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The Graduate Chronicle May 31, 1942

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OF MIKITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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»' '^"iPt^ The Men and Women of Canadian General
Electric are day and night producing
weapons to win the war!
They're quiet, determined men and women—these workers of
Canadian General Electric. They're the folks who, a few months
ago, took pride in building all the many contributions of electricity
to peace-time living. Today they're putting their whole heart into
the making of grimmer things—guns, searchlights, marine engines,
vital parts of planes, tanks and ships—and into the building of
essential electrical equipment for other war plants.
In their off hours you'll find them acting as air-raid wardens. You'll
find they've signed up for hundreds of thousands of dollars worth
of Victory Bonds and War Savings Certificates. And, on the job,
they're doing what they know best, giving it the best they've got
—so that they and all of us may the sooner pick up the never-
ending task of making better things for a better Canada.
C.G.E. 1542x.
Canadian General Electric
CO.
LIMITED
Head Office - Toronto
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CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC ft,™
Head Office-Toronto The GRADUATE CHROME
A Magazine Published by and Devoted to the Interests of the
Alumni Association of the University of British Columbia
Vol. IV
VANCOUVER, B. C, MAY, 1942
No. 1
cZdiioiiaL .
Successful endeavours require able leadership. Able
leadership is the result of logical thinking, temperate consideration, and humane understanding. It is bolstered by
an honest facing of the facts and a determined adherence
to a democratic and progressive policy.
Who has been better trained for leadership than the
University Graduate? The state, our parents and ourselves have attempted to instil into us, and we into each
other, the sound principles of leadership. We are the
thinkers, the engineers, the research workers, the administrators of business and the advisors of the government.
But all too sadly some of us are the shirkers, the pro-
crastinators, and the one who "leaves it for John."
Plainly, as never before "TUUM EST," it is up to
you. It is up to all Alumni to think, consider, understand
and above all, to lead. It is up to the graduates of the
universities of Canada to be a credit to their Alma Maters,
to their communities and to their country.
We did not learn all there was to know at our Universities, but we did learn how to think, how to study, and
how to grow mentally, we are now learning how to work
and live, and some few of us have learned how to lead.
We can all do our part in leading; be it small or large.
We, as graduates, must take the lead in the business world,
in community affairs, and in the affairs of government.
It is a debt that we owe to our Alma Mater. It is a debt
that we owe to Canada.
What can we do?
We can vote intelligently.
We can write letters to our members in Parliament,
offering our thoughts on many matters
We can think and help the other man to think.
We can do our job and do it well.
We can lean into the storm and push with all our
might.
We can lead where man has not gone before, we ctt-
not shirk.
Our fathers helped to make Canada what it is today,
we can help to make it what it will be tomorrow. What
that shall be, is up 1o you, you, and you, man and womin
alike.
Alumni, your job is before you, your duty is clear,
TUUM EST, it is up to you and to you alone; go to it,
and go to it with a will that cannot be deterred!
Lead on, lead on, O Alma Mater, and we will lead
with vou!
^tudsnti. SJ-'a.xa.iie.
at JVw <u 23. a
^n-rmouxis.i. The Fourth Climacteric of the Second World War
When Nazi Germany invaded Soviet
Russia on June 22, 1941, the World
War reached what Mr. Churchill has
called the "fourth climacteric," its predecessors being the Polish Campaign,
the Fall of France and the Passage of
the American Lease-Lend Bill. Almost
a year has passed since that tremendous event, which has done more to
shatter the legend of Nazi invincibility
than any other episode of the war.
Like Napoleon, Hitler had been driven
to attack Russia in order to assure his
mastery of Europe and like the Cor-
sican he had under-rated the powers of
resistance of his opponent Twice
since then he has publicly admitted
that "We did not know how gigantic
the preparations of this opponent
against Germany had been" or "Only
today do we realize the full extent of
the preparations of our enemies." To
a German people, feeling for the first
time the strain of heavy casualties the
best Der Fuhrer can offer is the promise that "Russia will be annihilatingly
defeated by us in the coming summer."
Should that annihilation fail to materialize, as was the case last year the
German army will face the appalling
prospect of another winter on the
Eastern front, a fate from which the
stoutest Nazi might quail.
The historian of the future may
have more access to the archives of the
Kremlin and the Wilhelmstrasse than
those of our day. To him will fall the
task of interpreting the tortuous course
of Soviet foreign policy in the past
quarter century out of which emerged
the present struggle. In the meantime
some tentative generalizations based
on the available evidence must suffice.
To those impatient souls who ask in
exasperation why it is necessary to go
back 25 years to explain the invasion
of 1941, one answer is that the contradictions and uncertainties of Soviet
Russia's policy created the doubts and
suspicions of its good faith upon which
Hitler hoped to capitalize in his "Crusade against Communism."
In April, 1917, when Lenin returned
to Petrograd, soon to be named after
By F. H. SOWARD
him, he was determined to make the
Russian Revolution a world proletarian revolt against capitalism and democracy. Russian participation in the
Great War of 1914 appeared to him
childish and futile. It was the task
of the Bolshevists to lead the oppressed
masses against their capitalist rulers
and not to prolong an imperialist war
in which he was confident Western society had obligingly dug its own grave.
Hence the peace of Brest Litovsk with
Germany which sheared off the western fringe of Russia and almost all the
gains made since the time of Peter the
Great. With that peace the Soviet
leaders defied the western world. The
next step was the foundation of the
Third International or Comintern,
whose avowed aim was "to overthrow
capitalism and establish the dictatorship of the proletariat and an international soviet republic." To the surprise of the Bolshevists Capitalist society proved much  more revolution-
proof than they had expected, while to
the surprise of the West the Russian
soviet republic proved equally stubborn in rising exhausted but triumphant from the sea of troubles which beset it between 1917 and 1921.
In the 'twenties the new revolutionary state abandoned war communism
at home for a mixture of state socialism and private enterprise which restored the shattered national economy.
Abroad it regained diplomatic relations with the great powers, the United
States being a significant exception. In
1922 it signed a pact of friendship with
the new Weimar Republic, under cover
of which the German army gained
valuable "training for some of its key
personnel in Russia. The links between
the German and Red armies that were
then established became so strong that
Stalin felt it safest to "liquidate" most
of his senior generals in the purges of
1937-38. In them innocent men may
well have perished but, to judge from
the record, Quislings also disappeared.
