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The UBC Alumni Chronicle Oct 31, 1952

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 74* %&.<£?. Alumni
*-&r*
FALL ISSUE
OCT.- NOV., 1952
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•--a**"..-" -r
v'->i- The Monthly Commercial Letter issued by
The Canadian Bank of Commerce is one of the
oldest publications of its kind. It contains
material on economic conditions gathered from
reliable sources and carefully weighed and sifted
for the benefit of its readers.
This Letter has a wide circulation among
business and professional men, students and
journalists in Canada and abroad. An application to the Head Office, Toronto, will bring
The Monthly Commercial Letter to you regularly, free of charge.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
EXPORT
CANADA'S   FINEST
CIGARETTE
^UaiyJaar
tffr
orted few*6
This advertisement is not published
or displayed by the Liquor Control
Board or by the Government of
British Columbia.
NOW- ODOR-FREE
Yes — a genuine flat oil paint with no objectionable
odor! Covers with one coat, goes on like magic with
either brush or roller. Next time you buy interior paint,
make sure it's MONASEAL, the sealized oil finish.
Page 2
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE LETTERS   TO  THE   EDITOR
Department of Classics.
University of British Columbia,
Dear Sir:
Permit me to draw your attention to a sentence
on page 15 of the June issue of the Chronicle: "The
Greyhound was used as a coursing' dog in Egypt
by the Pharaohs, and is mentioned by Ovid Zeno-
phon  (second century)."
Is this the same Ovid Zenophon who used to
take love-letters from Cleopatra to Marcus
Aurelius?
Yours very truly,
Geoffrey  B.  Riddehough,
(Arts '24).
We award a special and secret prize to Professor Riddehough for reading advertisements to the
dreggs. Reading ads is its own reward, but we
cannot let such industry go modestly by. Without
wishing to put words into an ad-man'8 mouth
■we feel that when the Doggy Wash Beauty Parlor
said greyhounds were mentioned by one Ovid
Xenophon, the D.W.B. Parlor was referring to Ovid
Xenophon Junior, not Senior. No wonder Professor
R. was for a moment confused. This is no reflection
on, him at all. On the contrary. We wish, however,
to point out that while most magazines slant their
stories to make you turn to the ads in relief, we
follow the opposite policy.—Kd. Xotc.
The Editor,
Alumni Chronicle.
Sir:
Somewhat hesitantly I call your attention to a
Doggy Wash Beauty Parlor advt. in the June issue.
It says greyhounds were mentioned by Chaucer.
It then advises us (on the strength of this information?) to have our dogs clipped to the tune of three
dollars. Greyhounds don't need clipping . . . which
is the sole advantage of greyhounds. But if they
did need clipping, what has Chaucer got to do with
it? Chaucer isn't going to clip them, you may lay
to that. I feel I have a right to protest, since I am
descended from Chaucer's sister. (This, oddly
enough, is true.) In 20-odd generations, I must
have about one-millionth of Chaucer blood. Which
makes me one in a million. And that's more than
you can say about greyhounds, who are terribly
inbred.
Yours faithfully,
David Brock, Arts '30.
.Is far as we can follow Dave Brock (who is a
nice guy to follow in. every sense of the word
")iice") writes in to complain about Geoffrey
Chaucer and assorted greyhounds. If he's worried
about getti)i<) himself mixed up with a greyhound
<rr even mixed up with (}. Chaucer, he can set his
mind at rest. Not that anybody ever accused Dave's
mind of being at rest. —Ed. Note.
ACORNS
AND
OAKS
The resilient Canadian economy gives
eloquent testimony that from small beginnings great business stems, much of it
seeded by the ideas of university-trained
men and women.
The Dominion Bank has lent a helping
hand to many acorns of yesterday. Let
it help you to become tomorrow's oak.
For any personal financial problem, consult your local Dominion Bank Manager.
THE
DOMINION
BANK
Established 1871
BRANCHES   THROUGHOUT   CANADA
New York Agency
49 Wall Street
London, England Branch
5 King William St., E.C. 4
Col. The Honourable E. W. Hamber, C.M.G., LL.D.
Director
R. E. J. Ford, Manager, Vancouver, B.C.
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page 3 r
And guess who's treasurer..*
When there's a community effort on foot, chances are you'll find the
Royal Bank Manager on the committee. He is often called on to act
because Royal Bankers have earned a solid reputation as public spirited
citizens. And so it is right down the line, from the Manager to the youngest
clerk. Royal Bankers are encouraged to pull their weight in all worthwhile
endeavours, for the interests of the bank and the community are one.
This spirit is reflected in their service to you. When you have banking
business to do . . . when you wish to discuss some financial matter in
confidence . . . see your Royal Bank first. The Manager and his staff are
there to serve you in every way they can.
The Royal Bank in your community
is there to serve you in many ways.
Perhaps you do not realize that:
... if you find it inconvenient to visit
the bank, you can still open an account, deposit and withdraw money
by mail.
. . . there are a number of reasons
why you and some other members of
your family might find it advantageous to have a "Joint Account".
. . . when you are going away, you
can obtain from us Travellers Cheques
which are a safe way to carry money.
. . . if you have valuable papers—and
who has not?—you can rent a Safe
Deposit Box. It is your private safe.
Not even the bank can open it.
THE   ROYAL  BANK  OF  CANADA
%<ue eon 6a#4 a* t&e "IRofat"
Page 4
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE The U. B. C. Alumni
CHROMCLC
Published by the Alumni Association of
The University of British Columbia
Editor: Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm., LLB.
Women's Editor: Leona Sherlock, B.A., '50
Board of Management:
President Gordon M. Letson, B.A.Sc, '26
Vice-President Douglas Macdonald, B.A., '30
Executive-Director... Frank Turner, B.Comm., B.A., '39
Treasurer . G. Dudley Darling, B.Comm. '39
Second Vice-President Mary McDougal
B.A. '33
Third Vice-President Prof. Tom Taylor, B.A., '26
Chairman Publications Board Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm.
•42 LLb. 48
Past President James A. Macdonald, B.A. '40
Degree Reps.: Medicine, Dr. Frank Turnbull, B.A. '23;
Law, Perry Miller, LL.B. '48; Pharmacy, W. T. Ainsworth,
B.S.P. 'SO; Commerce, Don Miller, B.Comm. '47; Agriculture, Iain McSwan, B.S.A. '42; Social Work, Richard Clark,
B.A. '41; Home Economics, Muriel Gullock, B.H.E. '46;
Physical Education, Reid Mitchell, B.P.E. '49; Architecture,
Harry Lee, B.Arch. 'SO; Applied Science, Phil Stroyan,
B.A. Sc. '24; Forestry, Jack Roff, B.Comm. '47, B.S.F. '48;
Arts, Aileen Mann, B.A. '37.
Members at Large: David Brousson, B.A.Sc. '49, Fred
Grauer, B.S.A. '30, Jean Gilley, B.A. '27, Mrs. James Harmer, B.A. '40, Dr. W. G. Black, B.A. '22, Art Sager, B.A. '38.
Senate Reps.: Dr. Earl Foerster, Dr. W. C. Gibson, B.A.
'33.
Alma Mater Society Reps.: Vaughan Lyon and Terry
Nicholls.
Editorial Office:
5th Floor, Yorkshire House
900 W. Pender St. Vancouver, B.C.
Business Office:
Room 201, Brock Hall, U.B.C.
VOL. 6, No. 3 OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ARTICLES PAGE
Youngest Attorney-General    . . .  „     7
Victoria  College   50th   Anniversary 8,  9
Finer Things A Must—by D. Brock. 23
FEATURES:
Speaking   Editorially       13
Women    18, 19
Frankly  Speaking       - 21
Published in Vancouver, British Columbia and authorized as second class mail
Post Office Department, Ottawa
<*£&*> 27
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
^J~or the Kecord . . .
Inis Fall is a season of anniversaries on the
campus and Home-coming will he the scene of most
of them . . . the class of 1932 is celebrating its 20th
anniversary and they are planning a special re-union
. . . also during home-coming October 30 will mark
the 40th birthday of Fall Convocation . . . later on
November 13, the Alumni Association annual meeting will mark the 35th anniversary of the graduate
body . . . perhaps topping the list was the Cairn
ceremony—one of U.B.C.'s special traditions—held
October 25 which marked an even 30 years since
the Great Trek in '22.
A University Stag affair held on the campus
last month got the new school year off to an exhilarating start when Freshmen learned a great deal
about the facts of life from a (lancer hired to entertain the group and who in fact turned out to be a
strip tease artist . . . apparently there wasn't: much
in the line of tease about the performance and some
of the honoured guests were not pleased . . . 'Twas
said that the girl was an American citizen hired
to dance, but some in the know maintain she is a
local gal well known for her talents . . . Ah vouth
. . . some of us went to College years too soon.
This issue is a variety number with articles to
suit all tastes . . . we advise vou to read about the
U.B.C. Graduate Bob Homier, 32-year-old Attorney-
General of B.C., on page seven and remind you that
five years ago Bob and your editor took over the
Chronicle from Darrell Hraidwood . . . Bob soon got
more interested in politics and the C.O.T.C. than
the magazine and no one can now doubt the wisdom
of his interests . . . there's a moral in that storv
about sticking in one place too long.
Victoria College is 50 years old and a storv runs
on page 8 and 9 . . . we ask you particularly to read
F. G. C. Wood's reprinted bit from the anniversary
brochure called "A\*e were seven" . . . it's a nostalgic
piece worth reading by all his former students and
others too.
Don't forget the Boxing Day Dance at the Commodore . . . one night this time . . . plan early and
arrange your parties in advance . . . it's the only
way to see all your old college pals and renew old
friendships.
COVER PICTURE
The pert cover girl photographed by student photographer Joe Quan is a blond, blue-eyed ex-Byng actress
named Olive Sturgess who was chosen U.B.C. Frosh
Queen. . . . She recently appeared in Totem Theatre's
"Summer and  Smoke"  .  .  .
