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The Graduate Chronicle Dec 18, 1939

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 I ..*.*.u   ntjBt turn Avenue
Vancouver   13, B. C.
The Graduate Chronicle
of the Alumni Association of the
University of British Columbia
CANADA
POSTAGE PAID
PORT PAVfi
1*.
VOL. II., No. 1
VANCOUVER, B.C., DECEMBER 18, 1939
no. 3287
VANCOUVER
Reunion Ball At Hotel On Boxing Day
**• *     *     * *     *     #
Sixth Annual Alumni Dance Expected To Attract Over 1000
Following up the monster success of last year, the Alumni- Reunion Ball has again been set for Boxing Day, December 26. Remembering the huge crowd that thronged the Commodore last
year in spite of a vicious snowstorm, the committee is providing
for over 1000 guests by appropriating nearly the entire first floor
of the new Vancouver Hotel.
The dance will again be cabaret style. Tables will be across
the wide hall from the ball room in the Banquet Room, and if more
space is needed, as many "Salons" as necessary will be called upon
to supply it.   The ball room floor itself will be left free for dancing.
Mart Kenney will be producing the music, and special entertainment will be provided. Tickets are $3.50, and may be bought
at the door, or from any member of the executive, or at the Georgia
Pharmacy.
Over 800 Grads turned out last Boxing Day to what was vociferously acclaimed the best party of the year. The snowstorm
caused 200 cancellations. Much greater floor space will be available in the new setting, and a more elaborate supper has been
arranged.
Darrell Gomery heads the ball committee, which includes
Edgar Brown and Arthur Laing.
HANDLE
with
CARE
THIS ISSUE IS
VALUABLE
It May Be  The  Last
Chronicle You Receive
and it WILL be, if you do
not send your Alumni Dues
to the treasurer, EAGER
EDGAR Brown.
The Alumni Association
cannot function without
YOUR support.
Fees are $1.00 or $10 for
life.
DIRECTORY LISTS
ALL STUDENTS
A new publication is now being
printed on the campus. Under the
direction of the Publications Board
a Student Directory has made its
appearance, containing in the neighbourhood of 2,500 names, addresses
and telephone numbers of undergraduates and students in, graduate
study. There is, in addition, a complete list of the presidents and executives of campus clubs and other
organizations. The book sells for
ten cents.
Treasurer Reports
FINANCIAL SITUATION OF THE
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BAD
Executive to Embark on Campaign to
Enlist Support for Greater Activities
Six weeks ago the President asked
the Treasurer how the financial situation was and the Treasurer said
it was bad.
(That was just before the annual
dinner at the end of October, when
we collected $62 in fees.)
Three weeks ago the President
again asked the Treasurer how the
financial situation was and the
Treasurer said it was worse.
(That was because he had collected only about $12 in fees in the
interval).
The other day the President for
a third time asked the Treasurer
how the financial situation was
and the Treasurer refused to reply because the situation was unspeakable.
(That was because he had collected only $4 in fees in the interval).
The President merely said he
knew all about it because he had
been the Treasurer last year and
went on planning for the Reunion
Dance for Boxing Day. But the
Treasurer looked up the books and
found that last year the Alumni Association made a profit of $393 on the
Christmas dance and that this year
there is no chance of making a profit
and there may even be a deficit on
the dance.
SOB STORY
So the Treasurer, finding the financial situation unspeakable, sat
down and wrote this.
Now, if the Treasurer may inter
ject a personal opinion, it would be
something like this: we are all members of the Alumni Association and
we all would like to see it remain in
existence and, even more, we would
like to see it develop into the active,
influential organization it might be.
Everyone, I think, agrees with that.
And yet, last year, only 231 out of
over  4000  members  paid  their  fees.
Last year we made genuine, and
repeated appeals for the payment of
fees. But, having made a profit on
the dance, we managed to carry on.
This year it is different. The situation is acute. Either the fees come
in—and in substantial volume—or
we quit.
ONLY A DOLLAR
In past years the Treasurer had a
difficult time in collecting fees because he could only talk about intangibles when alumni demanded to
be shown something in return for
their money. This year we have a
talking point — the Chronicle — and
that at least is something the members get for their one dollar.
We have gone further than that.
Alumni will not get their Chronicle
any more unless they pay their fees.
That was decided at the last meeting
of the executive. This edition of the
paper goes to everyone on the list,
including some who have never paid
their fees. But next time, the list
will be pruned and every man and
woman on it who is in arrears will
be stricken from the record and de-
HANDLE
with
THERE IS AN
ENVELOPE
INSIDE
in which we hope you will
send us your Alumni Fees.
The Alumni Association
cannot be much use unless
more than a handful of
Grads support it.
If we all show our interest
in it and in the University,
it can be made a very valuable organization.
STUDENT PASSES
ARE PHOTOGENIC
The Student Passes in use by undergraduates this year are really
quite the thing. Each is a good
thick card enclosed in transparent
celluloid. They bear not only the
name, address, faculty and year of
their owners, but also individual
portraits,  quite recognizable.
nied a Chronicle.
Thus the Alumni Association will
save a substantial sum in printing
and postage costs and the faithful
will get their reward,
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co w THE    GRADUATE    CHRONICLE
December 18, 1939
UNIVERSITY   CLUB   MAY   BE   FORMED
Plans In Making
For Financing
By Association
A University Club In Vancouver.
That is the dream towards the realization of which members of the
Almuni Association Executive are
working. And it may not be long,
according to President Fred Bolton, before some downtown building is taken over for the exclusive
use of the Alumni.
The idea of a University Club is
not a new one. In fact some years
ago such an organization existed,
though it could not be said to have
flourished, in Vancouver. At first
club rooms were maintained on Cordova Street, and later upstairs in the
building on the south-west corner of
Robson and Howe. However, this
club ran somewhat into difficulties,
and was to some extent taken over
by the Quadra Club when the lat-
ter's new building was opened on
Pender Street.
For several years the possibility of
re-forming a University Club has
been considered by Alumni Executives. Now the point has been reach-
- ed-jwhace,' it is felt, the number of
University Graduates in the city
warrants the formation of definite
plans.
Qudra Club Considered
The club, should it come into existence, would presumably be situated in or near the centre of the
city. The possibility of taking over
the Quadra Club, on Pender Street
just behind the Marine Building, has
been mentioned. Whether there
would be residential facilities provided, and whether the club would
be for men and women, or for men
alone, is not yet known.
