of their discovery,
went on to build applications that have now reached
cultural ubiquity: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, et al.
From a technology perspective, these applications
can be intimidating. Those of us who haven't grown
up with Twitter may not know what to do with it,
where to start or why to bother.
But if we can see social media as a simple change in
philosophy - an invitation to join online two-way
conversation-the intimidation diminishes. Facebook,
Twitter and the others are simply platforms; venues
for the conversation.
Alumni Affairs is exploring these venues in the interest
of starting a deeper conversation with you. For the
most up-to-date, real-time contact with us we offer
the options of Facebook and Twitter, and to network
with fellow alumni, there's our Linkedln group.
Consider this an open invitation to participate as much
or as little as you would like. Questions, stories,
praise or scorn: we would love to hear from you.
Discussion, Events, Stories:
www.facebook.com/ubcalumni
www.twitter.com/ubcalumni
[/BC Alumni Networking:
http ://www. linked in. com/groups?gid=59693
(or Google: UBC Alumni Linkedln)
Matt Armstrong, BCom'09 is working with Alumni
Affairs and other UBC units to help develop a social
media strategy.
20    Trek    Summer 2009 H^afs
>hort-Game
Advisor Long
on Experience
:>
,9-year-old golfer Bill McGhee is the latest
addition to the UBC Okanagan golf tea
cy cy
by JODY JACO
It's not how old you are, it's how old you feel.
Just ask UBC alumnus Bill McGhee, BA'46,
BSF'4y, who at age 89 is the newest addition to
the UBC Okanagan Heat golf team.
An avid golfer, McGhee - who doesn't look a
day over 70 - offered to volunteer his teaching
services as an assistant short-game coach after
reading about the newly-formed varsity golf team
in a monthly alumni email newsletter last year.
"Firstly, I volunteered because as I grow older
and play less I want to keep busy and stay
connected to golf," says McGhee, who is a short-
game specialist and former BC Senior champion
and World Senior semi-finalist. "I gained lots of
tournament experience since I became a senior
at age 55, and I think I have something of value
to offer the team - I can help them improve
their short game, especially putting, and teach
them how to behave in tournament play.
"I can also give some guidance on dealing
with the pressure of competition - both the
pleasant and unpleasant kind. And, sad to say,
how to deal with cheaters, which I had to do
only twice in all the years I've been golfing."
Raised in the small village of Port Alice on
Vancouver Island, McGhee learned to golf when
he was 10 years old. Nearly every day he would
take his dad's old wood-shaft clubs and practice
for hours, focusing on chipping and putting.
McGhee's boyhood home rested on the edge of a
five-hole golf course built in 1927. Golf was made
popular in the small pulp-and-paper town -
population 1,200 - thanks in part to a couple of
Scots with infectious enthusiasm for the game.
In fact, says McGhee, before the golf course
was developed in Port Alice the Scots would
place cans around the local baseball diamond
and play a few rounds of golf. It was one of
those same men who taught McGhee a unique
and effective grip for putting - a technique he
uses to this day, and swears by.
"As a boy, much of my golf was played
alone, as the few other young boys in Port Alice
were not interested," says McGhee. "However,
when I became a teenager I played a lot with
my father and other adults, some of whom
gave me some coaching, and all of whom led
by example and taught me how to be a
gentleman at the game. The fellowships that
develop from playing golf with the same people
over time are lifelong and priceless."
It is these same lessons that McGhee hopes
to pass along to the young men and women on
the UBC Okanagan varsity golf team.
"Golf is more than a sport, it is a culture,
and I'm looking forward to sharing what I've
learned with the young athletes, and helping
them develop their game," he says.
Rob Johnson, the director of Athletics and
Recreation at UBC Okanagan, says McGhee's
expert guidance is helping UBC Okanagan
offer one of the best student athletic golf
programs in the country.
"It's a great opportunity for our student
athletes because with the addition of Bill they
have the opportunity to learn from someone
who has a true passion for the game, its history
and its traditions," says Johnson. "Bill knows
how to compete and has been teaching,
coaching and mentoring for many, many years.
That kind of experience is invaluable.
"It's just one more great aspect to the UBC
Okanagan golf varsity program, which is
emerging as one of the most unique and
exciting varsity programs in the country."
Jody Jacob is an assistant communications
coordinator with UBC Okanagan's Office of
Alumni and University Relations.
Summer 2009    Trek    21 To Make the World
a Better Place
Two grads reflect on a life of study,
accomplishment and travelling the road together.
By HERBERT ROSENGARTEN and HENRY CHONG MD'56
When Memory Elvin and Walter Lewis first
met in the Biological Sciences building at UBC
in 1952, she was finishing her BA in science
and he was working on his master's in biology
and botany. Walter was struck by her long red
hair and sparkling hazel-green eyes; he
immediately took her out for a coffee at the
Bus Stop cafeteria. A couple of years later,
Walter left UBC to obtain his PhD in biology at
the University of Virginia, while Memory took
a position as a medical technologist in the
Pearson TB Hospital in Vancouver, but they
kept in touch. Friendship blossomed into
romance: in 1957 they were married, and by
1965 they had two children.
There the story might have ended, for
Memory at least: a career in science was not
encouraged for women in the 1950s, especially
for those who had started a family. But Memory
and Walter were not a conventional couple. In
the following years their contributions to
biological and botanical research would mark
them out as pioneers, and together they would
become world-renowned as ethnobotanists and
ethnopharmacologists.
Memory's work initially took her in a
different direction. In 1966 she completed a
doctorate at Leeds University in medical
microbiology, and the following year she accepted
a faculty position in the school of Dentistry at
Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri,
where Walter was now an associate professor
of botany and director of the herbarium at the
Missouri Botanical Garden. In 1968, when she
was doing research in chlamydial infections,
Memory was invited to examine a young man
who had been admitted to a local hospital with
a puzzling case of a sexually-transmitted illness
that would not respond to any treatments. The
patient, subsequently referred to as Robert R.,
struggled with his illness for six months.
Racked with disease, he was unresponsive to
antibiotics and unable to generate an immune
response that would have ordinarily controlled
his infection. He died in May 1969.
Memory and lymphologist Marlys Witte
stored separate samples of Robert R.'s blood
and tissues, hoping that a technology might be
developed that would help them unravel the
mystery. Memory deduced that some kind of
viral infection had compromised the patient's
immune system; she gave a conference paper to
that effect in 1970, and in 1973 she co-
authored a paper on the case history in the
journal Lymphology.
The true nature of Robert R.'s illness did
not emerge until the following decade, when
scientists identified the human immunodeficiency virus and showed its connection to
what came to be known as AIDS. In 1984,
Memory's interest in Robert R's case was
renewed by the recently published findings on
AIDS, and she and Marlys Witte sent their
samples for testing by an expert retrovirologist
at Tulane University. Memory's specimens
proved conclusively that Robert R. had in fact
been suffering from an HIV infection and that
his strain differed from the one causing the
pandemic then sweeping across the world.
This discovery, made public in 1987, had
significant implications for the study of the
transmission of AIDS, and was the earliest
documented case of AIDS in America. It also
demonstrated that the disease might have
entered the US many years before its official
identification in 19 81. Uncovered by the
then-novel technique of what Memory calls
"retrospective epidemiology," it would also
encourage scientists to forage through tissue
and sera banks for clues to the origins of other
diseases.
But Memory Elvin-Lewis's major contributions
would come in other areas of medical science.
Her work as a microbiologist and epidemiologist
at Washington University led to her becoming a
leading world expert on plants used in folk
dental practices. She became the first woman to
be president of the Microbiology sections of
both the American Association of Dental
Schools and the International Association of
Dental Research.
Increasingly focused on the bioreactivity of
plants used for healing, Memory's research
interests gradually converged with those of her
husband, who was then studying airborne and
allergenic pollens of North America. In the
1970s they began working on herbology (the
study of folk medicine based on the medical
properties of plants and plant extracts) in
response to the growing movement for
alternative medicine. They were especially
interested in the implications of herbal
medicine for the development of modern
pharmaceuticals, and their research led to the
publication in 1977 of what has since been
recognized as a standard work in the field,
Medical Botany: Plants Affecting Man's Health,
revised and enlarged in 2003.
What gives this research its particular
strength (as well as an aura of romantic
adventure) is the couple's painstaking collection
22    Trek    Summer 2009 Memory Elvin at UBC, 195
Memory the Botanist
over three decades of data and information
from indigenous people around the world,
including Africa, Asia and North and South
America. Initial studies included analysis of
tooth care in Ghana, followed by trips to the
Amazon in the early 1980s to investigate tooth
blackening and extraction by Peruvian and
Colombian Indians. "It was the beginning,"
says Elvin-Lewis, "of an expanded research
project to study the medicinal plants of Jivaro
tribes of the upper Amazon that gave us
quinine and curare."
Memory and Walter ventured deep into
tropical rainforests to meet with the elders of
remote tribes. They analyzed the medicinal
properties of herbs and plants for their therapeutic
value, their efficacy and (especially important
for subsequent development) their safety. The
couple's work was celebrated in a National
Geographic special, Secrets of the Rain Forest
(1989), and helped to uncover herbal remedies
with applications to many diseases, including
viral hepatitis, tuberculosis and malaria.
A significant dimension of this kind of research
is the threat it can pose to indigenous people
whose knowledge and traditions may become
vulnerable to entrepreneurial exploitation. Walter
and Memory have been exemplary in sharing
the benefits of their work with the people who
have made their discoveries possible. As
principal investigator of the International
Collaborative Biodiversity Group: Peru, Walter
has been instrumental in the development of
Peruvian intellectual property laws regarding
benefit sharing with indigenous people.
In like fashion, Memory has lectured
extensively in the US, the UK and Australia on
policies needed to govern the evolving field of
traditional remedies and their exploitation. She
was a keynote speaker at the international
congress on Indigenous Knowledge and
Bioprospecting held at Macquarie University in
Sydney in 2004. Only by treating indigenous
people as collaborators and partners, argue
Memory and Walter, can the full potential of
traditional herbal remedies be fully realized,
shared and sustained, a view not always taken
by colleagues working in the competitive world
of modern science and pharmaceuticals.
Their work has brought the couple
widespread recognition. Both are Fellows of
the Linnean Society of London, recipients of
UBC Geography
50th Anniversary
the Martin de la Cruz Silver Medal from the
Mexican Academy of Traditional Medicine,
and holders of honorary degrees from Andrews
University in Michigan. Walter also received an
honorary degree from the University of
Waterloo. In 2006 they were honoured by the
Society for Economic Botany as Distinguished
Economic Botanists, the first time a married
couple has been recognized.
Awards and titles often signify the culmination
of a career, but the couple is as productive as
ever. Memory is still on faculty at Washington
University (now in the department of Biology),
she continues to present at conferences from
Mumbai to Mexico and publishes journal
articles on the medicinal properties of plants
and the issues surrounding profit-sharing.
Alumni and friends of Geography are warmly
invited to participate in celebrations and events
to mark this milestone anniversary. Space is
limited and will be allocated on a first-come
basis. Please reserve your place by sending an
email to Geog50@geog.ubc.ca indicating
which events you'd like to attend. (There is
no need to send money at this time.)
Friday, September 25
10:30-5:00PM: Cutting Edges lectures (no charge)
4.00-6.00PM: Geopit (no charge)
7:00PM (DOORS AT 6:00PM):
Gala Dinner, Sage Bistro ($55)
Saturday, September 26
morning: Walking Tours ($10.00)
afternoon: Family Picnic at Jericho Beach
($15.00, children free)
Photographs: Left, Courtesy Washington University
Summer 2009    Trek    23 emory Elvin (L) in front of old UBC army hut
Walter, whose interest in botany began more
than 60 years ago raising roses in Victoria,
retired from his professorship in 2001 but
maintains his position as senior botanist at the
Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis. He is
currently engaged (with colleagues from
Berkeley and Montreal) on a monograph on
the genus Rosa in North America, scheduled
for publication in 2010.
Memory and Walter have traveled a long
way but they have not forgotten Canada or
their alma mater. Memory looks back at her
youthful self with a mixture of amusement and
nostalgia, recalling the dances she helped to
organize as secretary of the Film Society in the
early 1950s. "We got all the shorts of the big
bands and showed them on screen at Brock
Hall. It was a lot of fun. Can you imagine
dancing to all the big bands?" She also
remembers being a member of the first class in
bacteriology held in the new Wesbrook
Building (completed in 19 51) at the corner of
University Boulevard and East Mall. The
building housed the Preventive Medicine
Institute, an appropriate setting indeed for the
beginning of a long and distinguished partnership between two UBC grads dedicated to
uncovering the secrets of nature and making
the world "a better place in which to live."
Herbert Rosengarten is a retired member of the UBC
English department; Henry Chong is a Vancouver
physician who studied with Memory Elvin-Lewis
when they were both undergraduates at UBC.
THE 2009 UBC
ALUMNI
ACHIEVEMENT
AWARDS
For more than 90 years, UBC alumni have embodied the vital role their university
plays in society. From among their ranks have come the artists and researchers, the
civic leaders and sporting heroes, the activists, volunteers and business gurus
whose spirit, innovation and passion have had such positive impact on the university, in their communities and beyond.
The annual Alumni Achievement Awards present an opportunity to recognize some
of these outstanding men and women for their accomplishments.
This year, the celebrations will be held on UBC's Vancouver campus on Tuesday,
November 10 at the UBC Life Sciences Centre.
The following recipients will be honoured:
LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Hon. John Fraser LLB'54, lld'04
Lawyer and former federal cabinet minister who
has worked tirelessly on issues of conservation and
environmental sustainability.
ALUMNI AWARD OF DISTINCTION
Rt. Hon. Kim Campbell BA'69, LLB'83, lldvo
Canada's nineteenth and first female prime minister, now holding leadership positions in several
international organizations.
OUTSTANDING YOUNG ALUMNUS AWARD
Jennifer Mervyn PhD'06
Community health leader dedicated to improving
the lives of at-risk and homeless Aboriginal youth.
HONORARY ALUMNUS AWARD
Dr. Edwin H.K. Yen
Former dean of Dentistry who raised the profile
of the faculty internationally while reimagining its
instructional methods.
OUTSTANDING FUTURE ALUMNUS AWARD
Parisa Bastani basc'09
Mechanical engineering grad, Wesbrook scholar
and student leader who has shown outstanding
potential in the automotive industry.
Vida Yakong BSN'04, msn'08
Nursing PhD candidate who established a
community development project aimed at building
economic and health-care capacity in her home
region of northern Ghana.
GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP AWARD
Gary Birch BASc'83, PhD'88
Electrical engineer and executive director of the
Neil Squire Society who is committed to the
development of assistive technologies for Canadians with physical disabilities.
OUTSTANDING FACULTY
COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD
Dr. Judith Hall
Clinical geneticist and pediatrician who has shown
great commitment to the leadership and governance of the BC medical field.
BLYTHE EAGLES
VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP AWARD
Justice Grant D. Burnyeat LLB'73
A respected judge whose commitment to the
university spans from his presidency of the AMS to
his membership on the UBC Senate.
ALUMNI MILESTONE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
UBC School of Nursing
A pioneer in the field of public health, the school
was the first in the British Empire to offer a degree-
granting nursing program.
For more details, please visit our website at www.alumni.ubc.ca/events/awards. Recipient bios will be posted soon. No Handmaiden
ofMedicine
Ethel Johns helped establish the UBC nursing
program in 1919. Her vision - to transform
the role of nurses from physicians' assistants
to professional caregivers - would become
a reality.
Bv LISSA COWAN
The young girl who came with her family to
Canada from England in 1892 couldn't have
known the challenges that faced her or the
impact she would have on Canadian society.
But the seeds were there already: as an English
schoolgirl, she used her garden plot in the
schoolyard as a burial ground for dead birds
and mice instead of growing and tending
flowers like the other little girls. An early sign,
perhaps, of the independent mind and unique
spirit that would lead her to spearhead a
turn-of-the-century revolution in nursing.
The family lived at the Wabigoon native
reserve in Ontario, where Ethel Johns' father
was a missionary and teacher. According to
Margaret Street, who wrote Watch-fires on the
Mountains: The Life and Writings of Ethel
Johns, he was an atypical missionary in that,
unlike many God-fearing colonists who came
to Canada in the late 1800s, he didn't quash
Ojibway customs and traditions. After he
established his school, the indigenous community
continued to follow traditional rites such as the
mid-summer medawin or medicine dance. An Ethel Johns exhibit at a ceremony to celebrate the school of Nursing's 50th anniversary.
Those on the reserve accepted the Johns
family into the community and the Ojibway
chief even referred to Johns' mother, Amy, as
"a good medicine woman." By age 16, Ethel
Johns was fluent in Ojibway, and was an
interpreter between the Wabigoon Chief and
the federal government.
A defining moment for Johns came in her
early twenties when freelance journalist Cora
Hind visited the Wabigoon reserve. "This vivid
graduation from the Winnipeg General Hospital
Training School for Nurses. She received a
temporary appointment as superintendent of a
small hospital in Prince Albert during a severe
outbreak of typhoid. The experience brought
her into intimate contact with a resource-poor
hospital and illustrated the importance of
well-trained student nurses. Johns referred to
the untrained nurses as "deplorably ignorant"
pointing to the "crying need" for a serviceable
young woman lived in a world of which I knew nursing workforce based on more than just a
nothing and was free to come and go as she womanly need to serve.
pleased," Johns wrote in her diary. "I had never Between 1905 and 1911 she worked at the
seen anyone like her." Her encounter with the Winnipeg General Hospital as a teacher and
free-spirited journalist taught Johns that she head nurse in charge of the x-ray department,
could feed her hunger for learning and that it was She became involved in fledgling nursing
possible even then for women to be free of the
dictates of culture and upbringing. So, at age
21, she set off for Winnipeg to become a nurse.
"When Ethel Johns entered the profession,
nursing wasn't perceived as something that
required much knowledge or training," says
Sally Thorne, MSN'83, PhD, director of UBC's
organizations and publications, links that created
a solid footing for her to pursue the political
task of making sure that nursing was regulated.
Major challenges stood in the way of passing a
bill. Many nurses, for example, did not recognize
the significance of a State Registration for
Nurses. In a September 1907 issue of the
school of Nursing. In the early years, Johns saw      Nurses' Alumnae Journal, Johns referred to the
tremendous irregularities and shortcomings in
how nursing was taught in Canada, and
became aware of the profession's low standing.
No legislation existed in Manitoba to govern
nurse training and registration, and trained
nurses vied for jobs with those who had little
training and charged lower fees. Nursing was
perceived as a woman's labour of love rather
than a professional occupation.
Johns' first brush with struggles in Canada's
rural hospitals came in 1902 following her
"difficulty of banding women together for
concerted action." Then there was the age-old
idea that nursing was a special privilege.
Adding to that was legislative opposition
among rural constituencies with small hospitals
and feeble nursing schools. In speeches and
articles, she repeatedly defended her position of
having a legal standard instituted for the
nursing profession just as it was in medicine,
dentistry, pharmacy, law and teaching.
In 1913 the government of Manitoba finally
passed a Registration Act, which Johns initially
referred to as a "total wreck," then later accepted
as she realized that "a bad bill is better than none."
After the First World War, returning
Canadian soldiers caused an epidemic of the
Spanish flu. As the flu spread, trained nurses
were in short supply. Thousands of women
volunteered for nursing service, yet lacked the
training to contribute in a meaningful way.
Johns was superintendent of the Children's
Hospital of Winnipeg during the epidemic
when two-thirds of her trained staff became
ill and had to attend to the sick as soon as
they recovered. "Under the most difficult
circumstances they rendered us a service we
shall not soon forget," she said.
During the epidemic that killed 50,000 in
Canada and from 50 to 100 million people
worldwide, the need for trained nurses became
clear. But John's vision for the nursing
profession had progressed. She understood
that the higher education of nurses was the
only way forward. Years later, reflecting on
the period of the epidemic, she wrote, "I had
acquired a rooted conviction, based on my
personal experience, that it was in the university
and in the university alone that nurses could hope
to find the broader educational opportunities
without which they could never meet the
increasing demands being made upon them."
Her belief in the critical role that higher education
needed to play in forming a knowledgeable
nursing workforce was soon to nudge her
toward a new career in Vancouver.
Ethel Johns moved
nursing away from
the handmaiden
of medicine image,
identifying it in the
university and the
larger community as a
distinct discipline in its
own right.
26    Trek    Summer 2009 In Vancouver, discussions were taking place
about how to improve nursing education in the
province. Malcolm MacEachern, medical
superintendent for the Vancouver General
Hospital, was part of the hospital standardization
movement to improve the quality of hospitals.
While many in the medical establishment
disapproved of the higher education of nurses,
MacEachern understood that a high nursing
standard required it. In a letter addressed to the
UBC Senate, he asked the university to take
over from the Vancouver General Hospital
Training School for Nurses. The Senate
appointed a three-member committee to look
into the issue. A search began to find a director,
and Johns was hired. Although the wheels were
in motion for the new school, the debate on the
program's value and what faculty it would fall
under had only just begun. Johns was perfectly
placed to aid the development of the statement
of criteria. She was present at the executive
meeting to consider and approve the submission
and was there when the Senate referred nursing
to the faculty of Applied Science.