Page 5 Both the power-house and the ten-mile tunnel shown
above, in an artist's visualization, will actually be
located deep underground. In the sketch at right, the
irregular dark area near Kitimat is the water-shed of
tomorrow's vast reservoir of poiver-giving water.
j4*td CV&Ot <fc 6eOAt f.. .The world's
biggest single power-house at Kemano, designed to
pump life into the world's largest aluminum smelter
at Kitimat. From a huge man-made cavern 1,600 feet
deep inside the chest of the yet nameless mountain.
But put your imagination in dream-gear, because this is
only part of the giant project now a-building — on the unearthly scale of a scientific fantasy — in a mountainous corner
of British Columbia.
This is an Aluminum Company of Canada project — Canada's
latest answer to the free world's sore need for strategic
aluminum. Its realization will involve an area of 5,000 square
miles. Jobs to be done include: the raising of lakes a hundred feet
or more above their present levels; building the largest rock-fill
dam in the Commonwealth; boring ten miles of tunnel through
a mountain chain; creating and harnessing one of the world's
highest water drops for power use; and stringing a transmission
line between two mountain peaks — with helicopters.
The potential output of aluminum from this 'Martian' project
will be 500,000 metric tons annually.
WORKING      WITH      CANADIANS      IN      EVERY      WALK      OF      LIFE      SINCE      1817
Page 6 U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
Yes, this is among the very greatest things to happen to the
West since the transcontinental railroads were built. One of
the biggest strides yet in Canada's march to greatness.
In keeping with its tradition of pioneering with the pioneers,
the Bank of Montreal recently opened a branch at Kitimat
... to provide banking facilities for the hundreds of Canadians
already at work there.
Canada's First Bank is proud of this opportunity to chalk
up yet another 'first' in the service of Canada, its industries
and its people.
Bank of Montreal ROBERT   W.   BONNER   ARTS   '42,   LAW   '48,
YOUNGEST   ATTORNEY-GENERAL   AT   31
By DON INGRAM, Arts '37
Attorney - General
Robert William
Bonner. Q.C., B.A.,
LL.B., is a modest,
unassuming young
man with what political writers like to
call a brilliant future.
A good many eyebrows in British Columbia shot skyward
on August 1 when
Premier W. A. C.
Bennett, leading the
province's first Social Credit govern-
in e n t, announced
that his attorney-
general would be R.
W. Bonner.
They flew higher when their owners learned
the new "A.-G." was just 31 years of age, and only
four years out of law school.
"Imagine!" said the old-line politicians, the
political writers of British Columbia's greatest
newspapers, and the rank and file of four major
political parties. "Imagine a veritable legal stripling trying to fill the post of attorney-general!"
He certainly had some brilliant predecessors.
Lions of the law like Gordon Wismer and R. L.
"Pat" Maitland had occupied the roomy office in
the north-east corner of the main portion of the
Parliament Buildings commanding a view of Victoria's beautiful Inner Harbor.
T. D. Pattullo had the post for three months
in 1937, having succeeded Chief Justice Gordon
McG. Sloan on his elevation to the bench. Before
him had been the brilliant R. H. Pooley. And now
conies a young man—younger by far than a 35-
year-old Gordon Sloan who held the juvenile age
record for the position until then—considered hardly
dry behind the ears in either politics or law.
The experts expected chaos and confusion in
one of the most important posts in the Cabinet,
but said wisely that if the new attornev-general
minded his business and did what he was told the
government might manage to stagger along without too much disruption.
So what happened?
Absolutely nothing, until the young A.-G. suddenly burst out in September with a firm clutch
on the liquor problem—the knottiest, most awkward, and completely uncomfortable situation to
face a British Columbia government for years. Mr.
Bonner announced that he had appointed a three-
man commission, that has since won the plaudits
of everyone for the merits of the individuals chosen,
that would listen to the people then make recom
mendations to the government on the best way to
implement the June 12 plebiscite favoring liquor
sale by the glass.
On October 8 the commission held its first
public hearing in Vancouver, and will continue
until it feels it knows what the majority of British
Columbians want in the field of liquor sale.
Another nasty business was thrown in the lap
of the young lawyer October 2 when a riot broke
out in Oakalla Prison. On October 5 he had a chat
with the prison warden, and by October 6 a temporary solution had been announced that will pave
the way to a more permanent answer to the prison
problem.
With these two single actions the young Mr.
Bonner proved to a good manv doubters that he was
possessed of considerable legal ability plus the
intestinal fortitude to meet a difficult issue face, to
face and not waste time in solving it.
The experts then began to look a little more
closely at this young man. and found a man who,
though not particularly rich in years, has plenty
between the ears.
He was born in Vancouver in September. 1920,
was educated at Britannia High School, and was
graduated from the Universitv of British Columbia
in 1942.
He did a full hitch with the Seaforth Highlanders in the Second World War. and fought with the
famous kilted regiment through North Africa. Sicily
and Italy.    He was wounded October 3. 1943.
At the end of hostilities he was discharged with
the rank of major, and kept up his interest in the
military life with service in the U.B.C. contingent
of the C.O.T.C. in which he holds the rank of
lieutenant-colonel and is now the unit's commandant.
Home is still 4929 College Highroad, just a
step from the campus, where his wife, the former
Barbara Newman. Arts '44. looks after their two
children—young Barbara Carolyn, who is five, and
Robert York, who has just passed his first birth-
(Continued on page 25)
MONTREAL TRUST
COMPANY
"A Company that Cares for your
Affairs"
Services to Individuals and Corporations
• EXECUTORS & TRUSTEES
• EMPLOYEE PENSION FUNDS
• ENDOWMENT FUNDS
466 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C.
MArine 0567
J. N. BELL-Manager
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page 7 VICTORIA      COLLEGE     CELE
ANNIVERSARY  OF   FIRST   CLA
This fall marks the registration of the fiftieth
class at Victoria College, and a special celebration
was held to honour the members — all seven of
them — of the first class which began in the fall
of 1903. In addition, the College has prepared an
attractively illustrated Fiftieth Anniversary brochure, a copy of which will be sent to any former
student who requests it.
The member of the original group best known
to U.B.C. alumni is probably Prof. Emeritus F. G. C.
Wood who has written a short historical piece for
the brochure. Also included in the Class of 1903-
'04 were Mr. J. B. Clearihue, Victoria lawyer,
Rhodes Scholar, Chairman of the Victoria College
Council and former U.B.C. Governor; Mr. .Clifford
Rogers, President of the White Pass and Yukon
Railway; Miss Sara Spencer, Victoria's Best Citizen of 1952, and others. All seven ex-students and
Mrs. H. Esson Young and Miss Jeanette Cann, two
of their teachers, plan a reunion in October during
Thanksgiving week when the College will celebrate
its Fiftieth Anniversary.
A programme which included the opening of
the new Ewing Building by the Hon. Mrs. Tilly
Rolston, was held on Wednesday, October 15th. in
the College Auditorium. Speakers marking the
occasion included Dr. X. A. M. MacKenzie, Prof.
Emeritus F. G. C. Wood, Mr. W. T. Straith, Prof.
Emeritus Jeffree A. Cunningham. Mr. J. B. Clearihue, Dr. Willard Ireland, Mr. Neal Harlow and
others. In the new Library Building a portrait was
unvailed   of  the   late   Dr.   J.   M.   Ewing,   a   former
principal, after whom the building has been named.
Dr. Willard Ireland, a Victoria College and U.B.C.
graduate and Provincial Archivist, chaired this
ceremony.
The new Provincial Government building is in
a modern style and houses attractive reading rooms
(for both College and Normal School students),
adequate stack space, administration and faculty
offices and faculty lounge. To supply books for
the new library and pay tribute to former College
professors, the Victoria College Fiftieth Anniversary Library Fund has been established. Those to
be so honoured are Prof. G. P. Black, Miss Jeanette
A. Cann, Prof. Jeffree A. Cunningham, and the late
Percy H. Elliott, Dr. J. M. Ewing, E. Stanley Farr,
John Marr, Dr. E. B. Paul, E. Howard Russell, and
Mme. E. Sanderson-Mongin. Contributions can be
made in honour of any former professor or to the
general fund. Former students and other friends
may earmark their annual donations to the Alumni-
UBC Development Fund for this worthwhile purpose, or may donate directly to the Victoria College
Library Fund. The objective is $5,000.00. All
books bought through this plan will be inscribed
with specially designed bookplates.
U.B.C. has always enjoyed a close affiliation
with Victoria College through the stream of ex-
College students entering the Point Grey Campus
each year and through its formal affiliation. And,
as well, a continuing association is maintained
through the College Faculty members (and their
wives), many of whom are U.B.C. graduates.
The new Ewing Building at Victoria College opened October IT, by the Honourable Mrs. Tilly Rolston
Page 8
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE B RATES    50th
SS   OF  SEVEN
Dr. W. Harry Hickman, Arts '30, the principal of
Victoria College and former winner of the French
Government Scholarship.
Dr. W. Harry Hickman, newly - appointed
Principal of Victoria College, led the Graduating
Class of 1930, and won the French Government
Scholarship allowing him a year's study at the Sorbonne. In 1933. his wife (then Grace Parkinson)
repeated his achievement, and also spent a year in
Paris.
Other members of the Faculty and Staff who
are U.B.C. graduates include Dorothy M. Cruick-
shank (1929), Robert T. D. Wallace and Lewis J.
Clark (1932), Gwladys V. Downes (1934). Phoebe
Noble and Rodnev P. D. Poisson (1935), Svdney G.
Pettit and Phvllis Baxendale (1936). W.~ Gordon
Fields (1937), Roger J. Bishop (1938), William H.
Gaddes and Charles H. Howatson (1939), Eileen
Lee Gidney (1946), Winona J. Bethune (1947), and
Philip A. Morris (1948). All of these people have
pursued graduate work either at U.B.C. or elsewhere bringing recognition to themselves, the
College and their Alma Mater, U.B.C.