Alternative plans of financing have
been suggested. One plan would be
for the Association to contract with
some individual club owner to have
' the club run for exclusive Alumni
benefit. In this way the Association
would avoid excessive financial risk,
although thereby losing any possible
proflt. It is pointed out that the disadvantages of this plan are numerous, but that it might be the only
way to begin.
Another way is one involving the
selling of advance conditional
memberships, with the object in
view of getting enough commitments to warrant proceeding with
leasing and staffing arrangements.
No figures are yet available as to
how much the memberships would
be, or as to how much would be
needed before committing steps
could be taken.
A further plan being considered is
the financing of the project by an
issue of bonds, a means somewhat
Chain Letter
Is Operated
By Grads
Revolutionary Means
Of Keeping Touch
A group of U.B.C. Chemistry graduates who wished to keep in touch
with one another as they pursued
their post-graduate work in various
universities throughout North America, have devised a chain letter
method of correspondence. The first
results of this reached U.B.C. last
week.
The idea was the brainchild of
Art Eastham, U.B.C. graduate working in the cellulose division at McGill University. Drawing up a set
of rules for the letters, he wrote one
and sent it on its way.
When one of the group receives
the chain letter he must add a two
page missive of his own within four
or five days and send it on. When
the chain returns to him, he merely
removes his own letter, adds another
and continues it. In this way everyone receives a combination letter
every four or five weeks.
The letter covers a good deal of
territory in its travels around tlwa
continent. Art Eastham at McGill
mails it to Charlie Davenport who
is taking his Master's Degree in
Chemical Engineering at the Massa-
chusets Institute of Technology.
Charlie sends it on to Bernard Ship-
ton, 1937 U.B.C. graduate, at Northwestern TJniversity, Illinois, who
mails it to Francis Cook at the University of Toronto.
CONTINUOUS CYCLE
From there it goes to Frances
Wright who is taking a Doctor's Degree in Chemistry at Stanford University, California. She adds her letter and mails it to Charles Brewer
at U.B.C. Then it goes back to Art
Eastham who removes his letter,
adds a new one, and starts the cycle
once more.
"So far the letters have been mainly concerned with the different universities and their courses," Charles
Brewer, 1938 chemistry graduate,
told the Ubyssey. General news and
the type of work done by the postgraduates is also discussed.
similar to that employed by the
Alma Mater Society for the construction of the Gymnasium, the
Stadium, and the Union Building.
The basic body whose members
would be admitted to any such club
would be the Alumni Association:
that is, the graduates of the University of British Columbia. Making up the balance would be graduates of all other universities and recognized colleges, and possibly, former members of the Alma Mater Society who did not obtain their degrees.
Ralph McL. Brown
Arts '31
REPRESENTING
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INSURANCE CO.
Life Insurance
Pension Bonds
Annuities
Parsons,   Brown
Limited
ALL FORMS OF
GENERAL
INSURANCE
822 ROGERS BUILDING   -   TRinity J101
Complete written reports and quotations on any insurance
problems or requirements gladly furnished
Constitution Is
Altered By
Meeting
Fred Bolton Is
Association's
New Prexy
The passing of important amendments to. the constitution featured
the annual meeting of the Alumni
Association held this year in the
Hotel Georgia on October 27. By
the new amendments the number of
candidates given the Association's
support for the fifteen elective positions on the University Senate will
hereafter be twelve, rather than ten,
and these twelve will of necessity be
either life or ordinary members of
the  Association.
The effect of this in the long run
will be the readjustment of the composition of the Senate to keep pace
with the steadily growing proportion
of U.B.C. graduates as compared
with other members of Convocation.
District Representation
The method of selection of the
twelve nominees will be regulated
by additional changes in the constitution. The districts of Cariboo,
Kootenay, New Westminster (including Burnaby and the Lower Fraser
Valley), Okanagan, and Victoria will
each be entitled to nominate one
candidate, while Greater Vancouver
will be allowed seven. Power is given to the executive council to make
minor alterations  in the ratio.
Fred Bolton, 1938-39 Treasurer,
was elected by the meeting to take
over the presidential chair relinquished by K. M. Beckett. Others
elected to the executive were: Vice-
President,     Arthur    Lang;    Second
PROFESSOR'S BOOK
Coincident with the celebration
this month of the 300th anniversary of the birth of Jean Racine,
a new book by the University's Dr.
A. F. B. Clark will be published.
The book, entitled "Jean Racine"
is an up-to-date biography, hi \Eng-
lish.
RHODES SCHOLAR
TO BE PICKED
THIS YEAR
Contrary to previous announcement, there will be no suspension of
selection of further Rhodes Scholars
because of the war. Ten Canadian
scholars will be chosen in January
of 1940.
Applications for the B.C. scholarship will be received by the Provincial Secretary, Tom Brown, up to
December 30. Selection this year
will be subject to special regulations
that will limit the use which may be
made of the scholarships during the
war.
Vice-President, Darrell Gomery ;
Third Vice-President, Blythe Eagles;
Secretary, Marguerite Manson ; Records Secretary, Margaret Morrison;
Treasurer, Edgar Brown; Editor of
Publications, Kemp Edmonds; Auditor, Rod Noble.
New Offices
The offices of Second and Third
Vice-Presidents are new ones this
year, the latter to be a member of
the faculty of the University, and
the former to be a woman always,
and to have charge of social activities.
Guest speaker was Professor Ellis
H. Morrow, new head of the Commerce Department. Miss Margaret
Purvis, New Westminster's talented
violinist, gave two selections accompanied by Miss Marion Daniels. December 18, 1939
THE    GRADUATE    CHRONICLE
Last Year's Canadian Officers'
Training Corps Contingent is
here shown being inspected by
Lord Tweedsmuir while he was
at the University to receive an
honourary degree.
This Years' much greater
group wrote first examinations
on Saturday, held a banquet
after, and are now resting before resuming activity in January.
REMEMBER
DECEMBER
DECEMBER, FIVE
TEARS AGO—1934
Attorney-General R. H. Pooley
tells the Legislature, "I do not
think, I KNOW that Communism is
being taught at U.B.C." .... Professor remarks that he should have
stopped after the fourth word . . .
Ubyssey headline in next issue,
"There wasn't any bread Soviet
without it" . . . Rhodes Scholarship
goes to Tom McKeown . . . Oxford-
Cambridge debaters defeat Jack
Conway and John Sumner . . . War
questionnaire reveals 27.8 per cent of
students believe war is not justifiable for Canada under any circumstances . . . Student Council launches
investigation into publishers of mysterious, forbidden paper "Canyesee"
which appears surreptitiously on
campus.
