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The UBC Alumni Chronicle Oct 31, 1949

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 AuufuU
OCTOBER, 1949 Bank, or Montreal
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prefer 0. B. Allan Rings
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Where  smooth - riding   escalators
carry you effortlessly  from  floor
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OCTOBER, 1949
Page  3 THE MORE your savings grow the greater your
feeling of independence—of accomplishment—of readiness to
do the things you want to do. It all starts the day you make up
your mind to put aside a definite share of your income
for yourself... the day you walk into the Royal Bank and say:
"I'd like to start a Savings Account".
Remember ... what you save is the most /
important part of what you earn.
"Financial Training for Your Son and Daughter" is the title of a useful little
booklet now available on request at our branches. Please ask for a copy.
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
Page 4
V
THE U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
Unaa**** The U.B.C. Alumni
CHR0I1ICLC
Published by the Alumni Association of
The University of {British Columbia
Editor: Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm., LL.B.
Associate Editor:
Mary Fallis, M.A.
Alumni Association Executive:
President Winston Shilvock, B.A. '31, B.Comm. '32
first Vice-President John Buchanan, B.A. '17
Secretary-Manager-... Frank Turner, B.Comm., B.A. '39
Treasurer Harry Berry, B.Comm., B.A. '37
Second Vice-President Molly Bardsley, B.A., '33
Chairman Publications Board, Ormonde J. Hall, B. Comm.
'42, LLb. '48
Past President Richard M. Bibbs, B.A.Sc. '43
Members at Large: William H. Q. Cameron, B.A., '33,
Dorwin Baird, Arts, '38, Mrs. Maurice Sleightholme, B.A.,
'30, Thomas W. Meredith, B. Comm., '46, Robert S. MacDonald, B.A., '34, Ben K. Farrar, BASc, '27, Mrs. Tommy
Berto, B.A., '31, AMS Pres. Jim Sutherland, Senate Rep.,
Mrs. J. H. (Sally) Creighton; Mrs. E. T. Kirkpatrick,
B.A., '47; Roderick Lindsay, B.A.Sc, '48; James MacDonald,
B.A., '38; Elliott Schmidt, B.A.Sc, '36; F. D. Moyls, B.A..
'46; Ruth Wilson, B.A., '41; Wilf Calnan, B.A., '39; Junior
Member AMS P. De Vooght and Senate Rep. Dr. Harry
V. Warren.
Editorial Office:
Room 208, Yorkshire Building, Vancouver, B. C.
Business Office:
Alumni Association, Brock Building, U.B.C.
VOL. 3, No. 3
OCTOBER, 1949
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ARTICLES— Page
Dr. G. G. Sedgewick      8, 9
Speaking Editorially .._   15
Alumni  Fund      .......       22
FEATURES
Sport              7
Personalities     . ..                12, 13
Women                                  20
Births,  Marriages  ..— ._..    34
COVER PICTURE:
The large cover picture features Dr. Blythe Eagles,
the first U.B.C. grad to become a Dean of a Faculty at
our University. He was appointed Dean of Agriculture
thrs past year . . . and the inset shows the youthful
Blythe Eagles as a graduate 'way back in 1922.
tuHUbti In Vtnetmvtr. Brillib Columbia, mti tmtbmrtui m
snemi Hmt msil, Tmt Of let Drbtrhmtmt, Ottny.
Personal Questions ?
Ques:   What  is  correct  for  evening
wearr
Ans: Tuxedo is always in good taste
. . . and seen at most affairs . . . white
tie and tails for strictly formal events.
Call in and order your tuxedo or
tails now . . . you'll find accessories, too, at
c^LeJ j-^alt
mer
LTD.
327 Seymour St.
PAcific 2917
OCTOBER, 1949
Page 5 A   REFLECTION   FOR   MANAGEMENT
poor lighting slows down
ANY business..
Poor lighting is bad business for you, Mr. Manager-
it costs you money in the reduced efficiency of your staff.
Bad lighting or harsh lighting produce glare and shadows
that mean eyestrain and unnecessary fatigue.
Good lighting is planned lighting. It increases production, reduces wastage and accidents and improves
morale among your employees. It's easy to find out if
your lighting is giving you these "pay-off" values. You
can get the free advice of a competent illumination engineer by calling our Lighting Department, 570 Dunsmuir
Street in Vancouver, TAtlow 3171, or at 1503 Douglas
Street, Victoria, Garden 7121, or any of our Lower Mainland branches.
4960
B. C. ELECTRIC
Page 6
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
it.m1&MMi»msmimihsW±M^ ft SPORT
BAKKEN FORTH    with Ole Baken
ft
Hoop Stars of '25 Return
for Grad Homecoming Game
Athletic feature the night of homecoming will
be the fourth annual Thunderbird-Grad Basketball
game.
This year, with Frank Turner handling the
coaching reigns, stars of yesteryear will be turning
out en masse from as far back as 1925.
Returning from the 1925 team, which played in
the Canadian finals against Ottawa Rideaus, will be
Heiley Arkley, Al Buchanan, "Dad" Hartley, Fred
Newcombe, Swanzy Peck, Tom Wilkinson, Dal
Grauer and Arnold Henderson.
Arnold Henderson later was the captain of the
'Bird team in 1931 that won the Canadian title
against St. Catherines in a two-game total point
series at the Arena. Star of that series was sixteen-
year-old rookie Bob "Tony" Osborne.
Others back from the '31 team will be Frank
Alpen, Bob Chapman and Cy. Lee.
From the 1937 Canadian championship team, returning 'Birds will be Jimmy Bardsley, Rann Mat-
thison, Eddie Armstrong, Ralph Henderson and
coach Frank Turner. Brud Matheson will be the
lone returning member from the 1941 team, ranked
by many as U.B.C.'s greatest.
The 1945-46 Pniac Championship team will be
well represented with Ron Weber, Harry Franklin.
Sandy Robertson and Ritchie Nichol in attendance.
Others returning from intermediate years will be
Wally Myers, Ken "Hooker" Wright, Don Livingstone, Doug Alexander, Dave Campbell, Jim McLean and Bob Haas.
According to Turner, this 28-man team will form
the nucleus for his platoon system of substitution.
In addition there are others still to be contacted.
If reserves mean anything, look for the Grads to
puff home the winners.
Make Up a Party
for Saturday Night Dancing
at the
newly decorated
$1.25 per person, inc. tax.
Reservations: PA. 7838 872 Granville St.
THUNDERBIRD ROUNDUP
Baseball coach for the 1950 U.B.C. team will be
Hjelmar "Jelly" Anderson, at present assistant foot-.
ball coach.  Anderson for two years was all-city in
baseball at Ballard High School, in Seattle, won two
(Continued on page 33)
OCTOBER, 1949
Dynamic Doug Reid will be leading the Thunderbirds
against Pacific University during the homecoming football
game at U.B.C. stadium, on Saturday, October 29th, at
2:15 p.m. Reid, standout on 'Bird teams the past three
years, is playing his last year of football for U.B.C.
Page 7
JL. Dr. GARNET G. SEDGEWICK - - -
MUCH DISCUSSED, CAMPUS
By DAVID BROCK, ARTS '30
It is a curiously unreal experience to hear the
radio announce calmly, on a calm September afternoon, that Garnett Sedgewick's heart has just
stopped. Few of us who knew anything of that
heart can really believe that it would ever quit. It
was such a cocky heart (with, of course, a good deal
more than mere cockiness, though undergraduates
did not always know that). It was the kind of heart
that made men begin to use the adjective hearty,
and that made them speak of keeping one's heart up.
It is also a very odd experience to be writing
about Doc when he can no longer read and comment. He excelled at retort, and one expected it.
On the occasion of his retirement I wrote, anonymously, an appreciation of him in these pages. I
wished to remain anonymous because I tried to express a certain warmth of admiration which Doc
and I might both find a little embarrassing; neither
of us wore our heart on our sleeve, and indeed we
were fond of posing as savagely outspoken enemies.
Anonymously I said nice things about him (and
true things), but over my own signature I merely
dropped him a line to say "They tell me you are
retiring. What a lie. You never seemed very retiring to me, you forward old bastard." Well, in
spite of my anonymity, and in spite of my being
rather out of teuch with Doc this last dozen years.
he rang me up at once to say, "The hands are the
hands of Esau but the voice is the voice of Jacob."
He was very touched indeed, and anything but
cocky (no matter what some undergraduates might
believe). Modesty is perhaps the last quality one
would attribute to Doc, but it was there all right,
hidden with the greatest care. And who can say
that it is not an act of modesty to conceal your
modesty instead of being immodestly proud of the
damned thing? When I apologized, a little tremblingly, for having drawn attention to one or two
slight faults of his, he was indignant. One could not
write a decent article about him or anyone else without mentioning the faults, he said, and he thanked
me for mingling lenience with perception. Once
again, undergraduates might not readily understand
that a man of twice my age . . . my old teacher and
the scourge of my youth . . . should be humbly
grateful to me. So much the worse for them, especially if they are still undergraduates in spirit twenty
or thirty years after leaving college.
CONTROVERSIAL FIGURE
In my time it used to be said (and it may have
been repeated much later) that freshmen adored
Sedgewick, sophomores still liked him, juniors saw
through him, and seniors despised him. The greater
the truth, the greater the libel. The know-alls who
relished this saying, wise young men and women of
nineteen or even twenty, had no means of knowing
Page 8
that graduates could get past the stage of seeing
through him and could (with great profit and
pleasure) begin to see into him. It didn't take a very
keen vision to see his faults, so there was no reason
to feel smart at perceiving them. He took no pains
to hide them, and that again may have been a kind
of modesty. True, he had also a kind of pride, a
pride that could easily flaunt his faults as virtues,
but this was not the pride that is the greatest of the
seven deadly sins and the hardest to cure. It was
more the swagger of a Cyrano, if one can picture
a Cyrano with a sense of humour; some of Doc's
swaggering was put on for a joke and you could
never quite be sure when he was doing it to make
himself laugh and when he was doing it to impress
himself equally with his audience. I don't think he
could always have told you himself. When he
crossed the campus with his overcoat worn as a
cape, it was sometimes because he was too lazy to
put his arms through the sleeves, and sometimes
because he liked posing as Doc Sedgwick (which
was not a bad thing to pose as, at that), and sometimes because he really imagined he was wearing
a purple silken cloak with a crimson lining and the
hilt of a rapier poking out from beneath its left side.
HE WAS PROUD
The juvenile moralists felt very proud of discovering that Doc was proud. They discovered he
was occasionally lazy, and they were too lazy to
look beyond these occasional lapses. By means of
research (or gossip) they found he had copied a few
tricks from his two idolized masters, MacMechan of
Dalhousie and Kitteridge of Harvard ... as Shakespeare himself copied various tricks with which to
earn his living. They observed that he was rude to
bores and did not suffer fools gladly, in direct disobedience to the Holy Bible, a work in which God
himself is sometimes seen to be something worse
than rude to bores and rough on fools.
If Doc's shade will forgive the blasphemy of
comparing him with his god Shakespeare, it might
be pointed out that Shakespeare had a host of
faults; he was a poacher of both deer and other
men's books, he was a bad husband, he drank far too
much and probably died of the effects of a drinking
bout, and so on. But these great faults, for which he
is answerable to God and not to us, do not prevent
him from being the greatest poet and dramatist in
history. Nor do they enable every cheap dog to set
himself up as superior to Shakespeare. There is
something very comical in a third-year student's
horror of discovering that Sedgewick (alone of all
the human race) had certain faults; Doc must have
enjoyed this joke himself several times a year. For
insane logic, I do not think you can beat the proposition that because Doc was sometimes unkind, he
was therefore a rotten professor of English . . . that
because   he   sometimes   had   a   perverse  taste  for
THE U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE MUCH LOVED,
FIGURE
making the innocent look ridiculous, he was therefore ridiculous himself to all eternity.
Well, the criticism of Doc, which was once our
hobby, will now cease. But I hope the less popular
hobby of praising him will not cease for a while. In
some ways it is about thirty years overdue It is
not generally realized that though he came a trifle
short of being a very great man, he was still a much
greater man than most figures on the campus, and
he had an influence that was incalcuable but very
real and valuable. An intelligent editor (if I may so
paradoxically express myself) once told me that he
reckoned the climate of the B.C. coast was responsible for the fact that only here in all Canada is
grown-up poetry written. I have often wondered
if G. G. Sedgewick was not the most benign element
of that climate.
DESPISED SPECIALISTS
It is perhaps fitting that I have been asked to
write this very ineffectual tribute to my old friend
for I am an average graduate and not a specialist!
It was to me one of Doc's greatest virtues that he
despised specialists.   Not being a specialist myself
I am naturally biased, but I shall never forget my
own enthusiasm when I heard Doc's enthusiasm for
Elizabethan versatility ... for that age when a man
could be a duellist, a first-rate poet, a soldier, a courtier, and several other things at the same time.  He
spoke (I remember vividly after twenty-three years)
about Lord Balfour, who could be a statesman, a
tennis champion, and a workmanlike manipulator
of English prose, and he said that versatility was an
English virtue that showed signs of disappearing in
this once English land, to his great sorrow and to
our country's cost.   It was not that Doc had anv
fondness for England and the English; he never
even troubled to visit that land which inspired the
works from  which he earned his bread!   But he
knew a good thing when he saw it . . . another
virtue  that is  perhaps  passing away, if one  may
judge by the symptoms.   Sedgewick's appeal was
not to poor little school-teachers only, but to all of
us, all the thousands of us who paused at Fairview
or Point Grey between the twin hells of high-school
and the real world.   I do not think there are many
of us among those thousands who are not better
men for having met Doc, and I do not think there is
a finer thing I could say about anyone.