WE   WERE   SEVEN
(Reprinted from 50th Anniversary Brochure)
When "McGill University College of British
Columbia situated at Victoria" opened its first
session in the fall of 1903, it was not because the
seven students enrolled were clamoring for higher
education. Somewhat younger than the average
freshman class of latter times, we were rather vague
about the idea of going on eventually to McGill or
Toronto—remote institutions five days of weary
travel to the east. However, because the school
trustees of the capital city viewed with concern the
existence of a similar branch of McGill in that
twenty-year-old, upstart town of Vancouver, Victoria College came into being and some seven innocents placed themselves in the way of being
regarded as pioneers some forty-nine years later.
If that first year was one of hardship, we did
not realize it. Impressed with the novelty of being
college students, we worked reasonably well to meet
the standards of our esteemed instructors. In addition to their duties as senior teachers in Victoria
High School, Miss Rosalind Watson, together with
the late Dr. E. B. Paul, A. J. Pineo, E."H. Russell
and Dr. S. J. Willis, cheerfully took on the burden
of new courses. When, towards the end of the
term. Miss Watson left to become Mrs. H. E.
Young, her successor was Miss J. A. Cann. Three
of us passed, without supplementals, the examinations set and marked by McGill authorities, and two
of this trio later completed their courses in
Montreal.
CRAIGDARRDCH
Instructors were hot all we shared witli high
school students. Although we had none of our
own, we used the classrooms of the recently finished
brick building at the corner of Fernvvood Road
and Fort Street. Across the way, behind its stone
fence and iron gates, that curious pile, Craigdarroch,
loomed above us without a hint of the part it was
later to play in the history of Victoria College. The
principal's office was the scene of our classes with
him and also served as a library where all of the
half dozen reference books devoted to our needs
were kept.
In sport, too, we were dependent upon the high
school athletic groups. With their aid. men's and
women's gra-s hockey teams played league games
at home. and. once a year, went on a colorful trip,
via the E. and N.  Railway, to Nanaimo.
Even our social life was not entirely of our own
making. Seven is hardly a magic number for a
party and so our friends in the matriculation class
were added to our list. As dancing was deemed
a wicked pastime by some of the trustees of the
time, our parties were held at our own homes and
restricted to the innocent pleasures of guessing
games and parcheesi.
1903-1952.    How times have changed!
—F. G. C. Wood.
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page 9 or
There's no restriction on the variety
of careers that
U.B.C.'s graduates
can carve out for
them selves, but Peter
Cotton, ex - army
captain and D.V.A.
student is the first to
successfully enter
the field of professional design.
While still a student in the School of!
Architecture. Cotton!
began experimenting]
with    a   few    simple J
designs    for    tables]
and   chairs,   using!
wrought-iron,    glass
and laminated woods.
It wasn't long before
friends   visiting   his
basement suite began to eye the furnishings with a
view to their own needs. Production was on. By
the time he left U.B.C. those first models had become the prototypes for an extensive line of contemporary furnishings which he and his associates
PETER  COTTON
Mfl
in Perpetua Furniture are developing for Canadian
homes.
The technical training he received as an architect is useful to Peter Cotton as a designer. A
knowledge of strength of materials enables him to
use the most economical minimum for strength and
elegance. But fundamentally it is his intimate
knowledge of the contemporary house and its needs
which most influences his designs. They are
stripped of superfluous bulk because today's houte
is smaller and every item of furniture must give
maximum service in minimum space. Slender
frames, translucent table-tops, delicate proportions,
all help to make the smaller room seem larger both
to the eye and in actual use.
Moreover his designs look well in the modern
house. Although many houses of good contemporary design are being built today, few of their owners are able to furnish in equivalent style. Most
of the furniture offered up as modern is the usual
over-stuffed and bulky traditional jazzed up with a
few modern mannerisms. Peter himself observes,
"A lot of contemporary furniture attempts to look
smart but fails through misuse of materials. Excess
wood is often applied just to give a 'modern' effect.
Much existing furniture is badly proportioned. The
manufacturer seems to have no understanding of
the formal qualities of mass, line, texture and pro-
TOPS IN B.C.
CANNED SEA FOOD
Sockeye, Pink and Cohoe. The
Paramount label appears on only
the pick of each run . . . your
guarantee of the finest salmon
available.
An economical seafood that
fits any occasion. For
meals, or snacks . . . have
herring on hand.
If you prefer delicious white
tuna . . . always pick Paramount
Albacore. You'll notice the
difference.
^mrTU^
The  Paramount People also pack  3  Minute  Salmon
Croquettes,   Pilchards   and   Surf   brand   Fancy   Keta.
#
ALWAYS PICK
aratnount
"and lehen the Utth <mU come cn"
Remember the Day
With SNAPSHOTS
Pictures are fun to take
and fun to show . . .
Take your pick of our simple to
use flash cameras to "catch" those
Your Grad of '54 fleeting days of childhood— NOW !
KODAK CAMERAS IN STOCK
Baby Brownie Special $3.30
Brownie Hawkeye $6.25
Hawkeye Flash Model $8.25
Duaflexll. Kodet Flash $16.75
and many, many others
Guaranteed Photographic Supplies
787 HORNBY ST.
LTD.
TAtlow 2468
VANCOUVER 1, B.C.
DICK   DOWREY   -   Com. '40
Page 10
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE Examples of the  modern furniture being designed
by Peter Cotton
portion. Cabinet making tricks are used for deceptive visual effects without considering the waste
of materials and effort in the manufacturing process."
But providing beautiful furniture within the
range of the average customer is not a small time
business. Only some method of quantity production can realize this ideal. Meanwhile Cotton and
his partners, along with a handful of other designers
across Canada continue to produce and to hope that
the attention paid to their work by the Canadian
Design Index, Canadian Homes and Gardens and
other publications will make both the Canadian
public and the Canadian manufacturers aware that
the designing talent they need to resolve today's
furnishing problems is right on their doorstep.
—RENE BOUX
Curator of the University
I.O.D.E. Fine Arts Gallery.
MEN'S RESIDENCE FURNISHING FUND
During the Winter Session of 1951-52 the Councils of Fort and Acadia Camps were asked by Professor Geof Andrew to submit their suggestions in
regard to permanent housing for men on the
campus. The following suggestions were made:
that the dormitories be located near the Memorial
Gymnasium, and the construction of this housing
be instituted as soon as possible.
In early April of 1952 a committee was formed at
Fort Camp to investigate and inaugurate a fund for
furnishing these dorms. The committee was composed of Mr. John Pousette, Law '52 and Mr. Roy
Sadler, President Elect of Fort Camp, together with
the writer. John and Roy consulted with Mr. Kennedy of the Faculty of Law and a trust fund was
set up. The Board of Governors gave their approval
and the members of Fort and Acadia camps, graduating this Spring were asked to leave their ten dol
lar  caution   deposit.    Many  of  them   did  so.    But
much more money is needed.
We are now asking alumni in general atid former residents of Fort and Acadia in particular to
get behind this fund by contributing to the Alumni
U.B.C. Development Fund earmarked to the Men's
Residence Furnishing Fund. Such contributions
are exempt from income tax and are counted as
alumni fees. So let's have your contributions,
RIGHT NOW!
Bob Alatchett Aggie, '51
KEY TO GOOD DINING
A  delightful experience in  dining
MONTY'S
L^ariboo fSoom
famous for spare ribs, broiled steaks, onion soup,
chicken and spaghetti
1339 Richards St. Park Royal
PA. 6012
West 113
If you've never seen "Red Brand" western beef
steak broiled on the charcoal broiler — see and
enjoy at the
STEAK  HOUSE
982 Howe Street Phone PA. 1022
Open 5 p.m. to 5 a.m., daily; Sundays 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Treat your family to European dishes at the
Cuco', SPARE   RIBS
Our Special Dish—Shish Kebob
(Lamb  on  Skewer)
and other delicious specialties at
946  GRANVILLE  STREET,  VANCOUVER
(upstairs) MA. 3534
Open  5  p.m.  to  5  a.m.
SCANDIA
A   BIT OF  OLD  SCANDINAVIA
SMORGASBORD and STEAKS
Our Specialty
LUNCHEON
11:30  -  2:00
FOR  RESERVATIONS
Phone: TAtlow 7733
DINNER
5:00  -   10:00
775 BURRARD STREET
(Near Hotel Vancouver)
Vancouver.  Canada
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page 11 IT'S   FROM   BIRKS
45.00
Designed and handcrafted by
Birks own silversmiths . .. assuring
unrivalled value.
Although every piece may be purchased
separately, the prices quoted here are for
three-piece sets; mirror, hair brush and comb.
BUDGET TERMS:
10% DOWN, balance in
convenient monthly
payments with small
carrying charge.
BIRKS
SILVERSMITHS
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE
VANCOUVER, B.C.
BOXING DAY DANCE
will be strictly
FIRST COMEf FIRST SERVED!
Carleton (Cart) Collard, prennial and capable Chairman
of the Annual Alumni Reunion Dance, announced that
this year's gala affair (back on a one-night "stand") will
be bigger and better than ever.
The date? BOXING DAY, of course!
The place?' Why, the COMMODORE CABARET, naturally!
By returning to the one-night basis, the many dozens
of alumni and their friends who've "gone the wrong
night" to see their former UBC colleagues will no longer
be disappointed—unless they leave it too late to get
tickets and reservations!
And, to ensure that there is a representative .. all-
Universities' crowd for this traditional Holiday event,
tickets will be available for grads of other Universities—
through the University Women's Club, the Inter-Fraternity Alumni Council, etc.—as well as from genial Cart
Collard himself at the Commodore daily between December 17 to 24th inclusive and prior to that time, from
Executive Director Frank J. E. Turner, at the alumni
office (ALma 3044).
Regardless—one thing is sure—if you want to be sure
to go, PLEASE get your tickets and reservations NOW!
Sportswear and Accessories
Specializing    in    Imported    Woollens,
Plaid Suits, Tweed Separates,  Blouses,
Imported Novelty Belts
and Accessories
d5eau   fv/onde
2956 South Granville St. CHerry 5644
Vancouver, B.C.