In spite of persistent criticism, Johns had two
key allies in MacEachern and Reginald Brook,
dean of the faculty of Applied Science.
"It was an interesting tweak of history to
combine nursing with engineering because the
idea of nursing having a scientific basis wasn't
really accepted until the 19 50s," Thorne says.
"It exists as the only such configuration anywhere
in the world and it has retained that history.
We're still in the faculty of Applied Science."
A photograph of Johns taken in 1919, the
year the department of Nursing at UBC was
established, shows a slender, fair-haired woman
wearing a white cap and a black uniform. A
graduate of that opening year described her as
"very clever and a wonderful lecturer." Johns
referred to UBC as a "young, western, great big
striding university, without too many traditions."
When the school opened its doors, Canada
became the first country in the Commonwealth
to offer a baccalaureate degree program in
nursing. Addressing staff and students at VGH,
she called the university's new program an
"experiment," saying that its success or failure
depended on collective effort. "We must expect
in the future to be able to develop the faculties
of nursing in our universities," she said.
"Ethel Johns moved nursing away from the
handmaiden of medicine image, articulating it
and identifying it in the university and the
larger community as a distinct discipline in its
own right," remarks Thorne. "In 1919, this was
a very revolutionary message."
So revolutionary that in 1920 even the
College of Physicians and Surgeons expressed
open opposition to the new degree program,
remarking that "overtraining of nurses is not
desireable and results largely in the losing of
their usefulness," and "theoretical branches of
nursing are of very little use in the sick room."
Nevertheless, patient numbers were increasing
and there continued to be an overwhelming
need for highly trained nurses. Johns addressed
an assembly of physicians, entreating them to
support the program. "You have taken us for
granted, as men always take their women folk
for granted," she said. "Surely we can enlist
your sympathy in support of a movement
which has as its object the development of a
nursing force worthy of a cause to which it and
you alike are dedicated: the prevention of
disease and the conversation of life lived to the
full, active, healthy, and happy."
Fortunately, for us, Johns enlisted that
sympathy and went on to help improve Canadian
public health for the better part of a century.
Lissa Cowan is a writer living in Vancouver. She is
working on a book related to women's health.
The impact of your legacy gift to UBC will live on. Universities change our world
for the better. By planning your gift today, you can help future generations of students
and researchers meet the needs of tomorrow. No matter what your passion or interest,
UBC is making significant advances through education
and research. We can help you plan a meaningful gift to
the area that means the most to you. '-        -
Request a copy of our Planned Giving Options booklet
to learn about gifts that fit your financial plans and
family goals. The booklet is full of practical information,
examples and stories of donors whose gifts will influence
generations to come.
Contact UBC Gift & Estate Planning:
604.822.5373 | heritage.circle@ubcca
www.supporting.ubc.ca/legacy
Summer 2009    Trek    27 / **y
Painting is like breathing for acclaimed
BC artist Gordon Smith, but he's not happy
with his work.
ByROBIN LAURENCE
Picture this. Artist Gordon Smith, at 90, is
attending an exhibition opening in a crowded
South Granville gallery. The show features new
paintings by Gathie Falk, one of Vancouver's
most distinguished senior artists, and Smith -
ditto, only more so - is exclaiming over them.
"Gathie is wonderful," he says. "Wonderful."
Although it's difficult for him to get around
these days (nerve damage from an old injury
makes it hard now for Smith to lift his right
foot, rendering walking a perilous activity), he
conscientiously attends art-world events,
especially those honouring friends and colleagues.
Still, he's clearly tired at this moment and
wants to get home. As he makes his way through
the throng, towards the door, a fan rushes up to
him, shakes his hand, and says, "Are you still
painting?" In an uncharacteristic burst of
incivility, Smith replies, "Are you still breathing?"
Weeks later, in his West Vancouver studio,
Smith chuckles a bit ruefully at the memory of
this exchange. Still, he reiterates that painting
is, for him, truly a compulsion. Not to do it
would be unimaginable. To actually like what
he's done, well, that's apparently unimaginable
too. For most of his career, Smith has disparaged his own work. Irrespective of all the solo
and survey exhibitions he has racked up, all the
critical and curatorial acclaim, all the sales to
avid collectors, all the honours and awards and
public art commissions, he is chronically
dissatisfied with what he has accomplished. He
continues to drive himself on and on, through
different styles, different series, different realms
of colour and composition and brush work.
Doesn't he feel happy with anything he's
done? "No," he says, "no, I really don't." Then
he concedes, "Maybe one or two paintings." Over
a prolific 70-year career, that's not a hell of a
lot. But then one remembers Edgar Degas who
is reputed to have said on his deathbed in 1917
that he wished he had all his paintings back so
that he could put his boot through them.
Smith's painting compulsion is not about
competing with others, he insists. Instead, it has
to do with meeting the demands of some very
critical inner being. Meeting them and exceeding
them. "I like to be surprised by painting," he
says. "I like ugly paintings - the ones I have to
work at looking at." His recent series, complex
interpretations of tangled beach grasses, is "too
pretty, too easy," he remarks. "I look at them
and I think, I'm going to start all over again."
And that's what he's doing. Right now.
Leaning against the north wall of Smith's
studio is a large canvas, a work-in-progress. In
a forceful act of renunciation, he has created it
by painting over an earlier work. Where
previously there had been starburst ribbons of
white, green and buff, there is now a broad,
I
OdUt
-
energetic field of black. An array of colour and
detail has transformed into a sombre monochrome, although slivers of the original are still
evident at the painting's edges. They glimmer
remotely, like starlight from a distant galaxy.
By this act, Smith has launched himself into
a re-exploration of the abstract expressionism
of the 1950s. He is looking at accidental
compositions, such as the rings and splatters on
a cloth where his paint pots have been sitting.
And he is examining spontaneous self-expression by others, bursts of words and marks such
as those in graffiti. He has a file of photos he's
taken of graffiti-covered walls in London and
New York. "I really love graffiti."
It's often been remarked that Smith is a
protean artist, that his paintings have assumed
many different shapes, styles and guises over
the decades. Ian Thorn, senior curator at the
Vancouver Art Gallery and author of the
definitive history of Smith's art, has pointed out
that the artist seems to cycle between greater and
lesser degrees of abstraction and representation,
between looseness and formal control. "He's
always trying to push himself," Thorn observes,
then sighs over the amount of art that Smith
has destroyed over the years, either by painting
over earlier works, throwing them away or
burning them. "If he finds himself in a cul-de-
sac, he turns around and comes right back out."
Trek    Summer 2009 TOP:
CREEK TANGLE A/2
2009. ACRYLIC ON CANVAS
60"x67"
MIDDLE LEFT:
CREEKSIDE GRASSES ill
MIDDLE CENTER:
CREEK TANGLE A/1
2009. ACRYLIC ON CANVAS
60"x67"
MIDDLE RIGHT:
CREEKSIDE #6
BOTTOM:
CREEK TANGLE A/3
2009. ACRYLIC ON CANVAS
51"x77"
Smith's 90th birthday in 2009 has been the
occasion for yet more honours and awards,
including a Governor General's visual arts
award, a fellowship created in his name at
Emily Carr University of Art and Design, and
an exhibition of works on paper at the Artists
for Kids Gallery. There have been birthday
parties, of course, both public and private, posh
and picnicky, including a thronging fete in the
courtyard beside the Artists for Kids Gallery.
During that hot, sunny, Sunday afternoon, four
distinguished speakers praised Smith's abundant accomplishments as an artist, a teacher
(he taught art and art history for 36 years, 26
of them at UBC), a patron of the arts, an
enthusiastic supporter of young and emerging
artists, a generous friend, and a courageous
veteran of the Second World War. (He suffered
the injury that now impedes his step, in Sicily
during the Allied invasion.)
The tributes were many and long. "Who is
this person Gordon Smith?" Gordon Smith
demands now. "I'm sick of hearing about him."
It hardly needs repeating that there's no resting
on laurels in his world. With the help of two
assistants, Smith recently completed an
ambitious public art project for the West
Vancouver Aquatic Centre. An immense
assemblage of found objects scavenged from
West Coast beaches, including driftwood,
fishing buoys, plastic netting, roots, branches, a
rusty old tire, and frayed pieces of rope, it is a
striking summation of our maritime setting.
"Gordon causes us to look at our environment
in a different way," Thorn says.
Smith has spent the morning cleaning up his
studio. He has scrubbed paint pots, covered
work tables with clean cloth, and repainted the
floor a pristine white. Much as he works
compulsively, energetically, every day, he is
notorious for maintaining his studio in such
extreme order and cleanliness that it could
serve as a surgical suite. He groans at the
memory of how messy it was while he was
working on the Aquatic Centre mural. Then he
takes a broom-sized brush and swipes black
across the pale face of a rejected painting.
Abstraction and representation. Expressiveness
and control. Time to forge on.
Robin Laurence is a Vancouver writer and art critic.
Photographs: Scott Massey, courtesy Equinox Gallery
Summer 2009    Trek    29 ALUMNI
UBC
Thank you to all alumni volunteers who have given their time and talent to UBC. One of
you stands to win a case ofthe recently-launched HBC Alumni wine. We have made every
effort to include alumni who volunteered their services between April 2008 and March
2009 and apologize in advance for any omission. If you have been left out, please send
your details (first and last names, degree and year, and volunteer role) to Marisa Iuvancigh
(marisa_iuvancigh@ubc.ca) at 604.822.8917 by August 31, 2009, so we can include your
name for the draw.
GREGORY AASEN BASc'79 ■ JAN AASETH BCom> ■ FAIZAL ABDULLAH BASc'94 ■ RAE ACKERMAN BA'65 ■ KIMI AIMETZ BA'gS ■ EMILY AKITA BMvs'oo, BEd'oi ■ FERNANDO ALDASORO MBA'o, ■ LINDA ALEXANDER BA'Si, MA'S7 ■ ALY ALIBHAI BCom's7 ■ MICHAEL ALLAN BASc'73 ■ LINDSAY ALLIKAS BFA'oS ■ DONNA ANAKA BCom'7s ■ GEORGE ANDERSON BCom'64 ■ CARLOS ANDRADE MBA'003 ■ C INGE AN-
DREEN ■ STIRLING ANGUS BSc'Si ■ CHRISTINA ANTHONY BCom>97 ■ MIKE APSEY BSc'61 ■ ROBERTO AQUILINI BCou'Sg ■ REZA ARBABIAN MBA09 ■ NICHOLAS ARDEN MSc'Sjj ■ NICHOLAS ARKLE BSc'S f ■
LINLEA ARMSTRONG BSc'9f, MD'jjS ■ DONALD ARNOLD BPF62 ■ JEFFERY ARSENAULT BSc'oi ■ THERESA ARSENAULT BA'7S, LLB'S, ■ YUKA ASADA BSc"o4 ■ SHEILA ASHWELL ■ KEITH ATKINSON BSc'9f ■
ALBERT AU BCou'76 ■ RICHARD AUCHINLECK BASc'76 ■ SUSAN AYNSLEY BSc'6% MSc'S; PAOLA BACA BA'9S ■ KARL BAHENA BA'04 ■ SANTOKH BAHT BASc's4 ■ ANGELA BAILEY ■ ERICA BAIRD BA'07 ■
KENNETH BAKER BSc'7, ■ KODY BAKER BASc'o, ■ NYTHALAH BAKER Cext'o, ■ VICTOR BAKER BASc'jS, MASc'66 ■ AYNSLEY BALDWIN BA'o, ■ RICHARD BALLANTYNE BASc's, ■ PABLO BARANAO MASc'o3 ■
TOBIAS BARAZZUOL BCW92 ■ ADELA BARBOROVA ■ PHILIP BARER DMD'Si ■ FRANK BARKER BCom'So ■ SHIRLEY BARNETT BA'63 ■ LORRAINE BARON BSc's4, MA'92 ■ TREVOR BARRY Bsc'07 ■ MARTHA
BASSETTBA'So,M£d'o3 ■ CAROL BASSINGTHWAIGHTEBSN'X7,MSN'96 ■ FREDERIC BASTIENMBA'o, ■ JANE BATTLEBHE'60 ■ MEERA BAWA BAgSMA'o,, LLB'o, ■ ALLEN BAYNEBASc'ss ■ VERNON BEAIRSTO Djp'90
■ DOUGLAS BEATON MBAoS ■ TYLER BEATTY BA06 ■ TERRY-LEE BEAUDRY BEd's, ■ DANIEL BEDNAR BCou's7 ■ JOHN BEECHINOR BEA09 ■ BRIAN BEGERT MBAS, ■ TOBIN BELLAMY DMD'jjS ■ AMY BELLING
BA'03 ■ CLARE BENTON BA'06 ■ MOIRA BERMAN MSc'7jj ■ LYNETTE BEST BSN'7i MSN'Si ■ CLIVE BETHEL BSc'S,, DMD'90 ■ RUBY BHULLAR DMD"o7 ■ ANDREW BIBBY BCom'So ■ ERIN BIDDLECOMBE BSc'03 ■
HEATHER BIGGAR BSc'o6, MSc'ojj ■ DAWN BINNINGTON BA'So ■ BRUCE BIRMINGHAM MBA7, ■ JOHN BISHOP BCou'ss ■ MICHAEL BISHOP Djp>94 ■ KARMEN BLACKWOOD BA91, D„'97, MBA06 ■ SUSAN
BLACKWOOD BSc'o7 ■ LAWRENCE BLAIN BA69, P„D>77 ■ ALEXANDER BOGGIE BASo, MD'54 ■ ALLAN BOND BA'03 ■ DAVID BOND BCo*?9s ■ JUSTIN BONZO BA'o, ■ VINCENT BORCH BASc'ss ■ DAVID BORINS
BA'96, LLB'00 ■ GUY BOROWSKI BASc'Sf ■ MARY BOULANGER BASc's7,MASc'9s ■ JUSTIN BOURNE BASc'03, MEnc'o6 ■ HELEN BOYD BSN'94 ■ JEREMY BOYD BA'91, MA'92 ■ JULIA BOYLE MSc'o3 ■ MARTIN BRAVERMAN BSc'74, DMD-7S ■ SARAH BRAYNE BA'oS ■ BEV BRISCOE BCOM'77 ■ GRAEME BRISTOL BArch'So, MASA'91 ■ THOMAS BRODDY BASc's4 ■ MARIO BRONDANI PhD'oS ■ SANDRA BROUGHTON MSc'91 ■ BRENDA
