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The UBC Alumni Chronicle Mar 31, 1953

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 ALutuu
SPRING ISSUE
MAR.-APR., 1953
PUMENTARY ^M-MtMMmm:/.
You need
the background
too,
to know
the situation
For background information as well
as up-to-date facts about business conditions in Canada—read the Bank of
Montreal Business Review.
This four-page summary gives you
the broad picture of Canadian economic   developments   and trends.   Issued  every month, it contains   a  penetrating
analysis of the business situation and also detailed surveys of industrial and trade
conditions from coast to coast.
To receive the Business Review each month, simply drop a line on your
letterhead to the Business Development Department, Bank of Montreal,
119 St. James Street West, Montreal, P.Q., Canada.
Bank or Montreal
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WittM LETTERS   TO  THE   EDITOR
The Editor,
455 Adams St.,
Port Arthur,  Ont.
Dear Sir:
On page 12 of the Nov.-Dec, 1952 issue of the
Chronicle you have printed an article entitled
"U.B.C.'s 'Youngest' Grad", taken from the Province column "Talk of the town". I believe that
there is still room for argument as to whom U.B.C.'s
'youngest' grad might be. For the record I believe
this title should be given to Miss Marion Shaffer
who graduated in 1938 at the age of 58, having
reached that age the previous December. If I am
not mistaken she subsequently took her M.A. I am
relying on memory for these facts but a check of
the Registrar's files will either prove or disprove
them. Of the entire 1938 graduating class, Miss
Shaffer was the only member with whom President
Klinck shook hands, an honor which she deeply
appreciated. Miss Shaffer passed away in the fall
of 1952. Yours truly,
JAMES W. PURDY,
Sc. '41.
Dear Mr. Hall:
Thank you for the copy of the U.B.C. Chronicle,
the first I have received, I suppose because I am
an old-time member of Convocation.
These monthly or quarterly publications are an
excellent means of keeping the Alumni in touch
with each other and with their Alma Mater. I know
how much I appreciate Tower Topics (Chicago
University), which has been coming for a number
of years. I enclose a copy which may be of interest
to you, showing the kind of publication put out in
the United States.
I do not like to inject a discordant note, but unfortunately the first article I read was by Davide
Brocca (page 14). Tn this piece I note such expressions as "hell of a fate", "for God's sake", "but by
God".
Loggers, truck-drivers or illiterates of any type
sprinkle their conversation with profanity to cover
a lack of vocabulary, but why should a university
graduate (I presume) use such a crude device? I
am by no means a Puritan, but these unnecessary
expressions left a bad taste.
Sincerely,
ALLEN ROY EVANS.
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MARCH - APRIL, 1953
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Page 4
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE The U. B. C Alumni
CHBOniCLC
Published by the Alumni Association of
The University of British Columbia
Editor: Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm. '42, LL.B. '48
Women's Editor: Leona Sherlock, B.A., '50
Board of Management:
President Douglas Macdonald, B.A., '30
Past-President Gordon M. Letson, B.A.Sc, '26
First Vice-President Arthur H. Sager, B.A., '38
Treasurer G. Dudley Darling, B.Comm., '39
Second Vice-President Jean Gilley, B.A., '27
Third Vice-President—Dr. Harry V. Warren,
B.A., 26; B.A.Sc, '27
Chairman Publications Board Ormonde J. Hall,
B.Comm., '42; LL.B., '48
Executive-Director —Frank Turner, B.Comm., B.A., '39
Degree Reps.: Medicine, Dr. Peter Spohn; Law, Frank
Lewis, B.A. '49, LL.B. 'SO; Pharmacy, Doug. Denholm,
B.S.P. '51; Commerce, Don Miller, B.Comm. '47; Agriculture, Iain MacSwan, B.S.A. '42; Social Work, Richard
J. Clark, B.A. '41, B.S.W. '46; Home Economics, Audrey
Dunlop, B.H.E. '47; Physical Education, Hugh Marshall,
B.P.E. '50; Architecture, Harry Lee, B.Arch. '50; Applied
Science, Len Stacey, B.A.Sc. '24; Forestry, Jack Roff,
B.Comm. '47, B.S.F. '48; Arts, Margaret E. Clarke, B.A.
'32.
Members at Large: Dr. W. G. Black, B.A. '22; William H.
Birmingham, B.A. '33; Harry Franklin, B.A. '49; E>r. Fred
Grauer, B.S.A. '30; Mrs. Helen Harmer, B.A. '40; Aileen
Mann, B.A. '37.
Senate Reps.: Dr. Earle Foerster, B.A. '21; Dr. W. C. Gibson, B.A. '33.
Alma Mater Society Reps.: Raghbir Basi and Bill St. John.
Editorial Offices:
5 th Floor, Yorkshire House
900 West Pender Street Vancouver 1, B.C.
Business Offices:
Room 201, Brock Hall, U.B.C.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
VOL. 7, No. 1
MARCH-APRIL, 1953,
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
ARTICLES Page
WILL LONGHEAD      7
THIN GREY LINE OF ZEROES    10
HOME MANAGEMENT HOUSE      8
FEATURES
WOMEN  ' - .'....  16
PERSONALITIES    19
FRANKLY SPEAKING             — 21
Published in Vancouver, British Columbia, and authorized as second
class mail, Post Office Department, Ottawa.
> 27
^jror the lK.ecord . . .
The Chronicle Staff is always delighted when a
graduate with talent makes a first contribution to
the magazine and in this issue we are happy to
present a short screed written by Norman Klenman
that will take some of us back to the readings of
Sir Roger DeCoverleys Papers . . . for the sceptics
who aren't convinced about the work of our different alumni groups in campus life please read the
article about Home Management House on pages 8
and 9 and give the alumnae gals a big hand for their
efforts in this worthwhile project.
The Cover this issue is a repeat of an earlier one
only with the new wing of the Library included.
The Alumni-Development Fund hit $18,109.00
dollars this year but out of 12,000 more or less
graduates in the world only 2190 donors were listed
. . . what is the matter with the other 10,000 ... if
a good portion of that number gave we'd hit the
new objective of $50,000.00 in 1953 . . . some people
don't know when they're well off.
The Chronicle doesn't ordinarily record the
passing of its alumni members but the recent deaths
of Dick Palmer at Summerland and Audrey (Reifel)
Gourlay at Vancouver came as such a shock to so
many that we have noted their deaths in this issue
and bid farewetijto two graduates who brought
much credit to their University.
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Page 6
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
■ub.
'-zmmm HI til iCminbrciti
After t§? Hatful Mmntr of tlje 18tlf flkntttru, Sournala
By Norman Klenman
Will Longhead is a man newly arrived in our
town, who by his appearance and parts soon became a favourite in the Coffee Houses and a popular guest in the drawing rooms where love of the
arts is professed.
He is a man of height and distinct features,
pleasantly spoken and knowing of letters, the dance
and parnting, and adept at their practice.
His welcome here sprang from natural hospital-
it)-, and his position grew as the product of his
talents was placed before our notice.
A man. apparently, of taste and ability. Will
Longhead was nonetheless sparing in those things,
like poems and plays, on which one is ultimately
judged. But the quality of our town were only too
pleased to recognize talent, and each of Will's
snippets of poetry and theories of art were rightly
taken to indicate the strength of the work to come.
A welcomed star in the firmament of the Coffee
Houses. Will Longhead was quickly surrounded by
an eager court. He impressed them with the perspicuity of his mind and the novelty of his opinion.
Yet suspic'on of the man grew, for in spite of the
welter of little pieces of paper and new volumes
with which he came armed, in spite of his agile conversation, the man's great work was delayed.
(Enffee Sjouhpb
In time, as those who frequent the Coffee
Houses will, the more suspicious banded into a
clique whose principal pleasure was to sneer at Will
Longhead. Will himself stood above these unworthy practices. But even his friends began to
taste the bitter herb of suspicion. Why did Will
Longhead delay?
He was indeed a familiar figure; his conversa-
sations now gave the appearance of familiarity.
Not simply that they were oft repeated, but that
their obscure sources were sometimes discovered by
those in his audience who read widely. And there
was  general   embarassment   when   the  clique  who
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Will Longhead's paintings and the Continental
masters'.
Quickly, so quickly the change was hardly perceptible to the man hypnotised by his own talents,
suspicion of Will Longhead affected even the hard
corps of his  supporters.