It is also fitting that I should be a man who has
conducted a lively vendetta with Doc for more than
twenty years, for I am thus able to say that you
could fight with Sedgewick and still be friends.
That, too, is a highly unusual tribute. The very last
time I saw Doc he was outrageously rude to me, in
front of several witnesses who didn't understand.
He thought I would like it, and he erred. But he
knew I would forgive him, and he was quite right,
curse him. And bless him too.
OCTOBER, 1949
DR. G. G. SEDGEWICK
I talked with him once more after I saw him,
over the telephone.   It was only a very few weeks
ago. I wanted him to come to a party;   (How many
old teachers would you automatically think of as
the life of your next party?)   He told me his doctor
had forbidden all excitement, and when I said that
he should know that poor old  Dave  wasn't verv
exciting, he said, "Listen, son, there's no such thing
as a Brock that doesn't do terrible things to my
blood  pressure."   The   party  was   a   much   poorer
thing without him.  So is U.B.C.  So is British Columbia,  with  its   climate  that  is  alleged  to  breed
poetry.  The results of Doc's labours will remain for
at least a generation or two, but I think the Department of English will forgive me for saying that
while it can undoubtedly dig up better scholars than
Sedgewick,   it   will   never   again   dig   up   another
Sedgewick.   Which is a great pity.   It is a greater
pity, now that individualism is being bred out of us,
than it would have been fifty years ago.   As Doc
with his intuition (a better thing than scholarship)
undoubtedly knew. And as Doc, combining his faith
in youth with a secret modesty about his own real
merits, would never, never, never have admitted.
Page 9 Silver Anniversary Reunion Dinner, Class of '24
Members of the Class of '24 celebrated their
Silver Anniversary at a dinner in the Faculty Club
on June 3rd, 1949. ROSS DAVIDSON, Chairman
of the committee and of the dinner, kept the happy
note of gaiety and reminiscences alive throughout
the evening and as DEAN CLEMENT remarked,
"We don't look too badly even after the first twenty-
five years." Other committtee members included
DOROTHY PECK, LILLIAN COPE, HELEN
CREELMAN. MURRAY BRINK, JOHN BURTON, LYMAN MEADOWS, JOHN MITCHELL,
ROLEY GRAHAM, FRED COFFIN and PHIL
STOYAN. Special guests were MRS. MACK
EASTMAN, wife of DR. MACK EASTMAN, Honorary President of Arts '24, DEAN WALTER
GAGE, DEAN F. M. CLEMENT, U.B.C. Alumni
President, WIN  SHILVOCK and Alumni Secre-
Mmm!   CHOCOLATES...
Actrdi
araine d
Kerrisdale's Popular Candy Shop for delicious
chocolates, jellies, candies and nuts. Get a
box of Jardine's fancy pack for the football
game.
Order early for overseas mailing.
2059 West 41st KE. 4997
tary-Manager and MRS. FRANK TURNER. DR.
EASTMAN sent greetings from Saskatoon and
both he and Mrs. Eastman are looking forward to
permanent residence in Vancouver this fall.
HELEN and JACK GRANT, Seattle, BILL
McKEE, Spokane, THE JASPER WOLVER-
TONS, Kimberley, RHONA and DOUG WALLIS,
Victoria, The DOUG CAMPBELLS, Kimberley,
KATHERINE and HENRY GIEGRICH, Trail,
were welcome out-of-town members. BILL McKEE is now living in Vancouver after many years
across the border. JACK GRANT'S toast to the
Alma Mater replied to by DEAN GAGE recalled
Continued on Page 29
CATERING ARRANGED . . .
THE   KERRY
DALE
HALL
• RECEPTIONS FOR WEDDINGS AND PARTIES
• BUSINESS AND CLUB MEETINGS
• BRIDGE PARTIES
Call: Mrs. Reynolds,
KErrisdale 1614
2041 West 41st Avenue
Gifts of rare treasures . . .
English China, Oriental Vases,
Figurines,
Chinese and Irish Linens.
2932 Granville St.
CHerry 9633
Page 10
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
■HMi
iNtfl
SMS,**! Homecoming Saturday this year is Oct. 29th but
the big day arrives after a hectic period of festivity
and ceremony on the campus.
Convocation leads the way on Wednesday, Oct.
26, when seven distinguished Canadians will receive
Honorary Doctorate of Laws. Five of them will be
prominent law teachers who have come to U.B.C.
this month to attend a legal symposium being held
at the University of B.C. They are Frederick C.
Cronkite, Dean of Law, U. of Saskatchewan; Irwin
N. Griswald, Dean of Harvard Law School; Vincent
C. Macdonald, Dean of Law, Dalhousie; Dr. D.
Hughes Perry, London School of Economics, and
Cecil A. Wright, Dean of Law, U. of Toronto.
Two others receiving honorary degrees are
U.B.C. graduates Dr. A. E. Richards and Dr. Homer
Thompson. Dr. Richards was President of U.B.C.'s
A.M.S. in 1923 and led the famous "Great Trek"
and is now Secretary of Agricultural Foods Board,
Ottawa. Dr. Thompson, '25, is now with the American School of Classical Studies, headquarters,
Princeton University.
Following is the complete program for the
Homecoming weekend.
Dr. A. E. RICHARDS
Programme
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26— 3:00    Convocation.
THURSDAY, OCT. 27 —
SATURDAY, OCT. 29
Official Opening of Home Economics Building
After Convocation.
Legal Symposium in Auditorium all day.
6:00    Big Block Smoker, P. A. Club.
Art Gallery Open All Day.
12:00    Women's Big Block Luncheon, Brock Building.
Tables in Caf. for Big Blocks.
2:00 Pacific University vs. U.B.C.
6:00 Science '29 Reunion Dinner, Faculty Club.
6:00 Commerce '29 Renion Dinner, P. A. Club.
7:30 Potlatch—"Her Scienceman Lover"—Aud.
9:00 Basketball—Grads. vs. U.B.C—Gym.
9:30 Dance in Armouries.
ALUMNI REGISTRATION BOOK IN BROCK BUILDING LOUNGE
OCTOBER, 1949
Page  11
^f^i^aaA«^r,s -^ayfei. ika&&
k.'iii.-j--.-^ iLCiiikffi&d
/?^l...:\LiixtuiL£.'^L*.m--* PERSONALITIES
High Flyers:
U.B.C. has proved such a good training ground
for so many talented actors and actresses in past
years that it is with only mild surprise last month
that graduates noted that Art Hill was making
theatrical headlines in London's West End. . . .
Well known for his activities in the Players Club,
Art Hill and two other Vancouver people, Barbara
Kelly and Jon Farrell, stood the critics on their ears
with fine performances in James Thurber's "The
Male Animal." . . . Hill, 27, will be remembered for
his capable acting in "Berkely Square" at U.B.C. . . .
Also flying high was Wing Commander, then
Squadron Leader, Donald MacDonald, who as Commander of the "enemy force" in the Army-Airforce
exercise in the Canadian north know as "Exercise
Eagle". . . . The Vancouver air fighter stole the
show during the exercise and is generally regarded
as showing the outstanding initiative in the manoeuvre ... he graduated from Varsitv in 1934 and for
his recent exploits was promoted to Wing Commander ... a high rank in peacetime. . . .
Another prominent airman is Barrie Jeffrey. 23-
year-old North Vancouver praduate who claims
Canada's glider distance record after a recent motor-
less flight of 90 miles ... he flew the 90 miles in five
hours. 20 minutes . . . taken to 2.000 feet in the tow
of a Tieer Moth he used up drafts to carry him to
Coteau Landing in Ouebec from Arnorior. Ontario.
\ Pi
'"Cuum est"
Carry your camera on the campus and keep
college friends for life in your
snapshot library.
SEE    OUR    SELECTION    OF    CAMERAS
FROM    SIO.   UP
LTB
TA. 2468
787  HORNBY  STREET
Globe Trotters:
Dr. John Grace, '26, wartime "teacher" of Canada's overseas Army is home on a busman's holiday.
. . . Now a Cambridge professor, Dr. Grace is visiting here on a combination holiday and business trip
. . . he's acting as representative of British Society
for International Understanding whose job is promoting goodwill between countries through exchange of knowledge. . . .
Phil Daykin reported from Z7 degrees north that
mathematics are fun if mixed with Arctic fishing
... he was spending his summer with a Dominion
Observatory- magnetic survey crew and from Coal
Harbour, Southampton, wrote to say that "Arctic
chard up to 20 pounds are common and not shy of
the hook . . . walrus, seal and schools of white
whales are also in abundance. . . ."
Dr. John C. Sibley has been appointed demonstrator in pathology at University of Durham,
King's College School, Newcastle-on-Tyne ... a
brilliant scholar at U.B.C, Dr. Sibley took his degree in medicine at Queens and was awarded several
scholarships ... he will take his wife, the former
Jean Mcintosh, a graduate of U.B.C. school of
social work, with him to England. . . .
Frank Calder, 33-year-old member of the Nass
River Indian tribe and U.B.C. Theology graduate,
created historv in the last Provincial elections by
becoming the first native Indian ever to hold a seat
in the provincial legislature . . . Calder is also the
first Indian to hold a seat in anv Canadian legislature ... he will sit as member for Atlin. . . .
E. H. Maguire, Canadian Secretary to Chile was
in Vancouver, Oct. 3 to 14, to discuss trade with his
area which includes Bolivia. Maguire met many of
his old class mates at U.B.C. and local navy friends
he made as a Lieut.-Commander during the war.
Your favorite brand
shirt
ARROW    FORSYTH
TOOKE
in most wanted
collar styles
BERT
AMEY
2139 West 41st
KErr, 0539
Page 12
THE U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
■*M
MttM
mUstimmtmmm The Alumni Association and the University lost a great
friend in July of this
year with the passing of Roland Creel-
man Graham.... Mr.
Graham came to
Vancouver in 1911
from Nova Scotia,
served overseas with
68th Battery in First
World War and on
return entered
U. B. C, graduating
in 1924 in Electrical
Engineering. . . During the last war he
served with the
Dept. of National
Defence from 1940
to 1944.
R. C. GRAHAM
APPOINTMENTS
Ernest Lee, 42-year-old director of Physical education and recreation for B.C., has been appointed
national director of physical fitness in the federal
dept. of National Health and Welfare ... a prominent athlete and a graduate of U.B.C, Ernie Lee took
up residence in Ottawa, Oct. 1. . . .
Also heading East is John Finlayson Graham an
economics graduate of U.B.C. who has been appointed assistant professor of economics at Dalhousie University ... he received his master degree
at Columbia University in New York and up to his
present appointment was employed by United Nations at Lake Success. . . .
Dr. F. William Andrew, '35, now of Sumerland,
B.C., has written a story about a Bull Terrier (his
own )called "Klinker." It is receiving wide notices
throughout this continent and contributing to the
works of Canadian authors.
Myles H. Ritchie is now associate professor of
audio-visual materials in the school of Library
Training and Service at Florida State University.
William M. Mercer Limited
Employee Benefit Programmes
MONTREAL        VANCOUVER        TORONTO
Alumni men are noted for their good
appearance as well as their professional
ability .   .   .
Favored for Fall wear, the single breasted
or double breasted suit in imported tweeds
or worsteds.
CUSTOM TAILORED
OR
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Tux or Tails for Evening.
See our selection of well known makes in
shirts, ties and socks.
EDDIE R. DEEITI
534 Seymour Street (Opposite Yorkshire Bldg.)
Vancouver, B. C.
OCTOBER, 1949
Page 13 ALUMNI       POETRY
CRITTERS
When a dying rat wriggles round a little before he
lies still,
We say he feels no pain, which may be true.
And we say that dying men do not wiggle round
like that,
Because if they did we wouldn't like it very much,
And  what we  like  (the  Psychology  Department
tells us) is the only truth.
When dogs on the street behave concupiscently
We not only avert our eyes like sensible gentlemen
But promise ourselves that gentlemen do not act
like that,
Because if they did it would make Freedom a bit of
a joke
And we distrust jokes, and distrust being slaVes to
Freedom.
When a lost kitten is lonely, we say a man was
unkind to it,
Because loneliness as a condition of living in this
thick-^sown world is ridiculous.
We know any man who is lonely has been badly
treated by God or by his parents,
Because if we knew that being a man is a lonely
business however you look at it,
We would have nobody to sue, and that would be
unfair, and we're great on fairness.
Without somebody to blame, psychology would fall
in ruins,
And   that   would   lead   to   (heavens!)   a   kind   of
atheism.
David  Brock.
Plastics
Psychologists   and   psychiatrists   can   never   get
enough
Of a very wonderful thing called truth.   This new
synthetic stuff
Has now been made in a lab. all right, in small
amounts and dear,
But it cannot be made commercially on any scale
this year.
David Brock.
lorotfra JNttdpr
features
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Trees-. . . leafy, green,
Softly whispering
Above the scented pattern
Of bright flowers.
Stone . . . grey, severe,
Timelessly secure,
Moulded with the beauty
Of a master hand.
Thoughts . . . profound, noble,
Analysing man
In the perspective
Of sun, water, trees and stone.
P. A. M. Mitchell.
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Page 14
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
&a^^w..^,. ^..^A^^i^fe^^^,^^^,^. ^^^.,^^^^^J£'jl ^jizaklna ^ditoxiaLLij
It is one of the strange facts about University
Graduates that they know little, if anything, about
the administration and organization of their University. Ask any U.B.C. alumnus if he can tell you
the-functions of the Board of Governors, Senate, or
perhaps the Faculty Council of the University, and
his answer will usually reveal he doesn't know much
about them, and what's more he cares even less.