During that same period the persistent
propaganda of the Soviet agents
among the peoples of Asia helped the
Chinese revolution in its critical stages
but later caused a breach between
Chinese nationalists and communists
which has never been entirely healed.
It also gave Japan in the East, like
Italy and Germany in the West, the
chance to pose as champion of civilization against Communism of which
she availed herself when entering the
path of aggression in 1931. Soviet
Russia with Litvinoff as her Commissar of Foreign Affairs might preach
disarmament, sign the Kellogg Pact,
and conclude treaties of non-aggression with all of her neighbours except
Japan, but the legacy of suspicion and
fear abroad was not perceptibly diminished.
When Hitler became master of Germany in 1933 the U.S.S.R., though immersed in the Five Year Plan, worked
for closer co-operation with the democratic powers in resistance to War
and Nazism. It entered the League
of   Nations,   warned   the  world   that
Page 2
The Graduate Chronicle S 0 Wi R D^, lo mjJress &
onvocahon CZJ3anc\uel
On May 14th, following Congregation Ceremonies,
the new graduates will be guests of the Alumni Association at tea in the Brock Memorial Building.
In the evening they will be guests of honour at Convocation, when they will be welcomed as fellow Alumni.
Dinner will be served in the Banquet Room of the Hotel
Vancouver at 7.15 o'clock, followed by the annual meeting of Convocation. The Convocation address, following
the meeting, will be given by Prof. F. H. Soward, who
will take as his subject "These Five Years."
Following the dinner there will be dancing in the
Main Ballroom to Dal Richards' Orchestra. All graduates
—old and new—are invited to attend this informal "get-
together." There will be a charge of 50c per person for
three hours' dancing!
THE FOURTH CLIMACTERIC OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR
"peace was indivisible" and signed
treaties of mutual alliance with France
and Czechoslovakia. For five years it
was ready to share a common resistance to aggression, knowing only too
well that it too was on Hitler's list of
victims. But the Terrified Thirties
threw up no western leader to make
the world safe by collective security.
Frcm Nanking to Barcelona and from
Addis Ababa to Prague the way of the
aggressor was paved with feeble protests, broken promises and inadequate
defenses. When the Munich conference of 1938 barred Soviet Russia
from its membership, at the behest of
Hitler, and partitioned the land of the
Czechs and Slovaks to save "peace in
our time," Soviet Russia lost faith in
the possibility of collective security
and decided to follow a lone hand pol-
itcy of hard-boiled realism. The first
warning was the fall of Litvinoff as
Commissar of Foreign Affairs. The
climax of that policy was the pact with
Hitler in August, 1939, which removed
the last obstacle to the Nazi strategy.
Hitler has said it was "only with extreme difficulty" that he brought himself to send Ribbentrop to Moscow but
the latter's successful mission was the
general staff's sine qua rum for a successful campaign in Poland.
After Poland fell the Soviet state
hastened to strengthen its borders and
regain territory lost in 1920, It also
proceeded to secure bases in the Baltic
States which had been freed from its
grasp in 1918. One state proved unexpectedly recalcitrant—Finland—and
with it the U.S.S.R. blundered into a
war from which it emerged victorious
but with greatly reduced prestige.
When France fell the U.S.S.R. annexed
completely its little neighbors except
Finland and also seized the territory
it had lost to Rumania in 1918. Relations between Germany and the U.S.
S.R. grew cooler. When the Soviet
papers openly praised the heroism of
the R.A.F. and the British people in
the Battle of Britain, Hitler changed
his policy.    In his own words (1941)
"In August and September of last year
one thing was becoming clear. A decision in the West with England, which
would have contained the whole German Luftwaffe, was no longer possible
for in my rear stood a state which was
getting ready to proceed against me at
such a moment." From that moment,
barring a complete Soviet surrender
to Nazi pressure, the Russian campaign was inevitable. The British Intelligence realized its likelihood, and
from London warnings were sent to
Moscow which were never completely
accepted. As late as June 13, 1941,
the official Soviet news agency was
branding rumours of war as "completely absurd" and "obviously sheer
propaganda spread by forces hostile
to Germany and Russia." But Mr.
Churchill was ready for the blow that
fell on June 22. He told the world in
his famous broadcast that day "Any
man or state who fights against Nazi-
ism will have our aid." A new era
had opened in Soviet relations with
the West.
May,  1942
Page 3 i#4'-
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Word was received in February that
COLIN MILNE, Arts '36, had died of
wounds in Grimsby Royal Naval
Hospital. He had proceeded overseas
after graduating from the No. 7
Bombing and Gunnery School of the
R.C.A.F. in Paulson, Manitoba, September 20.    He was 28.
Word was received early in March
that P.O. ARTHUR WILLIAM
GOULDING, Arts '40, was killed in
action. Bill had been in service overseas for nearly a year. He was killed
on his twnety-sixth birthday.
One of Varsity's well-known graduates, LAC J. LIONEL CLARKE, was
a student at No. 3 S.F.T.S., Calgary,
and was killed while on a navigation
flight. He would have graduated in
March and received his wings. A popular student, he was regarded as one of
the most promising of his class.
P.O. ARTHUR COULTER, Arts
'37, was killed late in December
in a crash of a Harvard training
plane near St. Jerome, near Montreal.
The plane was carrying out a routine
training flight in which he was instructing in instrument flying. Art
joined the R.C.A.F. in October, 1940,
and trained in eastern Canada. I le
won his wings in August, 1941, and
shortly after received his commission.
£tO£d
t
—1>
P.O. MAX STEWART
The casualty list of April 15th
reported that P.O. RICHARD P.
LOCKE, Ag. '34, was "missing after
air operations." He was a "Captain
of a Wellington" in a Canadian bomber squadron overseas. He had enlisted
at Vernon in  1940.
P.O. MAXWELL STEWART, Arts
'34, former rugby and track star
at Varsity, was recently reported "missing, probably drowned at sea," following an air operation overseas. Prior to
his enlistment in the R.C.A.F., Max
had been teaching at Chilliwack High
School for seven years.