BROWN BSW6S ■ LINDSAY BRUMWELL BA'02 ■ DAVID BRYSON BCoM'90 ■ ELEANOR BUEZA BA'00 ■ CORNELIA BUJARA Djp>95 ■ HOLGER BURKE BA'76, MA'S, ■ STEVE BURKE BComV, PhD'o2 ■ CAROLINE BURNS
MBA'04 ■ ANDREW BURNSTEIN BA'S, ■ RICHARD BUSSE DMD'S6 ■ JULIE BUSSIERE BASS HECTOR CABRERA ■ BLAINE CAIRNS DMD'«9 ■ BRIAN CALLOW BASc'6S ■ BRENTON CAMERON MBA06 ■ MARY-
LOUISE CAMPBELL BSc'76, DMD-S; ■ FRANK CANTONI BCoM'91 ■ KENNETH CARMICHAEL BCom>95 ■ JASON CARROLL BA'oS ■ DENISE CARSWELL DMD'S6 ■ REID CARTER BSc'79 MSc's, ■ JANE CARTWRIGHT
LLB'Si ■ MARK CASAFRANCISCO BSc'99, DMD'o, ■ VALERIE CASSELTON BA'77 ■ CHANTAL CATTERMOLE BA'02 ■ STEPHEN CAWOOD BA'gS ■ MAUREEN CERESNEY MD'97 ■ RANDALL CHAFETZ BCom'Si ■
AGNES CHAN BSc'77, DMD'Si ■ CANISIUS CHAN basc'oo, MASc'o, ■ CHI CHAN BA'7S ■ LUM CHAN bcom'oi! ■ PAUL CHAN BASc's, ■ RENEE CHAN BComVi ■ TIMOTHY CHAN BCcrfoj ■ GRANT CHANG BA'00 ■
JAMES CHANG MBA'05 ■ JIMMY CHANG BA96 ■ SILVIA CHANG BSc'go, MD>94 ■ WENDY CHANG MBA'oS ■ SUBRATA CHATTOPADHYAY PhD'S6 ■ LILIAN CHAU BA'00, MA'05 ■ SHIRLEY CHAU BSW96 ■ CARLO
CHAVARRI GONZALEZ MBAoS ■ JANICE CHEAM BCom'oS ■ LAWRENCE CHEE BASc'Sg ■ JIM CHEN DMD'03 ■ JINYU CHEN MBA'oS ■ PATRICK CHENG BASc's, ■ STEPHEN CHENG BScfSo, MBA'Si ■ PAUL
CHERNIKHOWSKY BASc'<,4 ■ JESSICA CHEUNG BA'oS ■ FRANCOIS CHEVALLIER MBA'gS ■ BEN CHEW MD>9« ■ LESLIE CHEW BSc'93 ■ TYLER CHEYNE BCom'o7 ■ CHRISTIAN CHIA BCoM'91 ■ DERRICK CHIA
BCoM'94 ■ SAMUEL CHIANG DMD>74 ■ SIDNEY CHIU BA'02 ■ NANCY CHO BSc'sf ■ DAVID CHOI BCom'Sj. ■ JEMI CHOI BA95 ■ BENNY CHOW BASc>96 ■ FAYE CHOW MD>9« ■ SUSAN CHOW DMD'7a ■ WILBUR CHOW
DMD'02 ■ AYESHA CHOWDHURY ■ KAREN CHRISTIANSEN BA'S9 ■ JOHN CHRISTIE MBA'7i ■ ALEXANDRA CHU BA'o7 ■ CARMEN CHU BA'oS ■ BEVERLY CHUA BSc'9i, MSc'97 ■ JASON CHUANG BCom>97 ■
CHRISTOPHER CHUNG DMD'95 ■ MAVIS CHUNG BSc'9s,MSc'o, ■ MINA CHUNG BA'02 ■ REBECCA CLAPPERTON BA'99 ■ LEE CLAREMONT BFA'91 ■ GORDON CLARK BA'«2, LLB'67 ■ GREGORY CLARK BCou'S6,
LLB'Sg ■ JOHN CLARK BCom'79 ■ TERESA CLARKE BSc'77 MD'Si ■ RONALD CLIFF BCOM'49 ■ D WAYNE CLOGG BSc'77 ■ ERRIN CLUTTON BA'99 ■ TERESA COADY BA'So, BArch's3 ■ COLM COLE BSc'75, MD'79 ■
HEATHER COLE BSc>9, ■ BETH COLLINS BCoM'93 ■ CATHERINE COMBEN BA'67 ■ DOUGLAS CONN BSc'7s, BSc'7% DMD'Si ■ CYNTHIA CONNELL BA'05 ■ JACQUELIN CONNELLY BFA'06 ■ DUSTIN COOK BA'01,
MA'02 ■ THELMA COOK BEd'ss ■ JOHN COOMBS BCom>73 ■ COLIN COOPER Bi=A'o7 ■ ROBERT COTRONEO BFA'oS ■ MARGARET COTTLE MD'78 ■ BRETT COYLE DMD>S« ■ DANIEL CRAIG BA'92 ■ KENNETH
CRAIG MA'Uo ■ CARL CRAMER BSc>74, DMD'79, MSc'97 ■ ENRIQUE CRAMER MBA'00 ■ GRAEME CROSS basc'oo ■ JAMES CROWE BA'71 ■ DONALD CROWSON BASc'ss, MASc'6i ■ ANDREA CSISZAR BSc'9% DMD'03,
Djp'o«,MSc'o« ■ ROSALYN CUA BA'oS ■ RAY CUNLIFFE BASc'49 ■ BRENDA-LEE CURRIE DjpfDENrHYcJ'7iS,B Sc"o4,MSc'o7 ■ JAMES CURRIE BCoM'57 ■ MICHELLE CUSTODIO BCom'9S LUCY DAIBCom'oU ■ LESLIE DALA
MMvs'96 ■ DONALD DALIK LLB'76- ■ SIRAZ DALMIR BA'94 ■ TROY DALTON BCW99 ■ PHILIP DAYSON BASc's9 ■ DIANNA DEBLAEREBA99 ■ ROBIN DE PELHAMBA'9%MBA'07 ■ ALARIC DE SOUZABA'96,MBA'o} ■
STEPHEN DE WIT bcom'oi ■ MARKO DEKOVIC BA'01 ■ MICHELE DELESALLE BCom"7s, MHA9} ■ MARY DEMARINIS MA99 ■ SUSAN DERKACH BCoM'92 ■ HAROLD DERKSEN PhD>9S ■ ANDREA DERNISKY DMD'oS
■ PREETY DESAI Djp'95 ■ SASKO DESPOTOVSKI BSc'o, ■ RONALD DEVALL BASc'66, MASc'6S, PhD>72 ■ GAVIN DEW BA'06 ■ HASNAIN DEWJI DMD'90 ■ MANDEEP DHALIWAL BA9S ■ AMANVEER DHESI BA'06 ■
ANITA DIDUR ■ KATHLEEN DIGA BCW03 ■ ANJALI DILAWRI BA'07 ■ CHRISTOPHER DOBRZANSKI MA'73, MBA'75 ■ ALLAN DOIG BA'73 ■ CHRISTOPHER DOLL BA'S6 ■ ROBERT DOLPHIN BASc'jS ■ SEAN
DONLEY BA'96 ■ KENNETH DORMAN BA'72, LLB'77 ■ BAKHSHISH DOSANJH MSc'7s ■ BENJAMIN DOVE BSc"o7 ■ HEATHER DOWLING DMD'03 ■ WILLIAM DOWNING BSc'sf ■ ROBYN DRIEDGER BMra>oo ■
MATTHEW DROWN BASc'ss ■ MARC DRYSDALE BCom'9S ■ KIM DUFFELL ■ PATRICK DUFFY BSc'sf ■ DAVID DUKE BMra'71 ■ ALLISON DUNNET BA9S ■ WILLIAM DUNSMORE MEd'oi ■ JOHN DYBLE BASc'Si,
MBA'go KEITH EADIE BCom>99 ■ CHRISTOPHER EATON BA'06 ■ CATHERINE EBBEHOJ BSN'75, MSN'm ■ ANTHONY EDWARDS BSc"6S ■ GREGORY EIDSNESS BA'07 ■ KATIE ELIOT BA'So ■ GUY ELLIOTT BASc'oi,
Djp'o6 ■ ROBIN ELLIOTT BCoM'65 ■ BARNEY ELLIS-PERRY BA'S7 ■ MARTIN-GUNTHER ERTL BSc'93 ■ RICARDO ESTRADA MBA'07 ■ CONSUELO ESTRADA ECH AGARAY MBA'09 ■ MUKESH ESWARAN MA'7S, PhD's,
■ DAVID ETO BSc'S; ■ HAROLD ETTER BSc'61, PhD'66 ■ JIM EVANS BCom>67 SELENA FAN ■ CYRUS FAR BSc>99, MSc'02 DMD"o6 ■ KERRI FARION BHUM KmErjcs'97, LLB'04 ■ BRENDA FEDORUK BMv?sf ■ NICOLE
FENWICK MSc'o; ■ DAVID FERGUSON BSc'79, MBASi ■ KENNETH FINCH BASc'6S ■ IAN FISHER BSc'9i, BA'96, MA'9s ■ GORDON FITZPATRICK MASc'72, PhD'77 -ROSS FITZPATRICK BCW5S ■ ALLISON FLACK BA'92
■ BRUCE FLEMING BSc'7}, MD'78 ■ RYAN FLEWELLING BA99 -JASON FORD MD'96 ■ MICHAEL FOREMAN BSc'7% MA'S,, PhD'ss ■ SHIRIN FOROUTAN BA„ ■ PATRICK FRANCOIS PHD'95 ■ RAYA FRANSILA EdD's9
■ RUSSELL FRASER BAS^S, Djp-64 ■ EDWARD FRAZER BASc'jS ■ LORNE FRIESEN BSc'ss ■ ROBERT FRIESEN BCom'66 -VERA FRINTON DAVIS MD>69 ■ CHARLES FRO EHLICH MBA'oS ■ MICHAEL FUGM AN BCom'So
■ MICHAEL FUNG DMD'75 SARAH GALASHAN BA'00 ■ BRENT GALSTER BA'99 ■ DAVID GANDOSSI BCom'So ■ NATALIE GANGEMI BHK'04 ■ GERRY GARRETT MEDB'00 ■ ANITA GARTNER-MAKIHARA MSc'g,,
DMD'93 ■ ROBERT GAYTON BCom'62 ■ LINDSAY GEORGE BA'06 ■ BRIAN GERSON BASc'Si ■ PAUL GEYER BASc'ss ■ AIDIN GHOTBI BSc'02, DMD'oS ■ J DAVID GIBB BCom'66 ■ TRAVIS GIBSON ■ RICHARD GILBERT
BSc'sf ■ TREVOR GILKS BA'06 ■ BEATRICE GILL BA'01 ■ IAN GILL BSc'9s, Bfij'96 ■ JACK GIN BASc's, ■ JOANNE GIN BSc"So, MBA'Si ■ JUNE GOLDSMITH BA'56 ■ PAMELA GOLDSMITH-JONES BA'S6, MASS ■ VICTOR
GONCALVES BASc's7 ■ JAIME GONZALEZ MASc'03, MBA'oS ■ GEOFFREY GOODALL BA'54, MD'58 ■ MAHESH GOPALAKRISHNAN MBA'o, ■ KRISTI GORDON BSc'02 ■ CHRISTOPHER GORMAN BA'<,% MBA'09 ■
RYNA GOSALIA MBA'oS ■ BOB GOTHONG BCom'77 ■ ALEXANDER PHILIP GOUMENIOUK BSc'S,, MDS7, MEDR ■ PATRICK GOWDY MSc'97, DMD'01 ■ B DICKSON GRADY BSc'52 ■ GEOFF GRANT BSc's7,DMD'96 ■
LAUREN GRANT BA'04 ■ LISA GRANT BA'97 ■ SEAN GRANT basc'oo ■ PETER GRANTHAM BA'54, MD'58 ■ GURKAMAL GREWAL BSc'ss DMD'96 ■ DANIEL GRICE BA'03 ■ MURRAY GRIGG BASc'79 ■ STEFAN
GRZYBOWSKI MD'79 ■ CHRISTOPHER GUENARD BA'06 ■ ADERITA GUERREIRO BA'77 ■ SILKE GUMPLINGER DMD'03 ■ HAROLD GUNN BSc'77,MDS, ■ DONALD GUNNING BASc'ss ■ JAMES GURNEY BASc'71
ASHKAN HAFEZI BSc'<,4, DMD'00 ■ ROSHANAK HAFEZI BASc'07 ■ ROBERT HAGER BCom'6i ■ CHRISTOPHER HALL LLM'g, ■ JACKSON HALL BA'07 ■ NICHOLA HALL BA'S% MA'92 ■ NOEL HALL BCOM'52 ■
PRABHJOT H ALLEN BSc'96, DMD'oi ■ SARA H AMIDI BSc'9f, MSc'97, DMD'o, ■ HENRY HAN BA'02 ■ ADAM HANACEK BSc'o, ■ BLAKE HANNA MBA'Si ■ ERIC HANSON BA'73, MEr/04 ■ ERIN HANSON BA'oS ■ SOPHIA
HAQUE BCoM'07 ■ DONALD HARDER BMv?7s ■ THERESA HARDING BA99, MA'04 ■ MATTHEW HARPER basc'oo ■ GREGORY HARRINGTON BA'75 MD'79 ■ CHERYL HARRIS MBA'02 ■ KRISTEN HARVEY BA'04 ■
SALIM HASSAN BCom'o6 ■ MICHELLE HASSEN BA'04 ■ ANDREW HAUGHIAN MBA'07 ■ DARRYL HAWKES BASc's, ■ GWEN HAWORTH BA95, Djp>97, MFA'07 ■ IAN HAYES BA'72, MBA7S ■ PETER HEBB BCom'63 ■ ALEXANDRE HEBERT MBA09 ■ DONALD HEDGES MD'S3 ■ DAVE HEIKKILA ■ HUGH HEMPHILL BASc's4 ■ MICHAEL HENNIGBCom'o4 ■ TIMOTHY HENSCHEL BA'90 ■ THOMAS HEPPNER BMvs'7% LLD'97 ■ ALEXANDRA HERBERTSON DMD'90 ■ SAMANTHA HERON ■ CHRISTINE HIBBERD ■ WENDY HIEBERT BA'02 ■ ZOE HIGGS BA'06, Bfij'o7 ■ DANIEL HILDEBRAND BASc'ss ■ WENDY HILLMAN BA99 ■ FARZANA
HIMANI BA'07 ■ STEPHEN HINDMARCH MBAS, ■ ALIYA HIRJI BA'oS ■ BARBARA HISLOP B Home £c>76, Djp'Sj ■ ANTHONY HO BSc'9f ■ WENDY HO BASc'97, MENc'97 ■ SUE HOANG BA'03 ■ FRASER HODGE BASc'6%
LLB'9,, LLM'oS ■ JOHN HOFFMEISTER BA'67 ■ PAUL HOLLANDS BCW79 ■ WILLIAM HOLMES MBA97 ■ ELLIOT HONG BASc'gS ■ JOSEPH HOUSSIAN MBA73 ■ MAUREEN HOWE PhD's7 ■ LORNA HRUBY BA'So,
MD-S4 ■ IGNATIUS HSU BCom'oo ■ BOBBY HUANG BA'09 ■ FRANK HUBERBASc'So,MEnc'S3,MBA'9i ■ NATASHA HUDDABA'05 ■ CRAIG HUDSON bcom'oo ■ ANDREW HUGHES CrjiT'02 ■ PAUL HUGHES BASc'04, MASc'oS
■ TYLER HUGHES BSc'oi ■ PEI HUI BCom'o6 ■ STEPHEN HUI BCom'oo ■ VIVIEN HUI BASc'06 ■ DENNIS HUMMERSTON MBAoS ■ JOHN HUNG MBA'S4 ■ JONATHAN HUNG ■ GEORGE HUNGERFORD LLB'06 ■ JASON
HUNNISETT BA'96 ■ KRISTEN HUSKINS BMra'oo, Bfij'oi ■ PETER HUTCHINSON BHvu Kmetics'sS, MA'oo, PhD'o6 ■ JANET HWANG BSc'ss   WILLIAM INKSTER DMD'76 ■ BARRY IRISH MD'6S ■ RUSSELL IRISH BASc's,
■ CHERALYN ISCHE BA'oS ■ M THERESA ISOMURA BSc'7s,MD-79 ■ KIMIHISAITO BASc'7s JUSSIJ AAKKOLA BASc'ss, MASc'gS, MBA'04 ■ COLIN JACK BA'o3,Bfij'o4 ■ CATHY JACKSON Djp'79, BA'99 ■ LOUISE JACKSON
BSc'ss ■ MICHAEL JACOBS BASc's, ■ NICOLA JAMES BSc'76, MD'Si ■ FRANCES JANG BSc'7s, MD'Sj ■ OMIRA JANMOHAMED BCom'o4 ■ ELENA JANSSEN BA'oS ■ M GAIL JARISLOWSKY BA'60 ■ NELSON J ATEL BSc'gS
■ MICHAL J AWORSKI BA'00, LLB'o; ■ TINA JENG ■ JAMES JIAM BCoM'94, MBA'9S ■ JERRY JIM BCom'S6 ■ IVAN JIN BSc'm ■ BARRY JINKS BSc'74, BASc'Sf ■ LENNARD JOE BSC'97 ■ JACOB JOH BSc'OO ■ STEPHEN JOHAL
DMD'99 ■ BRIAN JOHNSON BASc'71 ■ CARLENE JOHNSON BSc'9s ■ CHESTER JOHNSON BCom>46 ■ LINDSAY JOHNSON BA'07 ■ WENDY JOHNSON BA'01 ■ EWEN JOHNSTON BCWS2 ■ DAVID JONES BSc'67, MD>
■ RICHARD JUREN BSc'7s, BASc'79 PHILOMENA KAAN MSc'9s, PhD"o2 ■ ADI KABAZO MBAoS ■ DANIEL KAH BSc'96, MSc'w, DMD'o, ■ MEGAN KALAMAN BA'05 ■ SHARON KALER BSc'oS ■ CATHERINE KALKE
MBA'g3 ■ REBECCA KAN Djp'So, BSc'09 ■ NAFEESA KARIM BA'04 ■ GORDON KEEP MBAS, ■ JENNIFER KELLY DMD'oS ■ PETER KENDALL BMus'g, ■ WILLIAM KENDRICK BASc'73 ■ MICHELLE KEONG BA'oS ■
MANDY KERL ANN BSc'82, BSc'S6 ■ ASHLEY KERR MBA'09 -JAMES KERR BA'68 ■ ELIZABETH KERSHAW BA'06 ■ THOMAS KEYWORTH MBA'00 ■ NISHA KHAREBA'9S,B£d'o2,M£d'oS ■ RAMITPAL KHURANA DMD'oS
■ BRAD KIELMANN BA'04 ■ GENNY KIM BA'91, LLB'9S ■ KAY KIM BSc'ss ■ ADRIAN KIMBERLEY BCom'S6 ■ ROBERT KING BMra> -JOSHUA KITSUL BCom'o7 ■ NANCY KLASSEN BA'01 ■ H ARPRIT KLER BSc'9o, DMD'94
■ KRIS KLIMEK DMD>9S ■ LYALL D KNOTT BCom'7i, LLB'72 ■ NICOLE KOHNERT BASc's, ■ VICTOR KOK BA99 ■ IVO KOKAN BASc'Sf ■ POLINA KONSTANTINOVA BCom>oS ■ MARK KORNELL MBA'07 ■ JOHN
KORSRUD BMm'Sg ■ VLADIMIR KRAVTCHENKO MSc'm ■ KOLIN KRIITMAA BH™KmErjcs'oi, MHK'04 ■ TIMOTHY KUCHER LLB'91 ■ FRANK KUELZER MBA'o, ■ ANDREW KWAN ■ DAVID KWAN BCom'oo ■ NICHOLAS KWAN BHK'w    MICHAEL LAANELA BA'97, W°* ■ ALICE LABERGE MBA'S, ■ BRENDA LAI BA'oS ■ WENDY LAI Bsc'07 ■ WINNIE LAI-FONG BASc'ss, MASc'g, ■ KIMBERLEY LAING BSc'04 ■ ADA LAM BA'04, LLB'07
■ ELLEN LAM BSc'o,, BSc'oS ■ MIRANDA LAM LLB'02 ■ PHOENIX LAM BA'06 ■ PETER LANDO BA7S, MASS ■ JESSICA LANGELAAN BSc'o,, MBAo9 ■ CARLA LANGHORST MBAog ■ DENISE LARONDE BA'SS, MSc'o; ■
KIM LARSEN BA'07 ■ CHARLES LASZLO ■ GARY LAU MBA'06 ■ SHARON LAU Bsc'oo, BEd'oi, MA'07 ■ NIKOLAS LAUFER-EDEL BCom"oS ■ ROBYN LAUGHLIN BA'oS ■ RYAN LAUWERS BSc'9% DMD"o4 ■ SHAYLA LAWRENCE BSc'oo ■ FRANCES LAWSON Djp'7i ■ SHEILA LAYCOCK BA'91, MEd'o7 ■ ARI LAZER BA'07 ■ MATTHEW LEA BASc'07 ■ ANNA LEE MSc's7 ■ CARMEN LEE BA'01 ■ CAROL LEE BCom'Si ■ CHRISTINE LEE
BA9S ■ DAVID LEE BASc'S9 ■ FELICIA LEE BASC'99, MBA'06 ■ FREDERICK LEE BASS ■ GRAHAM LEEDMD'7S ■ GRAHAM LEE BCom's7, Djp'90 ■ GUINEVERE LEE BSc'04, MSc'oS ■ HENRY LEE BMvs'g, -JOHN LEE BASc's,
■ JOO KYUNG LEE BCom"o7 ■ LILY LEE BSN'56 ■ MICHELLE LEE BCOM'92 ■ ROBERT LEE BCOM'56, LLD'96 ■ RODERICK LEE BEA'07 ■ TERRY LEEBSc'07 ■ VAN PAUL LEE BCom"s7 ■ YONG LEE BASc'oi ■ ZACHARY LEE
BSc'Sg, MASc'91 ■ DAVID LEGG BCom'S2, MBA'90 ■ STEFFEN LEHMANN BA'04 ■ JO-ANNA LEIN BSW'g7 ■ OLAF LEIREN BA'97, MA'00 ■ PETER LEITCH BCom>79 ■ GLADIS LEMUS PhD-o3 ■ KIT LEONG BASc'9, ■ CONNIE
LEUNG BASc'96, MBA'00 ■ DALLAS LEUNG BCoM'94 ■ ROWENA LEUNG BA'03 ■ SOPHIA LEUNG BSW64 Cept'66 ■ STEPHEN LEUNG BSc'7s, DMD'79 ■ VIVIAN LEUNG BSc>o6 ■ VIVIEN LEUNG BA93 ■ WILLIAM LEVINE
BA'63 ■ DAVID LEWIS BSc'9f ■ SONIA LEZIY Dip'93 ■ DALON LI ■ KATHREEN LIAO BA'01 ■ WALLEY LIGHTBODY BA'56, LLB',9 ■ PHILIP LIND BA'66, LLD'02 ■ AUDREY LINDSAY BSc'69 ■ T BARRIE LINDSAY BCW5S ■
T LORNE LINDSAY B£d>72, MEd'9, ■ JOYCE LING BSc'So, DMD'S4 ■ ANNA LIU ■ RICHARD LIU BA93 ■ GRACE LO BA99 ■ NATHANIA LO BA'06 ■ QUEENY LO BSc'07 ■ VICTORIA LOHVIN MBA'oi ■ ANGELINA LOO
DMD% ■ TRUDY LOO BA'04, MA'05 ■ DIANE LOOMER BMra'S2 ■ JUSTIN LOPRESTI BCom"o7 ■ TREVOR LORD MBA'06 ■ LENORE LOUIE BSc'g7, MSc'oo, DMD'04 ■ TIMOTHY LOUMAN-GARDINER BA'04, LLB'07 ■
HEATHER LOVELACE MSc'02 ■ GRAHAM LOVELY BASc'oS ■ SHARON LOWE BSN'92 ■ FRANCOIS LUCAS MBA'06 ■ JENNY LUM BCom'o6 ■ CYNTHIA LUO BA'oS ■ PETER LUTWYCHE PHD'93 ■ PETER LUU DMD'04 ■
ADAM LYLE DMD'02 GERALD MA BCOM'90 ■ MELISSA MA BCom'9S ■ ROBERT MACDONALD BCom'So ■ KENNETH MACGOWAN BCom'46 ■ BERNARD MACHT BCom"S6, BEd'9i ■ GORDON MACKAY BASc's, ■
SEAN MACKENZIE MBA'sf ■ DAVID MACLAREN BA'94 ■ ROY MACMILLAN BASc'71 ■ DEBRA MACNEIL Dip-76 ■ JAMES MADELEY BASc's, ■ LEONEL MADRUGA BASc'oi, MBA'07 ■ MARK MADRYGA BSc'S6 ■ JAY
MAGEE BA'97 ■ ROBIN MAH BA'Si ■ KEVIN MAHON BCom'S2 ■ DAVID MAIN BSc's7, MBA'90 ■ ERNEST MAK MSc'77 ■ MICHAEL MAK BCoM'97 ■ ROBIN MAK BSc'02, DMD'06 ■ SUNNY MAK BA'99, MSc'07 ■ MALCOLM
MAN BSc'91, MBA'oi ■ AKIFF MANJI BSc'oS ■ TASNEEM MANJI DMD'97 ■ AMARJIT MANN BSc'97, MBAo, ■ ALLEN MANSER BCom'o6 ■ JOHN MANSON ■ JESSE MARCHAND BA'06 ■ JORDAN MARR BSc'06 ■ MICHAEL MARTIN BCom'oo ■ PAUL MARTIN BCom>9S ■ GREGORY MASON BASc'07 ■ JOHN MASTERSON BSc'7}, MD'77 ■ MAIZITUN MAT YA BA'94 ■ STEVEN MATTHEWS BSc'77 ■ REBECCA MATTS BA'97 ■ KONRAD