This ignorance and antipathy is inexcusable although widespread. Without knowledge of the
University's Administration, the alumnus cannot
appreciate nor help in the University's problems.
And if the alumnus is in that position, he is not
really eligible to call himself an alumnus, graduate,
member of convocation, or anything else, despite
what the University Act might declare him.
Currently the Alumni are faced with a University problem and too few of our members can
understand or appreciate it. The problem, stated
simply, amounts to this: Because of many recent
developments, nearly all of them relating to expansion, the Alumni of our University are, less and less,
having any real say in the affairs of the University
of British Columbia. Gradually the voice of the
Alumni, because of constitutional strictures, is
weakening in University affairs.
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
At U.B.C. the Board of Governors (which has
the Chancellor as Chairman, the President as an
ex-officio member, as well as three members appointed by the Senate and six appointed by the
Lieutenant-Governor in council) is charged with
the over-all administration of the University. The
Board then distributes the money appropriated by
the Government for the current year, and also approves and makes all appointments to the academic
and administrative staff, and it must pass Senate
recommendations for new faculties, departments,
courses, etc., where these involve financial commitments.
The President is Chairman of Senate, the body
charged with the responsibility of courses and curricula. Unlike many another institution, the Senate
has a real function and plays the major role in maintaining high educational standards. The Senate is
composed of the President, the Chancellor as an ex-
officio member, the Dean and two professors from
each Faculty, the Dean of Administrative and Inter-
Faculty affairs, the Dean of Women, three members
appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council,
the Principals of the two Provincial Normal Schools,
one member from Victoria College, the Principals
of the Anglican and Union Theological Colleges
(with provision for Principals of all other Theological Colleges if and when they commence operation),
one member appointed by the High School Principals actually engaged in teaching, one member
elected by the B.C. Teachers' Federation and fifteen
(15) members elected by Convocation from among
their own members.
OCTOBER, 1949
ORMONDE
HALL
Convocation is composed of the Chancellor, the
Senate, all persons who became members of the
Convocation prior to 1919, all persons holding academic appointments within the University, and the
graduates of the University. With the vast numbers
who have become graduates in the last few years,
it's obvious that these (listed in Section B of Convocation) form the great bulk of Convocation members. And yet, less than one-quarter of those eligible
to vote in the 1948 elections actually exercised their
franchise. When the Founding Fathers created this
body, Convocation, and gave it such an important
function, they must have felt that in this way
graduates would have an ever greater voice in University affairs, and they must have had a very good
reason for choosing fifteen as the number of elected
representatives which were to be geographically
and occupationally representative of the Province.
Until the 1948 elections, however, these elected
representatives were certainly not representative of
the Province geographically — nor occupationally.
Down through the years the vast majority have been
U.B.C. Faculty members, simply because of widespread ignorance and apathy among the graduates
as Convocation members. Quite often, there has
been a mad scramble on the campus at the last
minute (i.e. deadline for nominations) to get the
minimum fifteen. When elections were held, most
voting graduates merely voted for Faculty names
which were known to them as undergraduates, with
little or no knowledge of alumni candidates and
their qualifications.
Let's make sure that doesn't happen again. Let's
at least take a good look at the list of candidates
and vote for those with the best all-round qualifications.
PRESSING PROBLEM
Probably the most pressing problem facing the
members of Convocation is this: AS THE UNIVERSITY EXPANDS AND NEW FACULTIES
ARE SET UP, THE STATIC REPRESENTATION OF FIFTEEN MEMBERS OF CONVOCATION BECOMES RELATIVELY INSIGNIFICANT. Continued on Page 32
Page 15
y^^^^m>^lM^J. M^iiT&UM-,: ^a^^^a^iMa^^^^^i^ia'^,^
■*M-.- ft
BRANCHES
ft
DAVE TURNER
VICTORIA PRESIDENT
The Executive of the Victoria Branch of the
U.B.C. Alumni Association held a meeting September 13th, and plans are now final for the cabaret
style dance to be held at the Sirocco on October
28th.
The Dance is to be an annual affair and is to be
called the "Varsity Trek." It will be held annually
about the time of the Trek of 1922. This year it is
to be held on October 28th at the Club Sirocco, time
from 9-1, and will be cabaret style. It will have
the music of Len Acres and his Orchestra. The
price will be $4.50 per couple. The dress will be
optional. Proceeds are for the U.B.C. Alumni Development Fund.
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NORTHERN CALIFORNIA NOTES
Mr. W. N. English has left California for Chalk
River, Canada.
Dr. and Mrs. J. G. Retallack have left for Indiana
where Dr. Retallack is associated with the Physics
Dept. of Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind.
Mr. Alfred Oglivie has left U. of C. and is now at
the School of Dentistry, University of Washington.
Bill Townsley has left U. of C. and is now back
in Vancouver.
Miss Mary McCulloch is now living in Eureka,
California.
Marjorie Todd Brookman*('38) is now living in
San Francisco. Address is 3035 Castro St., San Francisco 12.
Beatrice J. Anderson ('31) has moved from San
Francisco and is now living in Santa Rosa. Address
is 1000 Bush Creek Rd., Santa Rosa.
Dr. and Mrs. John Davidson are now in Lincoln,
Nebraska, where John is at the University of Nebraska. The Davidsons' address is 1500 U St., Lincoln 8, Neb.
Courtney E. Cleveland (Ap.Sc. '34, Ph.D. McGill
'40) is now a member of the geological staff of the
Barnsdale Oil Company in Calgary ... he was for
a number of years a geologist and exploration engineer with Bralorne Mines Ltd.
Mr. Ray Parker (Science '25), recently with
Standard Oil Co. of Calif, in San Francisco, will
have his headquarters in Paris for the next several
years and be in charge of construction activities for
the California Texas Oil Co. Mr. Parker is a charter
member of the Northern California branch and sent
his regrets in not being able to attend the dinner
for Dr. Mackenzie. Hiss address is c/o California
Texas Oil Co., 551 5th Ave., New York 17, N.Y.
Greetings to
Homecoming Alumni
on Their Reunion
PACIFIC MEAT Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Page 16
THE U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
ktrnkm
tsomus^s
bM Prof. J. R (Ran) Young, head of Agricultural Engineering and official "Chowderhead" at Salmon Barbecue is
surrounded by anxious gourmets Circlewise left to right are Stan Heywood, President of Summer Students Association,  Wm Shtlvock,  U.B.C.  Alumni  President, John Buchanan, Vtce.-Pres.; and Secretary-Treasurer, Frank J. E.
Turner.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION THROWS SALMON
BARBECUE    FOR   SUMMER   STUDENTS
The Alumni Association threw a salmon barbecue party for summer school students on the campus
in August. The idea was Prof. Blythe Eagle's and
the Chef was Prof. J. R. W. "Ran" Young, who
knows his way round these sort of things.
Prof. Young didn't use the eight hour sea-weed
and hot stone system but put the seasoned fish in
cleft alder sticks upright beside a log fire.
250 guests sampled six 25-pounders, that is all
except presidential assistant Geoffrey Andrew and
Commerce Head Prof. Ellis Morrow, who got there
just in time to see the last of the tasty morsels
being devoured by Darrell T. Braidwood and Dorwin Baird.  Next year they'll be on time.
ECONOMICS BUILDING CONSTRUCTION MIRACLE AT U.B.C.
Like the mythological Phoenix, U.B.C.'s Home
Economics Building has risen resplendent from the
flames. Completely modern and fire resistant, the
$200,000 edifice has replaced the former fire-gutted
Home Economics huts in six short months.
The building is of hollow tile construction with
75 per cent of exterior wall space in glass. Eighty
per cent of interior walls and room partitions are
storage walls designed to hold supplies, built in
OCTOBER, 1949
ironing boards and equipment. The buildings consists of two wings on different levels, one of which
contains clothing, textile and art laboratories as
well as a home management laboratory and a lecture room. The other wing houses three food laboratories and a demonstration kitchen. A large lecture
room seating 150 students is designed for conversion, at a future date, into an amphitheatre giving a
view down to the demonstration kitchen.
Page 17 FRANKLY     SPEAKING
In the vernacular, "the things you like to do
most are those that you don't have to do." That
must be true; that must be the explanation of the
present vital, strong and steadily growing alumni
organization.
More former U.B.C. students are now active
members of our voluntary and permanent Association than at any other time in our 33-year history.
And, during this past year, there have been more
alumni actively working on behalf of their organization and their Alma Mater than during any previous
period.
Winston A. (Win) Shilvock, current Alumni
President, typified this spontaneous alumni spirit
when addressing the 1949 Class of Freshmen. W'in,
who was himself a President of a Frosh Class, declared very sincerely: "Most alumni, like myself,
realize the privilege it was to attend U.B.C. and we
know we gained something of definite value from
University life. We want to keep associated with
U.B.C. and help the Institution as much as we can
out of a sense of gratitude."
Win's remarks contained no reference to a "debt
to be repaid"—a phrase which some Alumni secretaries have on occasion used and which usually
arouses a righteously indignant feeling among the
many loyal alumni whose self-reliance, determination and responsibility have resulted in hard-fought
independence and a large measure of family security.
Call it sentimentality if you will; call it nostagic
memories if you wish—call it what you like; the
inspiring fact remains that U.B.C. alumni have
proven that they have a greater desire to keep active
contact with their Alma Mater than most former
College students. And there's no denying that a
greater percentage of our alumni—wherever they
may be and regradless of how long they've been out
of College — are imbued with a living spirit of
genuine service than are most alumni.
For the generations of undergrads to come ■—
that's a healthy sign and the best guarantee of an
ever greater U.B.C.
ALUM NOTES—"Homecoming" bouquet to
energetic and enthusiastic Dr. Dave Turner (B.A.
'33), President of the Victoria Branch, for taking
the lead in arranging a " '49 Varsity Trek" as a
Homecoming feature for Capital City alumni. . . .
A "Record" salute to Fred Coffin, President of
Science '24, who has faithfully chronicled and distributed the antics and activities of every 5-year reunion of his '24 brother engineers, including the
recent Silver Anniversary get-together. Other class
executives please note! . . . Among the many to attend the recent War Memorial Committee meeting
called by A.M.S. President Jim Sutherland and
which recommended that the Trustees "go-ahead"
were first Chairman and '46 Rhodes Scholar Alan
Ainsworth, Immediate Past A.M.S. President big
Dave Brousson (B.A. Sc. '49), and '45-'46 Alumni
President Lt.-Col. W. Tom Brown. . . . "Charter"
President of the Southern California Branch Lionel
Stevenson (B.A. '22)  answered his own question:
By FRANK J. E. TURNER
Alumni Secretary-Manager
"Is there a Canadian Literature" in a talk to delegates to the American Library Association, Far
West Regional Conference in Vancouver this summer. . . . Up from California to attend same was
A. C. (Al) Lake (B.A. '28) who is now head of the
Riverside Country and Public Library, Riverside,
with a population of only 50,000 has 280,000 volumes
in its library! . . . Two former Thunderbird basketball stars also visited the alumni office in the "off-
session," B. W. (By) Straight, now with Coates.
Herfurth & England, Consulting Actuaries in San
Francisco, and Don Duncan who is "ph-dee-ing" in
Michigan. Don was a delegate to the Mathematics'
Congress held at U.B.C. . . . "Boosted upstairs" with
the Ford Motor Company was James Ferris (Arts
'36). Jim's now District Manager for Ford-M'onarch
in Winnipeg. . . . Yet another alumni office visitor
was Percy Henderson (B.A. '30), who's with Confederation Life in Vancouver.
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Page 18
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE A BUSINESS CONNECTION
*
The student of to-day is the business or professional man of tomorrow. As such he will in due
course require a banking connection, as depositor or borrower, as
holder of securities and other documents requiring safe-keeping, as a
remitter of funds to points in Canada or abroad. An early association,
beginning with the opening of a
savings account, no matter how
modest, can be made the foundation of a lasting bank connection.
the mtiim BAM
OF COMMERCE
University District Branch
4473 West 10th Ave., near Sasamat,
Vancouver, B.C.
H. M. Cornwall, Manager
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71   Branches in  B.C. and Yukon
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OCTOBER, 1949
Alumni Association Nominating
Committee Report— Nominations
For Executive 1949-1950
The Annual General meeting of the Alumni Association will be held in Brock Hall at 6:00 (dinner
meeting) on the 9th of November, 1949.
PRESIDENT
John M. Buchanan, B.A. 1917
John, past 1st Vice-President, has been a power
house for the Association.  President of B.C. Packers, he has yet made time for all Alumni activities.
FIRST  VICE-PRESIDENT
James A. McDonald, B.A. 1938
Jim has been in practice in Vancouver with the
exception of two years as secretary to Ian McKenzie. This year Jim completes a term as Member-
at-Large.
SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT
Honoree Young, B.A. '43, 'Ed 44
Honoree is teaching school at Edmond, B. C.
She is a member of Women's Residence Committee.
THIRD VICE-PRESIDENT
(Member of Faculty)
Dr. Blyth Eagles, B.A. 1922, Ph D., Toronto
Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, Blyth is a
long time booster for the Alumni, sparked the 1922
class gift that opened the Alumni Fund.
TREASURER
Harry A. Berry, B. Comm. '37, B.A. '37
Harry, Comptroller of Seaboard Shipping Company, is standing for his second term as Treasurer.
CHAIRMAN, PUBLICATIONS BOARD
O. J. Hall, B. Comm. '42, LLB. '48
Ormie has been dragooned into standing for
office again.