LIEl'T. JIM DITMARS
LIEUTENANT ERIC S. "JIM"
DITMARS, Arts '37, was reported
as "missing on active service" early
in January. Since that time no further
news has been received regarding Jim.
He was serving in a corvette in the
Mediterranean when his loss was announced. In 1940 he was chosen to
train in a naval college at Hove, England. He later went to Plymouth, was
commissioned and saw service in a corvette in the North Sea. A year ago
his vessel was sent to the Mediterranean and based at Alexandria.
J^any X. Bo[Lxk
Although the First Dean of Women has retired from
office, the name Mary L. Bollert will continue to be well
known at the University of British Columbia. Through
the tribute paid her this past year by Alumnae and Undergraduate Women, a portrait of Miss Bollert now hangs
in the North Entrance Hall of the Brock Memorial Building, and the Mary L. Bollert Loan Fund for women students has been founded. These were made possible through
a subscription of $864.64 raised in the campaign. Of this
amount $500.00 has been invested in Victory Bonds.
The Mary L. Bollert Loan Fund will be administered
through the Dean of Women's Office and thus wlil carry
on the work Miss Bollert did for so many years in making
privately small loans to women students who need to meet
some personal emergency. So that the loan may be a
permanent one, the loans will be dispensed by the Bursar
and are to be repaid to him. Furthermore, the Mary L.
Bollert Fund will remain an open account, which may be
added to at any time.
May,  1942
Page  5 Those
It's funny, and a bit tragic, how quickly
you disassociate yourself from university
life in the first few years after graduation.
Although I have been out a comparatively
short time, and you can hardly see the ivy
twining through my beard, it seems a long,
long time ago that I was getting excited
about football games, the Spring play, the
Friday edition of the Ubyssey and fraternity rushing. I sometimes pause to wonder
what made me that way.
Now my fraternity pin lies in the top
dresser-drawer along with the collar-buttons
and golf tees, to be rescued and worn—a
bit more prominently, as if to make amends
—at the annual banquet, and 1 have long
since forgotten what happened to the gold
pen and scroll they gave us when we left
the "Pub."
It's the same way when they ask you
to write a few notes for The Chronicle.
Names that seemed important in 1933 were
forgotten in 1937 and sadly remote in 1941.
To write about any definite era in undergraduate life is to peg your material, make
it outmoded and—chances are—boring. The
date-mark is on the can, chums. Accept
no substitutes.
1 have never gone back to the campus
for a Homecoming. There's something about
the whole show that fills me with an unspeakable sense of despond.
1 guess it's all part of the old ego. You
walk along old, familiar byways where
everyone called you by your first name and
find that nobody knows you. You see
strange faces—younger, smarter faces coming along to shunt you aside with a laugh
and a wisecrack.
You try to sing the old songs and find
that the words have mysteriously slipped
away. You meet that girl you thought was
pretty nice in your freshman year and listen
while she extolls the bright sayings of her
four darling children. It's a ghastly business.
Of a sudden, you stop short with the realization that you are an "old grad"—a has-
been, tolerated with a certain sympathy because you too once walked by the amber
lights of the Library on an April evening,
and pay for your memories with an annual
subscription to the Alumni Association.
Dollar a year, lads, and cheap at twice the
price.
These are the campus blues, brother.
They're terrific.
The annual party at Christmas time is a
little bit easier to take. It's nice to see all
the old gang again, dressed up in their white
tie and tails and telling modest lies to each
other about how much money they're making.
There's something about the season which
fills you with a brotherly spirit and first
thing you know you're behind the curtains
pouring a short one for the guy you never
did like, the one who used to pass you on
the way to the Science building without
speaking. And say—wasn't he the bloke
that robbed you of that Big Block?
It's fun to look around at the dancers
and see how they're maturing. You see
half a dozen couples who used to sip tea
together in the cafeteria every afternoon.
That shaky Musical Society soprano married to a tough tackle who wouldn't know
an obligatto if he met it in a bowl of soup.
The star of the Players' Club who was bent
on Broadway but settled for an insurance
salesman after a couple of walk-ons with
the Alley Players.
You see the handsome and personable
young fellow who was voted most likely to
succeed in your class. He's selling razor
blades door-to-door now. And the insignificant little twerp who was the most unpopular character on the campus. He's a
bit patronizing, now; made a fortune in
securities, they say, bought a yacht and half
a dozen race horses and is currently working on his second million.
By STU KEATE, Arts '35
Sports Editor, Vancouver Daily Province
And the professors. They're different
now. In your freshman year you regarded
them with reverential awe. By the time
you were a senior you found that some of
them could be good friends. Now you slap
'em on the back and cut in on 'em when
they try to sneak a dance with your girl.
The dear old professors. Freddy Wood,
still one of the most entertaining conversationalists on the campus. Doc Sedgewick,
still treading like an Indian fire-walker and
still playing Hamlet, with the accent on the
first syllable. Dean Buchanan, still quipping and dancing every dance.
The Sciencemen. Still running around
with hair in their ears, being lusty and vocal and he-mannish, boasting about their
drinking capacities and chanting: "We can
. . . We can . . . demolish 40 beers."
The Artsmen. Still Artsmen. Bored to
death with it all.
The Aggies.   Still Aggies.
Those campus blues.    They're terrific.
Toronto Grads Meet
University of B. C. graduates in
Toronto are meeting frequently again
this winter. Twenty-five of them gathered at a dinner early in December and
made plans for the winter's activities.
Dr. Clare Horwood was again elected
president of the branch. Other members of the executive are Mrs. D. R.
Michener, Stella Davidson, Ursula
Dale, Jean McLean, Elspeth Lehman,
Roberta Wilson, DeLancy Rogers, Win
Irish, Maurice Welsh, Tom Stephen
and Bill Lindsay.
Old members warmly welcomed the
newcomers present and all decided to
attend the joint dance to be held early
in February by the western universities.
Those present at the dinner besides
the newly elected executive were:
Gladys Downes Mrs. Horwood, D. R.
Michener, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Cameron,
Fred Davis, John Bateman, Vic Freeman, Howard Little, John Aldous, Norman Beattie, Bob Alanson and John
Schofield.