MAUCH BASc'77, MASc'Sf ■ R. H. MAWHINNEY BA'94 ■ DASHMEET SINGH MAYAL MBA'oS ■ MIGUEL MAZA Y FERRER MBA'09 ■ MERILEE MCCAFFERY BA'06 ■ BLAIR MCCARRY BASc'71 ■ JOHN MCCARTER
BAS3 ■ SARAH MCCARTHY MSc>o6, MBA'oS ■ BRYAN MCCARTY MBASS ■ HEATHER MCCOLL BSc'99 ■ LEANNE MCCONNACHIE MSc'07 ■ JOHN MCCORMACK BA'69 ■ NATALIE MCCORMICK BSc'07 ■ MARK
MCCOY BCOM'06 ■ DUNCAN MCCUE LLB'96 ■ ROBERT MCDIARMID BA'72, LLB'7, ■ TAMARA MCDONALD B£d'96 ■ WILLIAM MCDONALD DMD'77, MD'Si ■ IAN MCDOUGALL BASc'97 ■ JAMES MCEWEN BASc'71,
PHD'75 ■ JOHN MCEWEN BCOM'75 ■ ANDREW MCFADYEN BASc'Sf ■ BRIAN MCGAVIN BCom'62, LLB'6, ■ JAMES MCGRATH BEd'o, ■ MICHAEL MCGREER BA'oS ■ CATHRYN MCGREGOR BSc'7s, DMD'So ■ MARI-
ELA MCILWRAITH BA9S, MBA09 ■ CHRISTIANE MCINNES BA'oS ■ DIANA MCKENZIE BA'06 ■ DANIEL MCKERRACHER BASc'7, ■ TERENCE MCKIMM BASc'ss ■ SHAUN MCKINLAY BEA'oS ■ LESLEY MCKNIGHT
BA'97 ■ BEVERLEY MCLACHLIN LLD'90 ■ NICOLE MCLOUGHLIN BA'02, LLB'o, ■ CHRISTOPHER MCNALLY BASc'gS, MBA'o, ■ STEPHEN MCSHERRY MBA'04 ■ BRIAN MEAKIN BCom'So ■ JAMES MEEKISON BA'61,
MA'62 ■ TAMARA MELCK LLB'97, MBA'06 ■ MAICO MELO MSc'99, DMD'o, ■ SHELLY MESSENGER BScD'99 ■ JOHN METRAS MBA'91 ■ LOUIS METZNER BSc'67, DMD'72 ■ CATHY MEYER DipV ■ MONIQUE MILES
BSc'07 ■ ANDREW MILL BASc's,, MASc's, Dip-92 ■ BRUCE MILLER BASc's, ■ CLAYTON MILLER BSc'oo, BEd'oi ■ MARK MILLER BASc's7, MASc'go ■ JULIE MILLIGAN MD'99 ■ MELISSA MILLIGAN ■ KIMBERLY MILNES
BSc'S,, MBASS ■ SANDRA MIMIC BA'06 ■ GRACE MIN BCom'oS ■ KEITH MINIELLY BASc',s ■ LINDA MINT BHE> ■ GREGORY MITCHELL BA'00 ■ KYLE MITCHELL BCOM'65, LLB'66 ■ PAUL MITCHELL BCom"7s, LLB'79
■ ABIDAH MOHAMMAD BA'07 -JULIA MONTGOMERY BA'57 ■ BARRON MOO BCom>S6 ■ KWANG MOON MASc'76 ■ THOMAS MOONEN DMD'S7 ■ DAWN MOONEY BA'03 ■ STEPHANIE MOONEY BA'06, BEd'oS ■
JENNY MORGAN DMD'91 ■ SCOTT MORGAN BASc'ss, MASc'94 ■ SARAH MORGAN-SILVESTER BCom"S2 ■ DONNA MOROZ BA'66, Cerj'6S ■ KEITH MORRISON BASc'6,, MBA6S ■ MICHAEL MORTENSEN MA'97 ■
CHRISTOPHER MOULSON MBA'04 ■ DAVID MOWAT BCom"7s ■ VLATKO MRSIC MBA'oS ■ KEVIN MUELLER BCom>o3 ■ NIMISHA MUKERJI BA'06 ■ DAVID MULLEN BCom'7s ■ AMANDA MURDOCH BA'03 ■ JASON
MURRAY BA9S MOUNIR NADER BSc'94, MBA'99 ■ DALJIT NAGRA BSc'99, DMD'02 ■ EYOB NAIZGHI MA'Sf ■ HEDIEH NAJAFI MA'06 ■ EMILY NAKAI BA'96, MA'03 ■ COLIN NAM BCoM'93, LLB'97 ■ NAZANIN NA-
RANI MSc/Dip-oi ■ NAWAAZ NATHOO BSc'06 ■ RANDENE NEILL BA'91 ■ BILL NELEMS MEn'gS ■ SARAH NELEMS BA'S7 ■ GREGORY NELSON BSc'7s, DMD'Sj, MSc's7 ■ JODY NELSON MEn'g, ■ BRADLEY NEWBY
BCoM'91 ■ CLAIRE NEWELL BA'92 ■ BRYAN NEWSON BA7o ■ ANITA NG BA'oS ■ ELLIOT NG BA'02, MA'03 ■ FLORENCE NG BCom>99 ■ LAM NG BA'00 ■ MATTHEW NG BSc'97, DMD'o, ■ PATRICK NG BA'06 ■ SAMSON
NG BSc'9s DMD'02, MSc'04 ■ VINCENT NG BA'03 ■ MAY NGAI BSc'04 ■ ALAN NGO BASc'04 ■ RISKA NGUDJIHARTO BSc'07 ■ MURRAY NICHOL MMv?96 ■ CATHLEEN NICHOLS BSc'S,, MSc'g, ■ WILLIAM NIKOLAI
BA'So,MEd'S6, Dip-92, MLIS'oS ■ DANIEL NOCENTEBA'76 ■ NATASHA NORBJERGBA'04 ■ REGINALD NORDMAN BASc'7, ■ DAVID NORDQUISTBSc'9s ■ TERI-LEE NORFOLK Dip-S4, DMD'92 ■ MARK NORRIS DMD'79
■ M NOURI DMD'94, MSc'04 ■ MASOUMEH NOURI MSc'o,, Dip'05 ■ AMIR NOVIN BA'04 ■ ROBERT NUTTALL BSc'04, MBA'09 ■ ANGELINE NYCE BSc'oo, LLB'03 THOMAS O'BRIEN BASc'7o, MASc'74, DMD'7S ■ MALLORY O'CONNOR BA'91 ■ ALISON OGDEN BA'97, B£d'99,MEd'o6 ■ GINA OGILVIEMSc'oi ■ BAHA OHCEBOLMBA'02 -JULIO CESAR OLIVA SOTO MBA'09 ■ RICHARD OLIVER BSc'S,, BSWS9,MEd'9, ■ BRENT OLUND
BASc'96, MEng"97 ■ JOHN O'NEILL BCom% ■ DIANNE ONG BCoM'95 ■ LINDA ONG BA'94 ■ THEODORE ONG BCOM'90 ■ MARK OORD BASc'94 ■ FOTINI ORFANOU BA'97 ■ PATRICIA ORMEROD Dip'ss, BA9S, MA'02 ■
GREGORY ORYALL BASc'71,MASc'7, ■ PATRIC OUELLETTE MASc'91, PHD'96 ■ STEPHEN OWEN LLB'72 JONATHAN PAGTAKHAN BA9S ■ SUSAN PAISH BCom'Si, LLB'Si ■ BHAGAT PALLANBASc',s ■ KAMALDEEP
PANAG DMD'oS ■ JOHN PARK ■ MELISSA PARKER BA'05 ■ PATRICK PARKER BCom>6S, MBA'69 ■ SHIRLEY PARKS LLB'91 ■ HUGO PASSARELLO LUNA BA'05 ■ RUSSELL PATRICK BA'67 ■ TANYA PAZ BA'94 ■ DIANA
PEABODY BSc'91 ■ GARY PEARSON BCom'Si ■ REBECCA PEARSON MBA'oS ■ SCOTT PECKFORD ■ ALI PEJM AN BCoM'94 ■ RICK PELESH YTYK BASc>9i ■ GLEN PENNERBA'SS ■ MICHAEL PEPLINSKI MBA'92 ■ ALEXANDRA PERCY BA'05 ■ SARA-ANN PEREIRA BA'04 ■ BARBARA PESUT MSN'97, PhDVi ■ STEVEN PETERSSON BA'97, MA'o, ■ KEVIN PHILLIPS DMD'S7 ■ SCOTT PHILLIPS BASc'Sg ■ JUDITH PIGGOTT BAS9 ■ GERALD
PINTON BCOM'75 ■ MARIANA PIRES BA'05 ■ LINDSAY PLAMONDON BA'06 ■ PAUL PLANIDIN BA5S ■ ALBERT PLANT BCOM'55 ■ GEORGE PLANT BASc',o ■ RONALD PLOWRIGHT BSc'97 ■ LINDSAY POCOCK BA'05
■ GERALD PODERSKY-CANNON BA'7o, MA'7g ■ IRENE POETRANTO BA'07 ■ KATE POLSKY BMra'90 ■ LEANNE POON BCom>o6 ■ KARISHMA POONAWALA BA'07, BEn'og ■ HARKAMAL POWAR BSc'oS ■ KATHRYN
POWERS BA% ■ GARY POWROZNIK BCom>74 ■ CARLEE PRICE BCW96 ■ SCOTTFORD PRICE BA'06 ■ STEPHEN PRICE BA'03 ■ ROSS PRITCHARD BASc's, ■ AJAY PURI BSc'o,, MHAo, ■ ROY PURSSELL BSc'77, MD'79
WEI QIN ■ SANDY QUEK BSc'S,, DMD'S9 ■ DIXIE QUINTANILLA MBA'07 ■ ASA QUON BSc'So, DMD'SS, MLIS'o, WAYNE RAINS BASc'7, ■ FLORAZA RAJOO BCW02 ■ BENJAMIN RAMEAU BCom'o4 ■ PARIMAL
RANA BSc'9,, BSc'9f ■ KRISTINE RANDALL BA'05 ■ CATHERINE RANKIN BA'04 ■ EIMAN RAOUF BSc'o,, BSc'04 ■ AKASH RATTAN BCom'oi ■ AMARJEET RATTAN BA'75 ■ MARK RATZLAFF BA'07 ■ MANOJKUMAR
RAVAL MD-gS ■ IRFHAN RAWJI BCom'oo ■ KARL REARDON BASc'S6 ■ MARK REDER BAS6 ■ ANNE-JACQUELINE RELOVA BSc'gS ■ ANN REMEDIOS BA'S6 ■ GEOFFREY REMPEL BA'96, Bfij'97, MA'01 ■ ERIN RENNIE
BA99, MA'01 ■ ELIZABETH RICHARDS BA'07 ■ WILLIAM RICHARDSON BASc's, ■ ERIKA RICHMOND BA'07 ■ DMITRY RIFTIN BASc'97 ■ JOSEPH RINGWALD BASc'ss ■ LAUREN ROBERTS BA'06 ■ IAN ROBERTSON
BSc"S6, BASS ■ REBECCA ROBERTSON BSc'S, ■ DOUGLAS ROBINSON BCom"7i, LLB'72 ■ JULIE ROBINSON BA'02 ■ RONALD ROGERS BCom'ss ■ DAVID ROMALO MASc'ss ■ WENDY RONDEAU DMD'79 ■ LARS RON-
NING BASc:97 ■ TODD ROOKER BCOM'90 ■ THOMAS ROOZENDAAL DMD'o, ■ DEBBIE ROQUE BA'02 ■ AMOURA ROSE ■ WILLIAM ROSEBUSH DMD'Sj ■ ALEXANDER ROSENCZWEIG BSc'96, DMD'02 ■ SHIRLEY
ROSS BSN'92 ■ DENNIS ROUNSVILLE BSc'7s ■ LEE-ANN ROWAN BA'03 ■ JAIME RUIZ VIVANCO MBA'07 ■ DAVID RUSH BCom>s3, LLB'Sf ■ KEVIN RUSH BSc'So, MBA'S, ■ BEN RUTLEDGE BCom'o6 ■ DAVID RYAN BA'02
■ LISA RYAN BASS, MBA97 ■ MICHAEL RYAN BCoM'53 ANMOLE SAHOTA BSc'02, Bfij'03, DMD'07 ■ KOZUE SAITO MEd'o3 ■ DEREK SAKAMOTO BASc'94 ■ SHUBHAYAN SANATANI BSc'Sg, MD'93 ■ AARON SANDERSON BA'09 ■ LORI SANTOS DMD'9S ■ PETER SAULNIER BA95, MBA97 ■ DOUG SAVAGE ■ BARBARA SCHRODT BPF51 ■ JENNIFER SCOTT BSc'o, ■ KEVIN SCOTT BASc'Sg ■ NANCY SCOTT DMD'So ■ NICHOLAS
SEDDON BHK'02, DMD'06 ■ SATNAM SEKHON BHE'S, ■ MARINA SELEZENEVA BCom"o7 ■ MARIA SEMENOVA BCom'oS ■ ANTE SEMREN BSc'oi, DMD'06 ■ PHILIP SEO BCom'o3 ■ JAMES SEVERS DMD'76 ■ LEILA
SHAHBAZI ■ ALI SHAHKARAMI NOORI MASc'99, PhD'o6 ■ KAVITA SHARMA LLM'S6 ■ DONALD SHAW BASc's, ■ ELAINE SHE DMD'S7 ■ SHARON SHEPHERD BSc'73 ■ ROBIN SHEREMETA BASc's, ■ MAJID
SHERKAT DMD'92 ■ STUART SHERWOOD BA'71 ■ RANDAL SHEW DMD'94 ■ MARIA-TERESA SHEWARD BA'So, LLB'96 ■ WESLEY SHIELDS LLWS9 ■ KENJI SHIMIZU DMD'79 ■ SAJIDA SHROFF BA'90, BEd'9, ■ THOMAS
SIDDON ■ RAVINDER SIDDOO BSc'9,, DMD>95 ■ MARIA SILVA MBA'07 ■ SILVIE SILVIE BSc'06 ■ DEANNA SIMMONS BSc'9,, MD'95 ■ CARLA SIMON MBA'o, ■ JESSE SIMS BCom'oo ■ CHARITY SIU DMD'01 ■ JILLIAN
SKEET BA'S, ■ GERALD SKINNER BA'65 ■ ARNOLD SMITH BPF62, MEd'S2 ■ COLIN SMITH BASc'6, ■ DYLAN SMITH BA'01 ■ GREG SMITH BASc'Sg -JASON SMITH BCoM'94 ■ ROBERT SMITH BCom'6S, MBA'71 ■ ROBIN
SMITH BCom'S9 ■ TRACY SMITH BA'96, MFA'02, B£d'oS ■ VANESSA SMITH BA'07 ■ WARREN SMITH LLB'o, ■ TYLER SMYRSKI BCom'oo ■ LEO SMYTH BCom>s3 ■ IAIN SNEE BCom'Si BA'07 ■ JUSTIN SOLAMILLO BA'05 ■
MARCEL SOLYMOSI BSc'9,, Dip'07 ■ STEPHANIE SONG BSc'99, DMD'03 ■ GEORGE SOOKOCHOFF BCoM'75 ■ NIKHIL SOORI MBA'07 ■ KNUTE SOROS BASc'f9 ■ K ANDREA SOUTHCOTT BCom'S2 ■ DAVID SOWDEN
BSc'91, DMD'9S ■ JASON SOWINSKI BCoM'93 ■ KENNETH SPENCER BASc'67, nxr7i ■ AMELIA SPINELLI BA'02 ■ FREDERICK SPOKE BSc'70, MBA'77 ■ ANDRIA SPRING BA'05 ■ SURINA SPROUL BCom>o4 ■ CHRISTOPHER
STAIRS MBA96 ■ THOMAS STANDERWICK BCOM'55 ■ WILLIAM STAYER MBASS ■ NATALIA STEPANOVA MBA'04 ■ SHANNON STERLING BA'01, B£d'o3 ■ MICHAEL STEVEN BA'73 ■ THEODORE STEVENSON BA'43
■ GAYLE STEWART BA'76, MA'oS, MA'oS ■ JUSTINE STEWART MD'96 ■ WADE STOLZ BBA'07 ■ DAVID STOWE BCom'5s ■ NORMAN STOWE BA'77 ■ JULIE STRANGELAND ■ MARGIT STROBL BSc'oS ■ ARDEN STYLES
MBA'00 ■ STEPHEN SUE DMD'73 ■ SUSAN SUMI Djp>74 ■ LIE SUNARYO BASc'o, ■ SUSANNE SUNELL MA'96, £DLFo3 ■ LISA SUPEENE Djp-Sj, BSc'oi ■ SOPHIA SU ■ KARAN SURI BA'oS ■ SHAWN SWALLOW Dip>o4 ■
PHILIP SWIFT BSc'7,, MBA7, LOUISE TAGULAO BA'02 ■ REZA TAHERNIA DMD'06 ■ ASHLEY TAIT BMra'97, MBA'07 ■ LINDA TALBOT BSc'99 ■ JOHN TAM BASc'04 ■ MATTHEW TAM BASc'96 ■ STEFANNY TAM
BComV ■ BEVERLEY TAMBOLINE BA',,, MD'60 ■ HERBIE TAN BCoM'99 ■ KAREN TAN BCoM'93 ■ PETER TANAKA BCom> ■ BONGY TANG BASc'oo, MBA'oS ■ MAY TANG BSN'04 ■ WENDY TANG BSc'97, DMD'02 ■
GURMINDER TATRA DMD'03 ■ HEIDI TAYLOR LLB'03 ■ LINDA TAYLOR BSc'7s, DMD'Si ■ CARA TENCH BA'97 ■ ADRIAN TENT MBA'o, ■ BRUCE TERRY MBA'So ■ JAY THAKORE BCom'oS ■ CALVIN THAM DMD'02 ■
GORDON THOM BCom>56,M£d'7i ■ DARYL THOMAS BASc'7s ■ GREGORY THOMAS BP£'72,MP£'77 ■ NORMA-JEAN THOMPSON BCom'oS ■ SYDNEY THOMSON MD% ■ SALLY THORNEBSN'79, MSN'S, ■ ANDREW
THURLOW MBASS ■ LAURA THURNHEER BCom's4, MBA'07 ■ THOMAS TIMM BASc'7s ■ CHRISTINA TINSON BA'02 ■ JOANITA TJ ANDRAWINATA BA'04 ■ ALVIN TONG BASc"o2 ■ CHRISTINA TONG BSc'S, ■ DAVID
TONG BCom>96 ■ DAWNA TONG BAS9, LLM'96, PhD'oj ■ KAVINDER TOOR BA'99, BEd'oo ■ LISSETTE TORRES BA'04 ■ ILDIKO TOTH BSc'02 ■ BRENDA TOURNIER BAS2, MBA'Sf ■ SHELDON TRAINOR-DEGIROLAMO
BCom'ss ■ ROY TREASURER BCom^s ■ SVETLANA TREY BSc'03, MA'06 ■ DOUGLAS TRONSGARD MBA'9, ■ SHAYNE TRYON BA'00 ■ ANDREW TSANG BSc'96, DMD'97 ■ J ACLYN TSANG BA'06 ■ PHOEBE TSANG DMD'02
■ VALERIE TSE BA'93 ■ STEPHEN TSUEN BCom"o6 ■ BARRY TSUJI BASc'Sg, MASc'94 ■ ROBERT TULK BCom"6o ■ BARBARA TULLY BA'91, MA'96 ■ DUANE TUP CHONG BCom>o4 ■ KENNETH TURNBULL BASc'60, MD'67 ■
JOHN TURNER BA'49, LLD'94 ■ LOUANNE TWAITES BSc',3 ■ JONATHAN TWIDALE BASc'99 WENDY VALDES BA'79 ■ ANIBAL VALENTE BASc'79 ■ AMINA VALLI-HASHAM BComV; ■ KAREN VAN DER HOOP
BSc'79 ■ ERIC VANCE BA'75, MA'Si ■ BRUNO VANDER CRUYSSEN BCoM'91 ■ ASHOK VARMA BSc'79, DMD'Sj ■ PRAVEEN VARSHNEY BCom"s7 ■ JIM VAVRA BCom"s4 ■ NATALIA VENIDA BCom>9S ■ JANE VERMEULEN
BSc'gS ■ ALFRED VICKERY BA'9, ■ VIJAYANTH VIVEKANANDAN BASc'03, MASc'06 ■ ALEXANDER VON KALDENBERG BA'07 ■ MARK VON SCHELLWITZ BA'S, ■ NIKO VUJEVIC BA'00 GAIL WADA BA'91 ■
RICHARD WADGE MD'70 ■ MARISSA WAGHORN BA'05 ■ MARION WAHL BEd'77 ■ DEBORAH WAINWRIGHT BA'96, MA'04 ■ JULIE WALCHLI BA'90, MA'93 ■ MARSHA WALDEN BCom'So ■ JEFFREY WALDMAN
BCom'oo ■ VANESSA WALROND BA'05 ■ ANDY WANG ■ CHARLENE WANG BCom'o6 ■ LINA WANG BSc'09 ■ PAUL WANG BA93 ■ RICHARD WANG MBA'oS ■ TERENCE WANG BSc'oo, B£d'o2 ■ IAN WARNER BCom'S9 ■
MITCH WARNER BEA'07 ■ CHARLOTTE WARREN BCom>5S ■ BETH WATT MD'S3 ■ WILLIAM WAUNG BASc'77, MBA'S, ■ ROBERT WAY MBA'07 ■ MATTHEW WEALICK BSc'oi ■ PAUL WEARMOUTH BASc's, ■ MEI-YI
WEE BA'99, MEd'oj ■ RONALD WEISMILLER BASc's, ■ IAN WELLS BA'05, Dip'o6 ■ KATHY WENINGER MEd'o2 ■ WILLIAM WEYMARK BASc'77 ■ SHANA WHITE BMm'7o ■ KARINA WICKLAND BSc'oo ■ ANNE WICKS
BCom"7s, MSc-S2 ■ COLIN WIEBE Dip'97, MSc'97 ■ KENNETH WIECKE BASc's4 ■ NILMINI WIJEWICKREME MSc'90, PhD'97 ■ GORDON WILCOX BASc',s ■ JOHN WILCOX BSc'24, MSc',, ■ CINDY WILKER BCom's4 ■
DAVID WILKIE MD'78 ■ TODD WILKIE BCom"s7 ■ WAYNE WILSON BA'S4, MAS9 ■ PAMELA WILLIAMS BSN'7S, DMD'SS ■ ANNE WINTERS BASS ■ FREDERICK WITHERS BCom>77 ■ PETER WITT BASc'ss ■ GERALD
WITTENBERG DMD'77 ■ ANTHONY WONG BSc'7s, DMD'76 ■ BRIAN WONG DMD'76 ■ DARIN WONG BA'05 ■ EDMOND WONG PHD'99 ■ ELLEN WONG BSc'96, DMD'00 ■ GLENN WONG BCom'So ■ GRACE WONG
BEd'74, MBAS, ■ GRAHAM WONG BSc'91, MD'95 ■ JACKIE WONG BCom's5 ■ KENNETH WONG BSc's3 ■ PETER WONG BSc'7g ■ PETER WONG BSc'97, MSc'o, ■ RICHARD WONG BASc'Sg, MENc'93, MBA'03 ■ SABRINA
WONG BSN'92 ■ SAMANTHA WONG BCom>o6 ■ SHIRLEY WONG BCom'5 6, B£d>63 ■ SZE WING WONG ■ THERESA WONG BSc'73, DMD'76 ■ WILLIAM WONG BSc',9 ■ JONATHAN WOODWARD BSc'o, ■ GERARD
WOOLDRIDGE BA'76, Dip>9o ■ MORDEH AI WOSK BA'72 ■ DUNCAN WRIGHT BA'oS ■ MARION WRIGHT B£d'S6, MED'93 ■ ELLEN WU BSc'99, DMD'03 ■ CHRISTOPHER WYATT BSc'S,, DMD'S6 ■ ADAM WYLIE BSW06,
MSW09 CATHERINE YAMAMOTO BA'9,, BEd'96 ■ JAMES YAN BASc'69, MASc'71, PhD'77 ■ VICTOR YAN BA'04 ■ TRACY YANG MBA'06 ■ WILLIAM YANG BA9S ■ MELISSA YAP BSc'04 ■ DOREEN YASUI BH£'66 ■ NORMAN YATES BSc'79, LLB'S, ■ MAGGIE YAU BA'01, B£d'o2 ■ DARRYL YEA BCom'Si ■ ERNEST YEE BAS3, MA'S7 ■ ALEXANDRA YEUNG BASc'g4 ■ BENJAMIN YEUNG DMDS3 ■ CLAIRE YEUNG BCom%, LLB'ss ■ JEFFREY
YIP BASc'72 ■ KENNETH YIP BASc'72 ■ AMY YIU BSc'o, ■ CECILIA YONG BSc'03 ■ DARYN YONIN BASc'94 ■ CYNTHIA YOO BA'97 ■ CRAIG YOUNGBERG BCoM'93 ■ EUGENIA YU BSc'oo, MSc'03 ■ HELEN YU BSc'97 ■
JOCELYN YU BA'01, BSW04 ■ WARRICK YU BSc'gS, MSc'oo, DMD'o, ■ YVONNE YUAN BSc's7, MSc'90, PhD-9,    YIWEN ZHANG MBA'07 ■ MING ZHAO BSc'oi, DMD'07 ■ XIAO-MING ZHENG MBA'04 ■ KIRK ZHOU MBA'02
■ OLIVER ZIHLMANN BA'05 ■ GLENNIS ZILM BSN'5S ■ KATHLEEN ZIMMERMAN MSc'96 ■ AMBER ZIRNHELT BA'04 ■ GOSIA ZOBEL MSc'07 ■ RONALD ZOKOL DMD'74 ■ UTown@UBC
UBC's experiment in town-building has been bubbling
for twenty years. How has it fared?