MEMBERS AT LARGE
2-year term.       (6 to be elected)
E. (Doug) Sutcliffe, B.A. Sc. 1943
Doug spent three war years with the R.C.E.M.E.
as Captain. He is Director of Planning for B.C.
Electric transportation conversion program.
E. (Ted) Kirkpatrick, B.A. Sc. 1947
Ted, past president of the Alma Mater Society
(1946-1946) is presently with F. D. (Fred) Bolton
Ltd.
Dave Brousson, B.A. Sc. 1948
Northern Electric is fortunate to claim Dave
who as veteran—family man — AMS President —
engineer, ran up one of U.B.C.'s most impressive
student records.
Jack Underhill, B.A. Sc. 1924
Jack, a professional engineer, member A.I.E.E.,
spent 5 years a Lieutenant-Colonel as liaison officer
with the National Research Council. Now with
B.C. Electric.
Col. Gordon Letson, B.A. 1924
Colonel Letson, Wartime Brigadier, Canadian
Armoured Corps, has a long record of University
service. In private life he is Manager Letson-
Burpee, Vancouver.
Continued on Page 32
Page 19
|&ffeM(|^f^^,-...i.^aiai!t:,;.f:.. ,.^..A
-' / I   ! •'•rr'i Jij^.- 'hurt ^
WOMEN
By MARY FALLIS
ANNE  DUMOULIN
Anne Dumoulin, supervisor of Gordon Neighbourhood House, will shortly become Canada's first
woman professor in group social work.
Anne, who graduated with a Bachelor of Social
Work from U.B.C. in 1944, has been chosen for this
appointment to the newly organized Group Work
Department of the University of Manitoba's School
of Social Work
After three years on the staff of Alexander
Neighbourhood House, Anne took her Master's Degree at U.B.C. in 1947.
We very proudly report that DOROTHEA
LUNDELL, '32, was chosen 1948 Good Citizen of
Revelstoke. Teacher in the High School, sponsor
of the school paper, organist in her church, she was
honoured for her oustanding contributions to the
lives of the young people of her community. She
is the first alumnus we have heard of receiving such
a distinction.  Our sincerest congratulations to her.
- Among the participants of the Goethe Bi-cen-
tennial celebrated in Aspen, Colorado, last summer
was DR. JOYCE HALLAMORE, '25. This international gathering marked the beginning of what
may well become an outstanding cultural festival
for the North American Continent. Speakers included Dr. Albert Schweitzer of Africa, Ortega of
Spain, and the American Thornton Wilder.   The
Page 20
Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra performed at conference concerts, and guest artists were Rubinstein
and piatagorsky. In the ten-day program of lectures and discussions modern thinkers sought to
find an answer to some of the problems of our day
through a study of the philosophy of the great man
whom they honoured.
Vancouver has proudly opened its fifth Branch
Library, South Hill.  Chief Librarian of this attractive, modern building is VIOLA JOHNSTON, '31.
Continued on Page 30
Coats
and
Costumes
lead the fashion
parade at Runge's
So much dash-
So much style...
It's the easy chic
of these beautiful
coats and costumes
that add up to
the particular
kind of genius
we love to play
to the hilt.
2566
GRANVILLE
NEAR
BROADWAY
THE U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
riAi
MMUWiMriifa
imWrn
iii
<^gf* Head Hugging Cloche
frfadame oLouide
645 Howe Street
from our new
Ankle length Cocktail
£ Dinner Dresses
ZJraer C? oUicL
627 Howe Street
ie
Shorty Fur Jacket
by
C-. ^rnderSon
653 Howe Street
OCTOBER, 1949
Suits tailored to
measure or ready to
wear at
^aoa uDro3 eJLta.
622 Granville Street
Page 21 U. B. C. ALUMNI FUND  NOW
STANDS AT $12,000
MARK
Head Table at Fund Banquet: Mrs. A. M. Menzies, Dr. S. N. Chant, Mrs. J. Buchanan, Dr. Myron Weaver, John
Buchanan, Mrs. Weaver, Joe Brown, Mrs. C/jant, Dr. A. M. Menzies, Mrs. Howard T. Mitchell, Col. F. T. Fairey.
Alumni Fund Banquet
U.B.C.'s Alumni Development Fund has just
reached the $12,215 mark!
This was revealed October 14th, at the first an-
ual banquet of the Fund, which was held at Brock
Hall and attended by Alumni, fund officials and
prominent University men and women.
Board of Trustees Chairman Joe Brown told the
gttroup that $2000 would be used specifically to furnish the new women's dormitories to be erected on
the campus shortly and another $4,000 will be donated directly to the University as an unrestricted
grant.
Mr. Brown revealed that one of the principal results of the drive was that not only has more money
than ever before been raised but that the campaign
has had the effect of increasing the active membership in the Alumni Association from 700 to 1800.
Principal speaker of the night was new Medical
School Dean, Dr. Myron Weaver, who told Alumni
members that medical education was now "almost
entirely a public concern, supported by public funds
and that it has a greater duty than ever before to
extend its services." Dr. Weaver said that "all
medical schools are behind us one hundred percent
and will give every possible aid."
At the meeting Mrs. A. Menzies, Mrs. I. Campbell and Mr. M. McFarlane were appointed to the
board of directors of the U.B.C.-Alumni Development Fund.
Following is a detailed list of Fund donors.
ALUMNI    FUND
(CLASS    MANAGERS    IN    ITALICS)
1916 (44.82%)
Sherwood Lett
B. M. Carruthers
Marjorie Dunton
Isabel G. McMillan
Laura M. Lane
Ella G. Cameron
Wm. C. Wilson
Mrs. A. M. Menkes
C. E. Cairnes
Mrs. Harry C. Odendahl
Gladys C.  Schwesinger
F. B. Sexsmith
Edna M. Taylor
1917 (55.55%)
Mrs. Sherwood Lett
J. M. Buchanan
W. T. Abercrombie
Margaret E. Maynard
Mrs. H. Green
John   Russell
C. II. Wright
Mabel Lanning
Anne  Fountain
Mrs. T. G.  Millar
A. Winnifred Lee
Mrs. Eric Swadell
Mrs. R. R. Straub
Mrs. A. C. Smith
Mrs. C. A. P. Murison
1918 50%)
Mrs. H. C. Lewis
Lome H. Jackson
Irene M. Stewart
Mrs. John  Russell
Harold W. Mclnne;
Mrs.  R. B. Spears
Mrs. F. F. B. Sexsmith
Mrs. C. M. Dean
Isobe! Harvey
1919 (38.88%)
Major-General   H.   F.   G.
Letson
Mrs. H. G. Shepherd
John Allardyce
Mrs. G. C. Robertson
Ellen C. Hunter
Mrs. E. M. E. Napier
Mrs. H.N.'MacCorkindale
W. G. Sutcliffe
Mrs. R. A. Seymour
Mrs. Geo. H. Kidd
C.  B. Weld
Gordon W. Scott
Donna Kerr
Ian Shaw
1920 (28.57%)
Hester E. Draper
Willson H. Coates
G. S. Wilson
H.I. Andrews
Annie G. Hill
Mrs. Agnes Oram
Mrs. H. W. Bown
Louise Stirk
A. H. Gladwin
Hermine D. Bottger
N. D. Lambert
Mrs. L. S. Klinck
1921 (38.27%)
H. J. James
S. T. Galbraith
Marion Sauder
Ruth D. Craig
C. E. Milley
C. O. Swanson
Dorothy Blakey Smith
Mrs. John R. Fournier
C. P. Lecbie
Janet L. McTavish
Ruth Harrison
Frank R. Strider
K. B. Gillie
P. D.  I. Honeyman
R. C. Palmer
Enid M. McKee
J. R. Kingham
Anne M. Smith
C. A. Lamb
J. M. Schell
Mrs. F. B. Dick
Alfred Rive
/. O. C. Kirby
Marion E. Lawrence
Irene McAfee (Library)
R. G. Anderson
A. E. Lord
fas. L. Lawrence
W. R. McDougatl
R. E. Foerster
Mrs. A. E. Lord
1922 (50%)
Leonard Heaslip
Edna Orr
Ernie Clark
Marjorie Agnew
Doris Fulton
Art Vogee
J. Allen  Harris
Lionel Stevenson
R. J. Lanning
J.  R.  Fournier
Dr. Norman Cutler
Mrs. R. S. Woodford
J. F. Walker
Lionel  Stevenson
W. O. Scott
W. G. Black
W. R. McAfee
Dr. A. H. Imlah
Mrs. C. F. Failey
M. Lillian Reid
Marjorie Agnew
Edna F. Burch
Blythe Eagles
Marion  Redgrave
Edna Orr
Aarjorie Agnew
W. G. Black
Mrs. H. D. Wallis
James A. Daphnee
Norah Purslow
Mrs. L. W. McLennan
L. W. McLennan
E. M. Coles
Lionel Stevenson
Mrs. J. E. Levick
J. h. H. Imlah
Nora Willis  Michener
John F. Walker
Mr.   Mrs. E. Dewart
Lewis
W.  G.   Hatch
P. N. Whitley
Gwen  C.  Whittaker
Page  22
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE ft
ALUMNI      FUND
ft
(CLASS   MANAGERS   IN    ITALICS)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.,
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
Class
1917
1922
1918
1916
1923
1919
1921
1920
1925
CLASS STANDINGS
No. of Donors  Percentage
  15
45
9
13
55
14
31
12
35
1924   34
1926   42
1939   59
1927   34
1932   49
1930   43
1934   49
1929   40
1933
1931
1936
1937
1944
1928
55
40
43
45
51
36
1935  :_... 37
1940   50
1943   47
1942   43
1946   75
1945   50
1941   39
1938   38
1948   139
1947   1 12
55.55
50.00
50.00
44.82
39.85
38.88
38.27
28.57
28.22
26.98
26.92
24.18
22.66
22.37
22.27
21.77
21.11
20.15
19.04
19.02
18.67
17.22
17.06
16.44
16.39
16.31
14.59
14.28
14.08
14.07
13.24
12.46
12.08
Amount
$ 230.50
1785.98
85.00
99.50
591.00
135.50
248.50
181.00
537.00
333.00
279.00
385.00
204.00
346.50
331.50
319.00
261.00
326.50
662.50
425.00
311.50
312.00
237.50
286.50
241.00
225.50
285.50
468.09
279.00
248.00
246.50
658.00
625.50
LEADING TO CLASSES (Amounts)
1922 $1785.98 6. 1925 !
1931     662.50 7. 1946	
1948   658.00 8. 1936	
1947   625.50 9. 1939	
1923   591.00 10. 1932	
537.00
468.09
425.00
385.00
346.50
Mrs. Graeme King
Ralph S. Argu e
Donald L. Shaw
Mrs. H. Lloyd Johnston
M. Lillian Reid
G. H. Harris
Eli S. McColl
Mrs. R. F. C. Marrion
Mrs. R. E. Foerster
1923 (39.85%)
Mrs. John Creighton
Hunter C. Lewis
Frank A. Turnbull
E. E. Gregg
C. Muriel Aylard
R. V. Cavers
A. E. Richards
H. T. Allen
Gerald B.  Switzer
Fred J. Welland
Ralph C. G. Lidgey
Rowena Gross
j. W. Shier
Mrs. H. F. Angus
Mrs. Stanley Cowdell
Dr. C. C. Ppshall
/. R. Giegerich
H. C. Gunning
Mrs. L. H. Leeson
M. Fahrni
A. D. Hunter
G. T. Loveridge
Gertrude E. Lord
(Women's  Building)
I slay Johnston
Albert A. Drennan
Mrs. A. McLaren
T. E. H. Ellis
O. M. Sanford
Jessie E. Casselman
J. V. Clyne
R. E. Walker
M. Lindsay
L. T. Halfett
Margaret W.
Higginbotham
F. C. Stewart
Mrs. D. K. Faris
Jessie Main
Elsie D. Robathan
Mrs. Harry Lord
H. M. A. Rice
C. M. Dean
Mrs. A. Fraser Wright
F. M. Wallace
Archibald  Blair
George Gross
Margaret & Duncan Fraser
(Mr. & Mrs. D. Fraser)
R. Hudson
N. A. Robertson
Doris E. Lazenby
G. L. Landon
Jos. F. Brown, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Aubrey F.