Page 6
The Graduate Chronicle Economic Democracy and the Peace
When at war prepare for peace.
What kind of peace? Is it to be a
military truce or a resumption of economic warfare? Is it to be peace and
security on the foreign front only and
not on the home front as well? And
what do we mean by peace and security? Peace for whom? Security for
whom?
The war has forced upon us a restatement of democratic ideology. I
am not quite sure that we fully understand its implicit imperatives. Both
Churchill and Roosevelt have signed
an Atlantic Charter and it is very reminiscent of Wilson's Fourteen Points.
.The Treaty of Versailles failed to give
more than a truce on the foreign front.
The main reason for this was that self-
determination or political independence was not reconciled with economic
interdependence. Each state used its
new rights to make itself as economically self-sufficient as possible. Economic nationalism really meant intense
economic warfare as a prelude to the
real thing. A peace which grants political independence, as it should, must
also safeguard against economic anarchy; this probably means a limited
sovereignty, perhaps under a reconstructed League, in imposing economic
discriminations and restraints. Perhaps, in the long run, the home front
is more important than the international arrangements. For example,
Roosevelt has gone further in his statement of principles and has proclaimed
as a basic democratic aim the four
freedoms — freedom of thought and
expression, freedom of religious worship, freedom from fear and freedom
from want. There is nothing new
about the first two freedoms — any
student of history knows that, for
western civilization and for the English-speaking peoples, in particular,
freedom of thought and religious toleration have been battle slogans for
well nigh four hundred years. But
there is something new in the other
two freedoms — freedom from fear,
freedom from want. They expand the
bill of rights into a social philosophy
for the common man.    Freedom from
By
PROFESSOR G. F. DRUMMOND
Department of Economics, The
University of British Columbia
fear is not simply freedom from the
fear of war or a recurrence of wars
among nations; it is the fear of the
common man in an economic society
which has failed adequately to protect him against economic and social
hazards—the fear of unemployment,
fear of accident, fear of sickness and
its economic costs and consequences,
fear of widowhood, fear of dependency, fear of impecunious old age. In
short, society must make provision for
human costs of modern industry; if
they cannot be written directly into
business costs then they must be
charged against the national income.
Freedom from want cannot be interpreted as meaning public or private
charity—relief rolls or work camps.
It means the right to a job, a steady
job. This goes beyond the social legislation — unemployment insurance,
health insurance, old age pensions and
so on—which has marked the adaptation of democratic capitalism to the
social hazards and by-products of
modern industry. Social legislation,
no matter how important and necessary, has failed to solve the ills of
modern economic organization. In the
post war period in western Europe and
even in North America the economic
system has failed to give full employment. Large numbers of workers, in
all working age groups, have been left
stranded without hope and without the
expectation of a normally fruitful life.
Unemployment and underemployment
have in varying degrees marked the
inter-bellum period between 1921 and
1939. The economist distinguishes between frictional and cyclical unemployment and though he explains quite
readily  the forces  of  maladjustment
responsible  for   frictional   unemployment he is at a loss to give an adequate causation of the wide cyclical
forces or of the chronic unemployment
which is a feature of modern times.
The economist presents two solutions
for unemployment under the present
price system—lower wages or increased
productivity.    Reducing the standard
of living for large numbers of workers
does not seem a happy solution.   The
only   real   alternative   is   to   increase
total productivity, yet the fact remains
that in peace time our economic system is only a part-time economic system; it fails for one reason or another
to make full use of all the factors of
production.    The paradox of war industry brings  this out  very  clearly.
When we are producing war goods—
goods that cannot possibly be termed
durable goods or producers' goods —
we develop scarcities of capital, of resources,  and of labour.     Briefly, we
can, in the short run, give full employment to all factors of production
and increase our national income almost  50 per cent  in  little over two
years.   One cannot blame the ordinary
layman who is not versed in marginal
economics   from   asking   the   simple
question—If we can do this for war,
why cannot we do it for peace?    If we
can increase the national  income by
producing war goods why cannot we
increase   it   by   producing  more   and
more consumers' goods and producers'
goods?   Why?   Ask the economist.    If
you have any doubts about his answer
read Barbara Wooton's book Lament
for Economics.    She blames it on  a
price system which does not work in a
normative  way,   i.e.,  which  does   not
make the  proper  distribution of the
factors of production.   The economist,
she avers, has refined a system of abstract thinking (like the Scholastics of
the Middle Ages) into an intellectual
tool that has little or no practical utility.    Marginalism  describes  an economic system that exists only in textbooks and not in reality.   Consequently the classical, or neo-classical economist is not much help to us in an
economic crisis. And the present economic system  has been  in  a state of
crisis since the last war.   To introduce
reality into economic thinking we must
(Continued on Page 12)
May, 1942
Page 7 '♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<
GRADS
DUNCAN K. TODD, Arts '28, has recently
been made a Lieutenant-Colonel. Colonel
Todd, a professional soldier since he graduated and joined the militia, is in England
with the Canadian army. He became a
captain of field artillery in December, 1939,
a major in 1940, and a brigade major in
the same year.
RALPH H.JORGENSEN, Comm. '33, serving with the R.C.A. in England, has recently been promoted to the rank of
major.
TARRY F. LETSON, Sc. '19, former military attache at Washington, was recently
appointed Adjutant General. The appointment carries with it the promotion to the
rank of major-general.
SGT. PILOT HUGH ROSS WILSON, previously reported missing and believed
killed in action, has been located in a
neutral country, where he has been interned. Wilson had taken part in many
bombing expeditions over Germany before
he was reported missing.
MRS.    GEORGE    DODDS    (ELEANOR
MADELEY), Arts '29, is believed to have
been left in Hongkong after it was captured by the Japanese.
JAMES BEVERIDGE, Arts '37, is on the
staff of the National Film Board in
Ottawa.
SUB-LIEUT. NORMAN HACKING, Arts
'34, is training in Halifax, and LIEUT.
KEN GRANT, Arts '37, of the Canadian
Navy, is on active service in Halifax.
Both are former editors of the Ubyssey.
TOM MANSFIELD, Arts '35, former basketball star at Varsity, is now associated
with American Can in San Francisco.