Assailed everywhere, the man retreated to the
only trench of his building, which indeed another
had helped him build, and feared to venture far
forth.   His enemy, fear, was of his own creation.
Charged with pastiche, he held to the trench,
which he now claimed as his own and indeed as
the proof of his genius. There he scourged himself of a frenzy of righteous indignation at his
wounds real and fancied, and leapt out at the astonished world with arm lashings and cries of anger.
But being a coward he was quick to retreat when
challenged.
The town heaped their scorn upon him.
Will Longhead had sought to fabricate a reputation by placing imitation beside copy, copy beside
pastiche, pastiche beside plagiarism, binding them
together by his thin talent stretched thinner, and
sinking the whole structure in the mud of his ambition.
The building was not. by its nature, fit to stand.
A breath of wind collapsed it. and Will Longhead
stood revaled, naked, in the shivering pettiness of
his character, for all to see.
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Page 7 The Dining Room of the Home Management House
HOME   MANAGEMENT   HOUSE
Alumni women plan to support the Home Management House Building project as their special
objective in 1953.
What is a Home Management House?
ft is a model home built on a university campus.
It is a house, in which senior students in Home
Economics live and gain experience ... in living
together . . . and also in the practical and managerial
aspects of housekeeping, meal service, budgetting
and entertaining. The homemaking experience
gained in the period in the House is an essential
part of Home Economics training.
Why Make an Appeal for the Home Management
House Fund?
The House is needed. A reconditioned army hut
now in temporary use, is uneconomical to operate
and creates an impractical situation.
In the university building program other projects have prior claim on the building budget. Special assistance will make it possible to build the
House without delaying other campus projects.
$20,000. raised by British Columbia women in
the 1920's has been made available for the Building
Fund. A further $20,000. raised now would make
it possible to proceed with the building.
Page 8
Architects' Plans
The School of Architecture at the University has
made preliminary sketches. Plans are to build a
house in keeping with the requirements of the Canadian family.
The house will be in four parts: a central unit
for a group of four students, two apartments each
furnished to accommodate two students and a third
apartment for the instructor in charge of the course.
Each student will live first in the Targe unit, gaining experience in group management, and then progress into the smaller unit. In the plans, provision
is made to furnish each unit in a different manner
and on a different economic level.
The First $20,000.
The fund has a nest tgg of $20,000., an amount
that has already done good service for students.
It was raised originally in the 20's by members of
the Parent-Teachers' Association, assisted by other
women's organizations, to be used to establish a
course in Home Economics at the University of
British Columbia. For a short time, second year
students had options provided that were to give
them credit in Home Economics. But in the depression years expansion at the university was postponed and the course was abandoned. The $20,000.
fund was used at that time for a number of years to
provide   bursaries  to  help   send   British   Columbia
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICtE T*r?T,*£*B'EFT~
The Home Management House Living Room at the extreme left.  The other pictures show the students relaxing
students to other provinces to complete Home Eco-
nom'cs training.
Since 1943, there has been a Department of
Home Economics at U.B.C. At first it was housed
in army huts, but after a disastrous fire had destroyed this temporary accommodation, a modern
permanent building was erected on the campus. In
this emergency, funds were derived from a bequest
of $78,000. from the estate of the late Jonathan
Rogers, the payments of insurance on the destroyed
buildings and borrowing from the PTA Fund.
The Home Management House remains as a
major need. The scope of training to be given there
is wide. Every community throughout the province
benefits from the services of dietitians in hospitals,
residences, commercial restaurants and ^n laboratories ; of Home Economics teachers in the schools;
and of home economists with government services,
utility, equipment and food companies. These
graduates all receive practical training in the Home
Management House.
An Alumnae Committee has met to discuss
means of assisting this project. Members plan to
make the project known, and to interest women
throughout the province in supporting the Fund.
Alumnae at the first meeting—of necessity—
came from Vancouver. They included: JEAN GILLEY '27, MARGARET CLARK '32, AUDREY
DUNLOP,B.H.E.'47; FLORENCE MULLOY '34,
EVELYN CRUISE '29, MARY McDOUGAL '33.
DOREEN COURSIER. B.H.E. '50, CATHERINE
LONG, B.H.E. '49, ISOBEL BESCOBY '32,
MARY FALLIS '32; MRS. R. D. JAMES and
MRS L. M. SHEMILT, of the Faculty Women's
Club; MRS. W. COBURN of the University Women's Club; MRS. RAE and MRS. CONLAN, members of the original P.T.A. Committee; and EMILY
MAYHEW and YVONNE LOVE of the Home
Economics Teachers.
MISS BLACK, Director of the School of Home
Economics, and MISS HOLDER, Assistant Professor of Home Economics, are both working closely with the committee. JEAN GILLEY has been
appointed Chairman, Margaret Clarke, Secretary,
and Aileen Mann, Publicity Secretary.
Other alumnae in Kamloops, Salmon Arm,
Kelowna, Rossland, etc., have already been asked
to help the main committee. The committee appreciates their interest and the response that has
come so quickly from some centres.
The first Committee meeting was held in the
temporary Home Management House at the university, with the five students currently in residence
as hostesses. In planning their two weeks at the
House, they had set aside an evening to introduce
the Committee to their course as it was in progress. The meeting was part of their budget—of
time, of entertainment, of provisioning.
The students take turns at cooking, housekeeping, serving and managing. They showed the Committee attractive, well-kept rooms. Joan Lillie,
Home Ec. '53, outlined the work each girl was responsible for, in her time in the House. A spirit of
teamwork was apparent in the group of girls, and
the homelike atmosphere which they aim to develop in their time in the Home Management House
was most happily evident, too.
They gave this evening to the Committee as a
contribution on their part to the Home Management House Building Fund project, and the Committee members acknowledged their appreciation
by making a token donation to the Fund. In the
months ahead, the Committee members hope that
sufficient help will come to swell the total ... so
that $20,000. more will be in sight . . . and so that
the Building can go ahead.
Already two special projects have been planned
in aid of the Fund. The University Women's Club
of Vancouver is sponsoring two evenings at the
Totem Theatre, March 16 and 17. The Faculty
Women's Club is sponsoring the annual Home Economics Fashion Show in Brock Hall, April 15.
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MARCH-APRIL, 1953
Page 9 Thin Grey Lime of Zeroe
By Norfolk Howard (Arts '30)
I understand that the University has improved
vastly since I was there. And not entirely because
I am no longer there, either, for this wouldn't be
a very constructive solution of all its problems . . .
just to get rid of me. I mean, that's the Negative
Approach, surely. Getting rid of me is a step in
the right direction, but none of you can say this is
the Positive Approach. Though all of you have
just finished saying it, and I hope you think shame
to yourselves for a pack of Negativists and Defeatists. No, we've got to have something more
constructive than getting rid of old Howard, good
though this riddance is.
I know, I know . . . we must tear down in order
to rebuild. But we must (as the woman said at the
P.T.A. meeting), we must be educationally constructive and constructually educative. (Hear, hear.
Carried unanimous!). And what, I ask you, could
be more constructive than having an enormous battery of Public Relations Officers for the dear old
college? Public Relations is (or are) a very go-
ahead system indeed. It goes so far ahead, most
of us are miles behind, choked with dust. Public
Relations appeals (or appeal) to the imaginat'on.
Public Relations suffereth long and are kind. Public
Relations vaunteth not herself, are not. puffed up.
On the contrary. Or, as we say in the Department
of French, along about our fourth year, au contraire.
PUBLIC  RELATIONS  MEN
And what can a P.R. man tell us about U.B.C?
That's a good question. In a normal workaday P.R.
stint, he could tell us how the chemists are filling up
the old test-tubes to the very brim (O boy!), far
fuller than any other tubes in Canada (O baby!).
He could tell us how the Home Ec. girls are actually cooking porridge, with samples constantly examined by the Medical School. If these samples
were stitched into little bags, the P.R. man could
get into a light and human style by making some
remark about sewing your rolled oats, ho ho.
(They'd kill you, some of these madcap ad-men.
And vice versa.) And he could tell you how the
Players' Club has experimentally produced (and
otherwise mentally produced) a great big tiny little
huge play called "I Could Not Love Thee, Dear,
So Much. Did I Not Hate Thee More." A play
that has been a howling success everywhere men
howl, the world over, so that to experiment with
it now is bold indeed.