%k?M
her
^X /^ATEfcNIJY SHOPPE
783 GRANVILLE ST. PAcific 2056
Vancouver, B.C.
Page 12
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE Friends of the Library
Faraway and long ago, in the days of the Fair-
view Campus, it was a privilege for some of us to
spend many happy hours exploring the books in the
library stacks. This was a rich experience at the
time and has been a source of pleasant memories
since. I suspect that during the intervening thirty
years many others upon graduation from U.B.C.
have carried away the same affectionate esteem and
high regard for the University Library as I did.
And perhaps the successful growth of the University of British Columbia, like that of the great universities in the past, has been clue in large part to
the fortunate association of a competent faculty
with a fine library.
Not only is the Library important to the University, but it is also important to all the people of
British  Columbia and to the full  development
of their province. And, of course, through the
University budget, the people provide, and will continue to do so, it's main financial support. However,
many of the great university libraries in the world
depend upon the private support of their effection-
ate and munificent friends for an added or supplementary richness to the scope of their basis archives.
An example of such support is that furnished by
the Friends of The Bodleian in Oxford, England.
This group is composed of Oxonians and others
(not Oxonians) from various parts of the world who
are friendly supporters of the Bodleian. The
principal qualification is merely an interest in the
library. Although the individual financial support
is not usually large, the Friends of The Bodleian
have been instrumental in adding further literary
treasure to archives already rich beyond the dreams
of most university libraries. In addition, the moral
support generated by such an active interest also
encourages those responsible for the continued welfare of the Bodleian Library.
It would seem that the same opportunity exists
for helping the library at U.B.C. as for helping the
Bodleian at Oxford. U.B.C. is not without its
valuable opportunities, provided broad interest and
supplementary financial support are available. It
seems hardly an overstatement to say that the need
of the library at U.B.C. is a s great as that of the
Bodleian at Oxford. The Friends of The Bodleian
is not a highly formal organization, but it does some
effective work in a quietly informal manner.
It would be interesting to know what general
sentiment exists among U.B.C. alumni and friends
of the University for supporting an activity at
U.B.C. such as that outlined above. If the interest
is sufficiently broad, perhaps the necessary formalization can be completed along proper lines, and in
cooperation with the university authorities, by those
interested and living in Vancouver or its vicinity.
As a friend of the U.B.C. Library, I would
certainly give such an activity my full support.
(Note: Information regarding the Friends of The
Bodleian may be obtained from Miss Ann
Smith of the University Library, or from
Mr. S. G. Gillam. the Bodleian Library, Oxford, England.)
L. W. McLENNAN,
California Branch.
POETRY
A SPLENDID PLAN
Let's have a P.-T.A. at C.B.C.
And do the Problem Children lots of good.
We'll help the little pupils
With their worries and their .scrapples
And try to make them feel they're understood.
Let's hare a P.-T.A. at U.B.C.
And drink a cup of coffee, or of tea.
.Vow science is advancing
Few gatherings need lancing,
So gather, gather, gather fancy-free.
Let's have a P.-T.A. at U.B.C.
The T. should meet the P. and, talk it out.
To obviate disaster
We'll dance and play Canasta
And pay our fees and nominate and shout.
Let's have a- P.-T.A. at I .B.C.
And share our grievances to make them light.
We'll brush up on psychology
And art and numerology
And sho>fc our breadth of mind by getting tight.
Let's hare a P.-T.A. at U.B.C.
To prove the children's folks have enterprise.
The human- race, though  various,
Is forced to be gregarious,
So come along and try it on- for sighs.
—David Brock.
The
BILL'S of
Seymour Street
(Percy & Jimmie Bill)
Invite You to _
Compare this ,V>1*
TOPCOAT VALUE
$49-75
The   famous   Empire   Twist
E.   J.   Crowther  in  this  showerproof pure wool topcoat special!
Also    West    of    England    Topcoats,
Cashmere finish by Isaac Carr.
SUITS—Tailored   to   measure    from
the House  of  Hobberlin.
FURNISHINGS — Van   Heuson   New
Century  Collar—BVD  Tricot   Nylon.
BILL & CO
456 Seymour St.
TAtlow  5730
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Pago  13 Make WEDNESDAY your SHOPPING Day
in... WEST
VANCOUVER
COMPLIMENTS
THOMAS   BALSHAW
Kenwood Furs
824 PARK  ROYAL WEST  351
WEST VANCOUVER
SMART   SEPARATES,   ACCESSORIES
EXCITING GIFTS
Beautifully Wrapped
Tree of Charge
2),
'OCU 3
¥
1771  Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C., West 1971
KEEP THE KIDDIES
CUTE, COMFY and HAPPY
English Winter Coats
Snug Snow Suits
Famous Kiddicraft Toys
Merry Go Round Kiddie Shop
1439 Marine Dr., West Vancouver, West 1981
For Campus, Career,
and every girl's nite life
JERSEY or TWEED
CREPE or TAFETTA
Our fall styles are
distinctly  flattering
1568 Marine Drive West 2420
West Vancouver, B.C.
'It's Charmante'sfor Charm'
Leisurely shopping
for everything fine
in women's apparel
L-narmante  LjoivnS cJLta.
larman
757 Park Royal
West 236
WEST VANCOUVER
OPEN ALL DAY WEDNESDAY
1550 Marine Drive
West- 1500
With CREPE and JERSEY at the
top of your list . . .
See our exclusive selection of wonderful wools and flattering late-day
dresses.
tradition wise
768 Marine Drive West  1514
West Vancouver, B.C.        West  2322
Opposite Park Royal
^een In tin
^ruti
l^lcli
lumn
iion
lure
The new pleated tartan skirt
. . . wear it with doublet or
jacket! See the smart suede
suits . . . tweeds and worsted suits in the Fall collection at . . .
Open All Day Wednesday
Monday Nights till 9 p.m.
PARK ROYAL
WEST VANCOUVER,
B.C.
Phone West 1931
1122  Sherbrooke St.  W.,  Montreal
42 Berkely St., London, England
Page 14
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE ft
PERSONALITIES
ft
At press time, word had just been received that
Jimmy Sinclair, U.B.C. Rhodes Scholar and member of parliament for Coast-Capilano, had been elevated to a member of the Canadian Cabinet as
Minister for Fisheries. The 44-year-old Sinclair had
been mentioned as cabinet material for several
years, but had recently sold his home in Ottawa and
speculation was that he was quitting politics.
Lawyers have been inveigling their way into the
pages of the Chronicle in their inimitable fashion
the past couple of issues but we are forced to run
a sequence to follow the picture and note on William
H. Q. Cameron, B.A. '33 which ran in June ... it
turns out that Bill Cameron's opponent in what
might be the last appeal to the Privy Council was
none other than his good friend Harry F. C. Spring,
who was the counsel for the appellant in the case
of Sigurdson -v- B.C. Electric ... In the last issue
we mentioned Bill Cameron, but neglected to say
a word about Harry Spring . . . and Harry won the
case at that.
Hugh Christie, new warden at Oakalla, was
faced with a prison riot this month and came
through handling the matter like a veteran . . . but
Warden Christie who had warned the Provincial
Government of the overcrowded situation at Oakalla, advised there would be more trouble unless
the prisoners accommodation was improved.
Enrolled on a four year course at U.B.C. is Lee
Jung Ok, Korean interpreter with the Princess Pats
for two years in Korea . . . Canadian arm]? officers
who brought Lee to Canada are paying his tuition
fees.
Among the new Canadian diplomats is a University of B.C. graduate, Vivienne Allen of Vancouver, who recently passed civil service examinations along with 23 other successful candidates.
 MAURICE'S	
ZJne J-^ai-k  IKouat Keitaurant
ana SHidewaln   La/e
FAMOUS FOR SWISS and FRENCH FOOD
FROGS LEGS AU BEURRE NOIR . . . capers . . . parsley
FRENCH OMELETTES*. . . 20 different varieties
MILLE FEUILLES STEAK  DINNER
ESCARGOTS de BOURGOGNE
BABA AU RHUM
MERINGUE AUX MARRONS
Open every day, including Sunday, from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Reservations: West 200
809 Park Royal West Vancouver, B. C.
HARRY  F.  C.  SPRING
Lieut.-Col. Tom Brown, former U.B.C. Alumni
Association President has been elected regional
vice-president of the Association of Canadian
Clubs.
New Athletic Director on the campus is local
graduate Dick Penn who was chosen to succeed retiring Bob Robinett . . . Penn recently married the
former Marg Miller also of the physical department.
Dr. Richard Attree brilliant chemical engineering graduate has been assigned to do research at
Canada's outstanding Chalk River, Ont. atomic
energy plant.
W. P. "Pat" Birmingham, Comm. '47, has been
appointed assistant commercial secretary in the
Canadian Embassy at Bombay.
Cover gal for Canadian Home Journal, September issue, is Shary Pitts, now doing cancer research
work at U.B.C.
Another outstanding appointment to the U.B.C.
medical school came this summer with the addition
to staff of Dr. James Morton Mather as Professor
and Head of the Department of Public Health . . .
He is a Toronto graduate of 1936 and has done extensive public health work in Ontario.
U.B.C. zoology graduate W. Winston Mair, 38,
has been appointed chief of Canada's wildlife service.
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page 15 ALUMNI - U. B. C   DEVELOPMENT   FUND
REACHES   NEW   HIGH   OF   $18,109.36
Under Chairman Harry A. Berry, the Alumni-
U.B.C. Development Fund has reached new peaks
in both participation and total amount subscribed—
a record-breaking-result which reflects great credit
not only upon Fund Directors and representatives,
but also on the active interest and tangible expression of loyalty and support of U.B.C. alumni and
friends everywhere.
In 1952 (the Fund books close early on August
31st), almost 2,200 individuals contributed $18,-
109.36 in this fourth year of operation of the Association's voluntary annual giving programme designed to help U.B.C. and its students in a practical
way. In those four years, a total of some $63,000.00
has been given—an annual income which more than
equals the income available from an Endowment
of more than a half-million dollars!