Tom, as a bacteriologist and food technologist, has been engaged in some research work on the processing of canned
foods along with CHARLES T. TOWN-
SEND, Sc. '25, who is employed by the
State of California as food bacteriologist.
JOHN T. TERRY, formerly with the Canadian Marconi Company in Montreal, is
now a major with the Administrative Detail of the First Canadian Corps Signals,
overseas.
Dispatches from overseas report that
P.O. FRED SMITH, Arts '39, has
been seeing a great deal of action lately.
Fred piloted one of the bombers that
blasted St. Nazaire to create a diversion while naval units crept into the
U-boat base latein March. He also
took part in the spectacular raid on
the German radio-finder station at
Bruneval, dropping parachute troops to
smash the installations and kill German defenders.
Fred was a star performer both in Canadian and English rugby while at
U.B.C.
PROFESSOR J. A. McLEAN, who was head
of the Department of Animal Husbandry
at U.B.C. until he resigned in 1920 to
become head of the Educational Division
of Quaker Oats Company at Chicago, has
recently been confined to his bed seriously
ill in Hollywood, California.
REV. DAVID W. BLACKALLER, Arts
'34, is now priest in charge of St. James
Church, Kangra Valley, Punjab, India.
He has been associated with this missionary work of the Canadian Anglican
Church since 1938. In 1939 he married
MARJORIE M. KAY, Arts '36.
Page 8
CPL. B. CORNISH, Arts '36, a member of
the R.C.A.M.C, was recently discharged
from hospital overseas, where he had his
eye removed after being injured by a
bomb. John will be remembered as a former editor of the Ubyssey.
MARGARET M. PALMER, who has been
in Europe since she graduated in 1935, is
back in Canada working in the National
Film Board. Margaret escaped from
Florence, Italy, where she made her home,
just as Italy came into the war.
MARGARET ECKER, Arts '36, was appointed Women's editor of the British
United Press after her marriage to Robert
A. D. Francis in Vancouver, December 3.
JOHN E. GLEN, Arts '41, is studying at
the Seattle Repertory Playhouse, where
he has taken part in several outstanding
productions, including "The Man Who
Came to Dinner."
PILOT OFFICER BILL BIRMINGHAM,
Arts '33, is now an instructor in the
R.C.A.F. in Quebec City.
Former athletes who have recently received
their commission include PILOT OFFICER GEORGE PRINGLE, Arts '34, now
in Halifax awaiting embarkation and
SECOND LIEUTENANT DOUG PED-
LOW, Arts '42, now taking advanced
training with the Seaforths at Calgary.
FRANK WAITES, Arts '32; MAURICE
FARRANT, Arts '33, and MURDOCH
RUTHERFORD, Arts '31, have the distinguished honor of being the only B. C.
graduates to enter the actuarial profession. Murdoch is with the Canada General Insurance Co. Maurice is with the
Confederation Life and Frank has joined
the  Occidental   Life of California.
Women graduates doing war work abroad
include MARGARET MUIRHEAD, Arts
'31, supervisor of women's welfare in a
large factory in England and GWEN
STEVENSON, R.N., who recently left
for South Africa.
PAUL J, SYKES, Arts '39, has commenced
training as an aviation cadet for the
United States Army Air Corps at Santa
Anna, California.
The Graduate Chronicle sax an
FLYING OFFICER WILLIAM C. GIBSON, Arts '31, has recently been posted
to the medical research branch of the
R.C.A.F. in Regina.
Recent graduates in the R.C.A.F. include
SERGEANT PILOT W. T. HUTCHINSON, Arts '41, and PILOT OFFICER
PENN McLEOD, Arts '42.
IN HONGKONG. —DR. WILLIAM H.
TAYLOR, Arts '28, is believed to be
among civilians in Hongkong. He was an
economist in the U. S. treasury department and was reported in Hongkong on
Christmas day. He left for China last
summer as a member of the China Stabilization Board. His work was centred
around Hongkong, Shanghai and Chunking.
IN MALAYA. — Word has been received
that HAROLD POOLE, Ag. 40, is safe
in Malaya. He left for Singapore a year
ago to take a position as adviser on a
rubber plantation in Johore.
PRISONER OF WAR.—One of the relatively few Canadian officers in the Royal
Navy, SURGEON LIEUT.-COMMAN-
DER DONALD GUNN has been reported
a prisoner of war at Hongkong. He took
his pre-med course at B.C. and was commissioned in the navy shortly after his
graduation from McGill.
"TINY" RADER, Sc. '35, has recently been
transferred to the Toronto offices of Canadian General Electric.
FRED DEITRICH, Arts '38, has recently
taken a position with the Department of
Munitions and Supply at Ottawa.
CHARLES BRAZIER, Arts '30, has recently been appointed as counsel for the War
Time Prices and Trade Board for B. C.
DONALD M. MORRISON, Sc. '21, formerly with Shell Oil at Martinez, Caf, is
now working on the production of synthetic rubber in Montreal.
NORMAN DEPOE recently stood at the
top of his class in the exams at the Officers' Training Centre near Brockville,
Ont., and was in command of the unit at
the graduation exercises.
Star of Varsity's "Wonder Team" of
English rugby, SUB-LIEUT. JOHNNY
BIRD, Comm. '38, took part in the
naval engagement which ensued when
a German detachment attacked a convoy of British and American ships en
route to Murmansk. Johnny was serving in anti-aircraft aboard H.M.S.
Trinidad. He joined the navy here in
October, 1940.
H. R. L. DAVIS, who is now serving overseas, has recently been promoted to the
rank of major in the R.C.A.M.C.
FRANK C. THORNLOE has recently been
promoted to Flying Officer in the R.C.A.F.
He is now stationed at Trenton, Ont.
PILOT OFFICER NELSON ALLEN, Arts
31, is now an instructor in the R.C.A.F.
in Regina.
BERT BAILEY, Arts '27, is a teaching
fellow at the College of Education, University of Washington, and is now completing his Ph.D. in Education.
JOHN S. MAGUIRE, Comm. .'37, has recently been appointed Rental Administrator for B. C. under the Wartime Prices
and Trade Board. Shortly before this
appointment Jack had been admitted to
the bar in Vancouver.