ByCHRIS PET
Faculty/staff rental housing at Hawthorne Place
in the old B-lot.
UBC-watchers may remember the controversy
surrounding the university's first foray into
market housing at Hampton Place on the
corner of Wesbrook Mall and 16th Avenue on
the Vancouver campus. The idea of leasing
some of UBC's endowed land to generate
revenue was inflammatory to many people,
especially those living in Vancouver's West Side.
Protestors came in two stripes: one saying
that the university was selling itself out to
developers, the other that the pristine nature
of the campus would be forever compromised
by the destruction of forest.
It's easy to see what they were getting
at. Our campuses pride themselves on their
locations. Promotional materials from every
university unit including student view books,
Continuing Studies pamphlets, web sites,
faculty job prospectuses and this magazine do
not shy away from showing the grand vistas
from UBC's Vancouver campus and the radiant,
wine-growing backdrop of UBC Okanagan.
In the refined parlance of today, we pimp our
campuses shamelessly. And why shouldn't
we? If our locations will woo a top student
or researcher away from the crumbling state
infrastructure of California's universities or the
Toronto dreariness of the U of T or the frozen
urban tundra of McGill, why not? All things
academic being equal, who wouldn't want to
come to UBC?
Protestors' threats to climb the trees and
stop land clearing never came about, and one
Saturday morning the bulldozers moved in
to clear the site of its second growth trees.
Hampton Place was up and running. And,
20 years on, the dent in the forest has all
but disappeared.
Since then, commercial housing has taken off
at UBC. The Official Community Plan (OCP),
which outlined the concept of eight neighbourhoods at UBC has informed the construction
of market, rental and below-market rental
housing across campus, all being marketed
under the banner of UTown@UBC. A visit to its
website (www.planning.ubc.ca) gives a wealth
of information on the planning and execution
of UBC's new community.
The changes are huge: the old B-Lot is
gone, replaced by Hawthorn Place complete
with a replica of the Old Barn for a community
centre. The row of Animal House-era frat
houses is gone, replaced by more respectable
buildings for the Greeks on Wesbrook Mall,
and farther south, just west of Acadia Park,
is the new East Campus neighbourhood with
rental and market units.
Upscale Chancellor Place centres around
the Iona building (the Vancouver School of
Theology) and features rental and market units,
many of them with a $1 million-plus price tag.
The largest neighbourhood is currently under
construction south of 16th between Pacific Spirit
Park and Marine Drive, called Wesbrook Place.
It will feature about 2,500 units split among
market housing, rentals, co-development
(where the university partners with buyers)
and special needs housing. It will also include
the largest commercial area, with food stores,
32    Trek    Summer 2009
Photograph: Tim La shops and a village centre.
University Square (around the War Memorial
Gym) is still in the planning stages, but will
include student housing, a new SUB and an
Alumni Centre. It's envisioned as the new heart
of the Vancouver campus and, already, there's
a new pub and various commercial enterprises
doing brisk business across the street from the
Empire Pool.
As well, space in the academic centre of
campus has been filling up. From the mid
1990s to today, more than 30 new academic
buildings have gone up at UBC, with nearly as
many undergoing major renovations including
the Science Building, Main Library and the Buchanan buildings. It's not hyperbole to suggest
that grads from the 1990s and earlier planning
a visit to the Vancouver campus should get
themselves a map before they venture on
campus so they won't get lost.
There's no doubt that money was one of the
driving forces behind the creation of UTown@
UBC. The university's endowment of land was
originally about 4,500 acres, taking in much of
Pacific Spirit Park and north to Spanish Banks.
That shrank to nearly nothing over the years
until 1957 when WAC Bennett's government
defined the existing campus lands at about
1,000 acres. The purpose of the land was to
supply funding for the university through land
leases and rentals, a way of insuring financial
viability over a long period of time. Land is
leased to developers for 99 years, with funds
raised going directly to the endowment. So far,
the endeavour has raised nearly $300 million
to support UBC's institutional mission. (See
www.universitytown.ubc.ca/endowment.php
for details on UBC's endowment.)
But whatever criticism the university may
have earned for using the land for cash generation, it absolved itself, in many minds, by the
careful, thoughtful and sustainable manner in
which it manages the development. Many other
institutions in similar situations have cut every
corner and squeezed every dime, squandering
whatever good will they might have generated.
In formulating a plan for the land's use, the
OCP is very specific on the conditions of development. These are based on the GVRD (now
Metro Vancouver) Liveable Region strategic
plan and designed to ensure open spaces and
to create "a vibrant and integrated community
on the university campus." Development must
Family housing, and faculty/staff co-development
at Wesbrook Place, south of 16th Avenue at
Wesbrook Mall.
be aimed at reducing single car traffic, include
a large percentage of residents who work
or study at UBC, be roughly 20 per cent
rental and 10 per cent below-market rental for
students and special needs.
This commitment to the concept of open
spaces spurred the university's Board of
Governors to provide a conditional guarantee
that the UBC Farm will continue in its present
form for the foreseeable future. The decision
has helped to make moot some of the most
pointed criticism of the UTown project.
Now, nearly 65 per cent of the people who
live in new UTown residences work or study at
UBC; one thousand of those are faculty and
staff. This has an impact on the carbon footprint
of the Vancouver campus, though the decrease
in single-occupancy vehicle trips (down 14 per
cent) and the increase in transit ridership (up
185 per cent) might have as much to do with
the new student UPass and the high cost of
parking as it does with on-campus living.
Altogether, about 10,000 people live on
the Vancouver campus (which includes about
8,000 living in student residences like Totem
Park). By 2012, the OCP foresees a
population of 18,000, and by 2030, when
construction is complete, more than 24,000
people will live here.
So, were the initial protestors right? Has the
creation of UTown@UBC been an ecological,
social, academic and cultural disaster? The jury
might still be out on that: what the campus
might look like with 24,000 residents on it is
Family housing at Chancellor Place. The Iona
building has been remodelled and still houses the
Vancouver School of Theology.
hard to imagine. But so far it's supplied nothing
but benefits. The new neighbourhoods give the
campus a friendly, village feel; the increase in
foot traffic keeps the campus alive after classes
end; and the sense of community is clearly
growing. Construction has been tasteful and
attractive, suited to the local climate, nicely
landscaped and well-integrated into the rest
of the campus. It doesn't hurt, either, that the
university's endowment has been enhanced,
making sure that the academic mission will
continue to be funded.
There are still many who feel that UTown®
UBC has eroded UBC's purity as an academic
institution, that it has sold its soul to the highest
bidder. But careful planning and an honest eye
to sustainability, accessibility and community
building have, so far, improved the Vancouver
campus' reputation as the best in the country.
Refugees from the world's dowdier campuses
will continue to scour the want ads for hope.
Photographs: Left: Tim Lai, Right: Bayne Stanley
Summer 2009    Trek    33 Little known facts about UBC:
In 1929, a 24-strong herd of Ayrshire cattle
was donated to the university. Only problem
was, the cattle were located in their native
Scotland. That year, intrepid Scot John Young
accompanied the "bonny coos" to Vancouver.
He later became manager of UBC farm.
When UBC's varsity teams were trying to
decide on a nickname, students were asked for
suggestions. These included Seagulls, Golden
Eagles, and the (rapidly dismissed) Sea Slugs
(go Slugs!) Thunderbird- a powerful and
revered creature from indigenous folklore -
proved the strongest contender and was
officially sanctioned as school mascot by
the Kwicksutaineuk Nation in 1948.
When librarian/. T. Gerould was appointed by
first UBC president Frank Wesbrook in 1914 to
travel to Europe and purchase a collection for
UBC's library, the Germans detained him on
suspicion of spying for the British. Their
evidence? He was carrying a site plan for UBC's
proposed Point Grey campus. He was held for
three weeks in Leipzig before being released,
spending part of this time in prison.
The Thunderbirds took on the Harlem
Globetrotters in January, 1946, and won! -
In 1969, UBC Engineers absconded with
Vancouver's beloved nine o'clock gun. For four -
nights the city sat silent, awaiting the return of
its comforting bang.
The first student publication, Anonymous, was '
published in 1916. With such a memorable
name, it's no surprise that within two years the1
nameplate had changed to The Ubyssey.
£hf llEufiisni
Famous people who have attended or graduated from UBC include actress Evangeline Lily
(of Lost fame), pro baseball's Jeff Francis,
environmentalist David Suzuki, prime
ministers John Turner and Kim Campbell and,
of course, Nardwuar the Human Serviette.
The Ladner Clock Tower is 140 feet high and
has 133 bells. (Who knew?)
Agreement to build the Asian Centre was finally
granted when a UBC professor ceremonially
threatened the president at sword point.
Tennessee Williams was an artist in residence
at UBC, circa 1980.
The then-unknown Toronto band, Barenaked
Ladies, headlines the first Arts County Fair.
Sadly, this 16-year tradition came to an end in
2007 after years of losing money.
lessee Williams
UBC is a popular filming location. Famous
on-set visitors include Ben Kingsley, Dennis
Hopper, Jennifer Beals and Isabella Rossellini.
Movies and TV shows featuring backdrops you
may find familiar include The X-Files and
Scooby Doo 2 and the currently airing Harper's
Island (filmed at Cecil Green Park House,
home of UBC Alumni Affairs).
UBC's Chan Centre is shaped like a cello,
Koerner Library like a book, the First Nations
Longhouse like a canoe, the indoor pool like
the head of the Thunderbird, the Biology
building like a cell, and the layout of the
Nitojje Memorial Garden is modelled on the
Milky Way.
34    Trek    Summer 2009  Alumni
[Weekend 2009
Aay, more than 1,500 UBC alumni
and friends descended on the Vancouver
campus to top up on sunshine, music,
food and fun. They chose from more than
75 events ranging from yoga classes to
lectures on astronomy. 1. Professor of Astrophysics Jaymie Matthews
shared discoveries made by the MOST satellite
during one of several Classes Without Quizzes
offered by UBC experts over the weekend.
Designed and built at UBC, MOST is Canada's first
space telescope. While not much bigger than the
telescope used by Galileo it is capable of measurements beyond the abilities of almost every other
observatory in the world.
2. Alumni Weekend saw the launch of four varieties
of UBC Alumni Wine. See www.alumni.ubc.ca/
rewards/wine.php for details on how to order.
Proceeds go towards the construction of a new
Alumni Centre with facilities for the whole campus
community.
3. Alumni, along with friends and family, enjoyed
a BBQ lunch sponsored by Mahony & Sons, with
entertainment that included live music, face painters, balloon artists, magicians and even tooth fairies
from the faculty of Dentistry.
4. A tour of the Life Sciences Centre explained the
green building technologies used in its construction. It is one of the largest buildings in Canada to
achieve LEED® Gold certification in recognition of its
environmental integrity. The centre is an international hub for medical research and education.
5. Alumni enjoyed an afternoon softball game on
the new UBC Fields.
6 and 8. Globe and Mail National Affairs columnist
Jeffrey Simpson, LLD'98, moderated a panel discussion
on the state of the economy. He was joined by
UBC finance professor Maurice Levi; former CEO
of HSBC Bank USA Martin Glynn, MBA'76; and
president and CEO of the Business Council of British
Columbia Virginia Greene, BA'68. (Part of the UBC
dialogues series. See www.alumni.ubc.ca/events/
dialogues. For more info.)
7. Ever wondered how stars shine or why gold and
silver are more precious than carbon and oxygen?
Alumni found the answers to these questions and
more during a tour of TRIUMF, Canada's national
laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics.
9. Alumni tiptoed among the treetops at The
Botanical Garden's new Greenheart Canopy
Walkway, located up to 17.5 metres above the
ground. They had the perfect vantage point from
which to learn about the unique upper layers of the
coastal rainforest ecosystem.
10. Friends, kids and family pets - all were welcome.
11. The sun shone all day and live music from local
band Warless entertained people as they enjoyed a
BBQ lunch.
Summer 2009    Trek    37
i   i-t&i ALUMNI NEWS
Reunions
The Pharmacy Class of i<)j8 held its 30th
anniversary reunion on October 12, 2008, at the
Hilton Vancouver Metrotown. Thirty-four
graduates and 22 spouses attended with Dr. and
Mrs. John McNeill attending as honored guests.
The Class of '49 reunion, chaired by the
Right Honourable John Turner, was held on
May 21 at the University Golf Club. More than
130 alumni and friends attended.
The Masters of Social Work Class of '74
celebrated its 3 5 th anniversary with a pub night
at the University Golf Club, a tour of the Social
Work building and dinner at Watermark
Restaurant on Kits Beach.
The School of Nursing has been celebrating
its 90th anniversary all year, with events
including the annual All Years Nursing
Reunion Luncheon at Cecil Green Park House.
More than 60 alumni, students and faculty
attended. The school is collecting stories from
nursing alumni to celebrate their achievements
and would love to hear from you. Please submit
your "amazing alumni story" by emailing it to
alumni.stories@nursing.ubc.ca.
Congratulations to members of the classes
who celebrated reunions over Alumni Weekend.
It was an honour to welcome you back at this
exciting time of year.
Want to find out if your class is planning a
special celebration? For the most up-to-date
reunion information, visit our website at:
www.alumni.ubc.ca/events/reunions. If you
want to plan a reunion but don't know where
to start you'll find a reunion toolkit there, too.
Or you can contact your faculty alumni officer:
APPLIED SCIENCE: Tracey Charette at
604.822.9454 or alumni@apsc.ubc.ca
DENTISTRY: Jenn Parsons at 604.822.6751 or
dentalum@interchange.ubc.ca
FORESTRY: Jenna McCann at 604.822.8787 or
jenna.mccann@ubc.ca
LAW: Janine Root at 604.827.3612 or
alumni® la w.ubc.ca
MEDICINE: Ann Campbell at 604.875.4411
extension 67741 or med.alumni@ubc.ca
SAUDER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS: Kim Duffell at
604.822.6027 or alumni@sauder.ubc.ca.
You can find the most up-to-date reunion
information on the Alumni Affairs website, or
by contacting Liz King, Senior Alumni Relations Manager, Events at liz.king@ubc.ca,
604.827.5084 or toll free at 800.883.3088.
e Pharmacy Class of 78 celebrating its 30th anniversary reunion.
AGM
Please join us for the 92nd Alumni
Association Annual General Meeting
Thursday, September 10, 2009
Cecil Green Park House
5:30-6:30 Wine & Cheese Reception
6:30-7:30 Business
Please RSVP to Thea at 604.822.8923 or
althea.fletcher@ubc.ca
Alumni Networks
We bid a fond farewell to our dedicated reps in
Boston (Trudy Loo, BA'04, MAAP'05) and
Germany (Steffen Lehman, BA'04). Trudy will be
joining our alumni group in Washington, DC.
We thank them for volunteering with us and
hope both will stay in touch.
Welcome Alexander Li, BSc'oj, BEd'06, joining
Alexandra Leung as co-rep in Chicago.
We're looking for volunteers to build the
alumni networks in Montreal and Boston.
Contact Caely-Ann McNabb at caely-ann.
mcnabb@ubc.ca or 1.800.883.3088.
You can be part of the Alumni Network (aka
alumni branches and chapters) through faculty,
affinity, or regional connections with fellow
alumni. If you want to stay connected to your
student clubs, for example, why not collaborate
with your former club members and form an
affinity network? Your faculty or department
may also have an alumni group.
If you want to connect with fellow alumni
but you live outside the Lower Mainland, there
are more than 50 networks around the globe,
and the list continues to grow (www.alumni.
ubc.ca/connect/networks/index.php). If your
area doesn't have a network, why not start one?
Your Alumni Relations contact can help:
■ 17BC Okanagan:
Brenda at brenda.tournier@ubc.ca
■ L7i?C Vancouver:
Caely-Ann at caely-ann.mcnabb@ubc.ca
■ Asia Pacific Regional Office (Hong Kong):
Mei Mei at meimei.yiu@apro.ubc.ca
All regional network activities are posted on
our website (www.alumni.ubc.ca/events) and if we
have your email address we'll even send you an
invitation! If you're curious about alumni activity
in your area or would like to get involved please
feel free to contact the alumni rep for your region.
38    Trek    Summer 2009 Past Events
UBC Alumni Book Club meetings took place in
February and March. Members enjoyed
reading Murder at the Universe by Daniel
Craig, BA'92 and The Cellist of Sarajevo by
Steven Galloway, BA'98, MA'01. These sessions
were particularly interesting as they were
facilitated by the authors.
In April we took the popular event series,
UBC dialogues, on the road. Calgary Zoo was
the location for a discussion about sustainable
urban growth. UBC dialogues events also took
place in Surrey and Vancouver, bringing
provocative conversations about transportation
and the economic crisis to our Lower Mainland
alumni. Podcasts for all of these events are
available for download (www.alumni.ubc.ca/
connect/podcasts/index.php).
In May, UBC President Stephen Toope
discussed UBC's strategic plan with 100 alumni
and friends in Taipei followed by a small
gathering of alumni in Seoul. He discussed the
Bill Dunsmore, MEd'Ol, is playfully serenaded
by an opera student at the 3rd Annual
Okanagan Alumni & Friends Social in June.
question of planning UBC's future in the face of
challenging economic times.
Later in April, Toronto alumni enjoyed the
annual Great Trekker Luncheon, where they
had the opportunity to hear The Honourable
Roy MacLaren, BA'55 m conversation with UBC
Chancellor Sarah Morgan-Silvester, BCom'82.
At spring graduation we welcomed more
than 6,800 new alumni in 25 graduation
ceremonies on the Vancouver and Okanagan
campuses. As they crossed the stage, each new
alumnus was greeted with a warm welcome
and small gift by a volunteer grad. If you're
interested in helping us welcome new alumni
at our May or November ceremonies, please
contact Matt Corker at 604.827.3293 or
matt.corker@ubc.ca. These are just a few
event highlights from the past few months.
Visit the Alumni Affairs website regularly at
www.alumni.ubc.ca to find out about all
upcoming events.
Students marked their time at UBC Okanagan
with the annual Grad Gala - a party to remember.