DECEMBER, TEN
YEARS AGO—1929
Rod Pilkington was Ubyssey editor-in-chief . . . Muck Page flourishes
. . . Economics professors discuss
recent Wall Street slump . . . Frank
Burnett, donor of South Seas Collection in Library, receives LID. degree . . . Cokie Sheilds leads Thunder
Birds to grid iron victories while
Tommy Berto leads cheering section
. . . New gymnasium completed and
opened at Homecoming celebrations
. . . Prime Minister Mackenzie King
speaks to students, emphasizing the
need for truth in human affairs and
education in politics . . . Lieutenant-
Governor Randolph Bruce and Min
ister of Education Joshua Hinch-
liffe also attend ceremonies . . Work
begun on new playing field east of
Library . . .Players Club presents
"Atlanta in Wimbleton," "The Veil
Lifts."
DECEMBER, FIFTEEN
YEARS AGO—1924
Men students start new vogue of
garterless socks . . . Miss Sylvia
Thrupp, star of women's swimming
team, wins Royal Life Saving Society award . . . E. J. Knapton
awarded Rhodes Scholarship by
committee . . . Musical Society plans
its first radio broadcast with a program featuring Lillian Reed, Magdalene Aske, Alice Wilma, Maty and
Rose Marin . . . Students' Council
discusses plans for the annual Victoria Invasion . . . Players Club presents Christmas plays including Bar-
rie's "The Old Lady Shows Her Medals" . . . Saxaphone nuisance in
fraternity houses. . . .
DECEMBER, TWENTY
YEARS AGO—1919
Women students under Miss Mc-
Innes, plan to knit sweaters in
Christmas holidays for European
war refugees . . . Students defeat
professors 1-0 in a chellenge soccer
game. The professorial players included Profs. Davidson, Hutchinson,
Killam, Clark, Elliot, Hare, Boving,
Larsen, Foley, Jones, Angus, and
Librarian John Ridington. Students
included Keenleyside, Baker, Wolverton, Mitchell, Swenicsky, Day,
Fleming, Stewart, Denham, Jackson, Jones . . . Highlight of the
game: John Ridington kicked Alf
Swencisky in the face . . The Arts
ball was held in Lester Court due to
lack   of  space   in   Fairview   audito-
A KICK ABOUT THE RAISE IN
FEES FOR POST-GRAD STUDY
Probably Somebody Should Do Sojmething;
By DAVID CRAWLEY
"Read a Textbook While Eating
Out of the Paper Bag" ought to be
a good slogan for the Graduate
School of a University; but at
U.B.C. the sign to grads says "Keep
Away Until You can Bring Your
Cigar With You," or, more literally, "Pay $36 for a Three Unit
Course."
A certain percentage of April
graduates are working when the new
college year comes around in September—and during that short period they have found out that there
is plenty they didn't learn at University. They realize that a course
in Foreign Trade would have been
better than Railway Transportation
for a young Export man, that a little
Mathematics of Investment would
help in Insurance, and that some
knowledge of English Literature
should have been accumulated along
with a life-long dislike for coffee in
thick cups.
Naturally, the graduate still is in
the habit of studying up what he
doesn't know and still realizes that
books can be useful—so he goes out
to the University to register for an
extra-curricular course or a directed
rium . . . Thunder Birds tied with
a R.N.W.M.P. soccer team in a game
on snow-covered Bridge Park. Students plan the second annual Victoria Invasion.
reading course, and he finds that he
has to pay $36 for three units. He
soon figures that perhaps next year
would be better, etc., etc.
For the quite large percentage of
graduates that are not working in
September the ideal slogan might be
"Read a Book While Pounding the
Pavement" and many a graduate
wishes to do just that. But if he who
works cannot pay for a course how
can he who merely walks?
The obvious way to keep the graduates desire to learn strong is to
form the habit in him of taking a
course a year, or one every two
years, until he has an M.A. and a
B.A., or a B.Comm. as well as a B.A.
—but by the time many a man has
36 bucks he has many a use for it
that he didn't have in his first few
years out of school. A University
that could keep its graduates always
learning, almost as students, would
be an ideal thing; but one that discourages work "after school" is not
only inefficient but seems to be sort
of useless.
W.C.T.U. PRIZE
The Departments of Economics,
Psychology, and Sociology, of the
University will consult with the
Women's Christian Temperance
Union in connection with essay
subjects to be chosen by aspirants
for the new prize of $50 which
will be presented by the W.C.T.U.
in April, 1940. THE    GRADUATE    CHRONICLE
December 18, 1939
Grads ... Far and Near
Since the last issue of the Chronicle came out a scant two
months ago, there has not been so much history of the Alumni to
record. Nevertheless the following items have been painstakingly
noted, with some co-operation from the Victoria Alumni, and from
several Orads who have written in.
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BIRTHS
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CLASS OP 19
To Dr. and Mrs. John Allardyce, Arts
'19, (Henriette Mackenzie, Arts
'27), a daughter, in Vancouver, in
November.
CLASS OP '25
To Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Cummings,
Arts '25, a daughter, in Vancouver,
in November.
To Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Hardie, Arts
'25,  a second  daughter,  Jane,  in
Victoria.
CLASS OF '26
To Mr. and Mrs. William A. Bain,
Sc. '26, of Woodflbre, a son, in
Vancouver, in November.
CLASS OF '27
To   Rev.   and   Mrs.   George   Dawe,
(Evelyn Hill, Arts '27), a daughter,
in Salmon Arm, in December.
To Mr. and Mrs. A. E. MorreU, Arts
'27,  (Mary Barker), a daughter, in
November, in Vancouver.
To Mr. and Mrs. Max Wright, Arts
'27, Cnieaner Butler), a daughter,
in Port Alberni, in November.
CLASS OF '29
To Mr. and Mrs. Mervin Buckley,
Arts '29, (Aldien McDonell), a son,
in Vancouver, in December.
To Mr. and Mrs. O.. Aune, (Louella
Stangland, Arts '29), a son, in Vancouver, in November.
CLASS OF '30
To Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Pike, Sc. '30, of
Geraldton, Ont., a son, at Port
Arthur, in October.
To Mr. and Mrs. J. N. C. Clayton,
Arts '30, (Margaret Wood), a son,
in Vancouver, in November.
CLASS OF '31
To Mr. and Mrs. Frank Burnham,
Arts    '31,     (Alice    Beckman),    a
daughter, in Vancouver, in October.
To Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Johnston,
(Marian Macdonald, Arts '31), a
son, in Vancouver, in December.
To Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Magar, Arts
'31, (Bee Chisholm), a daughter, in
Vancouver, in November.