BIRTHS
To MR. AND MRS. R. S. McDONALD,
Arts '34, (nee MARY ALICE EAKINS,
Arts '35) in New Westminster on April 1,
a son.
'To LANCE CPL. J. W. M. McDONALD
and MRS. J. W. M. McDONALD (nee
MARJORIE L. BIGGS, Arts '37), in
Vancouver, March 22, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. ROGER HAGER (nee
HELEN CROSBY, Arts '38), in Vancouver, in February, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. R. A. PHILLIPS (nee
BARBARA AVIS, Arts '40), at Peterborough, Ont., March 27, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. JOHN M. MORTIMER, Sc. '35 (nee BARBARA HUTTON,
Arts '38), of La Orbya, Peru, in Vancouver, January 9, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. G. ELLWYN (nee
MOLLY WINCKLER, Arts'35), in Vancouver, March II, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. KENNETH CAPLE,
Sc. '26 (nee E. BEATRICE CLEGG, Arts
'28), in Vancouver, March 25, a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. C. R. ASHER, Arts '28,
in Vancouver, December 27, a girl, Julie
Ann.
To MR. AND MRS. GEORGE WHEAT-
ON, in Victoria, December 28, a son.
To LIEUT.-COMDR., R.C.N.V.R., AND
MRS. C. R. F. PIERS, in Vancouver,
January 27, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. NORMAN H. INGLE-
DEW, Ag. '31, in Vancouver, March 8,
a son.
To MR. AND MRS. GORDON WYNESS
(nee ALISON REID, Sc. '34), in Montreal, March 3, a daughter.
To DR. AND MRS. R. E. McKECHNIE
(nee MYRTLE E. HARVEY, Sc. '28), in
Vancouver, December 30, a son.
May, 1942
Page 9 BIRTHS—Continued
To LIEUT. AND MRS. ALLAN W. MERCER, Arts '36, in Vancouver, December
30, a daughter, Jean Elizabeth.
To MR. AND MRS. A. T. CAMPBELL,
Arts '31, (nee FRANCES MARJORIE
GREENWOOD, Arts '31), in Vancouver,
March 2, a girl, Lynda Frances.
To MR. AND MRS. JOHN T. MAYERS,
in Vancouver, February 27, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. JACK HARVEY (nee
HOPE PALMER, Arts 34), in Regina,
March 25, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. ANDREW W. M.
ELLIOTT, in Vancouver, April 12, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. ORNULF AUNE
(nee LUELLA STANGLAND), Arts '29,
in Vancouver, April 21, a son.
To DR. AND MRS. FRANK TURN-
BULL, Arts '23 (nee JEAN THOMSON,
Arts '25), in Vancouver, April  10, a son.
MARRIAGES
MARION IRENE KERSEY, Comm. '38,
to VICTOR JOHN COLLIER, April 25,
in Vancouver.
HELEN FERGUSON, Arts '33, to RODNEY POISSON, Arts '35, in April, in
Nelson.
HELEN MARY HANN, Arts '40, to LT.
JAMES CLARK HARMER, Comm. '41,
April 21, in Tornoto.
MARGARET (MARNIE) MILLAR, Sc.
'41, to CAPTAIN MALCOLM ALLAN,
April 24, in Vancouver.
DOROTHY CLAIRE HUTTON, Arts '40,
to W. H. KEMP EDMONDS, Arts '38,
in Vancouver, February 28.
JEAN ELIZABETH McRAE, Arts '39, to
ARNOLD VICTOR BURNS, in Vancouver, in early May.
ENA C. CLARKE to RONALD R. M.
STEWART, in Vancouver, in March.
AUDREY FRANCES HORWOOD, Arts
'39, to HAROLD A. ROBINSON, in Vancouver, in February.
DAPHNE MARGARET COVERNTON,
Arts '33, to RUSSELL S. McLEAN, in
Vancouver, in December.
ELSIE LEIGHTON SAGER to LESLIE
GEORGE WILSON, Arts '40, February
12, in Burnaby.
PHYLLIS JEAN MACEWEN, Arts '40, to
P.O. JOHN M. SHAW, Comm. '37, January 8, in New Westminster.
CATHERINE VAN LIEW MATTOON to
DR. FRANK LIONEL MARTIN (formerly Morris Bloom) M.A. '38, August
28, in Chicago.
GRACE ELEANOR SMITH to WILLIAM
E. WATSON, January 2, in Vancouver.
MONA WESTBY, Arts '40, to FREDERICK G. PEARCE, Sc. '40, March 14,
in Vancouver.
HELEN VICTORIA WOOD to SUB-
LIEUT. HUGH WARWICK GORDON,
R.C.N.V.R., March 6, in Halifax, N.S.
MOIRA MAITLAND WHITE, Arts '40, to
ERNEST E. ALEXANDER, Arts '40,
January 24, in Vancouver.
MADELAINE LUCILLE WHITTEN to
P.O. ALAN HARRIS in February in Vancouver.
MARY SHAUGHNESSY to DONALD G.
PYLE, Arts '40, February 12, in Berkeley,
California.
DOREEN MARTIN, Arts '40, to ENSIGN
ROBERT J. NORTON, in January, in
Norfolk, Virginia.
SHEILA MARTIN DOHERTY to WILFRED WATSON, December 29, in Vancouver.
WINIFRED CHRISTINE FIELD, Arts'39,
to THOMAS D. TRAPP ,Arts '39, March
27, in Vancouver.
VERA LOCK, Arts '35, to LIEUT. LLOYD
DOUGLAS MacKENZIE, March 14, in
Vancouver.
DOROTHY JEAN GILCHRIST to LIEUT.
GEORGE CAMPBELL KELLETT, Arts
'32, February 10, in Montreal.
DOROTHY IMOGBNE WHITLEY to
WILLIAM BRAIDWOOD, Sc. '41, in
February, in Vancouver.
DONNA LA VERNE McGAVIN to
JAMES NORTON WILSON, M.A. '36, in
February, in Vancouver.
GRACE ROWLEY to ROBERT M.
THOMSON, Arts '36, in Toronto, May 8.