Roberts
1924 (26.98%)
Mrs. S. H. Frame
H. D. Wallis
/. A. Grant
Mrs. J. A. Grant
A. E. Ogilvie
I.. B. Stacey
G. H. C. Norman
Fred W. Coffin
G. C. Lipsey
Helen Creelman
j. C. Wilcox
Jean Telfer
P. F. Peele
F. G. Elliott
J. M. Wolverton
Mrs.  R. Gardom
H. R. Offord
R. H. Hedley
/. E. Underbil
Jean Burton
Chas. H. Barton
C. R. Elsey
F. J. Brand
Mrs. M. Carr
Mrs.  E.  Rottluff
Wm.  V.  Smitheringald
C. G. McLachlan
Dr. C. H. Stockwell
Mary C. L. Astell
R. N. Crozier
G. M. Letson
John E. Gibbard
Mrs. G. C. Dixon
H. E. Bramston-Cook
1925 (28.22%)
J. E. Eagles
J. P. Ledingham
C. Arnott
Mrs. H. T. Mitchell
Mrs. F. M. Ross
W. L. Hardie
Mrs. Jean D. Arnold
B. P. Sutherland
C. N. Disney
George E. Stoodley
E. B. Gillanders
David B. Charlton
Mrs. A. Carr Lumsden
(Women's   Residence)
Malcolm McDonald
Elsie Davies
Dorothy G. Taylor
Mrs. C. S. Collison
Hugh M. Rae 016)
A. E. Grauer
Mrs. John McCulloch
H. A. Thompson
R. W. Parker
Mrs. Harold 0. Hall
A. W. Avlard
Walter H. Gage
Mrs. Chas. B. Crittenden
Florence McLeod
H. O. Arkley
Neal M. Carter
Eloise Tudhope
Vera F. Barnes
E. B. Fraser
F. M. Painter
H. B. Smith
Mrs. Ian Shaw
1926 (26.92%)
R. H. Baylis
Margaret  (Swanson)
Turner
Elsie Conrad
J. E. Kania
Margaret E. Kerr
Mary M. Selby
Jean Graham
lean Woodrow
Mrs. A. W. H. Needier
Ian A. Balmer
Wanetta Leach
Honor M.  Kidd
Mrs. J. C. Oliver
W. A.  Bain
K. P. Cap'e
B. S. Griffith
Florence V. Brown
George R. Robinson
Lorna D. McLean
Mrs. John A.  Fraser
Janet T. Crete
Lillian A. Williamson
Curtis }. Timleck
F. P. Levirs
Mildred H. Attridge
Marjorie M. Hess
Mrs. H. Leslie Brown
Mrs. T. A. Walker
G. W. H. Norman
Mrs. fas. Lawrence
Mrs. Harry D. Gibb
Laura Wilcox
Marv C. Turner
Bert F. Wales
^rs. Bert F. Wales
Gwen G. Stirling
Pev. N.  (. Crees
Warrv Warren
Mr   & Mrs. B. Britton
Brock
Dr. & Mrs. R. H. Ball
1927 (22.66%)
Frank R. Barnsley
Avis Pumphrey
Ian Stevenson
M. A. Cameron
Elizabeth E. Walker
Mrs.  lohn Allardvce
Mrs. T. R. Hobart
Mrs. George E. Moo-e
T. D. D'Aoust
I. C. Oliver
0. H. Gilt
Ethel  Fucler
fev. F. H. Stevens
Dr. Kenneth P. Groses
Margaret A. Donaldson
Rex. L. Brown
Inhn  S.   Shakespeare
W. J. Phillip
Iran R. D. G'Uev
Mrs. R. L. Morrison
A. H. I *n<"
Ralph M. Ra«shaw
Mirv I.. Black
Isobel Bate
William H. Christie
Isabella G. McTavish
Mr*. R   W  Hidv
Helen  I Cl^-k
M^'He E. Cottingham
1. Ma':e Riddell
Anne R. Ferrv
Mrs. V. W. Griffiths
Te^n Mus«r?ve
Mrs. Mary Oliver
1928 (17.06%)
Lucy Ross McKillop
Mrs. J. Arthur Cameron
Marparet I. Fs'ev
Or. DoiHas Telford
Mrs. J. Pollock
". G. McWiViams
Mrs. C. G. RaTett
M. L. Csndlish
Mrs. F. F. Anpelbe
Mrs. David H. D. Beich
Crice N'Vol
Wm. C. Brown
Olive W   H<"'t3»e
Arthur H.  Beattie
Mrs. K. P. Caple
Mrs. Harry Barratt
Ine? M'Vhell
A. H. Eden
T. P. Barnett
V. H. Osterhout
Margaret S. Cornwall
A. S. Towell
Mrs. Douglas Welch
Mr. & Mrs. A. S. Whiteley
E. A. Goranson
Mrs. Andrew Elliott
H. Leslie Brown
Margaret  C.   MacDonald
Med Macfarlane
Muriel MacKay Scace
Mrs. F. C. Tulloch
Mrs. Adolfo E. Minni
H. W. Blackett
R. F. C. Marrion
Wm. E. Thomson
1929 (21.11%)
H. W. Fulterton
Mrs. J. E. Eades
Mr. & Mrs. T. R. Boggs
R. H. Spilsbury
C. D. MacKenzie
Olivia D. Mouat
M. W. Gormerly
Jean H. Kirkby
Mrs. W. S. Owen
Dorothy M. Cruickshank
H. Muriel E. Loch
Elizabeth A. Groves
Eleanor Riggs Wod
Margaret T. Gourlay
W. N. Hal
J. V. Murray
Mrs. J.   K.  Halley
Mrs. Grace D'Arcy
C. E. Yarwood
Mrs. 0. Aune
Lionel H. Laing
E. S. Pretious
Mrs. E. P. Levirs
R. L. Morrison
Dr. D. A. Stee'e
Mrs. G. H. Tomlinson
Stanley Duffell
Eric E. Tod
Oscar Elmer Anderson
Jean Bailey
Evelyn  Cruise
R. Bruce Carick
Mrs. V. H. Bland
Mrs.   Gordon   Hambleton
Muriel Upshall
Mrs. Wm. R. Selby
Robert W.  Keyserlingk
L. M. Black
W. O. Richmond
1930 (22.27%)
Fred W. Grauer
F. W. Hallonquist
(Com '3D
T. Chalmers
.Mrs. W. T. Esselmont
Mrs. J. M. Gillison
M.A. '33)
M. S. Loch
Malcolm F. McGregor
Thelma   Johnson
T. Bent'ey Edwards
C. W. Brazier
Mrs. G. R. Cockburn
Mrs. J. W. Shier
1. Hadekiss
Chas. W. Deans
Gertrude M. Savage
W. J. C. Kirby
lean Sleightholme
I.. A. Hav
T. V. Berto
Mariorie DeHart
D. Macdonald
Margaret G. Fletcher
Russell  K. Baker
Margaret Coope
D. M. Flather
L. Muriel Lains
(Library  Fund)
Mrs. Wm. F. Henniger
B. G. Hunt
D. A. Maxwell
Mrs. George Dobson
M. G. Elliott
J. D. Curtis
Mrs. Aubrey G~oss
R. M. Archibald
Mrs. C.  H. Stockwell
Wm. R. Selby
H. Frances Harvey
E. A. Jenkins
Mrs. J. S. Daly
A. Hrennikoff
L. Bolton
F. T.  Keeling
James Dunn
1931  (19.04%)
P. R. Brissenden
G. Grant
Jordon Guy    .
L. O. Wright
W. Latta
Jessie Acorn
C. D. Schultz
Margaret B. Dick
K. W. Martin
M. A. Thomas
J. M. Rutherford
P. Brissenden
Ronald N. Smith
Dorothy M. Bruce
Mr. & Mrs. A. T. R.
Campbell
Mrs. A. W. Fisher
Mrs. V. C. Brink
Katherine  Hockip
Margaret G. Berto
Dr. j. A. Gibson
Vera B. Mawby
W. A. Shilvock
D. C. Murdoch
Mrs. M. M. Denny
Mrs. F. S. Cresswell
Herman   D.   Bischoff
Ernest M. Kershaw
David H. L. LePage
H. D. Watson
Robert J. Chapman
Mrs. William  E.  Ricker
Louise E. Poole
J. F. McLean
C.  B.  Dunham
Mrs. V. Oliver
Alex Turnbull
Mrs. C. Turner
Don N. Matheson
Tom D. Groves
Mrs. James Dunn
1932 (22.37%)
L. B. Black
W. H. Harvey
Alfred Watts
Jean Witbeck
Mrs. D. F. Macorquodale
A. J. Elliot
Ellen Glecd
W. J. Roper (Ed. '33)
I. Wilfred Lee
D. Beall
A. W. Fisher
Florence I. Wilson
M. M. Fallis
W. T. Brown
R. T. Wallace
Margaret E. Clarke
Dr. B. F. Bryson
Mrs.  Rupert Neil
Dorothy Myers
J. K. Halley
Dorothv Butle'
H. A. Shaw
William H. Hill
K. N. Stewart
Walter /. Lind
Donald S. Smith
Alexander Smith
Isabel Bescoby
H. R. Wright
M. G. Humphrey
Terence C. Holmes
Dorothy Farris
W. Robert T. Brooks
M-s. Bertie A. F. Bruce
Mrs. Leonard W. Chatwin
D. C. Fillmore
Mrs. L. S. Chipperfield
Mrs. Albert M. Snell.
Mrs. E.    V.McGauley
K. M. Beckett
H. M. Van Allen
W. P. Haggerty
Mrs. Stanley Idiens
A. S. Haggerty
Mrs. E. A. Jenkins
Carol Sellars
Dr. A. W. Bagnall
Fred C. Giles
Mrs. Med Macfarlane
1933 (20.15%)
Mrs. C. Campbell
Mrs. T. G. Wright
R. E. Strain
David B. Turner
Mrs. Alfred Watts
Mrs. T. Chalmers
A. E. Buller
J. V. Rogers
OCTOBER, 1949
Page 23
.foito&. ~.,ai a^afcSf^:»>,^: t ..•«.,
J: ■■•.::„'. <Mfo.mS
^t.'l':ri..>^ ■.'■■.V: ^-.i.'! S., ft
ALUMNI      FUND
ft
(CLASS   MANAGERS   IN   ITALICS)
R. H. Richmond
Morley Timberlake
W. M. Lydiatt
C. H. Smith
Catherine L. Black
Alan Webster
F. Darling
A. M. Howard
J. K. Campbell
G. R. Cockburn
br. D. V. Fisher
A. b. C. Washington
Annie E. Scott
J. M. Currie
K. W. Atkinson
Bill O. Whiles
B. M. Sutton
br. W. C. Gibson
G. Neil Perry
Mrs. H. Cannon
H. Moorhead
D. H. Campbell
iacqueline  Howe
Irs. T. C. Holmes
br. N. W. F. Phillips
W. H. Q. Cameron
Thomas G. How
Catherine M. Codings
Mr. & Mrs. P. D.
McTaggart-Cowan
J. R. Atkinson
M. H. Farrant
R. F. Osborne
Mrs. J. D. Lee
E. C. Duff Wilson
Gladys H. Carey
(Women's Residence)
C. D. Osborn
R. H. Jorgensen
W. H. Birmingham
R. Deane
Mrs. J. Ashby
Eileen DesBrisay
Donald C. Davidson
Geo. S. Allen
Alice D. Porter
1934 (21.77%)
Mrs. W. R. Rose
Mrs. I. E. Scott
Arthur M. Harper
Howard  F. Jones
J.   Innes   Macdougal
R. S. McDonald
J. U. Copeman
H. W. Agnew
Dr. G. M. Volkoff
Florence Mulloy
Mr.&Mrs.R.J.lMdMaster
I. C. MacQueen
W. M. Keenlyside
D. L. McMullan
Dr. V. C. Brink
J. Meryl Campbell
Fredena Capretto
Dr. James W. Wilson
D. M. Owen
Arthur K. Macleod
H. A. S. West
C. J. A. Dalton
.!. H. Hyland
Wilhelmina   Cragg
V.  Yvonne  Brown
D. A. Perley
H. Katznelson
C. E. Cleveland
Mary Latta
L. J. Nicholson
Dr. Forestier Walker
Walter B. Dingle
Mrs. J. R. Genge
Mrs. I. €. Paterson
Mrs. R. R. Arkell
G. M. Henderson
A. Gordon Brand
J. Norton Wilson
Douglas Smith
Kenneth M. Telford
I. L. Kosin
J. G. Hooley
Myrtle Beattie
Ken Wright
Dr. D. M. Whitelaw
W. Farenholtz
C. A.  R. Eyre
J. A. Bourne
1935 (16.44%)
Edgar C. Black
R. W. Wellwood
John M. Loggie
Charlotte Dill
I. A. Rader
F. S. Stevens
H. F. Salisbury
Leo S. Gansner
R. H. B. French
Miss A. Peirson
A. J. F. Johnson
H. H. Clayton
G. Roger Wood
F. T. Fairey
John M. Mortimer
Mrs. W. C. Gibson
Frank F. Rush
Ralph Davis
Mrs. Carol Tochach
Cdr. I. F. Ritchie
D. F. Rice
Viola A. E. Ringle
John E. A. Parnell
B. C. Brynelsen
R.f C. Twining
Mildred Marie Fraser
Berna A. Dellert
Mrs. H. J. W. Evans
R. M. Mather
T. G. Currie
Donald Buchanan
Mrs. Gordon S. Scholefield
P. L. Northcott
D. M. Fitzpatrick
John Conway
Mrs. R. S. McDonald
Madeline W. Harris
1936 (19.02%)
Kathleen V. Kermode
Elliot A. Schmidt
R. Paradis
Marian M. Dignan
F. D. Fulton
R. P. Forshaw
Mrs. C. D. Schultz
Bruce A. Robinson
F. R. Joubin
Jean W. Roxburgh
C. B. Watson
Doreen  E. Abernethy
Mrs. C. Nicholson
Mrs. J. K. Hentig
«
J. Richardson
C. Arthur A. Lind
A. C. Buckland
A. /. Renney
G. T. McHattie
Mary C. Matthews
Mrs. A. C. Ross
E. A. Cleveland
G. F. Seldon
H. P. Godard
John F. Melvin
Thomas L. Brock
Mrs. Eliza E. Mayhew
Frank L. Martin
Winnifred M. Stewart
Mrs. W. A. Blain
J. A. Mclntyre
Boris Turin
J. A. Findlay .
David Thomson
Mrs. D. E. Abernethy
P. J. Sharp
John Berry
D. R. Clandinin
Roger M. Bain
Mrs.   H.   Hollick-Kenyon
Lome R. Kersey
Helenn Chang
Mrs. M. S. Lougheed
1937 (18.67%)
Roger N. Chester
J. Maguire
R. K. Bell
ohn M. Shaw
. F. Veitch
b. A. barling
R. J. Killam
Roger N. Chester
Norman Soul
G. H. Gwyn
I. L. Witbeck
Mrs. J .L. Bieler
(Agri '36)
O. J. Biller
Harry A. Berry
Joan M. Hallett
F. T. Garrison
Lin Keey Lee
Elfriede H. Hoffmann
John  F. T. Saywell
A. M. Eastham
W. D. Charles
Sheila C. Buchanan
(Aggie '46)
Ken Grant
A. S.  Kadzielawa
Rupert Ross
Eileen E. Mann
Clara E. Johnsen
C. D. Graham
Mrs. W. J. Robertson
John G. Gould
Philip J.   Kitley
Mrs. F. L. Patterson
John J. West
Mr. & Mrs. R. M. Smith
Mrs. John G. Morrison
Kenneth A. West
G. A. Turner
D. B. Quayle
Mrs. J. A. Mclntyre
E. H. Maguire
W. S. Wainwright
W. M. Morris
Insurance Of All Kinds
FIRE AUTOMOBILE
PERSONAL PROPERTY FLOATERS
BURGLARY
NORWICH AGENCIES LIMITED
W. ORSON BANFIELD, Managar
MArine 6171
211  Rogers Bldg. Vancouver, B. C.
Anna P. Clarke
Gladys Owen
1938 (13.24%)
Mrs. Robt. (May W.)