Alumni Opportunities
TEDX AND TERRY*
TED is a non-profit devoted to "ideas worth
spreading" and has organized many prominent
speakers, from Al Gore to Jane Goodall. TEDx
is a community program that provides financial
support for other groups organizing events that
spread worthwhile ideas. This year, UBC's
Terry"' project (www.terry.ubc.ca/), which has
a mandate to educate members of the UBC
community on the pressing global issues of our
time, is revamping its Terry Talks speaker series
as a TEDx event. We are looking for a young
alumnus speaker to take the stage alongside
eight undergraduate and graduate students to
share their "next big idea" with UBC. Interested? See www.terry.ubc.ca/terrytalks for
information about last year's event and contact
Matt Corker at matt.corker@ubc.ca or
604.827.3293 for more information about this
October 3 event.
IMAGINE UBC 2.0
Starting this September, the first day of classes
for all Vancouver undergraduates will be
cancelled, allowing senior students to join in
the fun of UBC Imagine orientations. We would
like them to benefit from the insights of alumni
as they prepare for their final year as a student.
If you are interested in being a volunteer on
September 8 please contact Matt Corker at
604.827.3293 or matt.corker@ubc.ca.
slew to the alumni fold, Paul Emerson of Vernon shares his enthusiasm on his way to
receiving his Bachelor of Education (elementary) on graduation day at UBC Okanagan.
:   ■-         -j
Ideas and opinions
about issues that matter
•
•
uzcdiak'gues
UBC is coming to your community
to talk about issues that matter
to you! J
For details visit:
www.alumni.ubc.ca/events/dialogues
THIS SERIES IS SPONSORED BY CBC
Summer 2009    Trek    39 claSSACTS
1950s
Henry Ewert BA'58 received a Historical Award
of Merit at the Vancouver Historical Society's
annual banquet on April 5. The award is given
annually to one or more persons who have
made significant contributions to the understanding and appreciation of Vancouver history.
This award follows hard on the heels of the
publication of the historical society's highly
successful DVD, City Reflections, in which he
played a major role ... In May 2009, John
Gordon BASC'28 was inducted into the Queen's
School of Business Faculty Hall of Fame. The
citation read that "under his leadership as dean,
the school began its transformation to the
world-renowned institution that it has become.
Early in his tenure as dean, he led the creation
of a strategy for the school that emphasized
[its] identification with the university, innovation
and true excellence in both teaching and
research"... Mrs. Sakata's Garden, a painting
by Loraine Wellman BED'jy, was recently
donated to the Richmond Hospital Foundation
and has been installed in the waiting area of the
diagnostics imaging department. The painting
depicts Mrs. Sakata digging in her garden, a
well-loved local landmark, and Wellman feels
her subject represents the contribution of the
Japanese-Canadian people to Richmond.
I96OS
Sophia M.R. Leung BSW'64, MSW'66 has focused
her career in the areas of social work, community
development and public service. Through the
Samantha Bangayan, BSC'OS, recently returned from a six-month work placement in Peru.
I Sophia M.R. Leung
years, she has made significant social and political
contributions to BC and Canada as a medical
social worker, community volunteer, business
consultant and as the first female Asian
Member of Parliament, representing Vancouver
Kingsway. In recognition of her contributions,
she has received many honours, including:
YWCA Women of Distinction, Canada
Volunteer Award, Order of Canada, Honorary
Citizen of Calgary, Queen Elizabeth II Golden
Jubilee Medal and Prime Minister's Citation.
Sophia devoted her life to public service and
was elected to the House of Commons for two
terms (1997-2004). She served as MP and
Parliamentary Secretary for the National
Revenue. In 2004, Sophia did not seek federal
re-election. However, she remained involved in
public service as Special Advisor to the Prime
Minister from 2004-2006. Today she actively
works on international business projects and
facilitates high school and university exchanges
between Canada and China ... On March 26,
2009, Christopher Grant BASc'65, PEng and
Karin Lind MA'68, were married at the home of
the groom's mother in Fort Langley, BC. Karin
and Chris first met at UBC more than 40 years
ago when both were graduate students. They
went their separate ways, Chris working as a
structural engineer and consultant with his own
practice, Karin as an anthropologist teaching at
Capilano University. They each raised a family
of two sons (Eric and Simon Grant live in
Toronto and Karin's sons, Michael and Andrew
More, live in Vancouver and Calgary respectively).
Karin and Chris met again two years ago and
"love at second sight" led to the recent
marriage held among the extended kin of the
Grants. They will live in West Vancouver.
1970S
Jim Thorsell PHD 'yi was granted an Honorary
Doctor of Laws degree from the University of
Alberta at the 2009 spring convocation in
Edmonton. The citation reads: "...in recognition
of an outstanding Canadian and alumnus for
his pivotal role in the preservation of natural
areas around the world." From his home base
in the East Kootenays, Jim continues to work
part time for the International Union for
Conservation of Nature and serves on several
international conservation boards ... Lyall Knott
BCOM'yi, LLB'j2, a senior partner of Vancouver-
based law firm Clark Wilson LLP, has been
appointed as a Canadian commissioner to the
International Joint Commission. The commission
helps prevent and resolve water-related disputes,
primarily about quantity and quality, along the
boundary between Canada and the United States.
During the announcement of this appointment,
Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs The
Honourable Lawrence Cannon noted that "his
years of distinguished legal and community
service will be an asset to the commission"...
Marcus D. Busch MSW'78 is back at Edmonton
Public Schools as a social work consultant
40    Trek    Summer 2009 It was love at second sight for Christopher
Grant BASc'65, PEng, and Karin Lind, MA'68.
following a year of volunteering in Cambodia.
Marcus served as a communications consultant
with Lutheran World Federation (LWF) -
Cambodia, a rural community development
NGO. During his sojourn in Phnom Penh,
Marcus authored the book Angkar L, which
tells the story of LWF - Cambodia, from its
arrival following the defeat of the Khmer
Rouge in 1979 to its pending autonomy in 2010.
Marcus called on his social work training in
community development to make links with
the community development practices of the
organization. His social work experience in
emergency response contributed to discussions
around the formulation of a regional response to
the Cyclone Nargis disaster in Myanmar in May
2008. The Cambodia year of service marks
Marcus' third self-financed sabbatical in his 26
years with the Edmonton School Board. Marcus
and his wife, Margaret Sadler, spent 1992-93 in
a small town in central Hokkaido teaching
English as a foreign language and 2000-01 in
the largest city in the Sahara Desert - Nouakchott,
capital of Mauritania - as communications
consultants with LWF - Mauritania ... Glenn
M. Hardie MED'78, BA'99 nas published his fifth
book: Reason with Compassion - The
Humanist Way. It is intended as a primer to the
principles and practices of humanism for those
new to the free-thought tradition. He is a
founding member of the British Columbia
Humanist Association, serving on its board of
directors for many years.
Tracy Redies, MSC'89, is the new president
and CEO of Coast Capital Savings.
I98OS
Tracy Redies MSC'89 became the new president
and CEO of Coast Capital Savings, effective
June 8, 2009. Named one of the top 100 most
powerful women in Canada by the Women's
Executive Network in 2007, Redies comes to
Coast Capital Savings after a 20 year career
with HSBC, where she most recently served as
the bank's executive VP for personal financial
services and wealth management. Redies lives
in Surrey with her husband and is the mother
of four school-aged children.
1990S
Eleonore Schonmaier MFA'92 is the 2009 winner
of the Alfred G. Bailey prize for her poetry
manuscript What We Don't Think of Packing
... Carmen Werder PHD'94 is director of
Writing Instruction Support and head of the
Teaching-Learning Academy at Western
Washington University (WWU). She has won
the inaugural Carl H. Simpson Bridging Award,
which recognizes and supports efforts to create
bridges and forge new paths that others may
follow and build upon. The award is named in
memory of a 2 5-year WWU professor and
administrator ... Allan Rajesky BSc (Pbarm)'98
and Delphine Montel-Cambou were married
on October 12, 2008, in Vancouver, and are
now happily living in Calgary.
2000S
Social worker and author Sarah Burns BA'00
has won the 2009 Northern Lit Award for her
first novel, Jackfish, The Vanishing Village.
Jackfish tells the story of a woman unravelling
from a traumatic past and her yearning for
redemption. The award was sponsored by the
Ontario Library Service ... Christopher Mackie
BA'02 and his mother have received coats of
arms from the Governor General in recognition
of the latter's community service. As heraldry in
Canada is part of the national honours system,
this grant was a happy moment for the family.
The symbolism in the arms refers to Christopher's mother's heritage in both Cornwall and
Saskatchewan, and to her forefather's Loyalist
service in the American Revolutionary War ...
Giinther Jauck MSC'oj recently published Potential
Areas of Conflict in Mergers & Acquisitions:
An Investigation into Corporate Social
Responsibility and Shareholder Value Issues -
with Case Study Analysis, based on the
master's thesis he wrote when completing an
MSc in finance at UBC in 2003...Samantha
Bangayan BSC'08 recently returned from a
six-month overseas work placement as part of
the Youth in Partnership program at the Coady
International Institute, funded by the Canadian
International Development Agency. She worked
as an infant and small child health facilitator
for the non-governmental organization T'ikani
in Huancayo, Peru, conducting one-on-one
home visits with both urban and rural farming
mothers in the Mantaro Valley of the Central
Andes. She collaborated with Peruvian early
development workers to identify the primary
developmental difficulties that needed to be
addressed. Based on this assessment, she co-
headed a team that developed and implemented
a pilot program designed to give parents the
knowledge and skills necessary to foster
optimal development in their children. In
conjunction with Peruvian staff and other
organizations, the team also designed an
evaluation method, consolidated results,
and prepared reports of findings. The reports
included ideas to modify the pilot program
based on feedback from parents regarding its
accessibility and appropriateness to the family
context in the region.
Summer 2009    Trek    41 books
LAIJHA   ROiHAU
MURDER
HOTEL CINEMA
The Riverbones: Stumbling After
Eden in the Jungles of Suriname
ANDREW WESTOLL, MFA'04
McClelland and Stewart, $24.99
The Riverbones is part travelogue, part
guidebook into the unknown. Suriname
remains a mystery to most, a name some of us
may have heard but most wouldn't be able to
locate on a map. Despite its elusiveness, this
historically and ecologically-relevant South
American nation may inspire even the most
settled armchair travelers to set out in search of
their own pieces of Eden.
Westoll's masterfully-written exploration
of this beguiling and mysterious land reflects
deeply and often on the conflict between
turmoil and tranquility that lies at the heart of
Suriname's obscuring and ancient jungle. As
time goes by, it becomes increasingly evident
that the personal sacrifices he made to complete
his journey were - though difficult - ultimately necessary for him to find the freedom
he needed.
From his immersion into Maroon culture to
his obsessive quest to find the tiny blue okopipi,
Westoll's unique perspective on life and travel
takes readers along on a fantastic journey,
distilling his five months in Suriname into a
frequently thrilling, enchanting, occasionally
heartbreaking and thoroughly thought-provoking page-turner.
Westoll's work can regularly be found in
such Canadian publications as The Walrus,
Explore and the Globe and Mail. In 2007, he
won gold at the National Magazine Awards for
an adapted excerpt from The Riverbones.
Reviewed by Michael Awmack, BA'01
Inventory: Poems
BY MARGUERITE PIGEON, MFA'04
Anvil Press, $15
How much can one read into a mountain, a
hair dryer or a key? Does deep meaning lie
behind their practical purposes or are they
merely objects? In Inventory, poet Marguerite
Pigeon breathes life into these and many other
often mundane, but sometimes fantastic,
objects. In "Inca Child Mummies (Extinction
IV)" she writes:
DNA tests will determine whether these are
relatives of the teetering group that now lives
in the Andes. If not, scientists will be relieved,
since these orphans work so hard for them...
all in the name of time's cruelest joke:
a death that never ends.
As she prods deeper, getting to the very essence of existence, Pigeon uses startling imagery
to propose alternate perspectives on being. In
"Movie Theatre" she evokes the visceral spirit
of the movie-going experience:
Muggy cave,
the crowd haws and hees below
a shaft of lit dust, which stirs,
which sparkles into images;
Throughout the collection, Pigeon never
ceases to amaze with the insight she attaches
to her words. Her unique vision of the world
and the objects within it makes Inventory an
intriguing journey into the metaphysical realm.
Marguerite Pigeon's work has appeared in
journals including subTERRAIN, The Capilano
Review, dANDelion, Grain and Taddle Creek.
42    Trek    Summer 2009 Lousy Explorers: Poems
BY LAISHA ROSNAU, MFA'oo
Nightwood Editions, $17.95
In 2005, novelist and poet Laisha Rosnau
moved from Vancouver to northern British
Columbia and found a land in transition. The
region was at the peak of the pine beetle
epidemic and the forest was blanketed with the
telltale swaths of dying red trees. In her new
poetry collection, Lousy Explorers, Rosnau
reflects on her experience alongside contemplations on motherhood.
She notes, "I wanted to write about people
entering into new territory where things were
changing in ways that left them feeling more
exposed and raw but also opened them up for
change and transformation, for a new kind of
life." Her poems reflect a new-found maturity:
a shift in perspectives that likely came from her
new sense of maternal responsibility.
In "Look at Us: 2007" she writes:
/ was over throwing things by then, had learned
that lesson (men don't marry women who toss
teacups).
The themes of personal and ecological
change finally collide in the long, closing poem,
"Epidemic," as she tells the story of her new
family's move into the epicenter of the North's
silvicultural plague. As the forestry workers in
town try to contain the outbreak of fire and
decay threatening their community, Rosnau
and her soon-to-be husband proceed hesitantly
into their new life together.
The day we arrive, they cut down the pines
in the schoolyard behind our rented house,
a month shy of marriage, bodies sore
from the drive, we unload boxes labeled
separately.
Rosnau's work has been published in
Canada, the US, the UK and Australia and
has been included in the anthologies White
Ink: Poems on Mothers and Motherhood and
Rocksalt: An Anthology of Contemporary BC
Poetry. Her first collection of poetry, Notes
on Leaving won the national Acorn-Plantos
People's Poetry Award in 2005 and her 2002
novel, The Sudden Weight of Snow became a
Canadian best-seller.
Murder at Hotel Cinema
DANIEL CRAIG, BA'92
Midnight Ink, $18.50
Murder at Hotel Cinema is the second in a
series of five books written by engaging author,
Daniel Craig. The UBC Alumni Book Club
featured this book in the spring and it was a hit.
Like his earlier offering, Murder at the
Universe, I thoroughly enjoyed this peek behind
the calm, glamorous facade projected by high-
end hotels. Tightly written and filled with plot
twists and strong character development, this
story delivers a wonderful escape for the reader.
Protagonist Trevor Lambert, a hotel manager
of exacting standards, is faced with the task
of opening Hollywood's hottest new hotel. As
his life becomes infiltrated by the omnipresent
movie star culture that surrounds Hotel Cinema, he is thrust once again into the position
of ace detective after a high-maintenance yet
glamorous guest is...
Sorry, but you'll have to read it to find out.
This August, my holiday read will be Daniel's
latest installment in the series, Murder at
Graverly Manor.
Reviewed by Barney Ellis-Perry, BA'87
Public Art in Vancouver:
Angels Among Lions
AILEEN STALKER, BSR'yy, MA'92 AND JOHN STEIL
Touchwood Editions, $19.95
Most people think of beautiful scenery when
they think of Vancouver. What many people
may not know is that there are more than 500
public art installations in the city. This
guidebook explores Vancouver's public art
installations and features easy-to-follow maps,
detailed descriptions, engaging photographs
and artist and artwork indexes. Learn about
both the celebrated and unknown art installations covering a multitude of mediums
including tapestries, figures, monuments,
murals, First Nations art, mosaics, relics, busts,
fountains, gateways, sculptures and many
more. Discover these urban treasures as you
travel to communities and destinations such as
False Creek, Chinatown, the West End,
Downtown, East Vancouver, VanDusen Garden,
Stanley Park and UBC.
God of Missed Connections
ELIZABETH BACHINSKY, BA'02, MFA'04
Nightwood Editions, $17.95
There's a danger in remaining ignorant of
history's impact on one's sense of self. If where
you're from shapes who you are, then history is
the bridge that connects the pieces. In such a
world, people and place are inextricably linked.
In God of Missed Connections, Elizabeth
Bachinsky reflects on the horrors of her
ancestral homeland of Ukraine while attempting to build connections for a new generation
of Ukrainian-Canadians.
From Stalin's manufactured famine-turned-
genocide, known in the country as holodomor,
to the personal-environmental disaster of
Chernobyl, the Ukraine has had its share of
historic tragedy. In "Evolution of the Species,"
she reflects:
Since Chernobyl, children
Arrive in fabulous shapes,
Legs and arms on backwards.
Some are born without eyes.
Things are not always so bleak, however, as
Bachinsky has the ability to draw light from
even the darkest events of her family's history.
In "Letter to My Sister," she describes her
dancer cousin, Jenny, as a modern dervish-like
figure, spinning "like a revved-up ballerina" at
the very wedding where her mother nearly died.
Bachinsky is the author of Curio and Home
of Sudden Service, which was nominated for
the Governor General's Literary Award for
poetry in 2006. Her work has appeared in
literary journals, anthologies and on film in
Canada, the US, and abroad and has been
translated into French and Chinese.
Other Alumni Books
The Leader as a Mensch: Become the
Kind of Person Others Want to Follow
BRUNA MARTINUZZI, BA'81, MA'84
Hiking in Colour and Big Ken
JACQUELINE HOOPER, BA'5o, BLS'64, BSW'82, MSW'84
Kill or Be Killed: The Henry Street Affair
IVAN NARAYAN, BA'06
A Genealogy of Literary Multiculturalism
CHRISTOPHER DOUGLAS, BA'90
Summer 2009    Trek    43 2009 Big Block Banquet Honours
UBC Athletes
Almost 800 athletes, coaches, alumni and
supporters of the T-Birds came to the Hyatt
Regency in April to pay tribute to the finest in
athletics at UBC, both past and present.
The Big Block Club grew by more than 150 this
year as both student-athletes and staff earned
their place alongside 9,000-plus Thunderbird
alumni. Founded in 19 21 to build support for
UBC teams, the Big Block Club honours those
who have participated on a varsity teams for a
minimum of two years by presenting each with
the iconic UBC Block Club sweater.
Some of the greatest athletes in UBC's
history, as well as the top teams and athletes
from this past year were honoured. Soccer
standout Andrea Neil, basketball and track and
field star John Hawkins, renowned builder and
hockey icon Frank Fredrickson and the 'Birds'
1936-37 men's basketball team all earned a
spot in the UBC Hall of Fame.
The spotlight also shone brightly on the
great achievements of this year's annual Big
Block award winners:
Bobby Gaul Award to the most outstanding
graduating male athlete: Co-winners Chris
Dyck (basketball), and Callum Ng (swimming).
May Brown Award to the most outstanding
graduating female athlete: Marisa Field
(volleyball).
Bus Phillips Award to the most outstanding
male athlete: Cory Renfrew (golf).
Marilyn Pomfret Award to the most
outstanding female athlete: Annamay Pierse
(swimming).
Du Vivier Award to the team of the year:
Men's Golf.
Men's Rookie ofthe Year: Co-winners Spencer
Betts (football) and Matt Pepe (hockey).
Women's Rookie of the Year: Shanice
Marcelle (volleyball).
Carolyn Dobie-Smith Award to the Top
Athletic Trainer: Mischa Harris (women's
volleyball).
Arthur Delamont Award for Exceptional
Service and Goodwill: Claudia Richard
(women's track and field).
Kay Brearley Award for Service to Women's
Athletics: Tiana Blouin (women's hockey).
The 2009 UBC Sports Hall of Fame
inductees are:
Athlete Category: Andrea Neil (soccer), and
John Hawkins (basketball and track and field).
Builder Category: Frank Fredrickson
(hockey).
Team Category: 1936-37 Men's Basketball
PIERSE SETS WORLD RECORD
UBC swimming star Annamay Pierse followed
up her second consecutive CIS Female Swimmer of the Year award from February with a
world record performance in the women's short
course 200-metre breaststroke in March.
Competing at the Canadian Spring National
Championships in Toronto, Pierse's time of
2:17.50 bettered Leisel Jones' 2003 world mark
of 2:17.75.
"It feels absolutely amazing," said Pierse. "All
the hard work I have put in is paying off. It's
my goal to be the best in the world. I planned
to get the record tonight and I really believed in
myself. The crowd was absolutely amazing
tonight and it kept me going in that last 50."
Pierse was ahead of record pace the entire
race. After a blistering first 150 metres, she was
sitting more than a second ahead of Jones'
record with just 50 metres remaining. She was
able to hold on down the stretch.
It's Canada's first world record swim since
Brian Johns lowered the short course mark in
the 400 individual medley in 2002, swimming
for the Thunderbirds at the CIS championships
in Victoria.
This record has been a long time coming for
Pierse, who finished sixth at the Beijing
Olympics in the long course 200-metre
breaststroke. She was been rewriting the
Canadian record books for the last 18 months
in both the short course and long course pool.
Pierse's world record performance cemented
her spot as the top CIS athlete in Canada and
44    Trek    Summer 2009 in April she claimed the BLG Award as the top
female athlete in the CIS. It was the first time a
UBC athlete had won the award since Johns in
2002 (also after his world record swim).
Later this summer Pierse will compete at
the World Championships in Rome and will
be gunning for her first medal at the long
course event.