But does Public Relations (or do it) make the
most of the real human interest? Does it, for example, play up the few really crazy professors still
spraddling round the campus? I think not. And
how about giving us the complete lowdown on some
eccentric students also? I am not referring to the
girls who want to be the Sweetheart of some Italian
Scotchman called Signor MacKay, wrongly pronounced Sig. for short as if he were a mere fag or
gasper. Nor do I allude (if you will pardon the
second syllable of that verb) to part-time chorus
girls who think of Mardi Gras as any old day other
than Shrove Tuesday . . . and whose confusion isn't
limited  to the religious  calendar,  either.   Though
Modem Lecturer
of course, anyone who is covered with confusion
feels she needs very little other clothing.
Certainly not. I refer to the old-time eccentric
and crackpot, the man who (professor or student)
is what the French call an original or man
type. When the French say a man is a type, they
mean he isn't typical, which is very baffling. It
goes to show the French are types too, non? I
learnt my French outside U.B.C, by the way, so
the credit and blame belong elsewhere, and let the
chips off old Norfolk Howard fall where they may.
I like to think my mistakes are my own, which
shows I am not very educated, because a man isn't
educated until he realizes all his mistakes are attributable to some wicked conspiracy between his
mummy, his daddy, his nurse, and his teachers.
It occurs to me that the P.R. boys could stimulate the Public Imagination by scouring U.B.C. in
a search for genuine eccentrics. Professors whose
garments are their own invention . . . even if they
don't wear long woollen underclothes outside thejr
suits, as Herbert Spencer the philosopher did, to
keep the damp outside where it belongs instead of
next to his skin. Professors whose whole diet was
walnuts (have you ever notice that when a man
goes nuts, he quite commonly goes walnuts also?)..
Professors who look like a coelocanth, that fish who
still swims about, not knowing himself at least 50
million years out of date. Or like the pterodactyl,
the toothed bird. Or like the Belle Dame Sans
Merci, too, because their hair is long, their foot
is light, and their eyes are wild. Though we might
not want to shut their wild, wild eyes with kisses
four, you understand. And who call the students insolent puppies: ... as a professor more than once
addressed me.
Page 10
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE Old-Fashioned Lecturer
Speaking of their looks, you might hurriedly
suppose that the Present Day Professor, in our
little snapshot here, looks just as original in his
own way as does our picture of an Old Timer. If
so, you err. He looks exactly like thousands of
men who might be selling pop instead of selling
poetry, and you can't say this of the Old Timer, who
not only looks like himself but is of a toughness.
The human face is losing something, even on the
(Continued on Page 23)
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7476 Victoria  Drive, Vancouver,   B.C.
Telephone   FRaser 2128
Name
I
I   Address    	
I   Mail to:  Rosehall   Nurseries   Ltd.,
I P.O. Box 204,
Vancouver,  B.C.
_l
MARCH • APRIL, 1953
Page The Spirit of Adventure
CANADA has always been a challenge to
the adventurous. Her wealth was hidden, her
geography and climate raised obstacles to development. The stories of the men and women who
responded are the substance of Canadian history.
Today the spirit of adventure is as strong as
ever. But now explorers comb the wilderness from
the air with electronic devices for minerals undreamed of by Mackenzie and his companions in
their birch bark canoe. In laboratories, on
experimental farms, painstaking research workers
penetrate the unknown.
Countless Canadians are helping in the search
for better things. Through our more than 630
branches from coast to coast, in the outposts and
in cities and towns, we are an integral part of this
enterprise.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Over 630 Branches
to all points in Canada
orthern fm/ecfr/c
6653-1D
COMPANY   LIMITED
Page 12
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
t^tmtmm
^■■M^Mlfal DIPLOMA COURSES IN PUBLIC RECREATION
By Diana Sandford
U.B.C. will score still another first this Spring
when students from all over Canada successfully
complete the first nation-wide course of its kind in
the world—the Diploma Course in Public Recreation.
Most of the credit for establishment of this
course belong to The National Council for Physical
Fitness who had been aware of the rise in Public
Recreation in a number of communities and the
growing need for recreation on a community basis,
directed by trained leaders.
With the help of Federal scholarships the Council selected U.B.C. as the university best fitted to
launch this course. It is under the auspices of the
Extension Department.
Their students, they had no difficulty in finding.
Applications came from east and west, professional
and volunteer workers, 'Y', 'Pro-Rec' and 4-H
workers were eager for the opportunity to be
trained in this new field of recreation. Some already directing in community centres, were -subsidized by their town or province to receive a year's
education to further their knowledge and training
in their chosen vocation.
Professional and volunteer workers—from Y's,
Pro-Recs and 4-H clubs as well as a few community
centre directors—arrived in B.C. last September
from every Province in Canada except Newfoundland. A real cross-section of Canadian life, they
included high school graduates, university students,
teachers and office workers.
The Council sent Mr. Barry Lowes to administer
the course of study, to lecture in the course's major,
Organization and Administration of Recreation. A
graduate fr.om Toronto, with his M.A. from the
University of New York, Mr. Lowes has a keen
interest in public recreation and development of
community programmes.
English, Psychology, and Sociology departments
were called upon, for the Diploma Students' year
round academic studies. With their help, Mr.
Lowes, co-ordinated the involved timetable which
was necessary to cover the greatest number of skill
and study courses.
Although it was known that sports was only a
part of recreation, still it was acknowledged as an
important part and essential in any programme.
The Physical Education Department of this University was noted for both its skillful instructors and
its spac:ous facilities. So it was that early in the
Fall, attempting to learn the skills of golf, the students were found painstakingly digging holes in
the Women's playing field under the expert guidance of Albert Laithwaite. Or at other times, chasing tennis balls across the courts, supervised by the
watchful eye of Jack Pomfret.
Sport activities included basketball, swimming,
volleyball, bowling, golf and badminton. The correct techniques and rules of each game were taught.
Other subjects included square dance calling and
ballroom dancing with competent Physical Ed. instructors.
In all their social and athletic courses a degree
of skill was necessary, but the stress was laid on
the ability to adapt knowledge and put it to a concrete use.
As a creative art, drama offers the opportunity
for "getting away from it all," as an activity of
doing rather than watching, and drama is popular
in a community. Thus—-the curriculum included
drama. At the end of the course, two plays were
given—the students thereby applying theoretical
knowledge in a practical manner.
Music, was also included in the course. The Composition behind music and the need for music in a
community (including community singing!) were
discussed.
The Extension Department staff taught many of
the subjects in the course . . . such as farm forums,
4-H clubs and recreation in general in rural centres.
During the 8-week Youth Training School session in January and February, the class took an
Arts and Craft course.
Other subjects taken for short term courses
were, Public Relations, Group Discussions, Audio-
Visual Education, Public Speaking, and Professional Writing.
On completion of the academic year, eight weeks
of intensified field work will follow. This time will
be spent in community centres in the Greater Vancouver area, providing opportunities to put theories
into practise.
Other things have played a vital role in their
education at the University of British Columbia.
Co-operation in Inter-murals, participation in the
many clubs on the Campus, have contributed to
their knowledge.
This is the course of study that the 29 students,
who will graduate this session of '52-53, have undertaken. PUBLIC RECREATION is beginn'ng, and
should prove an increasingly popular and important
course at U.B.C.—first again!
NANAIMO BRANCH
Nanaimo Alumni Association held its branch
meeting on the 27th as planned, with a very good
attendance (around 80), and with a goodly representation from Duncan and Ladysmith.
BEST MIMEOGRAPH CD.LTD.
F.  A.   BEST,  MANAGER
A COMPLETE MIMEOGRAPH
AND LITHOGRAPH SERVICE
151 Vi WEST HASTINGS STREET
(Over Metropolitan Store)
VANCOUVER 3, B.C.
TAtlow
3742
MARCH-APRIL. 1953
Page 13 STAN COPP, Commerce '37 is proud
to announce the opening of
Vancouver d ~jrine5t C^xcluAive
IV len a ^3/i«
Stc
fen A
lore
MEN'S SHOES  LTD.
691 GRANVILLE ST.
DPP. THE BAY
3Rtrljari» Clnxtmt palmrr
Dr. Richard Claxton Palmer, 56, first graduate
in horticulture from the University of British Columbia, and director of Summerland Experimental
Farm died last month. Born in Victoria, Dr. Palmer
had been at the Interior Research Station for 33
years and was one of three men ever to receive the
Honourary Degree of Science from the University
of British Columbia.