CLASS OF '33
To Mr. and Mrs. Brenton S. Brown,
Jr., Sc. '33, (Pauline Lauchland,
Arts '32), a son, in Vancouver, in
November.
To Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Hogg, Arts
'33, a daughter, in Vancouver, in
November.
To Mr. and Mrs. Norman McConnell,
Sc. '33, (Shiela Tait, Arts '33), of
Zeballos, a son, in Vancouver, in
November.
CLASS OF '34
To Mr. and Mrs. Chris Dalton, Com.
'34, (Margaret Bird, Arts '32), a
son, in Vancouver, in October.
CLASS OF '35
To Mr. and Mrs. Lionel Clarke, Arts
'35, (Esme Tweedale, Arts '35), a
daughter, in Vancouver, in October.
To Mr. and Mrs. Robert Leckey,
Com. '35, (Mary Fralelgh), a daughter, in Vancouver, in December.
To Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Harris,
Arts '35, a son, in Vancouver, in
November.
CLASS OF '36
To Mr. and Mrs. Alfred C. Buckland,
Sc. '36, (Helen Jackson, Arts '33),
a son, in Vancouver, in November.
CLASS OF '37
To Mr. and Mrs. Donald Capon, Arts
'37, (Jean Jackson), a son, in Vancouver, in December.
CLASS OF '38
To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lindsay,
Arts '38, (Annallce Moncrieff), of
Huntingdon, a daughter, in Abbots-
ford, in November.
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! MARRIAGES (
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CLASS OF '23
Dr. Hugh MacKechnle, Arts '23, to
Evelyn Simpson, in Vancouver, in
October.
CLASS OF '33
Lieut. William Mathers, Arts '33, to
Christine Bell, in London, Ont., in
November.
CLASS OF '34
Jack Turvey, Arts '34, to Frances
Trites, in Vancouver, in December.
CLASS OF '35
Lieut. Jack Shaneman, Arts '35, to
Mary Johnston, in Duncan, in
November. Residing in Victoria.
W. R. Young, to Claire Green, Arts
'35, in Victoria.
CLASS OF '36
Lieut. Elliott Seldon, Arts '36, to
Helen Westby, Arts '37, in Vancouver, in October.
Lieut. Douglas Kirk, Arts '36, to Mar-
got Martin, Arts '38, in Vancouver,
in November.
Aser Harowitz, Arts 36, to Bessie
Lipson, in Vancouver, in December.
CLASS OF '37
Edgar Armstrong to Marjorie Hill,
Com.   '37,  in  West  Vancouver,   in
November.
JUST WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED
Seven   experienced   Pharmacists   to   dispense   just   what   your
Doctor ordered. Bring your next prescription to us.
GEORGIA PHARMACY LIMITED
777 WEST GEORGIA STREET
MArine 4161
Pharmaceutical Chemists
Leslie G. Henderson Gibb G. Henderson, B.A., B.A.Sc.
Oc P. '06
U.B.C.'33
CLASS OF '38
Rann Matthison to Elsie Stangland,
Arts '38, in New Westminster, in
November.
Charles J. Henniker, Sci. '38, to Pat
Hemberow, Arts '37, in Seattle, in
July,  1938.
llllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllfllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlffllMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII'
PERSONALS
TllllllllttllfllllllllllllllHIIlllllllllltllllllllMllllllllllllllllltlllllllMllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllfltllltlllltllllMIlT
CLASS OF '23
Mrs. Lillian Ralston Locklin Nicholas, Arts '23, is a librarian in the
Los Angeles Public Library System.
Mrs. John Creighton (Sally Murphy,
Arts '23) conducts a popular lecture course in contemporary literature for the department of extension.
CLASS OF '26
Marjorie teeming, Arts '26, who has
been in Durban, South Africa, for
the past two years, is due back in
Vancouver after Christmas. She
will spend the holiday with her
sister, Mrs. Kenneth Salmond
(Hope Leeming, Arts '28), in Toronto.
CLASS OF '27
Russ Logle, Arts, '27, is in business
in Stratford, Conn.
G. A. Luyat, Ag. '27, is manager of
the Cariboo Livestock and Fair
Association at Williams Lake.
Mrs. Muriel E. Hldy (nee Wagen-
hauser), Arts '27, has obtained her
Ph.D. degree from Radcliffe College, already holding an M.A. from
Clark University.
CLASS OF '29
Mrs. David R. Kennedy (Teddy
Sproule), Arts '29, is living in New
York.
Jean E. Andrew, Arts '29, is working
for the International Fisheries
Commission at the University of
Washington in Seattle.
CLASS OF '30
Don Sutherland, (Ag. '30) is district
agriculturalist for Kamloops and
this month organized the Kamloops Winter Fair.
William Robbins, Arts '30, has- been
appointed an Assistant Professor
of English at Victoria College.
CLASS OF  '31
John R. Taylor, Arts '31, is now
teaching in the Nordhoff Union
High School in Ojai, about 80 miles
north of Los Angeles, after having
completed graduate work at the
University of Southern California.
Reg Hammond, Arts '31, is back
teaching at Victoria High School
after a year's post-graduate work
at Berkeley.
S. Thomas Parker, Arts '31, is teaching mathematics at Horbart College, Geneva, N.Y. He taught at
Prince George 1934-7, married
Elsie  Eccles   of Victoria  in  1935,
has one son. Spent 1937-8 as an
Assistant in Astronomy at Brown
University, R.I., and is now in
charge of the Smith Observatory.
Dave Murdoch, Arts '31, is on the
staff of Yale University, having
received his Ph.D. from Toronto in
1937.
CLASS OF '32
Isobel Bescoby, (Arts '32) is director
of elemtary correspondence courses
for the department of education
in Victoria.
Rev. Bob Ward, Arts '32, is at Pelly,
Yukon.
CLASS OF '33
Douglas McK. Brown, (Arts '33) has
joined the legal firm of Russell,
Russell, DuMoulin, DuMoulin &
Brown.
Norman W. F. Phillips, Arts '33, is
with the National Research Council in Ottawa.
CLASS OF '34
Norman Hacking, (Arts '34), turned
up in Vancouver a couple of weeks
ago after an adventurous nine
month in Europe and went back to
work on the editorial staff of The
Daily Province as though nothing
had happened.
(Continued on Page 5) December 18, 1939
THE    GRADUATE    CHRONICLE
Constitution Changes
In response to many requests, the Chronicle is repeating with
this issue the full text of the amendments to the Constitution of
the Alumni Association, as passed by the Annual Meeting in
October.