Neil
Elizabeth Tuckey
C. M. Campbell
Mrs. C. Hillier
W. S. Tremaine
J. Z. Hall
C. P. Idyll
Neil Hockin
J. G. Retallack
Emily L. Nelson
Mrs. Margaret MacL.
Ingledew
H. W. Little
Maurice F. Welsh
James A. Macdonald
A. N. Charters
A. H. Sager
Phyllis L. Cowan
G. Zotov
Mrs. J. M. Mortimer
S. T. Madeley
Mr. & Mrs. J. M. Lecky
M. F. Chapin
Audrey E. Jost
Grace Thomson
Maurice M. Wright
G. B. Mason
A. M. Fotheringham
0. L. Lacey
Mr. & Mrs. C. P. Love
Eleanor Gibson
J. A. Beveridge
M. L. Ashby
1. B. Stibbs
Agnes S. Hooley
L. G. Light
Dorwin R. Baird
1939 (24.18%)
Gordon King
. M. Sibley
B. I. Nesbitt
W
Phyllis Jean Shaw
(Mrs. J. M.)
Dr. R. E. Simpson
T. P. Pepper
M. P. Larsen
R. M. McLagan
J. C| King
Joanne Brown
John Lamb
W. S. Leggat
M. B. Nevison
R. G. McElbanney
W. L. Hetherington
Venie L. Dean
Dr. John Davis
Ottilie G. Boyd
Graham B. Erlebach
Jean E. Burns
S. Murara
Arthur E. Lock
W. M. Calnan
Joyce Calhoun
Clara E. Cartmell
Dr.  John   M.   MacKenzie
Mrs. J. L. Dowling
(Mary A. Heyer)
Walter R. Ashford
J. M. Pepper
J. W. Green
Les. Martin
Elizabeth Norie
Carson McGuire
Burt M. Cooper
John G. Morrison
S. Weston
Beverly E. Wilson
William Petrie
P. R. Layard
Frank J. E. Turner
Fred L. Hartley
Elinor M. Brown
Pauline Capelle (listed
under B.A. '38,
B.A.SC. '39)
G. Dudley Darling
Mrs. G. D. Darling
D. R. Donaldson
Wilfred D. Stokvis
Robert L. McDougall
Warren L. Godson
Milton C. Taylor
Percy A. Adams
R. f. Boroughs
Constance Munro
Alfred Allen
Mrs. W. R. Hodgson
George P. Kidd
T. Graham Darling
Dr. Elmer A. Jones
Patricia M. Russell
1940 (16.39%)
Milton M. Kennedy
Jack T. Rush (M.A. '46)
L. Mitchell
R. P. ap Roberts
M. Fraresso
M. B. Hansen
G. E. White
R. B. Toombs
Jean E. Pearson
J. C. MacLean
Mary A. Murphy
Adrienne E. Collins
John C. Moore
Eric R. Flesher
Charles S. Ney
Elizabeth K. McCann
W. A. Parker
Joseph A. F. Gardner
R. K. MacKenzie
Harvey Carruthers
C. D. Ovans
Mrs. F. H. b. Hughes
Jack C. Campbell
Nell Trapp
Frank B. Clark
R. H. McBean
Hattie R. Staghall
Norman Lind
Dorothy W. Carbon
Darrell 7\   Braidwood
Jonathan Tribe
Helen M. E. Harmer
H. T. Daunt
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Page 24
THE U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
^mum
itikMta
mmim
tts^^sn^uttimkm ft
ALUMNI      FUND
ft
(CLASS   MANAGERS   IN    ITALICS)
Mrs. Fred L. Hartley
J. D. Runkle
L. B. Monasch
D. G. Mcintosh
Barbara C.  King
Mr. & Mrs. J. H.
Stevenson
Frances Germyn
W. A. Calder
Maud Williams
Harry C. F. Spring
Marjory H. Munro
Rosemary  Collins
Enid Butler
B. N. Moyls
Pamela Runkle Donald
M. S. Lougheed
1941  (14.07%)
Mrs. Clyde M. McLeod
Mrs. R. P. ap Roberts
C. C. Weldon
D. C. Buckland
R. G. McEachern
Mr. & Mrs. R. H.
Parkinson
J. J. Maxwell
F. Margaret Sage
G. E. Retalack
Mrs. Douglas C. Gourlay
Alistair J. Drydale
W. G. Osborne (& '47)
Alice Hauger
Dr. M. A. Menzies
Maureen  Evans
R. M. Thompson
A. J. Andrews
James A. McArthur
James W. Purdey
Allyn Richardson
Dorothy M.  Daniels
C. E. Holland
A. M. Bvers
Gerald V. Howard
Mr. & Mrs. Pierre Berton
H.  R. MacKay
H. D. Lumsden
Stanley Evans
James G. Cameron
Douglas Todd
G. S. Wade
Margaret Lowe
Dr. J. F. Morgan
Dr. W. R. Barclay
L. P. Patience
Verna C. Baird
Ruth P. Wilson
1942 (14.59%)
Thomas W. Mayne
('47 Education)
Echo Lidster
Muriel G. McLagan
David R. Nichols
N. H. Burnett
Mr. & Mrs. J. M.
Campbell
C. E. T. White
Hansi Nissen
Leonard  Korsch
Charles W. Nash
Dr. Anne B. Underhill
Barbara E. Smith
Mrs. John M. MacKenz'e
W. Edward McBride
O. J. Hall
Douglas L. Walker
Wm. J. Johnson
Dr. K. O. Fleming
Peter S.  Mathewson
Wm. M. Joiner
A. T. Paton
A. J. Phillips
C. D. Fowler
Stanley W. Sheldon
M. L. Howieson
R. G. Mencions
/. C. MacSwan
Harry P. Darley
Ray E. Foster
Margaret M. Haggart
G. R. Hilchey
Nora Neilson
Dr. W. H. Letham
Dr.  Eric L. Smith
Florence V. Rowell
J. E. Beech
Mona V. Bell
Mrs. J. G. Finlay
J. W. Oastler
Joan V. Hodgson
Jack L. McMillan
1943 (16.31%)
Joseph D. Weed
E. Jean Campbell
Mrs. Jean Orchard
F. E. Bradner
J. S. Gray
D. G. Jessup
S. W. Turner
Elizabeth Wheat
Andy Snaddon
John J. Carson
Mrs. J. Stewart
C. W. Kerr
William T. Mann
Donald C. Evans
Mary Buckerfield
Elizabeth R. Uglow
I. H. Schiedel
Elizabeth   N.   Beaumont
Mrs. D. G. Anstey
F. J. Gordon
Mary M   Dennis
Roy V.  fackson
F. M. Buck
Leonard W. Chatwin
John D. Creighton
Marjorie Crosby
Len Cox
Eric W. Robinson
D. B. Fields
Mr. & Mrs. James T.
Me*Cay
Mrs. W. H. Letham
Mrs. R. M. Hungerford
Laura E. Mills
1. P. Beley
Rev. W. J. Bingham
L. A. Patterson
Elizabeth Locke
Jhrillina I few   KStiiO
Phono-Combinations!
See the New Models Which Play All Three
Kinds of Records!
The Standard 78 R.P.M.
The New 45 R.P.M.
The New Long Play 33 R.P.M.
More for your money than ever before
at
Thomson & Page Ltd.
"The Store that Service Built"
2914 Granville St. CHerry 5144
Hbnoree G. Young
James H. Nevison
Charles F. Long
Lucy F. Berton
Donald K. Bannerman
A. L. Bonutto
William M. Mercer
Mrs. William M. Mercer
Alice M. Curtis
1944 (17.22%)
C. A. Carncross
(Com '46)
P. J. G. Carrothers
Andrew Lam
Barbara E. Godfrey
Charlie O. Ferinn
Joan C. Thicke
Jim Goodman
J. B. Douglas
S. D. C. Chutter
R. S. Marshall
W. E. Woods
Walter D. Thumm
D. A. Haggart
A. D. Turner
John T. Morrison
Harold N. Parrott
Margaret S. George
I. Haile
Nora E. Boyd
T. W. McLorg
Jack V. Smedley
D. A. Edwards
D'Arcy Nickerson
Arthur A. Buck
N. S. Wright
E. P. Friesen
Alastair McLean
V. H. Grigg
Mrs. W. A. Nesbitt
D. M. Roussel
Hugh Christie
John A. Hood
R. G.  Roche
C. G. Greenwood
Mrs. D. H. Findlay
R.  B. Chalmers Hughes
John C. P. Boyes
Harry Gruenberg
P.  Brenda McDougall
A. H. Rome
Paul S. Jagger
Mr. & Mrs. F. H. Dietrich
R. S. Crosby
Barry Sleigh
Mr. & Mrs. J. C. Siblev
C. C. Wright
B. E. Wark
A. John Shaw
J. M. Wallace
1945 (14.08%)
Catherine McL. Anderson
Kathleen M. Cole
(M.A. '47)
R. M. Bibbs
J. D. Hetherington
Sylvia A. Lees
Harry E. Ashton
Mrs. J. A. Ferry
W. A. Ker
J. Goodlad
Kathleen W. Jenkins
Gilbert Hayward
J. Kelvin Hamilton
Claude E. Walker
H. E. English
J. L. Bryant
George C. Best
C. D. Maunsell
Margaret MacLeod
John B. Hicks
Lois C. Reid
R. J. Binnie
E. H. Clifton
G. R. Wyatt
J. H. Parliament
Wm. M. Walker
Ellen Kinnaird
M. L. Van de Putte
Ormond W.  Fleming
Geo. W. Allison
William K. McCarter
D. F. Griffiths
Frank W. Barry
R. J. McKercher
Robert L. High
Patricia Stamatis
Mrs. Marjorie P.L.Fisher
Mary F. Trumbull
A. W. Boyd
Jlune L. Aubrey
Mrs. Paul S. Jagger
Ruth L. Hewitt
Sheila  Kirkpatrick
Stella Shopland
W. E. Barraclough
Victor C. Young
D. J. Donaldson
J. David King
Loise Allan White
R. Soderholm
Byron W. Straight
1946 (14.28%)
Roma J. Atkins
C. V. Barlow
lasquelvn N. Phillips
R. A. Waldie
Joan D. Morison
Gordon Hardy (and '47)
John  H.  Peatfield
Joyce Robinson
A. C. Dimock
R. C. R. Tweed
Tom F. Scott
H. T. Hansen
A. R. Huntington
Nancy Watt
M. W. Dennis
K. O. Macgowan
A. F. Smith
N. Latimer
Donald A. Scott
A. C. Warrander
Dorothy Poore
Violet Katainen
Peter H. Pudney
W. R. Baker
R. C. Poison
Wm. K. Kwong
T.  W. Meredith
Hugh McLeod
C. R. Henderson
Ruth A Lane
R. G. Nickells
Mrs.   H.   Fraser
J. A. Burgess
Sidney Flavelle
Kenneth L. Broe
M. McGregor
David M. Ritchie
Laurence F. Giovando
A. W. Watt
F. Ward Cook
H. B. Hilton
Aline M. Roulston
F. D. Moyls
W. E. Kenny
W. E. Lyle
Mrs. H. B. Graber
Evelyn   Fowler
J. C. Ellingham
S. B. Howlett
Oswald K. Miniato
C. Ashby
B. E. Bewell
A. B. Waller
Wm. D. Reid
SaLlv V. Martin
A. D. Scott
Don R. Stevens
A. G. Hodgson
Mildred Edmonds
Anita Jane Scott
Nobel R. Manzer
William M. Lindgren
J. Graham Mowatt
J. A. S. Neilson
Arthur L. V. Piatt
Judith Jardine
K. H. Deane
Ole  Bakken
R. N. McLellan
D. C. McLeod
R. J. H. Welton
Addison A. Lake
Mr.s W. K. Wardroper
Wm. B. Watts
E. H. Witingham
1947 (12.08%)
Mrs. Freda B. Springate
Freda M. Paling
A. H. Swinton
D. A. Gilmour
Wm. McGhee
M. C. Mackay
Christine M. M. Baillie
D. F. Miller
John J. Day
W. L. Rush
Agnes  E.  Mehling
A. J. Hunter
David L. Holms
R. Radcliffe
Jane Seymour
Robert W. Hampton
W. L. Robinson
Jack Cohen
Rosemary Wilson
Elizabeth J. Hodgson
Ruth C. Cochrane
V. B. Chew
R.  Ross
Lois M. Crook
(Women's Residence)
Jean MacFarlane
A. Lymbery
William A. D. Hare
Nicholas   Koerner
Mrs.  R.  H.  Laurence
Audrey Dunlop
D. A. Hazlewood
A. George Bulhak
Mrs. Shirley M. Allen
R. J. Perrault
Nancy K. Macdonald
*7wo. Stated, to. Sekue 1/au
SHAUGRNESSY HEIGHTS
FRENCH CLEANERS and DYERS
You can trust your finest clothes to our
care.  To serve you better we have
modernized our cleaning plants.