H was a member of the first class to graduate in
1921 (from U.B.C.) and he took top academic honours for the class.
Dr. Blythe Eagles, Dean of Agriculture at
U.B.C. and an old friend of Dr. Palmer's said "he
had a broad concept of his field, and an ability to
get along with people and get things done. His
hobby was flowers and he made the desert bloom
at Summerland."
In 1949 he was named Summerland's "good citizen" and he leaves many friends throughout the
Province.
Audrey Mac (Smtrlay
Audrey (Reifel) Gourlay died at the age of 34
in Vancouver last month.
A graduate of the class of '41, Audrey made
many friends both as an undergraduate at U.B.C.
and after graduation, in California, where she resided until 1950 when she returned to Vancouver
with her family.
Possessing qualities that made her many friends,
she was a popular and worthy graduate of the
University.
Gilmour Suffers
for Film Fans
iiiiiiiiiin in
Everyone goes to the movies now and again and
we all see and suffer a proportion of what the
trade irreverently calls turkeys. But those moviegoers who follow Clyde Gilmour's column, "Screening The Films" regularly in The Vancouver Sun
sees fewer turkeys and suffer less. Mr. Gilmour,
no doubt to expiate a sin in a previous incarnation,
sees practically ALL the new picture plays and
delivers to his readers a sprightly account of
those he likes and those that pain him. Then the
readers take their choice. Read Gilmour and your
movie-going will be more efficient and pleasurable!
THE VANCOUVER
Phone: TAtlow 7141 for Daily Home Delivery
llllllllllllllliniilllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
Page 14
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE ^hzak
afztna cZditoziaLLu
UNIVERSITY SPIRIT
I take it all back.
This writer had prepared an editorial in two
parts, one for this time and another for the June
number, but its theme was wrong and you might
as well know about it. They were to be a sort of
Swan song for your editor who is giving up the job
after the summer issue to make way for someone
with fresh ideas. The editorials were designed to
give one man's ideas of what is going on at the
University of B.C. and when they were written it
appeared that the wonderful University spirit upon
which our Alma Mater was built was extinct. And
so it appeared.
But one Saturday last month, anyone who was
at the University Stadium and saw the scrubby
looking little Varsity rugby team beat California on
sheer grit alone, and then witnessed the spontaneous
demonstration accorded the team by the whole student section in the East Bleachers can have no doubt
that the University spirit is still very much alive and
that this generation of students is basically the same
as any other and the athletes who play for our team
are made of the stuff that will ensure the good
citizenry of tomorrow.
The U.B.C. spirit has been quieted somewhat
since the war but not killed. All that was needed
was something to shout about and it occurred
against California. After the years of losing basketball games, American football contests and being
subjected to overcrowded conditions on the campus,
the dull routine of staggered lectures and the uninspired teaching of temporary professors, the student body was thoroughly chastened by the effect of
war on its members and didn't look like the same
group in character that many of us knew.
CHALLENGES  MISSING
Further the old challenges were apparently missing. At least symbolically. The crusade for a new
campus site that faced the Trekkers was over, the
battle of the depression was finished, the University
had become a big institution and the feeling of
being a close group working for one cause, the
future of the University, was unknown to the new
student. Also a new money era in which money
was in abundance for a large percentage of the student body and still further out of the reach of most,
helped to split the cohesion of the student body
which at one time was a large happy family wherein everyone knew everyone else and some of the
profs, by their first names.
The University had become to many undergraduates a cold and impersonal place.
And nothing is worse than that type of feeling
for a University. People may criticise the antics of
the undergraduate but if enthusiasm is missing at
that age when will it appear?
MARCH - APRIL, 1953
ORMONDE
HALL
English rugby has had a desultory history during the past ten years on the campus playing second
fiddle to the American game. But those that play
that game best typify the University spirit because
they play it for the fun in it and usually don't care
if the stands are full or empty so long as a game
is scheduled and they participate. Ballyhoo for the
games are kept to a minimum and when a crowd
turns up it's because they expect to see something
worthwhile.
The California series was just that and the unabashed thrill that ran in the stadium at the final
whistle and the surge of the entire East Bleachers
section onto the field, was something to be remembered. The event may even go down in University history as the turning point at this time of
the revival of the faith of the student in the wonder-
fullness of the Alma Mater. And at the age of the
undergraduate something must be wonderful, and
better it be the University or its teams or its
faculty or achievements than any of the many unworthy institutions society faces today.
The team deserved the ovation. Shorthanded
writh many of its remaining players injured but still
playing and heavily outweighed, the U.B.C. team
through sheer fight and determination won the
game in the last ten minutes of play against as
formidable opponent as one could wish to see. It
looked like the scrubs against the regulars, so magnificently built and attired was the California team.
But when it was over the student crowd carried
their team off the field, refused to go home-after
the game and heard their boys, almost too weary to
stand, lean against each other and give three of the
best and a tiger for the Californians.
The cheers weren't heard, however, because the
Gon Bears had long since left the field without offering congratulations. Such is the way apparently
in the land where no one would think of playing a
game to empty stands or just for the sake of having
a good time.
Page 15 *
WOMEN
By LEONA SHERLOCK
The news in this issue has to do with travellers
and jobs.
Seems a great number of our alumnus will be in
the throng gathered along the Coronation route in
London, June 2nd. And for all of us who can't go
it will be a thrill to know that at least a few of our
friends are enjoying the excitement.
Two recent graduates who are packing their
bags for their Coronation trip are Diane Elworthy
and Doreen Rutledge. Dodie recently received her
diploma as a medical records librarian at St.
Michael's, Toronto.
Speaking of London, news from there recently
told of one of our graduates who has done well.
She's Gerry McDonnell who is the first woman
remedial gymnast at Highlands Hospital, one of
London's major nursing homes. She exercises the
patients and helps back to normal polio and arthritic cases and those with fractured limbs. She'll
soon be starting another course in Yorkshire and
after another year or two will return to B.C. to introduce English methods of remedial gymnasts to
our hospitals.
Met an interesting alumna on her recent visit to
the city. She's Helen G. McArthur of Toronto and
among her many accomplishments she's National
Director of Nursing Services for the Canadian Red
Cross. As if this isn't enough to keep her busy
she's also president of the Canadian Nurses Association.
*      *      *
Her Red Cross duties are in a coordinating and
consulting capacity among the various branches
across Canada. It necessitates her keeping up to
date with nursing methods both nationally and internationally. She's held this position for six years
and previously was Director of Public Health Nursing in Alberta. She attended the University of
Alberta and took her Public Health degree atUBC.
In connection with the Nurses' Association,
Miss McArthur was associated with a demonstration school in Windsor, financed by the Red Cross,
which was set up to see if nurses couldn't be
trained in a shorter time — two years instead of
three — if there was an independent school that
had full control of the student's time. She explained
that this would mean that student nurses would
only have to spend as much time actually nursing
patients and doing the menial tasks of nursing as
is necessary for their actual training. As it is now
student nurses spend a great deal more time than
is necessary in plain hard work. Dr. A. E. Lord was
evaluator of this school and found it very satisfactory. "All we need now is the money to set it up,"
Miss McArthur said.
MONTREAL TRUST
COMPANY
ffA Company that Cares for your
Affairs"
Services to Individuals and Corporations
• EXECUTORS & TRUSTEES
• EMPLOYEE PENSION FUNDS
• ENDOWMENT FUNDS
466 Howe Street Vancouver, B.C.
MArine 0567
J. N. BELL-Manager
WILLSON E. KN0WLT0N
LJptometridt
•
MARINE 801 1
823 Birks Building Vancouver. B. C.
Mary McAlpine has been doing public relations
for the Cancer Society for several months and in
February and March was hard at work laying the
foundations publicity-wise for the Cancer campaign.
An honour to UBC and to Vancover was the announcement a few weeks ag"o of the appointment of
iPhyllis F. Grant as supervisor of all ex social work-
 MAURICE'S	
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FAMOUS FOR SWISS and FRENCH FOOD
FROGS LEGS AU BEURRE NOIR . . . capers . . . parsley
FRENCH OMELETTES ... 20 different varieties
MILLE  FEUILLES STEAK  DINNER
ESCARGOTS de BOURGOGNE
BABA AU RHUM
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Open every day. including Sunday, from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Reservations: West 200
809 Park Royal West Vancouver, B. C.
Page 16
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE WOMEN
*
ers at the Indian Affairs Department at Ottawa.