The following are the amendments, which Grads would do
well to check over, because of their important effect on selection
of members for the University Senate.
1. That Section (c) of Clause 4 be
amended by striking out the words
after the word "meeting" in the
second line and substituting therefor the words:
"twelve life or ordinary members of the Association shall be
selected as its nominees."
2   That Clause 9 be struck out and
the following substituted therefor:
"Clause 9.  The Executive of the
Association shall consist of the
following:
Honorary President shall be
the President of the University
of British Columbia; President,
Immediate Past President, First
MIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllllllllllllllllHIIIIlllllltllllllllfltllMI
Personals
i Continued I
riiiiitifitiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin.
Igor Kosin, Ag. '34, left the post of
farm editor for The Daily Province to take a position with the
federal department of agriculture
in Ottawa.
Dorothy Harris, Arts '34, will be
married this month to Jim Genge.
Cyril Chave, (Arts '34) is teaching
school in Vancouver. He is married to the former Estelle Matheson (Arts '35).
CLASS OF '35
Megan Thomas, (Arts '35) is teaching at Queen's Hall private school
in Vancouver.
Harold Johns, M.A. 1935, is to be
married at Christmas.
CLASS OF  '37
Anna Clarke, Arts '37, is teaching at
Norfolk House School.
CLASS OF '38
Charles J. Hennlker, Sc. '38, is studying at the University of Washington for his Ph.D. in Chemistry.
Harry Hickman, M.A., '38, is back
from a year of Doctorate study at
the Sorbonne. He is Assistant Professor in French at Victoria College.
Laurence Gray, Sc. '38, is a Radio
Engineer at the Marconi Factory
at Montreal.
Fred F. McKenzie is in charge of
the Physiology of Reproduction in
Farm Animals in the College of
Agriculture of the University of
Missouri.
Mr. and Mrs. John Parnall are living at Esquimau.
Dr. and Mrs. Kaye Lamb (Dr. Wes-
sie Tipping) are residing at the
De Cosmos Apartments in Victoria.
Vice President, who shall be a
man. Second Vice-President who
shall be o woman, Third Vice-
President, Secretary, Records
Secretary, Treasurer, Editor of
Publications. The Executive
shall meet at the call of the
President, or at the written request of any two members
thereof."
That Section (a) of Clause 13, be
amended by striking out the second
sentence   and   adding   after   the
word "Treasurer":
"and perform such other duties
as generally devolve upon the
office of President."
Section (b) shall be amended by
renaming it "Section (c)" and the
following inserted as Section (b):
"Section   (b).   The First  Vice-
President shall assist the President and perform the duties of
President in the absence of the
President,  and shall   perform
such other duties as may from
time to time  be  delegated   to
him."
"The Second Vice-President shall
direct the social activities and
the women's activities of the
association, and srall perform
the duties of President in the
absence of the President and
the First Vice-President."
"The Third Vice-President shall
be a member of the Faculty or
the administration of the University of British Columbia, and
shall act as liason o%cer between the association and the
administration, faculty and student body of the University."
That Clause 13 be further amended by adding Section (h) as follows:
"Section (h). The executive shall
have power to appoint a member of the Association as Assistant Secretary-Treasurer, who
shall be a paid official performing such duties as are assigned
by the executive on such terms
and conditions as the executive
may determine."
That Clause 19 be struck out and
the following be substituted therefor:
"Clause 19. Section (a). The
Association shall nominate a
candidate for the office of
Chancellor of the University as
often as an election is held to
fill the said office."
Section (b). The Association
shall nominate twelve life or
ordinary members in good
standing as candidates for the
Senate  of   the   University   of
"Good Neighbors
//
You carefully selected the neighborhood in which
you live. Neighbors are important.
Northwestern Mutual also carefully selects—your
fire insurance neighbors. In the aggregate their
losses are lower than the average. The savings
resulting are returned directly to them, the
policyholders.
When insured with Northwestern Mutual you are
associating with "Good Neighbors." It pays, it
saves.
NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL
FIRE ASSOCIATION
Randall Building TRinity 4266
VANCOUVER, B.C.
British  Columbia  as  often  as
such Senate elections are held."
Method of Selection
Clause (c). Section 19.
(1) An Association Candidate
for election to the Senate
shall represent one of the
enumerated districts in the
Province of British Columbia hereinafter set forth,
though such Candidate
need not be a resident of
the district he represents,
save and except in the case
of Greater Vancouver, Victoria or New Westminster
districts.
(2) Each district shall be entitled to nominate candidates as follows:
Cariboo  1
Kootenay   1
New Westminster (including     Burnaby     and
lower Fraser Valley) 1
Okanagan   1
Greater Vancouver (including North Vancouver,
West Vancouver, Richmond     and     University
Hill)    7
Victoria   l
(3) PROVIDED: that if at any
time the Executive Council
deems it advisable to have
some other district of the
Province represented, it
shall have power to give
such district representation,
and in such case the number representing the Greater Vancouver District shall
be reduced by the number
so allotted, but so that in
any event the number to
represent Greater Vancou
ver  District  shall not be
less than five.
(4) The Executive of the Association shall notify all
branches of the rules governing the nomination of
candidates at least six
weeks before the closing
date for such nominations.
(5) The name of the nominee
of such district must be in
the hands of the Secretary
fourteen days before the
closing date, and the list of
such district nominees other than Greater Vancouver
shall be submitted to the
Executive Council for approval.
(6) A slate of proposed nominees to represent Greater
Vancouver shall be chosen
by the Executive and submitted to a general meeting of the Association to
be held seven clear days
before the closing day for
nominations, and such
meeting may approve, reject or amend the proposed slate as it sees fit. The
names of those selected
shall be added to the list of
district nominees as approved by the Executive
Council and shall constitute the official slate of the
Association, and shall be
duly submitted to the Registrar of the University of
British Columbia.
(7) The list of nominees so selected shall be sent to all
members with the request
that they support it in the
forthcoming election. THE    GRADUATE    CHRONICLE
December 18, 1939
The Graduate Chronicle
A quarterly journal owned by and devoted to the interests of
The Alumni Association of The University of British Columbia.
EDITOR: W. H. Kemp Edmonds
ASSOCIATE EDITORS:
Mrs. Edgar Brown Ken Grant David Crawley
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1939
Editorials
SOMETHING FOR NOTHING
This will be the last issue of the Chronicle to Graduates of the
University who have not paid Alumni fees.
At the last meeting of the new executive the following minute
was passed: "RESOLVED, that the next issue of the 'Graduate
Chronicle' be the last sent to any others than paid up members of
the U.B.C. Alumni Association."