"We Call and Deliver"
2928 Granville St. Oak and 23rd
CEdar 5424 CEdar 1714
OCTOBER, 1949
Page  25 ft
ALUMNI      FUND
ft
Margaret Westinghouse
Arnold W. Greentus
T. K. R. Bourns
Evelyn Anderson
Heather Blundell
James W. Lee
A. H. Hill (M.A. '47)
Naomi I. Grigg >
E. T. Rice
P. Prescott
A. G. Forrester
Herb Capozzi
Dorothy M. MacLeod
Doug. Yates
Lorna Dowman
E. r. Kirkpatrick
Richard A. Gritten
W. V. Allester
Dennis Kershaw
F. W.  Robinson, Jr.
R. F. Scagel
E. M. Greenaway, Jr.
Jack A. Ferry
Margaret C. Scott
Gus H. Sainas
Norman A. Robinson
T. L. Hackett, Jr.
T. E. Pennington
J. S. D. Smith
E. R. McGrady
Norman Klenman
Kenneth A. MacKirdy
T. D. C. Bulger
Isabel Walsh
Alfred E. Carlsen
William Gluska
J. A. McKeague
Dorothy G. Farley
William G. Johnston
J. b. McAulay
R. D. Archibald
Margaret J. Ford
R. A. James
G. M. Bateman
Mary F. McCaJlum
Onysia Crapko
G. A. Patterson
Mary M. Mill
Mignon   Barclay-Ross
Marguerite  Byrnes
John J. Turner
R. D. Booth
J. W. MacKay
J. M. Frewing
B. E. Curtis
Frances E. James
M. H. Allan
Arthur Douglas Belyea
Ernest H. Andrews
E. R. Ball
J. B. Swinton
Robert Talbot
June V. Collins
John M. Cribb
b. R. Selkirk
A. R. Macaulay
A. H. Addems
Ronald J. Weber
John L. Nieuwdorp
W. R. Hodgson
T. F. R. Newmarch
Eric  Holmgren
W. K. Wardroper
Grant  K.  Moreton
M. A. MacDonald
A. Thomson
Philip  Daykin
1948 (12.46%)
M. Eagle
R. D. Grantham
Edna Smith
Paul Cote
John H. Wormsbecher
Howard Gardner
Beverley Wilson
Stafford L. Hardy
Norman Tannar
H. Riehl
D. D. Wilson
E. Rodenchuk
R, S. Brown
Paul Stockstad
Deryck C. Choate
Robt. L. Laurenc e
Robert G. Brown
Ross C. Stroud
J.  I. Lessard
H.  Brooks Lawrence
Harrv   J.   Allen,   Jr.
E. M. Horsfield
M. E. Muttart
M. N. Brodie
D. B. Lloyd
J. R. Cunningham
Beverley A. Bassett
Robert J. E. McKeown
Raymond Pillman
R. P. Harris
M. Jean MacQueen
Nancy Bibbs
John C. Rudolph
Russell Bridges
Mr. & Mrs. Stuart Todd
Mary Lou E. Jeffery
Merilyn J. McLeod
Eric S. Smith
Margaret J. Ross
Douglas  Knott
A. L. Babb
Grace V. Hooper
Iris Wolfe
E. M. Charnley
M. M. Dixon
R. MacKinnon
Beryl Nation
Mary L. Duncan
Patricia A. Tiedje
B. V. Dore
R. G. Lammers
Wm. C. Leith
Anne Snape
Shirley M. Coope
Gordon A. Green
F. Shirley
L. Jerrold Walls
Humphrey Toms
Winifred E. Johnston
Peter Zuk
M. F. MacKintosh
A. M. Carlyle   ,
Andre C. Beguin
C. B. Jeffery
Charles  Unsworth
Joan E. Boon (Mrs. D. A.)
Jean E. Greenaway
John A. Panton
J. Calam
G. C. Richards
Dennis S. McKimm
Jean E. Semple
R. B. Thomas
Ruby Joe
D. H. Massy
R. M. Dundas
Mary McAlpine
Alan J.  Wilson
A. D. H. Henderson
Geo. B. Milligan
K. E. A. Jackson
Helen J. Best
Orville Conner
Marquerite. Simpson
Frederick Lipsett
T. C. Marshall (Law '48)
A. W. Bartlet
Gordon H. Wheatley
Catherine A. Wilson
G. W. Hobson
Stanley C. Jones
D. H. James
J. G. Bartlett
Robert V. Gray
W. S. Adams
Raymond Shelley
Thomas Ard (Class '49)
Joyce Haywood
J. R. B. McLennan
E. R. Larsen
W. H. Winter
I. C. Paterson
Elizabeth May Ewart
J. Wendell Forbes
Eleanor Pye
Alex Craig
Robert Johnson
Margaret C.  Stokkeland
Gwen J. Bamford
Eva Chernov
Patricia Cowan
T. A. McCulloch
Bruce S. Mackay
Barbara Grunlund
Jean Grunlund
H.  F. Longfield
L. D. Evans
Harry D. Gibb
H. A. C. Stokes
Jean MacKinnon
Ruth M. Blair
E. Collinson
Perry S. Millar
Lillian Dyrndahl
Maurice Temoin
Alfred J. Butler
E. Mary Ernshaw
I. Dalla Lana
C. Joan Christian
Wm. H. Young
J. L.  HarbeM
R. Cote
M. E. Willis
H. F. Hooker
Chas. M. Senay
Nora Clarke Callow
Rod Lindsay
Suzanne M. Hart
Alumni and Friends
Dr. F. W. Andrew
Dr. Norman A. M.
MacKenzie
Dr. T. H. Boggs
Mrs. F. MacKay
(Furnishings   Women's
Residence)
Point Grey Jr. High
P. E. O. Sisterhood
(Chapter  F., Women's
Residence)
Harold B. Ireland
1949
Basil G. Donovan
H. G. Smith
obert Steiner
fe
Don't Forget FLOWERS
for that important date . . .
Call MORROW'S FLOWER SHOP
"Designs that Personify"
in distinctive corsages
5957 W. Boulevard KE. 5944
* Me«^,*oeA
^>ave   Wisely     I U Ii It I • • •
for TOMORROW
Consult any of the following Sun Life Representatives
who have had wide experience in budgeting your income
to meet essential insurance needs:
tf>VtC6
.«*'
SYD  BAKER
LLOYD  JACKSON
AUBREY  SMITH
DOUG  KLBBLE
HAROLD  COWHIG
KEN   DEANE
JOHN  TENER
JIM   BRANDON
ED   PECK
LARRY  WRIGHT
(supervisor)
Kotjal IDanii iifdy., Ue
ancouver
SUN UFE OF CANADA
Page 26
THE U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
Pf*'*:'-
*^aaa«^ ^«a^^ CLASS OF SCIENCE '24 REUNION
fi/t
<*" **r*J'"
8''~if!j-wiiSl:«S«w-r ;i|r^3:
'1   *     *:"■* iti #i fe^
if If        If       Ff
m k ";'P '■'.
SCIENCE '24—Heaslip, Swythen, Letson, Choate, Arnot, Stroyan, Napier, McLachlan, Wallis, Graham. Front row
—Stacey, Coffin, (Sec.-Treas.) Cant, Wolverton (Pres.), Hardie, Ferguson, Gregerich, Atkinson, Underhill, Fan-
ing.
Science '24 had its 25th reunion at Stanley Park
Pavilion on June 4, 1949. Dinner, speeches, reminiscences, etc., were the order of the evening under the
charge of President and Toastmaster J. M. Wolverton.   Tribute  was  paid  to  deceased  members  Dr.
J. G. Davidson, Norman Foggo, Robert M. Jackson,
A. E. Jure, Roy McLaren and Henry Rushbury.
Shortly after the reunion  Roland  Graham passed
away to the sorrow of his class mates.
ALBERTA MEAT CO.
"Puritan  Products"
ft
Arthur  Fouks,   '41
R.R. 1,   Eburne                 FR.   1126
l/Uelcome ^Momecomlnq ^/ilumi :
CAVE & COMPANY
A
LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND CHEMICALS
For  Assay   Offices,   Educational,
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567 Hornby St. Vancouver, B. C.
MArine 8341
OCTOBER,  1949
Page  27 U. B. C  PLAYER'S  CLUB  ALUMNI
TO  STAGE "THE  WINSLOW  BOY"
BILL BUCKINGHAM PRODUCER OF
TERRANCE RATTIGAN'S PLAY
Sponsored by the Women's Auxiliary to the
Vancouver General Hospital, University Auditorium, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, November
24, 25, 26. Tickets available from Mrs. W. A.
Shilvock at KErrisdale 0100-L.
CAST
Ronnie Winslow (the boy) Gordon Gibson
Arthur Winslow  (father) Allan Ainsworth
Grace Winslow (mother) Mary Hill
Catherine Winslow (sister) Norman Edwards
Dickie Winslow (brother) Phil Keatley
Desmond Curry (family solicitor) John Powell
John Watherstone (fiance of Catherine)	
  Richard Marry
Miss Barnes( a reporter) Beatrice Wood
Sir Robert Morton (solicitor)..	
  William Buckingham
Violet (the Winslow maid) Daphne Hutcheson
YOU'LL ENJOY SHOPPING FROM
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When you buy at Simpson's low catalogue prices.
YOU SAVE TIME....
By making your selections in your own
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SEND YOUR ORDERS TO
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367 Water Street
CATALOGUES Write for Simpson's latest catalogue—or ask at any Simpson's
Order Office.
SIMPSON    PACIFIC   LIMITED
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Telephone TAtlow 2311
Page 28
THE U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE CLASS OF '24
Continued from Page 1 0
the old days in the Fairview shacks and the excitement of the trek to Point Grey. JASPER WOLVERTON replied to DEAN CLEMENT'S toast
the Class of '24 and MILDRED CAPLE, in witty
vein, answered MURRAY BRINK'S toast to the
"Ladies." WIN SHILVOCK, Alumni President,
urg-ed support of all members for Alumni projects.
Letters from many absent were received expressing
regret at not being able to be present. Among these
were PERCY BARR, University of California at
Berkeley, " HAROLD BRAMSTONCOOK, California, who wrote from New York saying he was
spending the summer in Europe, FRED BRAND,
Dortmund, Germany, DENZIL JONES, Cloverdale, LLOYD WHEELER, University of Manitoba, ELEANOR ORMROD, Port Alberni, MARY
ASTELL, Penticton, MRS. PERCY PETTY-
PIECE (Marie Chapin) Kelowna. RUTH Mac-
WILLIAM, Richmond, and MRS. FRED HARRIS
(Annie Lillico) from Watsonville, California.
Roll Call, with appropriate comments by LYMAN MEADOWS and ROLEY GRAHAM caused
much hilarity. As the old pictures from the '24
Annual were flashed on the screen, each person was
spotlighted in turn for a "Then" and "Now" exhibit.
ISABEL DIXON. FRANCES HIGGINBOTH-
AM, MYRTLE KIEVELL. FLORENCE JOHNSON. FRANCES TUCKER, MARIE CARR,
FRANCES CASSELMAN, LOUISE McLUCKIE
and JEAN TELFER compared notes during this
part of the programme while other class '24 members GEORGE LIMPUS. STANLEY MILLER,
VAL GWYTHER. GORDON LETSON, WES
SIMPSON. WALTER SCHMIDT, ROY ELSEY
and TUG HARDIE bowed graciously in response
to applause. Renewing old acquaintances and comparing life stories since graduation day concluded
a happy and memorable evening.
We Cordially Invite Your
Inspection of Our Large
Selection of
vSeautiful
rCeproau ctionS
Pictures to Blend with Home Interiors
Quality Picture Framing, prompt Service
aD ^rrcu 6
Pictoral Atfs
2715 Granville at 11 th CEdar 1314
ow do you keep up
with    ^..     a^tf»,j'?
Economic developments in the world at
large as they unfold may have far-reaching
effects on your business. To help you in
evaluating the pattern for the future which
is being set today The Bank of Nova Scotia
publishes the Monthly Review, in which
is discussed economic developments
important from a Canadian point of view.
The Monthly Review is yours for the
asking. Write to the Bank's General Office
at Toronto, or ask for it at your nearest
branch.
THE BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA
OCTOBER, 1949
Page 29 WOMEN
Continued from Page 20
From now on we offer you an interest in the
Residence Program, and we hope that every Alumni
group will plan a project. Choose something to
suit the size of your local group; eventually it will
benefit a student from your community.
The present plans for the first four units of the
Women's Residence provide for the accommodation
of some 200 girls (i.e. only those out-of-town girls
on the campus as freshmen). The Alumnae Committee on Women's Residences is working on the
principle that every donation made to the Residences will mean that the number of students being
provided for can be increased. The main project
of the Committee is to interest women throughout
the province in extending residence facilities through
assistance with furnishings for bedrooms, for
lounges, for the dining hall and social centre. Local
Alumni can do much to raise interest in their respective centres, especially where local students
are attending the university.