Probably the most remarkable and heartening
feature of the past year's effort is the fact that there
has been an almost 25% increase in over-all participation compared to the best previous year—1950.
There can be no doubt that in the long run, the
number of people who are interested enough to
become UBC "shareholders" through personal contributions—regardless of the amount—must be the
yardstick by which the success of this excellent idea
is measured.
Elsewhere in this issue, the actual records
established by the various classes and individual
Class and Fund representatives will be seen. The
"up" totals of almost every class, together with the
fine efforts of so many reps., is indicative of the
superb way in which this plan of practical goodwill
is proving its worth.
MEMORIAL FOR DOROTHY MYERS
It is felt by some of the late Dorothy Myers'
friends that there should be a memorial in her
memory. Because of her interest in University
women's affairs and also in Canadian art, a suggestion has come forth that a picture by a Canadian
artist be hung in the Women's Residences of the
University. A plaque suitably inscribed would
mark such a picture.
Anyone wishing to be a part of such a memorial
could contact Miss Mary Fallis, No. 1, 3777 Cambie,
Vancouver, B.C., FAirmont 5987-L; Mrs. C. D.
Schultz, 6092 Wiltshire St., Vancouver 13, B.C.,
KErrisdale 7486-L, or Alumni Director Frank J. E.
Turner, ALma 3044.
THE QUARTERBACKS CLUB
As valiant warriors orter,
Each fan screamed off his head.
They never asked for a quarter,
So they charged one buck instead.
—D.  Badger.
1952 FINAL FUND TOTALS:
*2190 DONORS - *$18,109.36
1916
*$
146.00
12
1917
843.00
* 22
1918
*
95.00
*  g
1919
351.00
* 22
1920
*
291.00
* 20
1921
*
374.00
* 34
1922
*
462.00
* 43
1923
*
693.00
* 60
1924
*
746.00
* 56
1925
543.00
* 41
1926
*
484.00
* 40
1927
*
283.00
32
1928
*
324.00
* 39
1929
*
341.00
* 53
1930
*
489.00
* 62
1931
*
662.00
* 55
1932
*
454.00
* 62
1933
*
497.00
* 74
1934
374.00
* 49
1935
381.00
* 54
1936
*
371.00
* 49
1937
*
448.00
* 55
1938
341.00
* 56
1939
*
471.00
* 75
1940
295.00
* 49
1941
*
295.00
* 49
1942
273.00
* 44
1943
*
284.00
* 54
1944
217.00
* 40
1945
306.00
47
1946
*
433.00
* 70
1947
*
624.00
* 94
1948
*
943.00
*164
1949
*
1,012.00
*167
1950
*
873.00
*172
1951
800.00
169
* Equalled or bettered 1951 final figures (exclusive of the Class of 1951).
"Insurance Of All Kinds
FIRE AUTOMOBILE
PERSONAL PROPERTY FLOATERS
BURGLARY
NORWICH AGENCIES LIMITED
W. ORSON BANFIELD, Manag.r
MArine 6171
Yorkshire House, 900 West Pender St.
VANCOUVER 1, B.C.
Page 16
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE 1952   FUND  LEADERS
Amount
1. 1949    $1,012.00
2. 1948   943.00
3. 1950   873.00
4. 1917                 843.00
5. 1951   803.00
6. 1924                   746.00
7. 1923 693.00
8. 1931 ._. 662.00
9. 1947   624.00
10. 1925   --..  543.00
NUMBER OF DONORS
1. 1950   172
2. 1951      169
3. 1949     167
4. 1948 -   164
5. 1947   94
6. 1939     76
7. 1933    74
8. 1946             70
9. f 1930 /
1 1932   .    \   62
IMPROVEMENT
(% increase   in   number  of  donors  compared  to   1951
figures.  Class of '51   not  included)
1. 1930 ..                44.18%
2. 1922  43.3   %
3. 1937    41.02 %
4. 1950        36.2   %
5. 1943       35.00%
6. 1932        34.00%
7. 1923 30.04%
8. 1933       .29.9   %
9. 1919        29.4   %
10. 1929    29.2   %
TOP TWENTY CLASS AND FUND REPRESENTATIVES
••Jean   Bailey   C29)   	
A. J. F. Johnson ('35) ......
4  Mrs. A. D. Weeks ('3D ..
J. G. Light C38) 	
V. Perry Millar C48) 	
B. G. Griffith C26) 	
Hermine Bottger C20) 	
Margaret Clarke C32) 	
Bob Osborne C33) 	
John Gibbard C24) 	
W.  H. Q.  Cameron  C33)
{Gertrude Savage C30)  
Mrs. Howard Green CI7) ..
John M. Buchanan CI 7) ..
{Mrs. F. Sexsmith CI 7) ....
Doug. Macdonald C30) ....
Dr.  W.  C.  Gibson  C33)  ..
Ben Stevenson C36) 	
'Jean Gilley C27) 	
G. M.  Letson C24) 	
H. T. James C2D 	
H. I. Andrews C20) 	
Geo. Lipsey C24) 	
Mrs. G. Candlish C28) 	
Dr. O. E. Anderson C29) ...
Mrs.  Marion  Elliott  C30)
Alex Turnbull ('3D 	
Walter Ashford C39) 	
Honoree  Young  C43)  	
J. Allen Harris C22) 	
Mrs.  Norah Purslow C22)
C. C.  Upshall  C23) 	
100     %
6.
7.
8.
9.
12.
15.
{
19.
}
}
;}
90
83.3
81 8
80     %
75
71.4 %
69.2 %
66% %
STOP PRESS
STOP PRESS
HOMECOMING - NOV. 1st
It's official — Homecoming is Saturday,
November 1st!
However, as in the past, there will be
several other events during Homecoming
Week—October 27th to November 1st... So—
please contact your alumni office (ALma 3044)
or watch your newspaper for announcements.
There'll be a Football game in the Stadium starting at 2:15 p.m. (with the Presentation of the Great Trekker Award to the outstanding alumna or alumnus of the year at
half-time), a Homecoming Princess, and a
Ball, two (yes TWO!) basketball games in
the War Memorial Gym in the evening (an
alumni Blue team vs a Gold team as a prelim,
and a feature Grads vs Thunderbirds classic
as a feature), a dramatic show in the Auditorium at night, the Alumni Registration book,
student guides on duty, etc. ... on the big
day—Saturday, November 1st.
To wind it up, of course, there'll be a
dance in the Armouries, or the Fourth Estate
Frolic in the Commodore Cabaret.
ALUMNI  ASSOCIATIONS 35th
ANNIVERSARY  FEATURE OF
ANNUAL MEETING  NOV. 13
Special feature of the Association's Annual
General Meeting on Thursday. November 13th in
Brock Hall, starting at 6:30 •p.m., will be the
Association's 35th Anniversary together with the
40th Anniversary of Convocation. Chancellor
Sherwood Lett. (B.A. '16), Chairman of Convocation, will be a special guest.
Guest speaker on the occasion will be Mr.
Joseph Clearihue, Q.C., prominent Victoria Barrister and Solicitor, a member of the UBC Board of
Governors, and one of the original Convocation
members who met in the Assembly Hall in South
Park Public School in Victoria on August 21st,
1912, to launch the infant University.
Annual reports will be presented by the various
Association officers while entertainment will be
again provided by the fine UBC Glee Club under
the capable direction of Mr. Harry Price.
Tickets ($1.50 each) are available from the
alumni office until November 10th, and those wishing to attend are asked to obtain same early so that
catering arrangements may be completed.
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page  17 ft
WOMEN
By LEONA SHERLOCK
MARGARET
BRUNETTE
Margaret Brunette, lias been
named to co-ordinate the operation of seven
Branch Libraries
throughout the
city . . . Miss Bru-
n e t t e graduated
with honours in
teacher training and took her
library degree at
Universtiy of Toronto . . .
MARGARET
BRUNETTE
It's almost homecoming time of the year when
all good old grads go back to the campus to see
how things have progressed since they left.   There
are  more  buildings,  a  new  coat  of  paint  on  the
Aggie   barns,   new   sloping   lawns   and   well-kept
flowerbeds—and less students.
*        *        *
For all the sorority alumnae who haven't heard
about the change in rushing rules—there's been
quite a revolution in that department. This year
rushing was held for just one week—September 15
to 23 so that all the fuss and bother was over and
done with before classes began. Seems an excellent
idea. But not like the good old clays when there
was an excuse to skip lectures and quaff coffee the
first month of University!
Barbara Newman Bonner has been caught up
in a giddy whirl since her husband, Bob, was appointed the new Attorney-General. At present
they're house-hunting in Victoria and feeling just
a little sad about having to leave their year-old
home in the University District. Barbara graduated in Arts in 1944. She'd planned on going into
Teachers Training but decided to get married in
third year instead. She was an assistant editor on
the Ubyssey for awhile and was a member of Alphi
Phi sorority. She's busier than ever now with two
wee ones—a boy and a girl—to look after, parties
Lovely Essentials for
Every Girl
Lansea Sweaters
Stoles to Beautify
Beaded Accessories
Luxite Nylon
Lingerie
880 Howe St.
Vancouver, B.C
MArine 2934
to attend, and a new part to play as the wife of the
Attorney-General.
The YWCA seems to have become a haven
for UBC grads. Just joined the staff recently were
Noami   Page,   Frances   Smith   and   Irene   Ryniak.
Noami and Irene have degrees in social work, the
former joining the staff as director of the Young
Adult department and the latter in charge of the
Teen-age department. Frances will be Mrs. Ryni-
ak's assistant in charge of Hi-Y clubs.