ESTHER MABEL WHITEFORD, Arts '41,
to P.O. DONALD E. McLEOD, Arts '40,
December 5, in St. George, N.B. The
groom is an astro-navigation instructor at
Penfield Ridge, N.B.
RUTH MIMMS, Arts '37, to DAVID
FLADGATE, in Vancouver, in March.
GLADYS HELEN FROST, Arts '33, to
HARTLEY HERBERT CAREY, March
6, in Vancouver.
CATHERINE UPHAM HALL, Arts '40, to
WILLIAM ABBOT MEDLAND, February 1, in Vancouver.
AUDREY MAY REIFEL, Arts '40, to
DOUGLAS CROSBY GOURLAY, February 14, in Vancouver.
DOROTHY AILEEN NEWCOMB, Arts
'37, to JOHN ANTHONY McINTYRE,
Comm. '36, in Vancouver, early in  May.
EMMA PARKS to JAMES W. McCAM-
MON, Sc. '38, in Vancouver, in December.
ELIZABETH QUICK, Arts '42, to CECIL
S. COSULUITCH, Comm. '40, in Vancouver, in March.
JOAN CREWE to LELAND STRAIGHT,
Arts '40, in Vancouver, in March.
MARY IRENE FAIRBURN to EDGAR
CHARLES BARTON, Arts '40, February
7, in Vancouver.
ISABELLA ELEANOR ARTHUR, Arts
'33, to KENNETH BECKETT, Arts '32,
in Toronto, April 22.
PATRICIA WYNESS, Arts '33, to NORMAN ANKER TOFT, of Copenhagen, in
Vancouver, in March.
EVELYN ERIE WOODHEAD, Arts '37, to
JOHN E. ROBERTSON, in Vancouver.
April 4.
MONA DENMAN HUNTER, Arts '40, to
SUB-LIEUT. WILLIAM A. CALDER,
Arts '40, in Vancouver, April  II.
MARY ELIZABETH SANDALL, Arts '40,
to ALLAN C. STEWART, Sc. '40, in
Wells.
(Oditorial
Qlole
Another Chronicle is off the press. Fifty-four hundred
copies are being distributed all over the globe to graduates
wherever they may be. Our only hope is that our readers
are enjoying the publication. Some have shown their
appreciation by sending in breezy news items. Many have
not.   Again we ask for your support in this regard.
At this time we would like to thank the Alma Mater
Society and particularly the Totem staff for the assistance
they have given us to date. The cover pictures used on
all our issues have been hand-me-downs from the Totem
and have been very welcome indeed.
We thank them again for this courtesy and hope that
we will be as fortunate in issues to come.
Page 10
The Graduate Chronicle SOCIAL SERVICE
Class of' 28
The Social Service Alumni Club
considers that it has been somewhat
bashful, if not almost secretive about
its existence and achievements. It has
kept its doings from the graduate body
at large and it has even contrived, with
a membership pretty well scattered all
over the world, to lose track of many
individuals whose only offense has
been to get married or move out of
town.
The Club thought steps should be
taken to remedy this and casually instructed their Historian to get out a
news-letter, telling everybody where
everybody else was and what was going on in social service circles. But
what started as an innocent, if inquisitive little foible now shows signs of
growing into a project of immense
scope.
Besides decreeing that a news-letter
be circulated, the Club desired that
some personal news be assembled for
the Chronicle. This will be forthcoming — next issue, we hope — when the
returns from the outlying constituencies come in. Vancouver Social Service Alumni members seem to be able
to keep up with each other, in spite
of the dizzy speed at which many of
them are moving these stirring times.
What the Executive and Historian
want most is to learn the whereabouts
and present situation of the out-of-
town members. So if you live out of
Vancouver, either in B. C, some other
province, or abroad and your eye
lights on this—send us a line. Don't
take it for granted that we know where
you are. Probably we don't, or we did
know, but have stupidly lost the address. We want to have a complete
census of our membership covering our
eight years of existence.
On the more serious side, we are
currently working on the problem of
Recruiting for Social Service —• the
shortage of trained personnel being
one of the most pressing considerations
facing nearly every profession. In the
case of Social Service, it is acute al
ready and will become more so. Government departments dealing with social and rehabilitative aspects of National service are undergoing expansion due to recent legislative developments. Positions have been created
which social workers are by training
fitted to occupy and executives of
other agencies, both public and private, have been called upon to release
staff members, leaving many gaps. At
the same time, possible recruits, in the
shape of high school and university
students are finding well paid jobs
available in war industries. Thus when
the need is greatest, with old fields expanding and new ones opening up, the
supply of new workers threatens to
contract.
There is no doubt that the area of
social service will greatly increase after
the war, while war industries and other
over-stimulated fields will dwindle.
Many University graduates may not
know of the opportunities that lie in
this type of service, and the facilities
the University has to offer them. The
Club and the University expects soon
to have some literature dealing exclusively with these matters.
This year, the President of the Club
is Miss Margaret Johnson, Supervisor
of T.B. Social Service; Vice-President,
Jack Balcombe, Supervisor V.D. Social
Service; Secretary-Treasurer, Wilfrid
Calnan, Men's Service Bureau; Programme Convener, Miss M Moscrop;
Social Convener, Miss Jacobson; University Relationship, Miss M. Riddell;
Refresher Courses and Institutes, Mrs.
Titterington; Diplomas, Miss I. Harvey; Historian, Mrs. Mary Nicholson.
The membership totals 184. Of
these, 137 are graduates of U.B.C.
either with a Diploma in Social Service from our own University or a degree or diploma from schools of Social
Service in Toronto, Montreal or the
U.S.A. The remaining 47 are holders
of U.B.C. Social Service Diplomas
whose preparation was secured elsewhere.
The least one can say is that the
members cof the class of '28 have chosen varied lines of endeavor as their
life work. The executive of the class
has recently drawn up a report on the
members' activities, which provides a
great deal of very interesting information.
Sixty-two of the ladies in the class
are married and thus are busy making
a home. Forty-seven both men and
women are now school teachers, while
five have taken librarian's positions.
Ten are college professors; seven in
U.S. colleges, and three in Canadian
colleges. Three are ministers of the
gospel. Four are professional musicians.