Honour for putting on the first function for the
Residences goes to Vancouver City Panhellenic for
its series of Art Lectures last spring.
First donation for furnishings was made by the
girls of Point Grey Junior High School.
The Vancouver Alumnae Committee sponsored
a fashion show at Brock Hall, Oct. 12. The student
committee was under the direction of Eileen Moyls,
President of the Women's Unlergraduate Society;
almunae convener is EVELYN CRUISE, '29, and
her assistants are DOROTHY MYERS, '32 and
HONOREE YOUNG, '43.
We will report on the success of this venture
later. At the same time we would like to have stories of projects under way in other centres. How
about it VICTORIA, KAMLOOPS, OTTAWA?
Figure Flattery
begins with the
Foundation
for
Fall Fashions
Expertly Fitted at
JC&&.
CORSET  SHOP
LIMITED
711 Dunsmuir
PAcific 6624
First Canadian woman to enter the
University of Washington School of
Medicine is Mercedes Fairfax a 1948
graduate of U. B. C.
She is preparing for
service as a medical
missionary with the
Desciples of Christ
Congo Mission. For
the past year she has
been working for Dr.
Otto Bluh of the
U.B.C. Physics Dept.
on a research grant
from the National
Cancer Institute.
■m H. HASTIN6S ST.-
Signature of Significance
in
Women's Fashions
<JaE
\ja±nLon±...
For the
Junior Miss
and
Her Brother
COATS   -   DRESSES
SKIRTS     -     SUITS
Girls' Sizes
Infants to 12 years.
Boys to 7 years.
Aunii
'auntu   /junior
"TOT TO TEEN   SHOP"
2055 W. 41st      KE. 4611
Page 30
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
mtm
mmmtimt^^ KERRISDALE
tradition J^aracie
d—a
All feathered cloche. Just
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Maxine hats.
Dolly's Millinery
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2249 West 4Id
To go under your suit,
classic blouse from our
exclusive La Dear fashion
blouses . . .
Hilda Flinn
2007 West 41st
Bouffant formals in lovely fabrics. Net tulle,
swish taffetas, flowered
satins. High fashion strapless styles and bolero jackets.
Rose Marie
Dress Shop
2186 West 41st
Fashion note in suits, the
long jacket with wide revere collar. Imported British Grey Worsted at . . .
Lynne Harriet
Shop
2259 West 41st
For your new hair styling,
facial, manicure ... let
the Beauty Isle create a
lovely you . . . call Anita
Arnot at KErr.  1562 . . .
Beauty Isle
2011 West 41st
OCTOBER, 1949
Slips that fit by Marjorie
Hamilton and exquisite
lingerie you'll find at . . .
Chris & Peg's
2379 West 41st
Page 31
• ■■■*-- - -•■■--*■- We offer you...
moDERn
BflnKinG
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In the 78 years this Bank
has served Canadians
we have always been proud
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HEW ACCOUNTS
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THE
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Established 1871
EDITORIALLY SPEAKING
Continued from Page 15
In point are a few new developments at U.B.C.
For instance a new faculty of Pharmacy was recently
set up and a dean and two professors, in accordance
with the Act, were automatically admitted to the
Senate. Also, faculties of law and medicine meant
three more representatives on Senate in each case
and, in the future there will probably be a faculty
of forestry. Members of Convocation are gradually
taking on the look of the vanishing Indians and
their voice is becoming smaller and their influence
is decreasing in proportion.
What should be done? Surely the founders intended Convocation to have the strongest voice
on Senate, else why did they make its representation
so substantial in the first instance? Could it be that
they didn't foresee the tremendous growth now
taking place and thereby missed the implication of
larger faculty representation on Senate?
Reform of the Act is imperative immediately,
and in particular two sections of the Act must be
revised. First, Convocation should consist only of
the Chancellor, the President and graduates of the
University. Secondly Convocation representation on
the Senate should increase proportionately to the
increase in members from other sources. If the
trend under the present Act is continued, the voice
of the graduates in the affairs of the University will
grow weaker, whereas with the tremendous increase
in the numbers of the great body of graduates it
should have an even more influential part to play
in University affairs.
ALUMNI  NOMINATIONS
Continued from Page 26
Helen Creelman, B.A. 1924
Dr. Fred Grauer, B.A. 1930
Barbara McPherson, B.A. 1945
MEMBER AT LARGE
1 year term      (1 to be elected)
Elliott Schmidt, B.A. Sc. 1936
Your representative on this year's Open House
Committee, Elliott is Director of the General Refrigeration Engineering Company, Limited.
MILLINERY SALON
Original Creations
in Hats that are Different!
2806 Granville Street
CHerry 2433
Page 32
THE U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
risM SPORT   (Continued from Page 7)
letters as catcher on the husky team at Washington
and captained the team in his final year. During the
past two summers "Jelly" has caught for the Mount
Vernon Milkmaids, ranked third in the nation in
1948 in National A.A.U. standings. In the quarter
final round this year they were beaten by a 2-1
score in a seventeen inning game. In the sixteenth
inning Anderson was knocked cold by a runner
sliding into home plate. Maybe that explains the
loss! : . . Dick Mitchell, U.B.C. Phys. Ed. graduate
and football letterman, was appointed Assistant
football coach at the University of Toronto during
the summer . . . Hilary Wotherspoon. Chairman of
the Men's Athletic Directorate, is presently confined to crutches from an operation to remove a torn
cartilage from his knee. He will probably be back
with the 'Birds rugby team in the spring . . . feature
of pre-season Thunderbird basketball will be the
University of Washington-'Bird game on December
3rd, at U.B.C. Gymnasium. The previous night the
Huskies will take on the Canadian champion Clover-
leafs, composed mainly of U.B.C. grads . . . Fred
Rowell, Law '49, has been appointed Assistant
Track Coach to Bob Osborne . . . U.B.C. will be
host to the 1950 Evergreen Conference Track Meet.
May 19th and 20th. The Meet, which follows several weeks of dual and triangular events between conference schools, is the highlight of the Conference
season.
Competing members will be Central Washington. Eastern Washington. Whitworth, St. Martin's
College of Puget Sound, Pacific Lutheran and University of British Columbia . . . B. C.'s War Memorial Gymnasium at U.B.C. will be completed by September, 1950. The building will be constructed with
provision made for all facilities encompassed in the
original plan. Swimming pool will be added when
further funds are available ... the Big Block Club,
by adding a cardigan sweater award, has made the
choice optional of the new award or the regulation
pullover ...     .     ... Professor Geoff. Andrews has
J,
nnouncina . . .
OUR    NEW   ADDRESS
WALTER M. GOW
861   GRANVILLE   STREET
C/iffa for  the  turide
DIAMOND RINGS
DIAMOND WATCHES
CHINAWARE •  SILVERWARE
Waiter Wf. Q~
861 Granville Street
Jack Pomfret will be leading his Thunderbird Cagers
against the Grads, at 8:00 p.m., October 29th, in their first
game of the year. At present, Pomfret is doubling in football as Assistant Coach to Head Coach Orville Burke.
been appointed Faculty Representative to the Men's
Athletic Directorate. Professor WTilf Heslop was appointed as Faculty Representative earlier this summer. These two men will replace Dr. Frank Dickson and Dr. John Allardyce, one of the leaders of
the trek from the Fairview shacks, who have retired after many years of service to athletics .
€}UICK ACTION SERVICE
by
Body Specialists
Thrifty Prices
DRIVING1
SAFETY
OCTOBER, 1949
1150    SEYMOUR   ST.
| VAMCouvtn   BC.
look {cry tie. '/(tott Styn wtiitAiflifoMty ltil,eeti'
Page 33 ft
STATI   STICS
ft
BIRTHS
To Mr. and Mrs. John F. Olliver (Bernice Baxter),
a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Givens, a daughter.
To  Mr.  and  Mrs.   Sherwood Robson  (Jean Mc-
Glashan), a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Kenmuir, a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Brine, a son.
To  Mr.  and   Mrs.  R.  F.  Binnie   (Ruth  Boyd),  a
daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Ernie Carswell, a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Burke (Jean Meredith), twin
daughters.
To Mr. and Mrs. Robert Thomson (Helen Lees), a
daughter.
To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  David  Oppenheimer   (Donalda
Carson), a daughter.
^rrtidtdf Supplies
eJUrawina   Irlaterials
*P***r
621 Pender West
PA. 4448
WEDDING
CAKES
Made to Order
Novelty Cakes for Hallowe'en
Fancy Pastries for your teas and receptions.
We specialize in individual
Wedding Cakes and Shower Cakes
ALma 0500
PEERLESS   BAKERY
4493 WEST 10th AVE.
WEDDINGS
E. W. Newbury to Mary Elizabeth Rogers.
Clive Campbell to Mary Eilleen (Molly) Bardsley.
David Hayward to Ruby Doreen Dunlop.
John Reed Colclough to Noreen Sylvia Cooke.
William   Hugh   MacDonald   to   Muriel  Josephine
Carson.
Andrew   Francis   Seraphim   to   Lucille   Katherine
Nielson.
Lemuel James Bayly to Nancy Irene Raine.
Sven Rasmussen to Johanne Worsoe.
Patrick Cecil Telfer White to Jane Deniss Seylour.
Ian Henderson Fraser to Adele Proverbs.
Alastair MacLean to Martha Louise Knapp.
John Norman Olsen to Barbara Knowles.
Benjamin William Hill-Tout to Eva-Linf Hunter.
Michael Grattan McGeer to Irene Patricia Rogers.
William Donald Tuck to Mary Frances Trumbull.
Edward   (Sandy)    Robertson   to   Mary   Patricia
Crowe.
Jack Thomas Rush to Rohan Peele.
Burton Oliver Kurth to Erika Miriam Nalos.
Benjamin Morgan Lawson to Eileen Sarah (Sally)
Morrow.
Kenneth Elliott Meredith to Valerie Jean Manning.
James Arthur Robinson to Barbara Jane Effinger.
David Dale to Nancy Belton.
Whatever the price, Birks'
Diamond Engagement Rings
are unsurpassed in Quality and
Value.
Page 34
■    100.00
Free   insurance  certificate   supplied.
BUDGET TERMS AVAILABLE
Birks
JEWELLERS
JEWELLERS VANCOUVER
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
mmm
$jLzlLzl&*
«iWtfi*<HM«yMMtMMMMMteftil^<^
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EAST  AND   WEST
HOME   IS   BEST!
rr
We British Columbians are not a demonstrative people, but we are by no means lacking in appreciation of our magnificent province nor slow to voice its praises. But no one has a deeper sense
of what it has and what it means than those who have been absent from it.
From far and near the alumni of the University of British Columbia find their way back to the
stately buildings on Point Grey which, native sons or not, they look upon as "Home."
We bid them welcome on the occasion of the Annual Reunion. Welcome to those halls of learning, to the cordial, colourful City of Vancouver.   Welcome to British Columbia.
Information on British Columbia was never more in demand than it is today. There is an eagerness everywhere to know what it has to offer, and people in all parts of the world begin to see it
as a highly interesting field of opportunity.
MEN WHO CAN CHOOSE •   PICK BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B. C.
E. G. Rowebottom,
Deputy Minister
Hon. Leslie H. Eyres,
Minister
IF IT'S MEWS IT*S IN THE SUN,  VANCOUVER'S LEADING- NEWSPAPER.
T XT
NEWS IT*S IK THE SUN, VANCOUVER* SjLEABING NEWSPAPER a» IF IT*S NEWS IT
W't^X, £%.X. J&f£\ &  »  » X. a..      X, k-     *.'%    /,:■:.'>,;.'/'''.■'.'■«/%     .'%,. L     iw? -X.L%
LEADING NEWSPAPER* . «IF  IT*'S NESS  IT'   3  IN  THE BUN
LEADING NEWSPAPER.. *If %fo$€C4M&¥£fa t SUN,   VANCOUYE
R»S LEADING NEWSPAPER..*IF IT'S gyti/lfftltl?^fWW^V^1^3       +'-
ING NEWSPAPER...IF IT*3 NEWS  IT'S  IN THE  SUNs   VANCOUVER'S  LEADING NEWS
PAPER...IF IT»S NEWS  IT*S IN  THE SUN,   VANCOUVER'S LEADING NEWSPAPER... Safe, Swift Movement of Modern
Traffic Depends on
ELECTRIC  TRAFFIC
CONTROL
O     *M •
to   o o
0)
oa
p.
a. a
GENERAL %§ ELECTRIC
TRAFFIC CONTROL EQUIPMENT
A trip by car or a-foot, on business or pleasure . . . the work of private and public
services ... all depend upon unimpeded, controlled movement on our roads and streets.
The smooth uninterrupted flow of traffic provided by an automatic electric control system
is essential to all the community. Electric
traffic control protects pedestrians, alleviates
congestion . . . prevents accidents and
facilitates the handling of crowds in busy
centres, bringing everyone greater safety.
The specialist engineers of CGE are leaders
in the development of electric traffic control
equipment. Trained in the planning of traffic
signal systems, with long experience in towns
and cities, large and small, their services are
at the disposal of all authorities interested in
the application of better traffic control. Whatever your problem may be, engineers at CGE
can advise on the best system for your requirements so that you can install signal lights
which will give your city better traffic control.
CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC
co
LTD
HEAD  OFFICE  - TORONTO
Cuiniu ft Smith Ltd., Eftctiv* Printing
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