The executive is putting this into effect not without careful
consideration and not without regret. It will mean that whatever
contact now exists between the central office and the large body
of graduates will be broken off. The circulation of the paper will
fall from over 5000 to under 500, if we presume that no more fees
will be paid this year than have been in the past.
Though such action may not be desirable from other angles,
this much stands out beyond question: that present income cannot
support the publication and mailing of the Chronicle so often or to
so many people. In round figures the cost of printing and mailing
any one issue is $140. With the paper a quarterly, this amounts to
about $560 a year, a sum which uses up the proceeds of 560 ordinary yearly memberships. Total receipts for membership fees were
in 1938-9 $394, in 1937-8 $437.
It was hoped last year that the introduction of a quarterly
Chronicle sent to all graduates would stimulate interest and bring
in far more fees. Stimulate interest it undoubtedly did, but not
-payment of fees.
It is possible, of course, that enough money will be collected
this year to allow a return to the old policy. This remains to be
seen. But in the meantime, the Association is not able to continue
giving something for nothing.
PRETTY PASS-OUT
Things have come to a pretty pass in Vancouver, if we are
to believe the representatives of the W.C.T.U., Local Council of
Women, General Ministerial Association, B. C. Temperance League,
and Lord's Day Alliance and who could doubt them. Though we
more hardened Alumni of Vancouver know the sordid story only
too well, we cannot but be re-nauseated as we repeat it to the less
suspecting Alumni who have not been in touch. We do not want
to repeat it, but we feel it is our duty so to do.
A call has come for leadership, and we, the Alumni, who have
had the advantages of higher education, must supply it.
Liquor has been seen on tables in Vancouver Cabarets by the
Reverend Mr. Cooke, and openly flaunted. The Reverend Mr.
Mclntyre reported that in a cabaret on Pender Street on the night
of October 28, a booth had the curtains drawn so tightly that he
was unable to see inside. In fact, it appears that no member of
the ministerial delegation was able to see inside. Not one.
Depravity in even more shocking terms than this was
described. In another place one girl was so drunk that she wanted
to hold hands with one of the ministerial group. The upright Mrs.
MacKay says she saw girls seated on the knees of their partners,
with liquor on the table.
Vile conditions like this must not be allowed to continue. It
is up to the Alumni to act. The plan is this.
Members of the Alumni will attend (in pairs—for protection)
in Cabarets frequently, and there they will provide the intelligent
leadership for which they are so well fitted.
The guests will not be addressed from the tops of tables, nor
will they from under the tables. Alumni will be certain to be last
to leave, so that they may be in a position to check up the loiterers,
and so that nothing will happen after they are gone. Persuasive,
rather than forceful methods will be used at all times.
The Executive should approach the W.C.T.U., L.C. of W.,
G.M.A., B.C.T.L. and L.D.A. and offer such co-operation. The
Organizations will, no doubt, be so happy to have our help that
they will supply free all the cabaret tickets that are necessary.
CORRESPONDENCE
Editor, The Chronicle.
Dear  Sir:
In a recent editorial you spoke
of future plans for a Chronicle. I
hope that the sheet can be continued, but I do suggest that there
be more news of the University
rather than personal items.
The University plays an important part in the development of the
province and it is in recognition of
this role that the legislature contributes funds for higher education. The researches of Dr. M. Y.
Williams, whether in pure or applied science, whether of local or
universal application, are of far
greater Interest to me than the
matrimonial adventures of an entire class. The building of the
University to an elevated niche in
the social order bears, after all,
no relation to the social events
enjoyed by graduates.
Is It possible for university professors to contribute to the Chronicle? The birth of one penetrating idea In the mind of Professor
Sedgewick would make more interesting copy than a dozen or
more births credited to the alumni.
My thought is that an alumni paper should be a chronicle of the
university rather than of the alum-
no.
Yours truly,
GEOFFREY W. CRICKMAY,
Associate Professor,
Department  of  Geology,
University of Georgia.
NEW DEPARTMENT
Plans are now being considered
by the Board of Governors for the
incorporation into the Faculty of
Agriculture of a new and separate
department of agricultural economics.
Summer School
Professors Appointed
Two Stanford professors, one from
Toronto, and one from Berkeley,
head the list of prominent educationalists who will lecture at U.B.C.'s
1940 Summer School.
Dr. Paul Alvin Martin will give a
course in history, while his fellow
Stanford professor, Dr. John R. Reid
will lecture in Philosophy and Psychology. Dr. Healy Willan, professor of Music at Toronto, will head
the music department at the Summer Session. Frederick Schmitz of
the University of California, at
Berkeley, will give a course in German.
Other appointments are as follows: Department of Economics:
Professor H. F. Angus, Dr. A. W.
Currie; Department of Chemistry:
Dr. E. H. Archibald, Dr. M. J. Marshall,  Dr. J. Allen Harris;  Depart-
Book Review
Fancy  Free,  by  Carol  Coates;   The
Ryerson Press; 60 cents.
Carol Coates used to write poetry
when she was an English honors
student and a member of the Letters Club in 1930 and, off and on,
she has been doing it ever since despite marriage, the care of two children and travel in Japan.
A year or so ago she returned to
Canada and is now living in Toronto. The time seemed opportune to
gather up a collection of her poems
for publication in a chapbook and
Ryerson has thoughtfully brought
the little volume out just before
Christmas.
One might deduce, from reading
the book, that the author had lived
in Japan. (As a matter of fact, she
was born there of Canadian parents
and has spent about half her life in
Japan). The poems are marked by
the fragile beauty, the preoccupation
with form and the sense of delicate
imagery, which are characteristic of
Japanese art and literature.
It is a poetry that makes demands
on the reader, not because it is obscure (on the contrary, it is almost
transparently clear), but because it
merely hints at the theme and leaves
the fulfilment to the imagination,
aided by the suggestive rhythm of
the lines. One example will illustrate
its quality:
THE DANCE
Thistledown, did you say?
But thistledown is soft and silvery,
and floats along the rhythm of the
wind,
empty of will.
Ah yes, I see now,
for in the sweep of your arms,
I, too, empty of will,
am wafted in my silver gown
over the hills and valleys of delight.
Weren't you clever, though,
to think of thistledown.
—E.N.B.
Diddle diddle dumpling my son John,
Went to bed with his stockings on,
One shoe off and one shoe on,
Boy; was he plastered!
Groom: "You'll never know how
nervous I was when I proposed to
you."