After graduating from the University she spent
two years with the John Howard Society as a case
worker then went back to UBC in 1949 for her
social service degree. For the past two and a half
years she has covered the province as the department's first social worker among Indians in this
Province. In this capacity she has been as far north
as the Naas River and Fort St. James. She'll be
doing quite a bit of travelling in her new position
as there are now eight provinces with social workers among the Indians.
*      *      *
News of many of the alumni reads like a travel
folder. Bob and Cay Kerr are in the east and while
there will visit in Kingston with Joan and Jack
Collum and Ann and Russ Latham . . . Mary Lou
Gillies is in Australia . . . Shirley Malcolmson who
is training for a lab technician at the Toronto General has taken some time off to vacation in the Bar-
badoes . . . The Peter Cherniavskys (nee Ann McLennan) have gone to San Domingo to live . . .
Nancy Moscrop is in Hawaii on a holiday and from
there will go to Montreal where she'll become the
bride of Blair Paterson . . . Helen McKenzie is at
the Monkey Club in London . . . Mrs. Sidney Smith
is leaving soon for the Coronation . . . Mrs. Graeme
King spent part of the winter in Nassau . . . Mrs.
A. Donald Lauder was among Vancouverites wintering in California . . . Maureen Bell has gone to
Kentucky to live.
A
ean •••
for the Look of Fashion
The name 'Aljean' is synonymous with fine
tailoring in skirts and separates. Hand-tailored
in luxury-loomed fabrics, every garment is a
veritable fashion treasure.
You'll find them right here, in your University District.
"THE COLLEGE SHOP"
4409 West 10th Ave. ALma 2360
own
Select your lovely Bridal Gown in the seclusion of our
exclusive Bridal Salon . . . and if you desire all your
trousseau needs are planned there . . . Bridesmaids' Frocks
.' . . Your Going-away suit and coat . . . after five frocks,
sportswear . . . lingerie and evening dresses . . . Our
consultant will be most happy to assist you.
"The Shop With Personality"
2654 South Granville 917 Denman
CH.5025 PA. 5923
"Buy B.C. Products . . . Build B.C. Payrolls"
LOOK FOR THIS LABEL
. . Your Assurance of Top Styling
and Dependable Value . . .
SPORTS WEAR
SKIRTS, SLACKS AND JACKETS
SPORTS DRESSES
RAINCOATS AND  HOUSECOATS
MATERNITY WEAR .
suits
skirts, slacks and
DOROTHY-JEANNE SPORTSWEAR LTD.
3511  Main St., Vancouver, Canada
MARCH - APRIL, 1953
Page 17 PROCTER & GAMBLE
Career  Opportunities
The Procter & Gamble Co. of Canada, Ltd., has
several openings for young college men between 21
and 28 years of age. The men we seek will be
chosen for promise and ability, and may be located
in other parts of Canada, depending on the type
of training to be given.
We are looking for men whom we can train to
take over responsible positions in each of the following fields:
Sales Management, Marketing Management, and
Office Management. We are not seeking specialists
in each field; but rather men with good general
ability. Each applicant will be considered on general
merits as applied to the field he wishes to enter.
SALES MANAGEMENT
The men we seek must be ambitious and willing
to learn. Selling experience is not a necessity, as
complete training is provided within our sales
organization. Most of this training is given on the
job; selling methods are demonstrated, techniques
taught in the field. This program of continual on-
the-job training makes it possible for a man to
develop as swiftly as his abilities permit, prepares
him to assume further responsibility through training other men. Our policy of promotion from within
starts here, and with guidance from experienced
executives, a man of proven ability soon advances
to management assignments.
MARKETING MANAGEMENT
Men employed in this work are trained to accept
responsibility in our Advertising and Sales Promotion departments. Their positions involve work in
three separate fields:
BRAND MANAGEMENT—working with the Company's Manufacturing Division on product development; with the Sales Department on promotion
development; and with an Advertising Agency on all
phases of planning for consumer acceptance of individual brands.
MERCHANDISING—Developing store promotions,
premium articles, and retail selling aids. Managing
sampling and couponing operations, and operating
contests, mail-ins and similar promotions.
MEDIA—Guiding the Company in the investment of
Advertising appropriations. This includes working
with Advertising Agencies in formulating over-all
advertising programs, and co-ordinating the Company's entire advertising program for all brands.
Men in this field will also represent Procter &
Gamble in all negotiations with radio, magazines,
newspapers and other media used in advertising.
The men we seek to fill these responsible positions must have the ability to work closely with
many types of people. They must have a high degree
of imagination and aggressiveness, as well as more
than their share of good judgment.
OFFICE MANAGEMENT
A career offering unlimited opportunity in management is open to those interested in the administrative functions of our organization.
District Sales Offices, located in key cities, control
local operations of the Company. These offices offer
excellent training to those who appreciate the necessity of developing their ability to direct the efforts
of others. This training leads to office management
positions bearing increasing responsibility. Virtually all operations of the company are met in these
offices, and the training received will equip the
trainee for advancement to other administrative departments within the company—accounting, purchasing and traffic, if this is desirable. The men chosen
to fill these positions must have particular ability
to work with and direct others, and the ambition to
further develop that ability. Previous experience
can be an asset, but complete training is given within
the company, so that intelligence, imagination,
aggressiveness and good judgment are sought first
in applicants.
WHERE YOU WOULD FIT IN
New men are assigned to the types of work outlined above according to the abilities and inclinations of the individual. New men learn by actually
handling responsible jobs in the groups to which
they are assigned. They work with experienced
employees whose duty it is to see that they are
trained as quickly as possible. We feel that a man's
capabilities are developed more readily when he is
drawing heavily upon past training and ability right
from the start.
These jobs develop good all-round business men
capable of shouldering broad management responsibilities. There are many advancement opportunities
in all departments.
THE QUALIFICATIONS WE LOOK FOR
For all positions, we seek, above all else, men
with a capacity for learning, men whom we feel can
quickly advance to positions of real responsibility.
Educational background, of course, plays an important part. Previous experience is not necessary, since
we have thorough training programmes in all departments. We necessarily employ on a very selective basis for these positions. However, the right
man, once he is employed, will receive sound training
and can look forward to highly satisfactory progress
with regard to job satisfaction and financial reward.
EXAMINE  YOUR   QUALIFICATIONS   CAREFULLY
If you feel you qualify for any of the above-listed positions, write, giving full details
covering your background and experience, to:
R. H. IRWIN, District Manager
THE PROCTER & GAMBLE CO. OF CANADA, LTD.
654 Burrard Street — Vancouver 1, B.C.
Page 18
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE -fr
PERSONALITIES
rt
RDGERS
A. Hugo Ray, Arts '23, one of Vancouver's most
popular lawyers is the new Reeve of West Vancouver ... an entertainer in his own right when
he puts his mind to it, Hugo was associated
with the old Beacon theatre which he administered
as part of an estate from about 1932 to 1944 . . .
long interested in West Vancouver municipal affairs
he is pointing the way for other U.B.C. graduates
to serve in their communities ... as he puts it he
is not in "politics" but in "municipal administration."
Johnny Sparrow, who spent over two years on
the university campus studying history and political science is the new chief of Vancouver's Mus-
queam Indians ... 22 years of age, Chief Johnny
Sparrow has some 270 subjects.
Sophie De la Haye represented her Alma Mater
at a unique ceremony recently when she read out
greetings when the name of U.B.C was called out
at the congregation of Ibadan University College,
India.
Geraldine McDonnell, 24-year-old U.B.C. graduate is the first woman remedial gymnast at Highland Hospital, one of London, England's leading
nursing home . . . she took her B.A. here and became an English teacher and games instructor before taking up her present post last August.
Hugh Keeleyside is now director-general of the
Technical Asssistance Administration of United
Nations in New York . . . one of the most important posts in the organization he is the man who
tries to put into practice the official UN view that
people of the "underprivileged countries" can
greatly benefit their lot if their resources, labor and
capital are put to better use.
J. V. Rogers, B.A.Sc. '33. is the Assistant Chief
Engineer of CM & S at Trail.
Keith Taylor, 27-year-old Victorian, has been
appointed Secretary-Treasurer of Saanich District
... A war veteran. Taylor attended U.B.C. after
the war and graduated in 1949 with a Batchelor of
Commerce degree.