MEN'S BASKETBALL CLAIMS CIS SILVER
It was quite a season for UBC's men's basketball team, ending with the T-Birds competing in
their first CIS national championship game in
22 years. Although the result was likely not
the one they had hoped for - they settled for
silver - it still ranked as one of the best team
performances of the year.
For all of their success in conference play, the
T-Birds have won two conference banners and
have a second-place finish over the last three
years. This was the first time under head coach
Kevin Hanson that UBC had advanced past the
first round of the CIS Championship in six
attempts. They advanced in convincing fashion,
dispatching the Dalhousie Tigers 78-54 in their
CIS quarterfinal, a game in which they never
trailed. It was a consummate team effort with
five players reaching double figures to lead
UBC into the semi-finals - their first CIS semi
since 1996 - against conference rivals Calgary.
In arguably one of the best games of the year,
the two regional foes went punch for punch for
a spot in the final, with UBC's fifth-year senior
Chris Dyck putting together a career perfor
mance. Dyck led UBC to a 79-74 victory with
34 points on io-of-20 shooting and did so
while wearing a pair of borrowed shoes, as his
own pair were damaged in the game's warm-up.
Dyck continued to carry the hot hand into
the CIS final, helping UBC to a 24-18 lead over
Carleton after one quarter, but the equally-
veteran Ravens were too much down the stretch
as they took their sixth title in the last seven
years with a 87-77 victory over the T-birds.
To top off this stellar season, Hanson was
named the Canada West Coach of the Year and
Dyck a member of the CIS Championship
all-star team.
T-BIRDS ACE CANADIAN GOLF TITLES
The 'Birds had another banner year on the golf
course, with both the men's and women's teams
claiming the top prize at the Royal Canadian Golf
Association University College Championship in
late May at King's Forest Golf Club in Hamilton.
The men won their second consecutive title
behind the play of senior captain Cory Renfrew
(-3), who won the final individual tournament
of his UBC career as the T-Birds outdistanced
second place Laval by 2 5 strokes over the
54-hole rain shortened tournament.
The result on the women's side was much the
same as the T-Birds were 25 strokes ahead of
second place Victoria. However, senior captain
Kyla Inaba (+13) just missed individual glory
finishing second overall behind Hum ber College's
Maggie Trainor (+11). For the women, it was
their sixth title in the last seven years.
The male Thunderbirds fared nearly as well
in the NAIA Championships held earlier in the
month as they finished second overall, while
the women had a solid fifth-place showing.
TRACK TEAMS MAKE TOP TEN AGAIN
For the second straight season, the Thunderbirds
men's and women's track and field teams finished
in the top 10 at the NAIA Championships.
The men's team tied for eighth with 3 5 team
points on the strength of two gold medals and
a silver over the three-day competition in
Edwardsville, Illinois. Inaki Gomez repeated in
the 5000m race walk (20:41.11), narrowly
edging out freshman teammate Evan Dunfee
(20:41.15) who finished second. Curtis Moss
brought home a silver medal in the men's
javelin with a throw of 67.79m. Decathlete
Reid Gustavson just missed out on the podium
with a fourth place finish in the multi-event
competition.
The T-Birds women's team finished 10th overall
with 37 points. Liz Gleadle got the team off to
a great start with a record setting performance
in the women's javelin (54.31) winning her
third straight NAIA title. Sophomore Nicola
Evangelista improved on her 2008 silver medal
performance in the 3000m race walk, winning
a gold this year (14:54.51). Marathoner Nicole
Akeroyd just missed the podium, finishing
fourth, while Claudia Richard was fifth in the
women's 400m hurdles.
Chris Dyck
Marisa Field, Chris Dyck and Callum Ng
Liz Gleadle
Summer 2009    Trek    45 )NEWS
■ Scott Webster
T-BIRDS AMONG TOP TEAMS IN NAIA BASEBALL
The Thunderbirds proved once again to be
among the top teams in NAIA baseball,
spending virtually the entire season in the top
25, with most of that time spent in the top 15.
UBC, which peaked with a ranking as high as
seven, finished the year as the number 12
ranked team, with a 38-13 record.
After winning their conference with a 26-6
regular season record, the T-Birds hosted the West
Regional qualifying tournament at Nat Bailey
Stadium in early April. With only the winner
from the four-team, double elimination
tournament guaranteed to advance to the next
round, the 'Birds knew that they likely needed
to win in order to continue their season. The
road to victory, however, was fraught with peril
as UBC lost its opening game 7-6 to Oregon
Tech in 11 innings after giving up a 6-4 lead in
the ninth. In the next game, the team looked to
be on the brink of elimination, trailing College
of Idaho 3-0 in the bottom of the ninth. The
T-Birds, however, scored one run to make the
game 3-1 before Nic Lindsay sealed the
comeback with a double that cleared the bases
for a 4-3 victory.
UBC completed the improbable comeback
with three more victories which allowed them
to advance to the opening round of the NAIA
National Championship. They traveled to
Azusa, California for that opening round
tournament but lost a pivotal game to eventual
2009 Avista-NAIA World Series runner-ups
Point Lorna Nazarene. They eventually bowed
out of the tournament with a 1-2 record.
A number of T-Birds earned individual
accolades with head coach Terry McKaig taking
home NAIA West Coach of the Year honours.
Mark Hardy led a group of three UBC pitchers
earning conference all-star status - Eric Brown
and Sean Hetherington also took that honour -
with centre fielder Jon Syrnyk being the lone
position player to earn a spot on the all-star squad.
Syrnyk was joined by three UBC infielders
and one pitcher on the conference's Gold Glove
team as first baseman Scott Webster, second
baseman Alex White, short stop Sammie Starr,
and pitcher Taylor King all took home the
honours, as the top defensive players in the
conference at their respective positions.
2009-10 Fall Schedule Highlights
Don't just read about your Thunderbirds, come
out and support them live at their home games
this fall, including their championship runs.
Visit www.gothunderbirds.calschedule for a
detailed schedule.
The perks ol membership!
Alumni Affairs has established relationships with carefully selected companies to
provide you with special deals on quality products and services. Help support student
and alumni activities at UBC by participating in the following great programs:
Wealth Management
Wellington West Clearsight
offers full service retirement
planning including lower
fees, professional advice and
a wide selection of products.
Home & Auto Insurance
TD Meloche Monnex home and
auto insurance plans extend
preferred group rates and
specially designed features for
our grads. Small-business and
travel insurance is also available.
Personal Insurance
Manulife Financial has
served the alumni community
for over twenty years,
providing extended health
and dental, term life and
critical illness plans.
ALUMNI
UBC
Credit card
More than 12,000 alumni
and students use their UBC
MBNA Alumni Mastercard
which has low introductory
rates, 24-hour customer
support and no annual fees. In Memoriam ~ UBC Alumni Association Board Members
GAYLE STEWART BA'76, MA'08
1954 - 2009
Loving and devoted wife of Bob
Philip, mother of Sara, stepmother
of Matthew Philip (Kim), daughter
of Jim and Doreen Stewart, sister
of Brian (Joanne) Stewart and
Susu Reid (Michael), aunt, cousin,
and friend, Gayle passed away
peacefully after a courageous and
dignified battle with cancer.
After finishing her BA, Gayle
worked as a reporter for
Canadian Press, then as a
broadcaster with the CBC,
specializing in business reporting.
Later, she moved into corporate
communications in the natural
resources, energy, telecommunications and financial services sectors with firms including BC Hydro, BCTel
(Telus), Noranda, Royal Trust and First City Financial. In 2006, after her
last employer, Placer Dome, was bought out in a hostile takeover, Gayle
realized a longstanding dream and came back to UBC in the Political
Science master's program. She graduated in 2008.
That same year, Gayle was appointed head of UBC's Olympic Secretariat
with the task of preparing the campus for the 2010 Olympics and Paralympics. Before she was forced to withdraw due to her illness, she established a
strong foundation for the Secretariat and the work to follow.
She was also very generous in volunteering her time, contributing her
talents to the Jack Webster Foundation, YWCA Women of Distinction
Program, United Way, and Junior Achievement of BC.
Gayle joined the UBC Alumni Association board in 2005. She worked
on a Business Process Reengineering that helped restructure and refocus the
Association's strategic plan. She was a key member of the Communications
Committee and served as co-chair of the Chancellor Nomination Committee, which resulted in the election of UBC's current chancellor, Sarah
Morgan-Silvester. Gayle was elected Vice Chair in 2006, and was to
become Chair in 2008, but her illness prevented her from taking office.
At Gayle's request, we have established a memorial fund to benefit UBC
alumni in her name. Cheques can be made payable to the UBC Gayle
Stewart Memorial Fund and mailed c/o Susan Hardie, Donations Processing, Suite 500 - 5950 University Boulevard, Vancouver, BCV6T 1Z3.
Gayle was a high-achieving, fast-paced worker who developed solutions
to problems rapidly and decisively. She was a quick study and had the
ability to take her ideas past theory and into practice smoothly and
effectively. At the same time, she was a patient and able mentor who
extended a helping hand to many. Her laugh was always close to the
surface and her smile was infectious. Her kindness and passion touched the
lives of everyone she knew. She will be deeply missed.
GERRY PODERSKLCANNON 1945-2009
We received news of Gerry's death just as Trek Magazine was going to press.
We will include an expanded obituary in our fall issue.
WILLIAM CARLETON GIBSON BA'33, DSc'93, MSc, MD, PhD
1913 - 2009
Dr. Gibson spent almost three
decades at UBC, as a professor of
neurological research,a research
professor of Psychiatry, a professor
of the History of Medicine (he later
headed that department) and
assistant to the president on
university development. His vision
and leadership led to the creation
of the Kinsmen Laboratory of
Neurological Research and the
Woodward Biomedical Library.
He later became chancellor at
UVic. In that role, he tapped each
graduating student on the head
with his mortarboard to admit
them into convocation, swearing
he had "never intentionally caused a migraine" in so doing.
Dr. Gibson served as chairman of the Scientific Advisory Committee for
the US Muscular Dystrophy Association. He also was a member of the
International Brain Research Organization and the World Health Organization's
Panel on Neurological Sciences. He was an honorary fellow of Green College,
Oxford, and of the Royal Society of Medicine in London. He served as
president of the UBC Alumni Association from 1961 to 1962.
Born in Ottawa, Dr. Gibson earned a BA at UBC in 1933, an MSc and
MD degree from McGill, and a PhD from Oxford. He reeived an honorary
Doctor of Science degree by UBC in 1993 in recognition of his service.
"He possessed a level of intelligence, commitment, and true caring that
is hard to imagine unless you had met him personally," Gavin Stuart, dean
of Medicine, said. "He saved countless lives, taught hundreds of students,
influenced his colleagues through his research, books and articles, and
ensured that generations would excel in their education with his work in
establishing the Woodward Biomedical Library and developing the faculty
of Medicine."
Dr. Gibson was a researcher and clinical associate professor when the
medical school opened and soon after became director of the Kinsmen
Laboratory for Neurological Research. In the 1950s, he was a member of
the UBC Senate and also president of the Faculty Association. From i960
to 1978 he served as a professor and head of the History of Medicine and
Science department and wrote more than 100 articles and books including
Wesbrook and His University (1973).
A good friend of Cecil and Ida Green, Bill Gibson is said to have
convinced Cecil Green to purchase what is now known as Cecil Green
Park House and to donate it to the university as a "town & gown" facility.
(Cecil Green referred to Bill as "my most expensive friend.") Cecil Green
Park House is now home to the UBC Alumni Association.
Dr. Gibson served in the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1941 to 1945,
and was a Vancouver alderman and Parks commissioner in the 1970s.
He died on July 4 in Oak Bay, aged 95. Please consider making a
donation to the WISH Drop-In Centre Society in his name, at No. 515 -
119 West Pender Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1S7.
Summer 2009    Trek    47 N MEMORIAM
We depend on friends and relatives for our
IN MEMORIAM materials. Please send obituaries
(500 words or less) to Michael Awmack at
michael.awmack@ubc.ca. We will edit all
materials to fit the space available. When sending
photos, please send originals or high resolution
scans (at least 300 dpi) as separate files.
WALTER DOUGLAS CHARLES BSc(Agr)'37
Walter was born in Castor, AB, and moved to
Summerland with his family in 1927. He
married Mary Munn in 193 8 and during the
war was a member of the army medical corps.
After the war he worked at various jobs: the
Copper Mountain mine near Princeton, the
Summerland Box Factory, and in the family
business, Walter's Ltd. Packing House. In 1958
he changed careers and moved his family to
Vancouver, where he worked for the federal
department of health and welfare as a food and
drug inspector. During his career he was posted
to several different cities in Canada: Vancouver
(1958-1963), Belleville, ON (1963-1965),
Toronto (1965) and Edmonton (1966), where
he and Mary remained until his retirement in
1978. They returned to Summerland and lived
in the family home in Peach Orchard. In 2005,
Walter moved into Angus Place.
Walter was a man with many friends,
activities and interests. He was a Cubmaster in
Summerland and Edmonton and he enjoyed
hunting deer and pheasant, fishing, vegetable
gardening, woodworking, and photography.
Family holidays were generally camping trips.
After retirement he took up the study of spiders
and became a keen collector, even discovering a
previously unknown species that was named
after him. He was a bit of a local celebrity,
giving various talks on the subject and known
to many as Spider Man.
He and Mary travelled extensively in their
RV and went on several cruises. He took part
in the greeting program at Summerland
Secondary School and joined the Ham Radio
Club, which involved considerable study
including learning to send and receive Morse
code. He enjoyed monitoring communications
during forest fires, making himself available as
a communication resource. In his 80s Walter
learned to operate a computer and kept in
touch with many friends by email. He was a
great reader, both of fiction and nonfiction,
enjoying especially murder mysteries and
western adventure.
Very handy around the house, he always
enjoyed making repairs and painting. Walter
will be sorely missed. He died peacefully in his
home at Angus Place on Sunday, December 28,
2008, after a gradual decline of health. The
family is grateful to the Home Support workers
who looked after him and also thank his
extended family at Angus Place. Support from
various family members and friends is also
gratefully acknowledged. Donations to the
Land Conservancy BC (www.conservancy.be.
ca) or your favorite charity in his name would
be gratefully received.
BRITA HELENA MICKLEBURGH BA'41
Brita passed away peacefully in Newmarket,
ON, on December 27, 2008, family by her side,
after a remarkable life of achievement and
dedication to teaching and scholarship.
Raised on a farm in the idyllic Fraser Valley,
Brita earned an honours degree in English
and French before beginning a distinguished
career as a high school English teacher. In
Ontario, she started teaching at Newmarket
High School in 1956, before switching to the
new Huron Heights Secondary School in 1963
as head of the English department - one of the
Helena Mickleburgh
few women to hold such a position in the days
before feminism.
Brita was a pioneer in another way. On her
own, she developed a ground-breaking English
course based entirely on Canadian literature,
rather than the British texts that still dominated
high school English. She arranged face-to-face
discussions between her Grade 13 students and
prominent Canadian authors such as Robertson Davies and Margaret Laurence. Her
innovation in this area was recognized by
McClelland and Stewart, who asked her to
produce a book for use in high schools and
colleges. Canadian Literature, Two Centuries in
Prose, was published in 1973.
Perhaps her most satisfying year was 1966-67,
when she took a sabbatical to do her MA in
English at the University ofToronto. Her
professors that year included renowned academics
Northrop Frye and Marshall McLuhan.
She was heavily involved in the Ontario
Secondary School Teachers' Federation, serving
a term as the first woman president of OSSTF
District 34. Among the causes she championed
was teachers' maternity leave, now taken for
granted. Brita retired from teaching in 19 81,
having imparted to thousands of students the
importance of literature. Few forgot their time
in her stimulating classroom. She was a life-long
advocate of women's rights, social justice and
world peace. Brita is deeply mourned by her
children Rod, Norma and "the twins" Paul and Pauline; grandchildren Matthew, Mia and
Chelsea; Lucie McNeill and Leanne Mickleburgh;
many friends and relatives; and by her dear
sister, Greta, in Burnaby.
ELVIRA WEINS LE GROS BA'44
Elvira died suddenly at Norfolk General
Hospital in Simcoe, ON, July 14, 2008.
Born October 23, 1921, in Herbert, SK, the
middle child of three, she attended Bethania
School until grade seven, before moving with
her parents, John and Catherine Weins, to
Abbotsford, BC. Elvira finished high school at
Philip Sheffield High and after a year out,
enrolled at UBC.
She was proud to have earned her way
through graduation, doing part-time work on
campus in the library, in the museum room
under Dr. McTaggart Owan's direction (at 40
cents per hour), and also in the film department. Other activities included membership in
the Fraternal Cosmopolitan Club and Social
Problems Club. During two summers she
worked at the provincial mental hospital at
Essondale as a student nurse, and one summer
as a waitress in Prince Rupert. Dr. Mawdsley,
Dean of Women, was very helpful in guiding
her to this part-time work. Elvira remembered
her fondly and particularly enjoyed her English
II lectures on Elizabethan poetry.
Elvira had hoped to study journalism but no
such course was offered in Vancouver at the time.
After graduation, Elvira went to the Yukon. She
obtained a clerical position on grid 911, hoping
to find fame and fortune as a writer. A pleasant
dream, easier said than done. After six months
in Whitehorse, she transferred to Watson Lake,
still in the Yukon. This was an air base shared
by the Americans and the RCAF.
On VE day, Elvira met Flight Lieutenant Philip
Le Gros, the Adjutant. It was the beginning of a
beautiful romance. Since the war was nearly
over, Elvira was transferred to Edmonton. After
a brief stay there she went to Toronto and
started working at Imperial Optical on Don
Oaks in downtown, another clerical position.
By June, Philip had transferred to Eastern Air
Command and in July of 1946 he and Elvira
were married. They lived in Ottawa for a short
time until Philip returned to Toronto to commence
working with Canada Wire and Cable. They
had two children here, Sharon and Stephen.
The latter was a difficult birth, resulting in a
cerebral palsy spastic diagnosis for Stephen
three years later. Those were challenging times.
A cure was not possible. Steve attended regular
school at age seven, with many difficulties.
After living in the Toronto area for ten years,
Philip was transferred to Simcoe, ON. It was
here that son John and daughter Kathryn were
born. John was diagnosed profoundly autistic.
Philip became very active in the Norfolk
Association for Community Living (NACL), as
it later became known. He threw himself into
his work at the office and had various business
trips to London, Frankfurt, Italy and even
Australia. In November 1973 he had a massive
heart attack. After six months he became a
consultant for CWAC and later joined Ontario
Research Foundation as a field representative.
Meanwhile Elvira took her teachers' training
in London, ON, and became a high school
teacher for a few years, teaching business and
French. Elvira was a board member of the
NACL, managing the Cash for Life program.
She also joined a parents group for autism.
In November 1979, at age 63, Philip was
overtaken by cancer and on January 29, 2002,
at age 43, John also died of cancer.
Elvira lived quietly in Simcoe. She was an
avid reader and particularly enjoyed Canadian
authors. She loved language, took some creative
writing courses and had some fun with limericks.
She was keenly interested in politics and
wouldn't hesitate to write letters to the editor
to speak out about any observed injustice.
Elvira found a keen interest in the stock market
and maintained a successful portfolio in the
late 1990s. Later she used the Internet to track
her penny oil speculator stocks. Elvira followed
alternative health advisory letters, including
those by Jonathan Wright, MD.
Elvira was a wonderful and dedicated wife,
mother, grandmother, sister, aunt, friend and
advocate. She had seven nieces and nephews
who graduated from UBC.
MARJORIE C. L. FISHER BCom'4}, BA'46
Marjorie Catherine Lynis Fisher (Smith) passed
away on January 16, 2009, from a stroke at
Ken Stoddart
Ken Stoddart (right) was a cherished and
long-standing member of the department of
Sociology from I)J2 to 2003. He died in 2.006.
He was a generous mentor to students and
younger colleagues, a sharp thinker, a gifted
writer, and a favourite teacher. In memory of
Ken, a few colleagues, students, family
members and friends are raising funds for a
park bench and plaque honouring his life and
work. A tax-deductible contribution to the
fund can be made to the Vancouver Board of
Parks and Recreation by cheque or credit card:
604.257.8513 I Vancouver Board of Parks and
Recreation, C/O Fundraising and Development,
2091) Beach Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V6G 1Z4.
For further information, please contact Dr.
Thomas Kemple at kemple@interchange.ubc.ca
age 85. She was born on April 6, 1923, in
Vancouver, where she lived until she left for
graduate work in Berkeley, CA. There she met
and married Walter D. Fisher, an economics
professor, in 1948. In 1952, they moved to
Manhattan, KS, where they lived until 1967.
Since 1967, Marjorie has lived in Evanston, IL.
Marjorie was a pioneering woman of many
accomplishments. She was a devoted mother
and wife; an academic researcher, editor and
writer; and an environmental and nutritional
activist, both personally and politically.
Marjorie's family was very important to her.
She was a loving and supportive wife, mother,
and grandmother. In addition to helping Walter
with research and writing, she cared for him
for more than 10 years when he was disabled,
until his death in 1995. Her avid interest in
nutrition and the environment started from her
Summer 2009    Trek    49 IN MEMORIAM
concern for the health of her own family. She
was a Cub and Girl Scout leader. Throughout
her life she was interested in, inquisitive about,
and supportive of her children's and grandchildren's educational, professional, musical, and
sporting pursuits.