Bride: "You'll never know how
nervous I was until you did."
ment of Classics: Dr. O. J. Todd,
Professor Lemuel Robertson; Department of History: Dr. W. N. Sage,
Dr. Sylvia Thrupp; Department of
Mathematics: Dr. D. Buchanan, Dr.
F. S. Knowlan, Dr. Ralph Hull, Miss
Mary L. Barclay; Department of
Modern Languages: Dr. Isabel Mac-
Innes, Dr. Dorothy Dallas, Dr. Ronald Hilton, Dr. Joan Dangelzer, Mrs.
Alice Roys.
Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Gondoliers" is the selection of
the U.B.C. Musical Society for presentation this spring. This will
mark a return to G. & S. by this excellent group after a vacation
of two or three years spent on such things as "Robin Hood."
Judging by the record of "Iolanthe," "Pinafore," etc., the return
will be a happy one. December 18, 1939
THE    GRADUATE    CHRONICLE
Brock Memorial Opens With New Year
ENVELOPES
ENCLOSED
FOR FEES
The envelopes that reach
Chronicle Readers with this
issue are tendered with the
earnest hope of the executive that Alumni everywhere
will take advantage of the
ease they provide for remitting fees. Every Graduate
of U.B.C. is a member of
Convocation, but all are not
Members of the Alumni Association. The Alumni Association is an organization of
high potential value, but it
must have an interested
membership before that
value can be seen in a tangible way.
The Executive this year is
embarking on a strong campaign to get two or three
thousand paid-up members
for the Alumni Association.
Should this campaign be
successful the Association
will amount to something of
more definite value.
Fees are one dollar a year
for   ordinary  members,   or
ten  dollars  for  life.   Send
yours by cash or by cheque
to: The Treasurer, The Alumni
Association, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.
Victoria Holds
Elections
The Executive of the Victoria
Branch of the Alumni Association,
elected in October of this year, consists of Mrs. Ross Napier, President;
Harry Dee, Vice-President; Mrs. C.
M. Lauder, Membership Secretary;
W. Harry Hickman, Recording Secretary; E. G. Hart, Treasurer; and
the following committee members:
Miss Eugene Cant well, Mrs. K. McAllister, and Dr. J. S. Stevenson.
The late Dr. Henry Esson Young
was elected Honourary President in
October, but died shortly afterward
at Victoria. In the loss of Dr. Young,
who may fairly be considered the
father of the University, not only
the Victoria Association, but the
whole body of Alumni has suffered
irredeemable loss.
She: "Now let's talk about you for
a while, darling."
He: "All right, dear."
She: "Well then, what does a
handsome man like you see in a girl
like me?"
Professor: "Didn't you have a
brother in this class last year?"
Student: "No sir, it is I. I'm taking
the course over again."
Professor: "Extraordinary resemblance."
$85,000 Student
Investment In
Structure
Undergrad Describes
The New Building
By PIERRE BERTON
Arts '42
Four years of U.B.C. student
endeavor will reach a successful
completion January 12, when
the new Brock Memorial Men's
and Women's Union Building
opens on the campus.
Sometime during its existence
every university is faced with the
need of a Union building. Some
universities have edifices of this nature; some have not. But few can
boast as adequate and handsome a
construction as is now being erected
on the U.B.C. campus. Financed by
the students themselves at a cost of
more than $85,000, the building is
the last word in luxurious modern
design and will fill a long needed
want at the University.
COMFORT AND CHEER
The building is of reinforced concrete leading up  to  a  cedar shake
roof.   In the centre of the greystone
wall which fronts the building is a
bronze placque looking out onto the
green  terrace.    Leaded  glass  doors
permit   entry  into   the  main   social
lounge,  where  spacious  arm  chairs
and chesterfields will offer comfort
to    lecture-weary    students.      Two
large   fireplaces   at   either   end  will
add an atmosphere of good cheer.
In the evenings the lounge can
ue changed to a ballroom offering
dOOO   square   feet   of   unimpeded
dancing   space.     A   gallery runs
around three sides of the lounge
and a balcony Is provided for the
orchestra.   All class functions will
take place here.
The walls of the room are of cedar
panelling running half way up to
handsome cream donna-conna board.
On the main floor will be a dining
room where the minimum charge
will be thirty-five cents. A modern
kitchen is being installed complete
with large gas range and steamtable.
CEDAR PANELLING
The Men's and Women's common
rooms on the lower floor will be
tastefully furnished with armchairs
and tables. Cedar panelling will go
up to the ceiling in the Women's
rooms. The floor in the men's commons is of hardwood, as are the
floors of the dining room, main
lounge and faculty reception rooms.
In a large Alma Mater Society
office in the south wing of the building, Mr. Home, A.M.S. accountant,
will hold sway. Here also will be
the offices of the council president
and treasurer while upstairs will be
the Council Chamber,
REHEARSAL STAGE
Several large meeting rooms will
take the place of Arts lecture rooms
for noon hour and evening meetings. A stage has been built in one
which may be used for rehearsals
or oratory and can be screened off
by sliding doors for ordinary use.
In the basement, the Publications
Board will hold forth. Separate offices for the Efiitor-in-chief and for
the Totem have been installed. They
are screened off by glass doors. A
telephone booth will supply Jong
needed privacy for phone calls. A
brand new U-desk will put the publication of the Ubyssey on a more
efficient basis. The Totem files and
a special photographic dark room
will be added features of the office.
The building will be officially opened on Friday, January 12. The Varsity radio society is at present making attempts to broadcast the event.
The following evening, the opening
ball will start the Union Building's
social season.
Long before the official opening
the Students' Council, and Publications will have moved in and started
on their second terms of activities.
Clubs will follow soon after.
The building is intended as a memorial to Dean and Mrs. Brock who
were killed four years ago in an airplane accident.
But it is even more than that. •
It is a monument to the initiative
and achievement of the students of
the University of British Columbia
who, revisualizing the vital need for
a building of this sort, spared no
effort until their dream was achieved.
KLAHOWYA
Fellow Grads
Corsages for the Alumni Ball—
Christmas flowers —or flowers
anytime — call
Joe Brown,   Arts '23
Bill Brown, Aggie '28
Flowerfone
SEy. 1484
BROWN
665 GRANVILLE ST     B KOS.
189   WEST HASTINGS
LENGTHY RECORD
ON EXECUTIVE
For the first time in five years, D. ,
Milton Owen is not a member of
the Alumni Executive. At the first
meeting of the 1939-40 Executive this
was pointed out, and a motion of appreciation for his past services was
put on record. Owen was elected
secretary in 1935, and held that position until 1937, when he succeeded
T. E. H. Ellis to the presidency. He
spent 1938-39 on the Executive as
Immediate Past President. Owen
still retains his position as Secretary
of Convocation.