A bit of this and that—Mary Cole Cameron
is principal of the Civil Defence School; Connie
Farleigh Lee had a brilliant record at Seattle University last year winning the President's cup and
obtaining her Bachelor of Science and Nursing;
Maureen Bray has joined the teaching staff of the
University of Western Ontario; Bim Schrodt is
back at Magee High school on the other end of
the stick—she went to school there and now she's
teaching teen-agers their keeping fit exercises;
Mary Ann Stevenson has gone to Paris to study at
L'Ecole Bazot; Shary Pitts was the cover girl on a
summer issue of Canadian. Home Journal.
* *        *
Every Chronicle we have news of more grads
going east. The saying may be Go West Young
Man but it seems to be Go East Young Woman
SKIRTS 'N' SWEATERS AT
*7<4e JleatheA, SUofi
The Little Stores with the Large Selection of
Finest Imports
474 GRANVILLE ST. TAtlow 4746
(Next to O. B. Allan)
NEWSMAKERS IN SPORTSWEAR:
Pleated Skirts
Matching Stoles
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Page 18
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE WOMEN
ft
'. . . Off to Toronto to stay with Di Milsom is Betty
Heard . . . Gordon and Mary (nee Mare)  Selman
have moved to Ottawa.
* *        *
Joan Ritchie has gone to San Francisco to live
. . . back from six months in Hollywood is Jo-Jean
Johnston   .   .   .   Chris  and   Helen-Mary  McGregor
spent their honeymoon in Europe . . . Among the
UBC  colon)-  who  spent  the  summer abroad  was
Joan Stevens.
* *        *
Summer visitors to Vancouver from the east
included Pat Borgeson Crone of Ottawa, Thelma
Behnsen John of Hamilton. Olive Blair McLean of
Montreal, Nancy Pitman of Ottawa.
* *        *
The Olympic Games drew a lot of spectators
from this party of the world . . . Dot and Harry
Franklin flew over for a few weeks . . . Doreen
Fowler and Louise Haamerstrom left in June for
the Olympics then stayed on in Sweden where they
hope to work for a year.
* * *
Out from Kingston, Jamaica, for a brief holiday this summer was Mary Williams Lloyd, her
husband Tony and their daughter.
* *        *
There's nothing like having two PhD's in the
family and Hugh and Marion Gilmour are well on
their way to achieving just that. Hugh gets his
this fall from the University of Utah and Marion
gets hers next spring from the University of
Illinois.
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OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page 19 AUBREY   ROBERTS   SPEAKER   AT   CAIRN
CEREMONY   MARKING   30th   ANNIVERSARY
OF   THE   GREAT   TREK
Aubrey F. Roberts, one of the original group
which staged the "Great Trek" of 1922, was this
year's speaker at the annual Cairn ceremony on the
Main Mall.
Mr. Roberts urged U.B.C. freshmen to meet
challenges presented to them at University with
the same characteristics of students who participated in the march that took them in 1922 from the
Fairview shacks to the present campus.
He told how the cairn, built with the original
stones piled up in a mound by the first group of
UBC students to visit the campus, was now a symbol of what university students can do when properly organized.
He said the trek was from the Fairview Shacks
to  downtown  Vancouver and  out  to  Point Grev.
Later student leaders carried a 56,000-signature
petition to Victoria, where delegation leader "Ab"
Richards told legislators the Fairview Shacks were
inadequate and urged a new start on the war-interrupted Point Grey site.
One month later, Mr. Roberts said, the Legislature voted more than $1,000,000 to the university
building program. The chemistry building went up
first, followed by others.
Construction of UBC buildings started in 1914
but just as the framework of the Science building
was nearly completed, war stopped work on the
structure.
Nothing more was done at all, he said, until the
provincial government was spurred into action by
the campaign started by UBC students.
U. B. C.   Alumni   Association   Scholarship   Winners
An announcement from the University of B.C.
revealed Kelowna's 1952 "Lady of the Lake" as a
girl who combines beauty with brains.
Kathleen Ann Archibald, crowned queen of the
Okanagan city's annual lake regatta, was one of 10
winners of UBC Alumni Association scholarships
announced by association president Gordon M. Let-
son and Dean Walter H. Gage.
$250 AWARD
The $250 awards are given annually by regions
to students in Grade 12 and 13 who are going on
to UBC and who show high marks as well as potential qualities of leadership.
Among the 10 UBC winners today were Susan
Friesen. Abbotsford, who received the highest B.C.
marks in senior matriculation this vear and Nadia
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Komar of Creston, who received 88.9 percent, the
highest in her area.
Winners were also announced for the $2000
Chris Spencer Foundation scholarships for students
entering the University of B.C. for the first time.
William Mervin Jory, Abbotsford, and Donald
Richard Peter Weeden, Chilliwack, will receive
$400 for their first year at UBC and will be eligible
for four other payments of $400 if they maintain
their high scholastic standing.
10 WINNERS
The 10 winners of the UBC Alumni scholarships
were: Kathleen Ann Archibald, Kelowna; Douglas
Bennell Craig, Chemainus; Susan Friesen, Abbotsford; James Douglas Jamieson, Armstrong; William Harvey King, Prince George; Nadia Komar,
Creston; Norma Geraldine Koski, Victoria; Ruth
Julia Krane, Balfour; Arthur Kuhn, Vernon, and
Gwendolyn May Wells, Britannia Beach.
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Page 20
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE FRANKLY   SPEAKING
Just forty years ago, the "Founders" gathered
together at U.B.C.'s first Convocation meeting in
the Assembly Hall of the still-standing South Park
Public School in Victoria—August 21st, 1912, to be
exact.
The tremendous significance of that historic
occasion should never be minimized now or in the
future—nor ever forgotten. With the then-Provincial Secretary, the late Hon. H. E. Young, M.D.,
LL.D., as chairman (platform guests included the
Lieut-Governor, the Hon. T. W. Paterson, and
Premier Sir Richard McBride), the original members of Convocation officially "launched" U.B.C. by
electing the first Chancellor, the Hon. F. L. Carter
Cotton, and members of the Senate.
"GREAT TREK"
Just thirty years ago. UBC's students wound
up a remarkable campaign with the now-famous
"Great Trek" to the chosen Universitv site at Point
Grey, and threw the rocks and stones i picked up
en route) into a pile which is today the family Cairn
on the Main Mall—the same Cairn which has become of a symbol of student spirt, determination
and faith, and a constant challenge to all members
of U.B.C.'s "family."
Success crowned the efforts of interested University-trained men and women in the founding of
this young and growing institution. Solid achievement was the result of the activities of enterprising
students a decade later in moving to the present
beautiful campus.
The continuing understanding, initiative and
support of students, alumni, faculty, friends and
subsequent Governments has contributed tremendously to the amazing development of our Alma
Mater—an University young in years but old in
tradition.
U.B.C.'s motto: "Tuum Est"—literally translated two ways: "It Is Yours" and "It's Up To
You" is a ringing challenge which has been, is and
will be boldly accepted.
Alumnotes . . . Following a well-established
Engineer-grad-trend, the Class of '52's Social Convener and B.A.Sc. '52—Danny Stankov^ch—went
from hither to yon. Danny's address is now 1318
Princess Ave.. Camden, X.J. . . . One of the more
than 2000 Fund donors this year is W. Graham
Fulton (B.S.A. '49), who's now with the 9427th
T.S.U. of the U.S. Army Signal Corps. P.O. Box
401, Kodiak, Alaska . . . New member of the Trail
Branch is Rosalie Haakonsen, (B.A. '50) >. It's the
Royal City's loss ... A man who, as he aptly puts
it: >"was all at sea when I received my U.B.C.
degree"—and literally!—ex-Navyite Gordon Campbell (B.A. '45) is back on the campus after postgrad work at Harvard and is now in L.B.C.'s
Anthropology Department . . . Ex-Legionnaires
(UBC Branch 72) please note: J. R. (Mike) Lakes,
(LL.B. '49), has launched his own law office in
Vancouver . . . Our records are now straight! It's
Rev. R. E. M. Yerburgh (B.A. '28)  who is Rector
BY
FRANK J. E. TURNER
EXECUTIVE-DIRECTOR
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
of Fernie Anglican Church, and it's E. R. M. (Bob)
Yerburgh (B.A. '31) who's on the Faculty at Christ-
church School, Christchurch. Virginia. We're indebted to the latter unscrambling this familv
(brother) tie . . . D. W. (Don) Hammersley (B.
Com. '46) and his attractive wife, of Spokane,
dropped in for a brief visit. Don's brother R. C.
Hammersley ('42) can now be reached at 115 West
Franklin. Bound Brook, N.J. . . . Among the many
alumni attending the Canadian Bar Association
meeting in Vancouver this Fall were the Roy Jack-
sons. Roy (B.A. '43) is President of the Toronto
Branch   .   .   .   On   the   staff   of   this   year's   Summer
(Continued on page 24)
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At 65, the funds can be la) taken in cash; b used to
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OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page  21 V
SPORT
#
BASKETBALL GREATS TO FEATURE
HOMECOMING GAME NOVEMBER 1st
BOB SCARR DAVE CAMPBELL
JACK POMFRET
Dear Grad:
Homecoming this year is on Saturday, November 1st and we are sure this is one celebration you
will want to enjoy. Once again the annual Grad
basketball game is a must on the Homecoming
program. We feel you will want to recall your
college basketball days by playing your usual
stellar performance with some of the old gang.
Like last year the game will be played as follows:
The Varsity Grads will play the first game of a
double header in two eight minute halfs. This
will be followed by the Freshmen Grads playing
a regulation game against the 1952-53 Thunderbird Team.    If vou earned  vour  Block in  an
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odd year you will pick up a Blue jersey from
Johnny Owen. If it was an even year you will
play for the Golds. The Freshman Grads will
pick up white jerseys. Please bring your own
shorts as the last few years we have not been
able to produce shorts to fit your magnificant
waistlines.
Here is the schedule:
8:00 p.m.—Thunderbird Blues (odd years)
vs
Thunderbird Golds (even years)
8:30 p.m.—Thunderbird Freshman Grads
vs
Thunderbird 52-53.
Saturday,  November  1st,  1952,
Place, Memorial Gym.
We all look forward to seeing you again.