Marjorie excelled academically. In 1945 she
was awarded the Gold Medal for being the top
bachelor of Commerce student at UBC. She
wrote a chapter in Walter's first book: Clustering and Aggregation in Economics, regularly
reviewed his professional papers, attended
conferences, and presented papers. She pursued
a doctorate in economics at the University of
California at Berkeley. She never completed her
thesis because she started her family. Thirty
years later, her Berkeley professor remembered
her and gave her a glowing recommendation
that helped lead to Marjorie's statistics teaching
position at the University of Illinois' Chicago
Circle Campus, which she held for six years.
Marjorie always believed in and practiced
good nutrition, educating herself and others. In
the mid 1970s she joined with several other
ambitious women to found the Nutrition for
Optimal Health Association (NOHA). She was
editor of their quarterly newsletter, NOHA
NEWS, for more than 20 years.
In the late 1970s, Marjorie became active
against pesticides and toxic chemicals. She
would buy, cook and eat only organic food and
encouraged others to do so. She installed water
filters, solar panels on her roof for hot water,
and non-toxic kitchen cabinets at her house.
She replaced the grass with a native and edible
all-organic garden. Outside her home, Marjorie
campaigned for environmental and women's
rights candidates and the equal rights amendment. She was active in the League of Women
Voters and participated in environmental
organizations including the Talking Farm, the
Inter-Religious Sustainability Circle, and Dr.
Randolph's environmental sensitivity support
group. She was founder and first chair of the
Green Sanctuary committee at the Unitarian
Church of Evanston. In 2003, she received the
lifetime achievement award from the national
organization, Beyond Pesticides, and in 2008
the Leadership in Sustainability Award from
the Network for Evanston's Future. At age 83,
she was interviewed on television about
pesticides and toxic chemical build-up in Lake
Michigan. She wore and distributed "Just Say
NO to Pesticides" buttons.
Marjorie enjoyed travel and outdoor activities.
She and Walter regularly attended Chicago-area
concerts and plays. She lived in Belgium from
1971 to 1972, and India for three months in
1982. Up into her early 80s she continued to travel
extensively for family events and environmental
conferences. She always participated, whether it
was swimming, paddling, snowshoeing, sailing,
snorkeling, hiking, birthday parties, graduations or conferences.
Her family and many others will miss
Marjorie's vivacious presence, intellectual
curiosity, gentle persistence, and loving support.
S. ELIZABETH (BETTY THOMPSON) SHAW BA'46, BSW'47
Born inVancouver on May 13, 1925, Betty
passed away peacefully in Prince George on
November 19, 2008, in her 84th year.
Betty is survived by her loving husband of 5 5
years, Lome Shaw, son Don (BApSc'81, Jo-Anne
BEd'80), daughter Betty Ann (Kelly), and
predeceased by son Gordon (2002).
After graduation, Betty became a social
worker in northern BC, starting out in Prince
George in 1949, where she met Lome,
marrying him in 1953.
In those early years as a social worker, she
travelled extensively in the northern portion of
the province, on rudimentary roads, to many
places (such as Germansen Landing) that few
people have visited to this day.
This was a precursor to life with a travelling
salesman. The couple's son, Gordon, was born
in Prince George in 1954, followed by a move
to Williams Lake, where son Don was born in
1956; then North Vancouver, Burnaby, and
Kamloops, where daughter Betty Ann completed
the family in 1961; then on to Nelson in 1973
and finally returning to Prince George in 1974,
where she and Lome have been ever since.
The majority of Betty's married life was as a
homemaker, but she loved to work with children.
She volunteered in the school library in Kamloops
and returned briefly to social work in the 1980s,
tutoring challenged students for the child
development centre and the school board.
Her interests were largely cultural - playing
the piano, reading historical novels, and
listening to a wide range of music from swing
to classical and opera to pop (but her all-time
favourite was undoubtedly Old Blue Eyes,
Frank Sinatra). She was a bridge player, a
dedicated follower of the Blue Jays, and loved
word games.
A memorial service was held in Prince
George on November, 24, 2008, followed by
cremation. Her ashes will be spread at a later
date, reuniting her with her father, Andrew
(McGill, MUCBC, and Great Trek participant)
and mother, Gladys.
Robert (Bob) Thomson ROBERT (BOB) THOMSON BSc(Agr)'ji
Born October 25, 1927, in Quesnel, Bob died
peacefully at home in Maple Ridge on Friday,
December 26, 2008. The eldest son of the
Reverend James Currie Thomson and Margaret
Ellen Thomson, Bob is survived by his loving
wife, Nancy, son Keith (Lisa) and daughter
Rhona, as well as grandchildren Braeden and
Shayla. He is also survived by his sister,
Margaret Anna Kelly, his brother, Peter
(Heather) and numerous nieces and nephews.
Bob taught in BC for more than 30 years -
25 as a science teacher in Maple Ridge. He
enjoyed teaching but he especially enjoyed all
his students over the many years.
Bob was very active in the community - in
St. Andrew's United Church, Maple Ridge
Lions Club, Ridge Meadows Hospital Board
and curling. He was well known in the
community for his woodworking and gardening and was honoured by being named Citizen
of the Year in 1999. He will be missed by many
people but most of all by his loving family.
LAWRENCE DICKINSON BASc'52
Lawrence Dickinson passed away peacefully on
December 26, 2008, at the Hamilton General
Hospital. Lawrie will be lovingly remembered
by his wife, Josephine, sons Garth and Blair,
their spouses, Kathryn and Carol, and grandchildren Bart (Ottawa), Reta (Barrie), Emma
(Cairns, Australia) and Amy (St. Catharines).
Lawrence was born in Arbroath, Scotland,
and immigrated to Canada aged two, settling in
Vancouver. He was a WWII veteran of the
Canadian Navy and subsequently earned his
mechanical engineering degree at UBC. He
worked in Hamilton at Canadian Westinghouse
for 37 years, was a member of the Professional
Engineers of Ontario, BC Museum of Mining
and a past member of the Ancaster Rotary Club.
He loved to fish and swim in the Saugeen River,
encourage his night blooming moonflowers and
create great beauty with stained glass.
B. FRANK PETERS BASc'55, MASc'58
Born in Drumheller, AB, on January 24, 1933,
Frank spent his first 10 years in the mining
town of East Coulee, AB. Though his father
died when he was two, Frank's memories of his
childhood were positive. He wrote, "I had the
river to fish in, to swim in, and to skate on, the
hills with their caves to hike on and hide in. My
Mother trusted in God and loved and trusted
me. And I had three tolerant older brothers:
Hugo, Ernie [Ernest Peters, UBC professor
emeritus of metals and materials, 1991] and
Zeke, who treated me better than I deserved."
His happy disposition and his penchant for
teasing, which remained with him throughout
his lifetime, endeared him to many people
around the world.
Frank attended Mackenzie Elementary
School for Grades 6-8, and John Oliver High
B. Frank Peters
School for Grades 9-13, participating in sports
teams, choirs and drama productions, excelling
in the extra-curriculars as well as in academics.
John Oliver was where Frank met Alice
Ruddick, who became his wife eight years later.
After receiving his BASc in metallurgy, Frank
accepted a position at the Pacific Naval
Research Laboratory (later renamed Defence
Establishment Pacific) in Victoria. He left this
position temporarily, from September 1956 to
December 1957, to return to UBC to pursue his
master's. He married Alice in August 1957, and
encouraged her in a teaching career at Esquimalt High School.
In 1965, when Frank and Alice had three
sons aged three and under, the family moved to
England where Frank obtained his PhD and
Alice her MEd at the University of Leeds in
1968. During his three years at the University
of Leeds, Frank was appointed by the Senate to
lecture a course in metallurgy to civil engineers.
While in Leeds, a fourth son was born in 1967.
After his return to the Defence Research
Establishment Pacific in 1968, Frank co-
authored a book Why Metals Fail (Gordon and
Breach, Publishers) and wrote many scientific
papers and gave lectures on failure analysis,
corrosion and non-destructive evaluation of
metals. He served as president of the local
chapter of the American Society for Metals, as
Canadian national leader of the Technical
Cooperation Program's Panel on metallurgy
(Australia, Canada, UK and USA), and as the
Canadian member of the NATO Action Group
on Materials for Aeronautical Research and
Development (AGARD), which resulted in
frequent trips to NATO countries.
Frank was a wonderful husband, father,
grandfather and friend. Of his sons, he wrote,
"God blessed us with five bright, happy,
inquisitive, healthy baby boys [the youngest
was born in 1969] ... each with his own
strengths as well as idiosyncrasies." Following
in their father's footsteps, all five sons have
obtained PhDs, have married, and are fathers.
Between 1982 and 1988, Frank served as
head of the dockyard laboratory of the Defence
Research Laboratory in Halifax. Back at DREP
in Victoria, he was head of materials technology
from 1988 to retirement in 1994.
Summer 2009    Trek    51 IN MEMORIAM
Throughout his adult life, Frank served in
many roles in the Central Baptist Church
(teacher, deacon, youth sponsor, chairman of
the board, host to internationals, president of
young married couples, captain of Christian
service brigade, president of prime-timers), at
Inter School and Inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship, at Pioneer Pacific Camp and at
Camp Qwanoes.
With retirement, Frank and Alice travelled
extensively, enjoying many package tours but
especially enjoying visits with their five sons
and their wives and children.
Frank passed away on October 5, 2008. He
is lovingly remembered and sorely missed by
family and friends.
HAROLD (HAL) LEONARD BA'63
Hal was born in a Victoria farmhouse on May 19,
1926, to William Valentine Leonard, a 73 year old
retired British naval captain, and his 27 year old
wife, Florence Louise Duck, who worked as a
chambermaid at the Empress Hotel. Hal spent
his childhood in Victoria and Salmon Arm and his
teen years in Vancouver. He was a member of
the Ryerson High School basketball team, which
won the provincial championship in Kelowna
in 1942. At age 18, Hal enlisted for active duty
and was a radio operator during WWII. After
the war, he completed grade 12, worked at a
number of temporary jobs, then took a one
year teacher training course at UBC.
Hal began his dedicated teaching career at
the age of 24 in Nakusp, where he taught at the
elementary school level for three years and
where he met his future wife, Shirley, a newly
appointed public health nurse in the region.
Hal and Shirley were married in Nelson in
August 1952, and then they moved to North
Vancouver where Hal took a one year break
from teaching to pursue his degree. It was
during this time that Hal and Shirley designed
and hand-built their first home in Lynn Valley
and started their family. Hal continued to
pursue his degree through night and summer
school courses, while teaching full time. In
November 1963, aged 37, Hal proudly received
his BA, the first member of his large family to
earn a university degree.
In 1967, after teaching for thirteen years
in North Vancouver, Hal and Shirley moved
with their two children, Lora and Thane, to
Windermere and then Invermere, where Hal
accepted an elementary consultant position for
one year, followed by an elementary supervisor
position for four years. He was responsible for
assisting and evaluating teaching staff at every
elementary school between Canal Flats and
Radium Hot Springs. In 1972, Hal and his family
moved to Kelowna where he was principal at
Glenmore Elementary School for eleven years
and at Wood Lake Elementary School for one
year. Throughout his 3 4 year career, Hal saw
potential in each and every student and was a
mentor to many young teachers.
Upon Ken's retirement in December 1983, he
and Shirley enjoyed the adventures of travel
and Hal participated as a volunteer for the local
food bank and on an officiating committee for
the BC Summer Games in Kelowna. Hal enjoyed
playing golf, listening to music and viewing
sports, while engaging in other interests such as
woodworking, gardening and playing daily
games of Scrabble and Upwords with Shirley.
Family and friends were very important to Hal,
and along with a wonderful sense of humour
he had a deep sense of fairness, loyalty,
commitment, compassion and kindness.
Hal passed away at the age of 82 in Kelowna
on January 5th, 2009. He will be deeply missed by
all those whose lives he touched so meaningfully.
Harold (Hal) Leonard
ROBERT LUCAS BCOM'68, MSc'78
Robert Gilmore Lucas had a presence - an
endearing quality that found its way to the
UBC campus during the 1960s. Rob grew up
on the North Shore, graduating from West
Vancouver High School in 1961. At UBC he
joined Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, with his
athletic highlight being a year of rowing with
UBC's Junior Varsity crew.
After earning his commerce degree, then
working with The Bay, Rob returned to UBC
for his master's of science in administration. Rob
had launched his academic career. He graduated
from Cornell University in New York State in
1980 with a PhD in organizational behaviour
and immediately joined the Schulich School of
Business at Toronto's York University.
At York, where he was an associate professor
of organizational behavior and industrial
relations, Rob was a beloved teacher and
distinguished academic who played a major
role in the reorganization and relaunch of a
number of the school's degree programs.
Rob was a strong supporter of qualitative
research, a field in which the Schulich School
now has a stellar reputation, and he was the
architect and implementer of the school's
management skills course. For his 28 years at
York and for the years during the 1980s when
he guest lectured at UBC's faculty of Commerce, he is remembered by academic colleagues as a reflective practitioner, gifted
educator and creative manager.
Rob was indeed a loyal colleague and
supportive, generous friend. He was memorable.
He was unique. As a friend he could make you
feel like a million bucks. The minds of his
friends have so many images and visions of him
because each encounter, whether a phone
conversation or in person, would be an event.
Rob took a keen interest in virtually
everything. Whatever his friends or relatives
were experiencing he would not only grasp
with interest or pride but with, perhaps,
long-term fascination.
Rob, of course, had a plethora of interests of
his own: the culture and art of the Haida,
movies, books, sailing, sports cars, '60s rock,
talkin' baseball, and recalling his or your earlier
life experiences and stories, punctuated with Robert Lucas
humour and garnish. And his long, scintillating,
and thought-provoking conversations . . . his
inquiring mind hard at work . . . always in the
company of his scotch and cigarettes.
Rob passed away in Toronto on February 17,
2009, on his 65th birthday. He will never be
forgotten and will be missed by his friends and
family in BC, Ontario and the US.
PETER VLADIMIR OKULITCH BA'69
Peter Vladimir Okulitch was born on April 9,
1946, in Vancouver. He was the son of Dr.
Vladimir and Susanne Okulitch (Kouhar). He
attended University Hill elementary and high
school. He was a member of the Royal
Canadian Naval Sea Cadets and he served in
the Canadian Army Reserve. While at university, he spent his summers working for the
Noranda Mining Company doing prospecting
work in the Okanagan Valley. He received his
bachelor degree in psychology and moved to
Madison, to attend the University of Wisconsin.
There he completed his master's and doctoral
degrees in clinical psychology, doing research
on alcohol and drug addictions.
While in Wisconsin, he interned at the
Veterans Hospital and volunteered in the
children's program with the Archdiocese of
Milwaukee. It is there that he met his wife,
Judith. They married on December 28, 1974.
Together they returned to Vancouver, where he
worked as a psychologist in a maximum
security prison in Abbotsford and Judith taught
at Simon Fraser University. Several years later,
they returned to the US and settled in Portland,
where he spent the majority of his professional
life working in clinical and forensic psychology.
He worked for Clackamas Mental Health
before opening up a private practice in 1979.
He worked on forensic cases and was an expert
witness in numerous court cases including an
Oregon Supreme Court case.
Peter was a consultant to numerous addiction
programs and hospitals in the Portland area. In
1997 he was board certified by the International
College of Prescribing Psychologists as a
diplomat/fellow prescribing psychologist
(FPPR). In recent years, he branched out and
began treating geriatric patients. At his death,
he was employed at the Veterans Hospital in
Walla Walla, WA, where he finished his
professional career the way be began it.
Peter's interests and hobbies were varied. He
obtained his pilot's license in Wisconsin. He rode
vintage BMW motorcycles and attended BMW
rallies. He built a sailboat in his garage - it
leaked. He was an avid reader who loved science
fiction books and movies, military history and
photography. He had an excellent memory and
would share the smallest trivia with family and
friends. All of his life, he followed mankind's
exploration of space. He was a member of the
Planetary Society and watched with great
enthusiasm the recent Mars landing.
Peter was father to George and Katie. He
loved his children and, together with Judith,
raised them in the Eastmoreland neighborhood
of Portland. Peter was interested in the world
and took his family to Germany, across Canada
and US and Hawaii. They spent summer
vacations in Central Oregon and in Wisconsin
with Judith's family.
Peter passed away on June 2, 2008.
PATRICIA IVY GRAY BED'75
Pat Gray (Lindblom) was born with her twin
brother, William, on March 18, 1924, in
Vancouver, BC. She died with family by her
side in the Alzheimer's Palliative Care Unit of
the Olive Devaud Residence in Powell River,
BC, on January n, 2009. During the last five
years of her affliction, while in the unit, she
remained her usual smiling and pleasant self.
Pat left North Vancouver High School and
joined the Royal Canadian Air Force Women's
Division in 1943 for more than three years of
service in stations across Canada. Upon discharge,
with the aid of the department of Veterans' Affairs,
she attended UBC. In 1950, she attended the
Vancouver Provincial Normal School where she
met Jim, who was also taking teacher training.
They married on Christmas Eve in 19 51.
Pat learned to ski on Red Mountain while
teaching elementary school in Trail, BC, and
was prepared for the local mountains when she
moved back to Vancouver to teach at Bayview
Patricia Ivy Gray
Summer 2009    Trek    53 IN MEMORIAM
Elementary School. In 1967, after rearing her
three children in North Vancouver, she was
employed at UBC as a student-teaching seminar
adviser and joined the group of mentors
referred to in the faculty of Education as the
"part-time ladies."
In 19 81, she was appointed to the faculty of
Education as the elementary student teaching
placement coordinator, a position she held until
her retirement in 1989 as an instructor emerita.
Pat was a keen member of the Margaret Mackenzie hiking group in the Faculty Women's
Club and was an avid cross-country skier with
the group. One member of the group said of
Pat, "she was kind, funny, supportive, strong,
and a natural leader as well as being the only
person Margaret Mackenzie would allow to
drive her car!" Until she was 75, Pat was still
a poised downhill skier who carved graceful
turns on the slopes of Mt. Washington.
Because of her Haida heritage, she was
pleased to be named an honorary graduate of
the UBC Native Indian Teacher Preparation
program in 1988.
Pat has left behind her husband of 57 years,
Jim; a son, Chris, and a daughter, Susan; as
well as seven grandchildren and six great
grandchildren. She is also survived by her twin
brother, and remembered by many ex-students
and former faculty members.
DR. MELVIN LEE Professor Emeritus,
Family and Nutritional Sciences
Melvin Lee, scientist, professor, clinical
nutritionist, researcher, world traveler and
above all a grand husband, father, grandfather
and brother, died on March n, 2009, from
complications of Parkinson's disease. He was 83.
Mel marked many milestones in a life packed
full of living. Born in New York on January 5,
1926, the younger of two sons of Herman
Israel Lee and Rae (Panish), Mel graduated
with bachelor's and master's degrees in zoology
from the University of California at Los
Angeles and later earned his PhD in nutrition
at UC Berkeley. He married Beverley Mae Egan
Low on February 5, 1950, and they had four
children, three boys and a girl.
By 1965, when he took the family on
sabbatical to Guatemala and Mexico, he was
an assistant professor of Preventative Medicine
at UC Berkeley. In 1967, Mel was invited by
UBC to take up positions as a professor of
nutrition and director of the school of Home
Economics. It came as many such schools
across North America were modernizing into
science-based learning institutions. In one of his
first acts, Mel ushered in a graduate program of
nutrition. In 1973 he resigned as the director to
take up teaching and research full time.
Throughout his life, Mel sought to under
stand and teach his students the underlying
issues of clinical nutrition. He authored or
co-authored more than 60 research papers
documenting nutrition in the elderly and in
First Nations communities, and studied the
correlation between alcohol and diabetes in
pregnancy as well as the triggers for cleft palate
and fetal alcohol syndrome and more.
He became a Canadian citizen and took
frequent sabbaticals to study and teach at other
institutions. At different times, he called
London, Tokyo, Valencia, Hiroshima, Mexico
and Guatemala home. Mel eschewed religion in
favor of science but was a firm believer that
anyone who had a belief had a right to it.
Mel retired from UBC as professor emeritus
in 1996. He and Beverly moved back to Japan
where he taught nutrition at Hiroshima
Jogakuin University. They finally retired to
Vancouver in 2001. The Lee family wishes to
thank the incredible staff at VGH's Palliative
Care Unit and Nurse Marie on the 11th floor
ACE unit, as well as the 4th floor staff of UBC's
Purdy Extended Care Unit.
Are you:
□ Getting engaged or
married?
□ Starting a family or
welcoming a grandchild?
□ Buying a new home?
□ Starting a new job?
□ Retiring?
Graduating from university is a major milestone, but it's just the first
of many others. Whatever your stage in life, UBC Alumni Affairs would
like to mark your latest milestone with a gift and point you towards
some relevant alumni programs and campus resources. For information
see our website (www.alumni.ubc.ca/rewards/milestones.php) or
contact Alex at 604.822.3313 / aluminfoOalumni.ubc.ca.
www.alumni.ubc.ca/rewards/milestones.php
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