INFORMATION PLEASE
THE RADIO PROGRAM THAT
FLATTERS YOUR INTELLIGENCE
with
Oscar Levant
John Kieran
Franklin P. Adams
Clifton Fadiman
CJOR
Thursdays 8*15 p.m.
HEAR THE N.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, EACH
SATURDAY AT 7 P.M., PROM CJOR. THE    GRADUATE    CHRONICLE
December 18, 1939
CELEBRATING . . .
the opening of the
BROCK MEMORIAL BLDG.
and
Twenty-fifth
ANNIVERSARY of UNIVERSITY
Souvenir Edition
fth<
or tne
UBYSSEY
Date of Issue: January 15, 1940
CONTENTS . .
• CHRONICLED HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY
• OUTSTANDING UNIVERSITY GRADUATES
• UNIVERSITY CONTRIBUTIONS TO
BRITISH COLUMBIA
• BEAUTIFUL COLOR PICTURES OF CAMPUS
ORDER YOUR COPY NOW
TWENTY-FIVE CENTS
(Coin or Stamps)
MAIL TO: PUBLICATIONS BOARD
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
Following are the degrees conferred
by the University of British Columbia
Fall Congregation, 1939:
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
Conferring the Degree of Master of
Arts:
Donald Kellie Bell, B.A., B.Com.;
major: Economics; minor: Philosophy. Thesis: "Health Insurance in
British Columbia."
Agnes Margaret Gwyn, B.A. Major:
Zoology. Minor: Botany. Thesis: "The
Development and Relative Growth of
the Scales of the Pacific Herring
(Clupea Palasii)."
Geoffrey Blundell Riddehough, B.A.
(Brit. Col.), M.A. (Calif.). Major:
Latin. Minor: Greek. Thesis: "The
Mercenaries of Ancient Carthage."
Conferring the Degree of Bachelor
of Arts with Honors:
Lloyd Charles Francis Bannerman
—Second class honors in Philosophy
and Psychology.
William Royce Butler—First class
honors in English Language and
Literature.
Genille Cave-Brown-Cave — First
class honors in Chemistry.
Thomas Graham Darling — First
class honors in Economics and Political Science.
Mary McNeilage Davis—First class
honors in Philosophy and Psychology.
Lloyd Fraser Detwiller — Second
class honors in Economies.
Byron Laird Ferguson — Second
class honors in English Language and
Literature.
George Pirkis Kidd—Second class
honors in History.
Robert Law McDougall—First class
honors in English and Economics and
Political Science.
Joseph Francis Plaskett—First class
honors in History.
Arthur George Richardson—Second
class honors in Philosophy and Psychology.
Samuel Rothstein—First class honors in French and English.
Conferring the Degree of Bachelor
of Arts in the general course (names
in alphabetical order in each class):
Passed
Malcolm L. Brown, S. Roy English,
Jean Fitch, Alice J. Gavin, Mary S.
Maclnnes, Patricia Macrae, Johnson
Sun Pao, Harold Raphael, Adam Reid,
George S. Shepherd (B.Com.), Jeaji
Stordy, Henry F. Stradiotti, Sheila
Wilson.
Conferring the Degree of Bachelor
of Commerce:
Passed
Rosemary J. Bawden, B.A.; Robert
J. H. Davidson, Roy J. Leckie, Gordon H. McCullough, B.A.; Betty D.
Skaling, Margaret A. Westlake.
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Conferring the Degree of Bachelor
of Applied Science (names in alphabetical order in each department):
Passed
Chemical Engineering — Ronald S.
Wilson.
Electrical Engineering—Thomas A.
G. Beeching; M. Patrick Larsen.
Mechanical Engineering—Colborne
H. Shortley-Luttrell, B.A.
Mining Engineering — Patrick W.
MacMillan.
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
Conferring the Degree of Master of
Science in Agriculture:
Myles Houston Ritchie, B.A., B.S.A.
Major: Plant Nutrition. Minor: Botany. Thesis: "Nutritional Studies
with Strawberries and the Breakdown
of the Strawberry in Canning."
Conferring the Degree of Master of
Science in Agriculture:
James Berton Saunders.
Social Service Diploma  (names in
alphabetical order in each class):
Class I.
Margaret T. Gourlay, B.A.
Class II.
Stanley J. Bailey, B.A.; Beatrice
Ball; Priscilla A. Boyd, B.A.; Mrs.
J. E. Buck, B.A.; C. Stewart Clarke,
B.A.
Mrs. M. A. Granat, B.A.; Regis A.
Hicks, B.A.; Mrs. S. M. Levin, B.A.;
Margie B. Macdonald, B.A.; K. Avis
Pumphrey, B.A.
Agnes A. H. Shewan, B.A.; Mrs. M.
K. Smith, B.A.; Barbara A. Van
Kleek, B.A.; Kathleen E. Webster,
B.A.; Madge York, B.A.
Passed
Barbara Brooks; B.A.; Catherine L.
Carter, B.A.; Joyce Craig, Gladys F.
L. Reid.
Mrs. C. Robinson, B.A.; Nora Scott-
Colquohoun, B.A.; Amy Seed, B.A.;
F. Ruth Tisdall, B.A.
CORRESPONDENCE
Editor Chronicle.
Dear Sir:
Would you request, through the
columns of the Alumni Chronicle,
copies of the following issues of the
University Calendar?
3rd issue, 1917-18.
4th issue, 1918-19.
The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., has requested these issues
to complete their files, but we have
been unable to supply copies. As the
Library of Congress has always been
extremely generous to this University,
we are anxious to obtain copies if it
is at all possible.
Would you have the copies sent to
me at the University Library?
ANNE M. SMITH,
Reference Librarian.
Victoria Holds
Reunion Dance
A highly successful dance was held
by the Victoria Branch of the Alumni November 25 at Victoria College. Nearly a hundred old grads
turned out to enjoy the varied entertainment.
Committee in charge was W. H.
Hickman, Mrs. C. M. Lauder, Robert
Wallace, Mrs. Kaye Lamb, and Mrs.
Stanley Frame.
Doctor: (after examining patient):
"I don't like the look of your husband, Mrs. Brown."
Mrs. Brown: "Neither do I doctor,
but he's good to our children."
ALUMNI-
DON'T FORGET
The
Reunion
Ball
December 26
BOXING DAY
at the
Hotel Vancouver
Ballroom and
Banquet Room
9:30 (till long after twelve)
One Couple $3.50

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