The U.B.C. Players Club alumni gained new
honours at the recent B.C. Drama Festival with the
award for the best presentation of a group went to
"Volpone", the offering of the Players Club Alumni
of U.B.C, directed by Peter Mainwaring and Philip
Keatley . . . Keatley also carried off the best actor
award for his role as "Mosca", in the same play.
A school of Dentistry on the University campus
was discussed recently between Vancouver dentists
and U.B.C. officials.
The Red Cross got strong support from the
University of British Columbia again this year when
our students won what they called "the blood letting" championship of Canada with 79% participation . . . Next was Universitv of Montreal with
72.6%.
Dr. J. Ranton Mcintosh, Professor of Education
and Psychology and director of summer session at
the University of British Columbia, has been appointed Director of the School of Education. ITe
succeeds the late Dr. Maxwell Cameron . . . Dr.
Mcintosh is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan and received his Ph.D. at Columbia University in New York.
Dr.  David M. L.  Farr,  Analysis Professor and-
Chairman, Department of History, Carlton College,
received a degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Oxford
in November, 1952.
James A. Gibson, Arts '31. Dean of the Faculty
of Arts and Science, Carlton College has been heard
in recent months on the trans-Canada network of
the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, both on
Capitol Report as a book reviewer in "Critically
Speaking", "The Incredible Canadian" and a special
speaker on the subject "Mr. Mackenzie King and
the Blunt Pencil".
MARCH-APRIL, 1953
Page 19 MRS, MARY   I.  ROGERS
First Administrative Staff Member Dies
Many graduates of the University of British
Columbia, who, between the years of 1913 and
1937 had occasion to pass through the offices of the
President, will recall Mrs. Mary I. Rogers, a quiet,
competent woman who was the first member of the
administrative staff to be appointed, and will regret
to learn of her recent death.
Mrs. Rogers had come to British Columbia as
secretary to President Wesbrook in August, 1913,
and served in that capacity to President Klinck also
until she was superannuated in 1937. Through all
those years Mrs. Rogers acted as secretary to the
Board of Governors and to the Senate as well, and
her knowledge of University matters was phenomenal. In her quiet retirement she continued to
take a lively interest in all that pertained to the
University to which she had devoted so much of her
entire life.
Concerning Mrs. Roger's service to the University, the following statetment, prepared at the time
of her retirement conveys some idea of the high
esteem in which she was held by her associates:
"When Dr. F. F. Wesbrook assumed his duties
as first President of the University of British Columbia, he chose as his private secretary Mrs. Mary
I. Rogers who had been associated with him in a
like capacity in the University of Minnesota. The
wisdom of his choice was quickly demonstrated
and abundantly justified. In her person were happily combined all those qualities which are sought,
but which are rarely found, in one apointed to this
position.   Courteous, capable and surpassingly effi
cient in everything which pertained to her office,
Mrs. Rogers, throughout the twenty-four years of
her active connection with the institution, a connection which terminated on August 15th, 1937,
established a reputation for excellence in public
service which has become a tradition, and which
will long continue to exert a powerful nfluence in
the personal and corporate life of the University."
PR, WILDER   PENFIELD
U.B.C. Doctorate of Science Wins Order of Merit
Dr. Wilder Penfield, who holds the Honorary
Doctorate of Science from U.B.C, was awarded the
Order of Merit in the recent Queen's New Year
List in recognition of his outstanding work as
Director of the Montreal Neurological Institute at
McGill University.
Born in Spokane, Wash., he was a Rhodes
Scholar from Princeton, and during his Oxford
vacations, was active with the American volunteer
medical forces in France early in the First World
War. He was closely associated with Dr. Wes-
brook's early confrere Sir Charles Sherrington,
O.M., and carried the physiological teachings of
the latter into the neurosurgical operating room,
in the study of epileptic patients particularly. He
became a Canadian citizen in 1934 with the opening
of the Montreal Neurological Institute and is on the
National Research Council.
Dr. Penfield gave the Fall Congregation Address
at U.B.C. in 1946, entitled "Where Shall Wisdom
Be Found?" He was also an expert advisor to the
Senate Committee on the Medical School.
GIFT FOR
At graduation time, a watch
from Birks is always
appropriate, always acceptable.
Choose from a wide selection
of exclusive models.
A. Challenger, 17-jewel movement,
lOkt.  yellow  gold-filled  case  70.00
B. Rideau, 17-jewel movement,
lOkt. yellow gold-filled case 44.00
BIRKS
JEWELLERS
Page 20
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
aiNtita FRANKLY   SPEAKING
When speaking of the excellent and untiring
efforts of the Hon. Eric W. Hamber, then U.B.C.'s
Chancellor, this column suggested that most of us
seem to take his great and entirely voluntary work
for granted.
It's probably just human to not understand nor
appreciate a tremendous contribution, but surely
a little recognition now and then would go a long
way in personally thanking men and women who
give generously of themselves in active support, of
our free institutions.
By the same token, a great deal of credit is due
to Norman A. M. MacKenzie, a leader in every
sense of the word. In just under ten years of his
Presidency, our University has maintained a high
academic standard and has expanded its services
and facilities phenomenally. Without doubt, Dr.
MacKenzie has brought U.B.C. closer to the people
of this Province and has told this institution's story
effctively all over the Continent.
Once in awhile . . . including right now! . . let's
join with others in paying tribute to this gentleman,
scholar and top administrator and wish him continued success in building an ever better U.B.C. in
the future.
ALUMNOTES . . . After a year with the Canadian
forces in Korea,' Norman E. Cooke (B.A.Sc. '45)—
which included a Mention-in-Dipatches — is now
taking post-grad work in Chemical Engineering at
M.I.T. His wife (nee Pat Salter, B.A. '47) reports
also that Norm plans to return to his position as Associate Chemist, Pacific Fisheries Experimental
Station in a couple of year. Son Terry (aged 4) is
also currently studying—at Harvard's Nursery
School! . . . Brock Ostrum (author of the now-
campus-famous Ostrum Plan for Athletics) is now
Recreational Leader at Sunset Memorial Community Centre . . . Bert Henderson ('39) informed us
that son Cliff (B.A. '48) is now an M.D. and is
interning at Toronto General ... A "World of experience" — literally —• is about the best way to
describe Miss B. M. Wellington's (B.A. '27) activities during the past 16 years. Miss Wellington,
currently on a 3-month holiday, dropped into the
alumni office on her recent visit to the campus.
She's been with the U.N. latterly and has been in
constant demand as a speaker since her arrival in
Vancouver . . . Just in case it's not reported elsewhere, be it known to all that the Geoff. Woodwards (nee Lucy Berton '43) of 4649, W. 9th, Vancouver, have a son . . . and Janet and Pierre Berton
(a pair of B.A. '41's) have a daughter . . . "We certainly appreciate the Chronicle. It has a unifying
influence on U.B.C. grads" ... so sayeth Yvette
(Morris) and John Bayfield, B.A. '47 and B.S.A.
'47, who now call Chilliwack home . . . "Boosted upstairs" by his company is D'Albert Town (B.Comm.
'49), now Fleet Jobs representative, Montreal Zone
for General Motors. Congratulations D'Albert! . . .
Richard Sephton ('51) is now "ph-d-ing" (Philosophy and History) at the University of Nebraska
. . . It's "Flying Officer M. F. Chapin" now. Mac,
a Kelowna native, reports that there are at least
BY
FRANK J. E. TURNER
EXECUTIVE-DIRECTOR
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
two other U.B.C. alumni at the R.C.A.F. station in
London. Ont.—S/L Roy Haines (B.A. '40) and
former Thunderbird rugger captain F/O Barrie
Morris (B.Comm. '48) . . . "Remember me to any
in the Classes of '47 of '48" says Norm. Klenman
(B.A. '47), now back in Canada with the National
Film Board, Ottawa. Classmates kindly note . . .
Another office visitor was Lieut (E) Frank Dayton,
R.C.N., (B.A.Sc. '50), during a spot of leave.
Spring is a good time to talk about Christmas
cards—one of the most unusual of which received
at U.B.C. last December being that sent by Mr.
and Mrs. R. G. de la Haye (nee Sophie Witter, B.A.
'34)   from  Kano,  Nigeria.   Card  featured  a  camel,
(Continued on Page 26)
MOW!