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Page 22
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE The Fiiner Thjegrs Are a Most
By PHOEBE BEEBE, B.A.
(frequent contributor to Canadian Homes,
North American Tomes, South
American Pomes, etc)
The Finer Things in Life! (I am not referring
to Life Magazine.) Let us roll the phrase richly
round our lips and even inside our mouths. We
leave the University with a capital U, but what
does it mean, question mark? It means a B.A.,
exclamation mark! Nothing more. Can we interpret a symphony? No (Period) Dare we live
with a modern painting and permit it to enrich our
lives? Never. We (and I use this pronoun in the
singular) do not even own a Canadian painting at
all, dammit. And we think shame to ourselves,
as the phrase goes. As it goes, as it comes, as it
slides sideways, who cares? That's my whole
point, and that's why the Extension Dept. pays me.
(Out of the funds it extracts from its pup;ls, never
forget that.)
LETTER DF APPRECIATION
By the way. old Phoebe has never had a letter
of appreciation from the Extension Dept. All she's
had is letters appreciating the Extension Dept.
Lord)' (and she says this reverently, men), Lordy,
she doesn't expect the Extension Dept. to think
of everything. Which is wrong of Little Phoebe,
at that, because the Extension Dept. does so think
of everything . . . heck, it even gives courses in
How to Repair Trucks Before They (Juit Running.
But to get back to the Finer Things. What
profiteth it a man that he should get a B.A. but
not get to the Symphony or the Art Gallery. Nowt.
I will spell that . . . N-O-W-T. Nix. Zero. It
leaves him feeling bereft and just awful, as if he
were suddenly caught between a professor of Art
and a professor of Appreciation. It makes him feel
he is missing one of life's Finer Experiences. And
may the Lord pity him.
How often have you, clear reader, been caught
in an art gallery with your awareness uncocked?
How many times has a beautiful symphony gone
in one ear and out the other? Many's the time you
have listened to a costly phonograph record, carefully explained to you by an expert, and you've not
understood what made its grooves go round, shame
on you.
Records! Let it be recorded! Recorditur
(Latin). You may glibly say "Recorditur!" but
in all modesty, can you tell the difference between
the records you should like and those you should
abominate? Not you. You're fair flummoxed. That's
because you have never taken an extension course.
And that's what's wrong with our B.A. today. A
bachelor's degree that doesn't incorporate an ex-
tesion with it is of little use.
I will go further. I maintain that a bachelor's
degree should carry with it an honorary LL.D.
Heck,   with   everyone   else   getting   LL.D.'s,   why
should the students themselves stand out in this
ignomiuous way? In any true democracy, each
student should become an LL.D. the minute he
enrolls, and this will keep him from feeling1 conspicuous.
I have always felt that an honarary LL.D. is
just the thing to make its owner conscious of the
finer things in himself, and therefore conscious of
the liner things in life, in so far as he is still connected with life itself, which is a moot enough
point. I am acquainted with many an LL.D. who
has suddenly started hanging round the Art
Gallery and the Symphony Society in a manner to
touch all hearts. Only last week I was prowling
round the Art Gallery (humming a couple of symphonies to myself the while) when I met a poor
old LL.D. out of work. He was not onlv out of
work, but out of works of art. He faced me squarely
and said "Brother, can you spare a work of art?"
1 burst into tears, which seemed to please him a lot.
There is a lesson here for us all, so please accept
a free copy.
I am quite sure that the P.-T.A. can help our
children to make each other fond of great music and
notorious paintings. Instead of telling each other
dirt_\- limericks, teachers and parents can go in
for square-dancing, and in some mysterious way
this will make their chidren fond of Giotto and the
School of Sienna, which is a good thing. It will
also make the little rascals fond of Brahms, which
is a bad thing. ( Brahms wrote a few good songs,
but we aren't speaking of those. We are speaking
of his orchestral works, which is another wav of
saying we aren't speaking of anything.)
But the most important thing 1 plan to bring
up at the next P.-T.A. meeting is this: just what
are we doing in the way of interpreting symphonies
in terms of French painting? Almost nothing. And
our children are jeering at us for it. They're scoffing, no less. This is what makes them wear zoot-
suits. ft makes them despair in other ways, too.
The Dept. of Social Worries is frightfully worried
about it. And there's no use in saying it is paid
to worry. That's dodging the issue entirelv. It
makes our children jeer all over again. And when
they jeer too much the)- get monotonous, damn
them, because we have deprived them of a finer
way of jeering.   It's all our fault.   It always is.
Newest Colors
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2808 Granville St.       Vancouver, B.C.
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page 23 FRANKLY   SPEAKING
(Continued from page 21)
Session were visiting Professors Lionel Laing (B.A.
'29) of Michigan, and Malcolm McGregor (B.A.
'30) of the University of Cincinnati . . . While in
New England, Prof, and Mrs. R. F. (Bob) Osborne
(B.A. '33; B.A. '35), had an enjoyable visit with
Mr. and Mrs. Keith Porter (B.Com. '42). Keith, a
former Student Council Treasurer, is now President
of Harriet Hubbard Ayer, Inc., and represented his
Alma Mater at Columbia's Centennial Celebrations.
. . . Another former Councillor, Margaret Low-Beer
(B.A. '50) was an alumni office visitor from Ottawa
. . . "A wonderful experience" is the way John
Drysdale (B.A. '49) described his 3-month U. K.
and Continent tour as a member of the University
Travel Club group. We deeply appreciate "Reporter" John's notes on the following alumni: Tony
Scott (B.Com '46, B.A. '47). is now studying for
his Ph.D. and lecturing on Public Finance at the
London School of Economics . . . R. T. (Bob) McKenzie (B.A. '37), also "Ph.d-ing", is teaching in
the Extension Dept. at the London School . . . Mr.
Justice Wilson's daughter Barbara (B.A. '47, BSW
'48) worked with the International Refugee Organization in Germany for 18 months, and now has a
position with Ontario House in London . . . Still
another who's almost entitled to use "Ph.D." after
his name is Parzival Copes (B.A. '49, M.A. '50) of
the London School . . . Good luck to F. S. (Van)
Perry (B.A. '46), formerly Music Editor of the
Province, in his new position as Managing Editor
of the "B.C. Lumberman" . . . Mr. and Mrs. John F.
Tener have no less than 3 UBC sons as grads.
John S. (B.A. '48) is currently studying for his
Ph.D. in Zoology at Oxford (was 1 of 5 students
selected from all over the world for the course) ;
Gordon (B.A. '49) is proceeding towards the same
degree at Wisconsin in Research Chemistry, while
Robert (B.A. '47) is Principal of Blubber Bay High
School . . . "Wouldn't recognize the campus" stated
J. D. (Jack) Mair (B.A.Sc. '40), now with Canada
Salt Co. in Windsor, as he had his first look at the
campus since graduation . . . "Business-tripping" to
the Coast was former Rhodes Scholar and Rugger
star Al Gillespie ('41) who now calls Toronto home
CARSIZE MCGUIRE
. . . The New Year will find Walt Wilde (B.A. '50)
taking post-grad work at Utah State . . . Former
A.M.S. President J. Carson McGuire (B.A. '39)
was yet another amazed at the tremendous developments at U.B.C. in the past years. Dr. McGuire
(better known as "Carsize" when he was an almost
non-stoppable lineman with U.B.C.'s wonder Football teams of the '30's) still has his big, capable
hands full. On the faculty of University of Texas,
he's Head, Educational Psychology, Director. Laboratory of Human Behavious and Director, Air
force Services Contract . . . Ex-Thunderbird basket-
bailer Fran. Mitchell ('39), Ph.D. is now Associate
Prof, of Psychology at Wabash College. Crawfords-
ville, Indiana . . . Returning to Vancouver for her
first visit in 34 years was Gladys Schwesinger,
Ph.D., a member of U.B.C.'s first graduating class
in 1916.    She is Senior Clinical Psychologist, State
of California, Youth Authority. "A marvelous
site" was her reaction to seeing the West Point
Gre) campus which was still merely a selection in
the pre-Great Trek days when she was an undei-
grad . . . Pardon the "de-motion" in this column
in June . . . Ottawa's Irvine Ritchie (B.A. '35) is
Instructor-Commander, R.C.N. . . . Mrs. P. W.
Pinn (nee Elizabeth G Petrie, B.A. '36), together
with her husband and son had a peek at the campus
this summer during a holiday from their Port
Arthur home . . . Aggie note: Bob Machett (B.A.
'51) can be reached at the Department of Agriculture, Victoria . . . After a temporary appointment
in UN Headquarters, New York, Michael Hind-
Smith (B.A. '51) has returned to Canada as Executive Director of the United Nations' Assocation's
Toronto Branch . . . Former Ubyssey Editor Chuck
Marshall (B.A. '50) came in to say hello just before
leaving for the Northwest Territories. Chuck's now
Secretary of the Council of the Northwest Administration . . . Another trio of alumni office visitors
were Dr. Lionel Stevenson (B.A. '22), back from
England, Carleton College's Dr. James A. Gibson
(B.A. '31), formerly Private Secretary to the late
Prime Minister MacKenzie King, and Dr. William
R. Barclay (B.A. '41), of the Medical Faculty at
the University of Chicago.
WILLSON E. KNOWLTON
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Page 24
U. B. C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE BRANCHES
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER
Annual Meeting of Southern California Branch
was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Corfield, 450 No. Gerona Ave., San  Gabriel.
The meeting opened with a talk by Chairman
Corfield, who welcomed several new members and
spoke regretfully of the absence of Dr. Lionel Stevenson, at present in England.
Mr. Hartley, Chairman of the Nominating Committee, presented the following names as officers
for the coming year, who were elected.
Past Chairman—Guy Corfield.
Chairman—Arnold Ames.
First Vice-Chairman—Mrs. Dwight Miller.
Secretary-Treasurer—Mrs. Fred Hartley.
Chairman of Program and Arrangements — L.
W. McLennan.
Chairman of Publicity and Membership—E. P.
Duval.