LIFE INSURANCE AND
YOUR MONEY BACK
A BRAND NEW SUN LIFE PLAN WHICH:
Provides insurance protection to age 65.
Returns all  basic  annual  premiums  paid  if
assured lives to 65.
Is available for male and female
lives ages 15 to 50.
At 65, the funds can be (a) taken in cash; (b) used to
purchase a paid-up policy for the original sum assured and
the balance taken in cash or as guaranteed income; (c) used
to provide an annuity; (d) left on deposit at a guaranteed
rate of interest.
Inquire    now    about    this    remarkable
new Sun Life plan.   Just call or write:
LARRY WRIGHT (B.A.'3D
Supervisor Vancouver   Unit
Royal Bank Bldg.
PAcific 5321
SUN LIFE OF CANADA
MARCH - APRIL, 1953
Page 21 U.B.C. Defeats California Bears To Win World Cup
The University of British Columbia Rugby team
won the world cup on Saturday, March 14th, by
defeating the California Golden Bears 9-6 in the
final game of a four-game series.
The teams each won two games of the series
but the Thunderbirds took possession of the trophy
by outscoring the Californians 27-26 over the four
contests.
The final game was one of the most thrilling in
the history of the Cup series, and was won by Bob
Morford of the Thunderbirds who kicked three penalty goals, thereby scoring all the points for the
University team, the first time this has happened
in the history of the competition.
It will also be the first time in the history of the
Inter-Collegiate matches that the series was won
by the narrow margin of one point, and the U.B.C.
team had to come from behind starting the final
game two points down. Lacking three of their
starting players and playing the last half short of
the services of Bill Mullholland, the Varsity hook,
and with several of their performing players injured
in various degrees by the hard playing tactics of
the Golden Bears, it appeared mid-way through the
last half that the Varsity team, down by a score of
6-3 would lose the cup.
However, in the last ten minutes of the game,
Bob Morford kicked two penalty goals to add to his
earlier one booted in the first half, and the game
ended with the Californians desperately trying to
draw even.
After the game was over the entire student
bleachers section rushed out into the field and car
ried the team off the field and tore down the goal
posts at the south end of the field.
It was one of the finest examples of University
spirit displayed on a campus playing field in many
years, and to many in the stands it indicated a
revival of the old University spirit.
The first two games of the series were played in
Berkeley, and California won the first game 6-3
with U.B.C winning the second, 9-6. Upon return
to the Varsity campus the first game was won on
the Thursday by California, 8-6, and the final game
was won 9-6 by U.B.C, giving them their one point
edge.
EPITAPH
Here in this funereal park
The gates are locked soon after dark
Ijest anyone should come and touch
Bodies no one values much.
Who would steal, by what device,
A corpse that cannot fetch a price f
Even those who held him dear
Have no motive to be here.
Who would leap the spiky fence.
The iron gate, the bar immenset
Men who live and men who've died
Xeed no boundary fortified.
God has made a quickest hedge
To border off life's outer edge.
A hedge no live man ever thought
To penetrate.  These gates are nought.
D. H. B.
One of the best sources of security
and contentment is your money in
the bank. It is never too early to
start a savings account.
THE BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA
Page 22
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE OFFICE ASSISTANCE
(VANCOUVER) LIMITED
EXPERT STENOGRAPHY
— IN YOUR OFFICE
OR OURS
207 - 535 HOMER ST., VANCOUVER 3, B.C.
A Large Staff of
^tifg^flMU
EXPERT
jfljf       ^m :
STENOGRAPHERS
miTr
Available Immediately
rtr     ;
£fj%
im/*y j
JOAN   WHITE
Manager
.   WKtk      *'
HOURLY-DAILY-WEEKLY
Mi'      '
f          ^*r-'S*<~*
* Stenographers
Legal
Insurance
WINIFRED  BLOWN
Personnel  Manager
+ Machine  Operators
Bookkeeping
* Telephone Dictation
Calculating
Comptometer
Dictaphone
* Language Translations
* Mimeographing
Switchboard
* Telephone Answering
* Accountancy and
+ Convention   Reporting
Bookkeeping
* Office Space
* Typing
* Desk Space
* Secretarial Work
* Mail Addresses
THE GREY  LINE OF ZEROES
(Continued from Page II)
campus. So it is up to the P.R. boys to salvage what
is left of it. And to let us know what goes on behind the face too, for all is not well even there.
I dare say they still have queer professors and
students today. But they have become more furtive,
in an effort at self-preservation. It is up to the P.R.
blokes to dig them out, lest we get the impression
that the faculty and student body are just a thin
grey line of zeroes, a tired grey smudge, and not
the colorful bunch that once endeared itself to us.
Perhaps unfairly, we get the idea that individualism
is dying out. As it certainly is dying, in the outer
world ... it is not only dying, it is being executed,
and many of its executioners hold college degrees
in school-teacherism, psychology, and salesmanship.
But inside the college there should be no death,
even for individualism. Inside this quiet retreat,
this oasis, this little world of its own, a man should
be as crazy as God meant him to be.
For, as a wise man observed, it is only through
the cracks in your brain that the happiness can seep
in. And I think it is up to the P.R. fellows to reassure us, and to report that all is still well with
the old school. To tell us, in effect, that the faculty
and students are still having a great race or competition to see who can go nuts first. That would
warm our tired and chilly old hearts.
r
The Biggest Name in Swim Suits
SUN   CLOTHES
TEE   SHIRTS
SWEATERS
KNITTED   SUITS
Wherever you find the Jantzen label—
you have found the best design, in tailoring  and  fit.    Look  for  the   Red   Diving
Girl, your assurance of quality.
JANTZEN OF CANADA LIMITED
Canada's Best Known Apparel Name
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MARCH - APRIL, 1953
Page 23 DEVELOPMENT FUND STRIVES FOR
Plans for reaching the 1953 Alumni-U.B.C. Development Fund Objective of $50,000 were explained to Dr.
Xonnan MacKenzie by Aubrey F. Roberts, left, chairman, and A. T. R. Campbell, right, vice-chairman, at
the Alumni Fund dinner in Brock Hall.
LATEST     FUND     FIGURES
1205 Donors   -   -   $13,010.00
Fifty in '53!
This slogan was adopted by enthusiastic Alumni
Fund workers at the annual dinner in Brock Hall
on Thursday, March 19, when proposed by Aubrey
F. Roberts, Arts '23, chairman of the 1953 Board of
Directors.
"We're setting our sights very high this year,"
Mr. Roberts declared, "but an objective of $50,000
is not beyond our reach if everyone who has an
interest in U.B.C. does his share."
Last year, he said, 2190 donors contributed
$18,109. If the number can be increased to 3,000
(out of a total alumni list of 12,000) the total should
reach $25,000. The Special Efforts division under
Mr. Justice J. V. Clyne should bring in $10,000, the
Home Management House under Miss Charlotte
Black and Miss Jean Gilley should raise another
$10,000 and the Convocation Founders and Friends
of the Library, $5,000.
There are several new factors in the Alumni
Fund this year. One is the Special Efforts division
under the general chairmanship of Mr. Justice Clyne
which is contacting business and professional men
and firms who should have an interest in U.B.C.'s
Page 24
development. Hon. Mr. Clyne is being assisted by
Howie Cleveland, B.Comm. '33, and William Mercer, B.Comm. '43, in Special Names and Harry
Andrews, B.Sc. '20, and Howard Wright, B.A.Sc.
'32, in Business and Industry.
Another is the Convocation Founders committee headed by Cecil Killam and J. Alex Walker, who
were members of the first convocation in Victoria
in 1912. This group includes all who were members
of convocation up to 1918 and their special objective
is to raise funds for the preparation and publication
of a history of the University.
A third special committee is the Friends of the
Library, now in the process of formation, in which
L. W. McLennan, B.A. '22, of Los Angeles, A. L.
Drennan, B.A. '23, of San Francisco, and Miss Anne
Smith of the library staff are interested.
Dr. Norman MacKenzie, who addressed the dinner meeting, thanked Alumni Fund directors and
class representatives for their interest and outlined
some of the University's needs which can not be
met from government appropriations or student
fees.
"Universities can not operate like private businesses," he said. "If a college is going to be a top
flight institution it has to have top quality instruc-
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE $50
•   I If
1953
ALUMNI FUND'S 1953 DIRECTORS
A   roll  call  of   1953   directors  was  a  feature  of  the
Alumni Fund dinner.   For those who missed the luncheon,
here is the list:
Chairman—Aubrey F. Roberts
Vice-Chairman—A. T. R. Campbell
Advisory Committee—Mr. Justice J. V. Clyne
Committee Chairmen—Howie Cleveland, William Mercer,
Ernie  Perrault, Miss Jean Gilley Cecil  Killam
1916 —Mrs. A. M. Menzies
1917 —W. T. Abercrombie
1918 —Mrs. F. B. Sexsmith
1919 —Mrs. G. C. Robertson
1920-21—Harry Andrews
1920—Alf Swencisky
1921—Mrs.  Art  Lord
1922 —Ralph Argue
1923 —Reg.  Hodgson
1924-25—John S.  Burton
1924—H. T.  Goodwin
1925—H.  Henderson
1926      —Mrs.  Bert Wales
—Frank Barnsley
—Mrs. J. R. Pollock
■—-Mrs. J. E. Eades
—James A. Pike
Frank Buckland
—Howard R. Wright
•—-W. H. Birmingham
—Arthur Johnson
—Arthur Harper
—Peter Sharp
—Ben Stevenson
—Aileen Mann
1939-40—Graham  Darling
1939—Wilf Stokvis
1940—Mrs. Helen Harmer
1941      —Hector MacKay
—-Dr. Joiner
—Honoree Young
—Jim   Nevison
—Barry Sleigh
—Ken Macgowan
■—Ted Kirkpatrick
—Herb Riehl
—Ray Dewar
—W. McGavin
—George Cumming
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
tors. It has to keep up its plant, no matter what the
cost, and it can't pass the increases on to its customers. There is no university in the country which
charges its students high enough tuition fees to
cover the cost. That is why private giving like the
Alumni Fund is so important."
A special feature at the dinner was the presentation to Carlton Collard, B.A. '22, of a jeweled
U.B.C. ring in recognition of his special contribution to the annual Boxing Day dances for the past
PITMAN BUSINESS COLLEGE
Secretarial Training
Stenography
Accounting
Typewriting
Dictaphone
Comptometer
DAY AND NIGHT CLASSES
ENROL AT ANY TIME
BROADWAY AT GRANVILLE CHerry 7848
Gertrude M. Savage
B.A.,   P.C.T.
Principal
Joan  M.  Rayment
P.C.T.
Asst. Principal
A feature of the Alumni Fund dinner in Brock Hall
was the presentation to Carlton Collard, B.A. '22,
right, of a U.B.C. jeweled ring. The presentation
was made by Douglas Macdonald, left, president of
the Alumni Association, in appreciation of Carlton's
contribution to the success of the Bo.ving Day dances
during the past ten years.
ten years. The presentation was made by Douglas
Macdonald, B.A. '30, president of the Alumni Association.
A male chorus recruited from membres of the
University Musical Society contributed to the program several rousing numbers under the baton of
Harry Pryce, director of the Musical Society.
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519 Granville St.
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MARCH-APRIL, 1953
Page 25 STATISTICS
MARRIAGES
John Mallery Watson to Jean Laura Wills.
David MacLachlan to Jean Gunn.
William Ristenpart to Joan Moore.
Stewart Manson to Helen Clarke.
Bongt Hedberg to Dolores Ford.
Robert Blackhall to Joan Hodson.
Lome Brooks to Jean McAllister.
William Donnolly to Tamea Rice.
Fred Moonen to Elaine Boon.
John Fuoco to Patricia Skinner.
Maurice Soward to Evanthie Limperis.
Ralph Arseneau to Joanne Van Antwerp.
Graham Baillie to Clare Macgillivray.
Lawrence Dyer to Diana Marler.
Bruce Arenesen to Lois Whimster.
Les Bewly to Bessie Ridley.
Ronald  Leslie, B.Comm.  '51   to Evelyn  Walling,
B.h.e. '48.
FRANKLY   SPEAKING
(Continued from Page 21)
complete with rider on one side and a very fine picture of the five de la Hayes on the other—Sophie
and Ray, and daughters Annette and Joy and son
Ray . . . Past-President Bruce A. Robinson (B.A.
'36) lunched with Dr. James Gibson (U.B.C.'s
Rhodes Scholar in '31), Dean of Carleton College
during a recent Eastern trip . . . Congratulations
to the enterprising Penticton Branch for successfully sponsoring appearance of the Winnipeg Ballet
. . . D. Stuart Conger (B.A. '49) is now Psychologist, Personnel Appraisal Unit, Employee Development Service, Industrial Relations Division C.G.E.
A nice promotion but one tough title! . . . After
many a moon, Don Madsen ('37) visited the campus
recently. The Madsens now have two boys and a
girl, and their own wholesale produce business in
Roseburg, Oregon . . . Good luck to W. A. D. (Bill)
Hare (B.Comm. '47) in his new position as Manager, Insurance Dept. of Elgin  Investments.
Jhe ^Trollies
for your
Wedding Reception
All the gracious appointments of a lovely, spacious home
with luxuriously furnished reception room, lounge, living-
room and dining-dancing room for your wedding guests.
Because of the popularity of "The Hollies" reservations
should be made well in advance.
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Campbell will be pleased
to assist you in planning the details.
CATERING  FOR WEDDINGS, TEAS, COFFEE PARTIES
ZJne J^rolties     Weddinq /deception J*ri
tollies
6468 East Blvd. at 49th
9
\eceplion ^rtome
KErr. 6904
BIRTHS
To Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Laird Cliff (June Brown),
a daughter, Diana Dorrance.
To Mr. and Mrs. Fred H. Brooks of Climax, Colorado (Billie Wadds), a daughter, Lois Jean.
To Mr. and Mrs. Val Sears (Meg Cameron), of Toronto, a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Wilf Stokvis, a daughter, Susan.
To Mr. and Mrs. Arnold B. Cliff, (Nancy Allen), a
daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. William Sauder (Marjorie Ann
Munnis), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ready (Nancy Grant),
a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Michael Robson (Audrey Wilson),
a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Johnson (Joanne O'Fla-
herty), a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Peter Birks (Joan McLean, twin
daughters.
To Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Selman (Mary Mare), of
Ottawa, twins, Mark Richard and Janet Elizabeth.
To Mr. and Mrs. Donald Alan Sutton (Betty Best),
of U. of Manitoba, a daughter, Pamela Elizabeth.
To Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Fields (B.Comm. '43)
(Betty Millins, B.A. '44), a daughter.
To Dr. and Mrs. R. G. Wilson (B.A. '47) (Marjorie
Weber, B.Ec. '46), a daughter, Catherine Ruth.
To Dr. and Mrs. John Davis (Margaret Worthing),
a son, John, in Ottawa.
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Page 26
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
■Man
turn* ii
and our new C-l-R Air Compressor
is really doing a job!"
The records and reputation of Canadian Inger-
soll-Rand's new All-Canadian portable air compressor have already started growing. Within
a few short months Canadian construction men
have seen the All-Canadian start that impressive "on-the-job" proving so essential to new
equipment's success. New owners of the All-
Canadian have been unstinting in their praise
of the unit, and with good reason, for the All-
Canadian is a new concept in portable air
compressors. Lighter and smaller than the
models it supersedes, it gives much more than
105 cfm units and has many other outstanding
advantages.
125 cfm actual
delivered capacity selected as the most efficient and economical for contractors, municipalities, public utilities, steel erectors and
others.
Resultant lower towing costs,
ease of handling and set-up save man-hours
and dollars.
The complete story of the All-Canadian is given in a
new, fully-illustrated folder. It will pay you to telephone
or write our nearest distributor today.
A-32
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ASK    OUR    BRANCH     FDR    THE    NAME    DF    YDUR    NEAREST    C-l-R    DISTRIBUTOR Mr. L.G.R. Crouch,
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by manufacturing equipment for the generation and transmission of electric power
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as well as a wide range of products that put it to work
At one time or another, almost everybody
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or a simple fuse plug, an electric motor
which runs an elevator or the electronic
control that speeds thenewspaper presses,
a labor-saving appliance in the home or
a two-way radio that summons a taxi.
Canadian General Electric is proud to
have played a part, for sixty years, in the
ever-growing electrical development of
Canada. It is equally proud that the
wide range of electrical equipment it
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CANADIAN    GENERAL    ELECTRIC    COMPANY
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MCGE-552T
CAMPlifcLl & SMITH ITU..  Effective Printing

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