Campus Representative—E. P. Duval.
New Chairman, Mr. Ames, expressed appreciation at having been elected and said he looked forward to an active year.
Present  were:
Edith McSweyn. Maxine McSweyn, Mrs. Eliz.
Birnie Berlot, Mr. Berlot, Rev. and Mrs. DeBeck,
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hartley, Mr. and Mrs. Dwight
Miller, Dr. W. F. Seyer, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Ames,
Mr. and Mrs. L. W. McLennan. Mr. and Mrs. Corfield.
ATT'N.-GEN. BDNNER
(Continued from page 7)
KIMBERLEY BRANCH
Dear Sir:
The following is the new executive of the Kimberley Branch for the ensuing year:
John W. Stewart,  Box 632, Kimberley.  B.C.—
President.
L. H. Garstin, Box 313, Kimberley,  B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer.
Yours truly,
JOHN P. ROKOSH,
Secretary-Treasurer
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day. While in Victoria he eats and sleeps at the
swank Union Club near the Empress Hotel and
Parliament Buildings, but spends most of his time
in his office.
He is a member of .Delta Upsilon, Gyro, the
U.B.C". Alumni Association, and follows the Anglican faith. Until his appointment he belonged to the
legal firm of Clark, Wilson, White, Clark and
Maguire in Vancouver. When he has some spare
time he dabbles in photography, but it is hobby of
political science that has probably had the most
bearing in placing him in the position he now
holds.
Until tlrs year his political leanings were Conservative, and he championed Premier Bennett in
his effort to wrest the Conservative leadership in
British Columbia from   Herbert Anscomb.
He became a Social Creditor, and when Premier
Bennett begf.n to choose his cabinet he remembered
the personable young Vancouver lawyer who had
proved his loyalty earlier.
The Premier took a chance on Bonner's vouth
not being a handicap, and he has never regretted
the choice.
It was typical of the man that he admitted at
the start that he knew little of the job, but was
willing to learn. All the Social Credit ministers
put in long hours on the job but none any longer
than Bol) Bonner. He is at his office early in
the morning—well before 8:30—and is still there
late at night. He would be the first to say that
he does not know everything of the job yet, but he
certainly knows a lot more than he did on August 1.
and shows every indication of having it completely
under control in the time the experts gave him to
find his way from the Union Club to his office.
At this stage he is still cautious, playing his
cards close to his chest and saying very little to
anyone about his work. He likes to keep even
routine matters out of the public eye, and prefers
his staff to be not too talkative about the work of
the department.
He has won considerable solid acclaim since
his appointment but the highest compliment of all
came from an experienced observer at the Parliament  Buildings:
"He appears to be a man who can act quickly
when he has to, and who lives up to his promises."
CEdar 1151
'We Treat Your Clothes White'
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page 25 STATISTICS
BIRTHS
Richard Bird, a daughter.
Harold Tennant, a son.
Fred H. Brooks (Billie Wadds),
To Mr. and Mrs.
To Mr. and Mrs.
To Mr. and Mrs
a daughter.
To   Mr.   and   Mrs.   Gordon   Lyall   (Marigold   McKenzie), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Buchanan (Lois Stratton),
a son.
To Mr. and  Mrs. Frank Nightingale  (Mim Carn-
sew), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Wills (Marion Hebb),
a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. David Rea (Peggy McLeod), a
daughter.
To Mr. and  Mrs.  Chester H.  B.  Cotter  (Shirley
Marpole), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. John N. Bennett (Arts '43) a son,
at North Wrilkesboro. North Carolina.
To Mr. and Mrs. Ian F. Greenwood (B.S.A. '49) a
son at Vernon, B.C.
To Mr. and Mrs. Con Ashby (B.S.W. '46) (Peggy
Jones, B.A. '38), a son at Revelstoke, B.C.
To Dr. and Mrs. M. A. Menzies, a girl, at Toronto.
To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ian Anderson (Arts '48), a
boy at Victoria.
To Mr. and Mrs. Hector Grant, twins—a boy and a
girl—at Dawson City.
To Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Roy (B.A. '50), a daughter at Ottawa.
To Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. McDougall (Arts '39)
(P. B. Goddard '44), a son, at Toronto.
DEATHS
Dr. Harry Ashton, 70, founder of the French
Department at U.B.C. in 1914 . . . holder of an honorary degree—Doctor of Laws—from U.B.C.
Mrs. Gladys Webster, Arts '32, wife of Arnold
Webster Vancouver Parks Board Chairman.
Donald John Urquhart, 27, electrical engineering
graduate, in a plane crash in the Yukon.
John Illington, '48, at Castlegar, B.C. . . . civil
engineering graduate with the federal water resources division.
"Pasadena   Tournament   of   Roses"
and  Rosebowl  Football Tour
December 26 to January 4
Lv. Vancouver December 26th—train to and from San
Francisco—bus to Los Angeles. Seat on procession
route—sightseeing in San Francisco and Los Angeles.
INCLUDING   HOTELS  $125.00
Deposit—$25.00  by December 6th
DRAINIE TRAVEL AGENCY
856 DUNSMUIR TAtlow 3055
MARRIAGES
Donald Lord to Joan Nicholls
Stanley Avis to Daphne Black
Robert Lane to Jean Mowatt
Michael Bodnar to Isabel Gould
William Andreson to Geraldine Dench
Reid Mitchell to Marjorie Sharp
Alexander Bingham to Janet Whitmore
William Harrison to Claire Nelson
Charles Hopkins to Beverley Hall
Stuart Wallace to Janet Lister
Rev. Calvin Chambers to Alice Wilson
Michael Jones to Iris Sanderson
Bruce Brown  to Norma McAuley
Dr. Thomas McCusker to Joy Donegani
John Cavers to Vivian Morten
Charles Bickerton to Jane Gibson
John Ayers to Lorraine Mayoh
John Creery to Barbara Finlay
Harvey Cook to Barbara Rose
Alan Newhouse to Harriet Reid
William Barker to Joanne Finning
Richard Lister to Lois Jensen
Cyril Newton to Vivi Busch
George Coates to Joyce Handel
James Dalton to Mildred Lauritsen
Rodger Manning to Pat Gamey
Harold Newton to Betty Jane Mathieson
Lawrence Munroe to Diana Bampton
Ralph Christensen to Ann Moisted
Ronald Webster to Elspeth Clyne
Earle Heisler to Merna Taylor
Thomas Reed to Barbara Williamson
Lance Heard to Frances Nelson
Quinten Robertson to Elizabeth Armstrong
Gordon Kemp to Frances Archibald
Kelvin Service to Peggy Edwards
Bruce Cooper to Patricia Tiedje
Peter Reeves to Dorothy Snow
George McKinley to Marjorie Hewett
David Sharp to Kathy Howard
Dr. Harold Wolverton to Muriel Penn
Gerald Carter to Barbara Squire
Frederick Dewey to Marilyn Giovetti
Kenneth Appleby to Joyce Sumonds
Lawrence Ades to Shirley Mae Airey
William Patrick to Mary Teresa Campbell
Robert Kerr to Catharine Eastwood
James Brisby to Jacqueline Hume
Williams Lort to June Mclntyre
Alan Fonseca to Shirley Lloyd
John Dawson to Pauline Diamond
Norman Dusting to Helen Lindsay
Denis Heeney to Jacqueline Smith
James Little to Barbara Robinson
Victor Edwards to Margaret Chamberlain
Eric Gee to Kathleen MacMillan
Ian Harford to Margaret Pye
John Anastasiou to Joan Barton
Robert Johnstone to Helen Collister
Clifford Hill to  Geraldine  Mitchell
William Walker to Beverley Reeder
Gordon Hardwicke to Teresa Audet
George Davies to. Barbara Black
John Godefroid (Comm. '49) to Ilia Rue Rice.
Page 26
U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE No
lB*TBEB»
Ocean Products
CANNED SALMON
CANNED HERRING
CANNED CLAMS
CANNED SILVETS
CANNED SMOKED SALMON
+
Francis Millerd & Co.
LIMITED
Cypress Park, West Vancouver
—GRAHAM   WARRINGTON
pcrpetua furniture limited
I CI 2    VVFST   I'OURTKHNTH   AVENUE, VANCOUVER,   CANADA
An Excellent Newspaper
for Everyone •
There is every reason to suspect
that those who read our paper
(two out of every three people
in Greater Vancouver) do so
because they like it better than
any other newspaper. To see
why, all non-readers are invited
to try The Sun for a while!
■ a wnne: ^ ^
Phone TA. 7141  for Home Delivery
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER, 1952
Page 27 rMWjfl Ou MlMA- tytwQItMir...
PUTTING POWER TO WORK
REQUIRES THE "KNOW-HOW"
BUILT INTO EVERY PIECE
OF G-E EQUIPMENT YOU BUY
Canada's steady march to industrial independence has been
paced by the ever-growing hum of
electric power.
Keeping pace with this growth
for 60 years, Canadian General
Electric equipment has led the
field in harnessing our mighty
rivers, in carrying power across
the land and in putting it to work.
We believe our manufacturing
skills, engineering "know-how"
and dependability have won for
us the faith of the nation.
Many firms have found that it is
in their own best interest to contact us for all their electrical
equipment needs. We want to
serve you too. We offer Canadian
industry our services through a
nation-wide system of sales and
engineering offices.
r. a)
& c •
n ■-> o
O cri •
e: s ca
eg O
t-l O
• o c
U  *? rt
O  -£> >
INDUSTRIAL CONTROL
G-E motors totalling 20,500 horsepower driving
Canada's largest continuous hot-strip mill in an Ontario
steel mill.
GENERALS ELECTRIC
EQUIPMENT
generates power, transmits it and puts it to work
SWITCHGEAR
TRANSFORMERS
MOTORS
Apparatus Division
CANADIAN   GENERAL   ELECTRIC   COMPANY
LIMITED
Canada's Oldest and Largest Electrical Manufacturer
CAMPBELL & SMITH  LTD..   Effective Priming

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