Four have entered the medical profession, three of them now having entered the active services in this capacity. Only one in the class has chosen
nursing. Nine are busy practicing law.
Two are Trade Commissioners, while
fifteen are secretaries in various lines
of endeavour. Thirty-one are engineers and scientists, while two are agriculturists.
Four are salesmen of different capacities, while nineteen have taken executive positions. Two are accountants,
one a banker, and one a statistician.
Four are deceased.
Seventeen of the class have entered
the armed forces. Since we have not
sufficient space to list the names of
those active in civilian life, we list below those on active service, as a particular tribute to the class of '28.
Ernest Boulton Bull, C.A.S.F., England. Lawrence Elmer Bryson, C.A.S.,
R.C.A.P.C. No. K91008, c/o Base P.
0., Canada. Allan Jones, Squadron
Leader, R.C.A.F. Alan Crawford, R.
C.A.F. Phil Elliott, Sub. Lt., R.C.N.
V.R. Charles G D. Gould, R.A.C.M.
C. John A. C. Harkness, 111th Co.
Vet. Guard, K500117. Harley Hatfield, R.C.A.F. Dr. Alex Marshall,
R.C.N.V.R. (Medical), England. Bill
Masterson, C.A.S.F., 1st Lt. Dr. Jack
MacMillan, R.A.C.M.C,  England.
May, 1942
Page 11 Un-(i.i! mi m: tiiiiimm:
A Quarterly Journal owned by and devoted to the interests of
The Alumni Association of the University of British Columbia
Editor: RON ANDREWS
MAY, 1942
inly Beanmont
lew Secretary
Arthur Resigns
Our Secretary, Isabel Arthur, has
tendered her resignation in order to
depart for Eastern points to enter into
bonds of matrimony. The aching void
left by Isabel will be filled capably,
we are sure, by Margaret Beaumont,
Arts '36. Margaret is well known for
her interest in University activities
ever since her first year as a Freshette;
she participated in extra curricular
work and won her big block, and in
her last year was president of the Women's Undergraduate Society. Four
years ago Margaret served a term as
Vice-President of the Alumni Association. She is presently engaged in a
stenographic capacity in the head office of the B. C. Telephone Company.
All communications with the Secretary
may be addressed to her there — i.e.,
B. C. Telephone Company, 768 Seymour Street; her business number is
MArine 9171.
CLASS OF '28
(Continued from Page 11)
Francis C. Pilkington, C.A.S.F., Capt.
attached to Staff Headquarters, Ottawa. Duncan C. Todd, CA S.F., Lt.-
Colonel. Richard E. M. Yerburgh,
Chaplain Ltd., 11 Can. M.G. Corp.
Jack Duncan, Mgn. Signal Corp. Hector Neil McQuarrie, R.E.C.A.S.F.
James Sinclair, R.C.A.F.
ECONOMIC DEMOCRACY AND
THE PEACE
(Continued from Page 7)
use statistical tools, measure the forces
at work, see what is actually going on
and decide what must be done about
it. Any sentence, even mathematics,
which gets out of touch with practical
affairs, is apt to become mystical and
abstract—a form of intellectual dilettantism. Read Hogben's Mathematics
for the Million if you want a healthy
corrective to abstract thinking. There
is nothing like keeping your feet on
the ground —■ or your science in the
practical affairs and problems of life.
If, therefore, we want to make
Roosevelt's democratic ideology a reality it means making our economic system a full-time in place of a part-time
system. Can it be done? We shall
have to be bold in our economic expedients and experiments. Essentially
it implies conscious economic planning
—long-range estimates of how best to
use labour and equipment for desirable
social and economic ends. It means
that the price-system and the taxation
system will both have to be subservient to economic aims. In short, it
means a revolution in thought as well
as in method. The problem is whether
democratic capitalism can or will
adapt itself to this form of ordered
economic progress. There may be a
disposition to bring collapse and deflation on our war economy by a too
ardent desire to get back to "business
as usual" (and at its worst) immediately hostilities cease. But if economic planning will be necessary at all
it will be then—for unless we have
made provision for the gradual demobilization of the fighting forces and
the war workers over a period of from
five to ten years then we shall have
depression indeed—the return to unemployment, and a fateful inability to
do all the things for the common man
or to implement his rights in the way
Roosevelt envisages. That way lies
disaster. No less will disaster, either
by decay or decline, follow a return
to a system of economic organization
which leaves a large portion of our
labour, our resources and our capital
unemployed or under-employed.
The democratic ideology is to maintain the cultural freedom of the individual, his right to social security and
his expectation of a normally happy
and fruitful life. In international affairs it is to give to each nation its
right to a political independence which
allows its own cultural development
without using that independence as an
excuse for economic warfare. Limited
sovereignty of the state among states
and limited sovereignty of economic
interests in the state might well express the ideology of democratic capitalism.
Mice of Meeting
Take notice that a General Meeting
of the members of the Alumni Association of the University of British
Columbia will be held on Tuesday,
the 9th day of June, A.D. 1942, at the
hour of 5:15 o'clock in the afternoon,
at the Board Room in the Royal
Trust Building, 626 West Pender
Street, Vancouver, B. C, for the purpose of considering, and if thought, advisable, of adopting the following as
amendments to the Constitution of
the Association:
A. That Clauses 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 14
of the Constitution of the Association be
deleted and the following substituted there-
tor :—
CLAUSE 6.    EXECUTIVE
The Executive shall consist of—
(a) Elected Members, that is to say:—
Honourary President, who shall be President of the University of British Columbia;
President; Immediate Past President; First
Vice-President, who shall be a man; Second
Vice-President, who shall be a woman;
Third   Vice-President;   Secretary;   Records
Secretary; Treasurer; Editor of Publications; and two members at large; all of
whom shall be elected at the Annual Meeting of the Association in the manner hereinafter set forth.
(b) Ex officio members, that is to say:—
The President, or other officer of each organized Branch of the Association, and the
President or other officer of the then immediate past graduating class of the University of British Columbia.
Page 12
The Graduate Chronicle CLAUSE 7.   ELECTIONS
The elections of the Elective Members of
the Executive shall be held at the Annual
Meeting of the Association. At least three
weeks prior to the Annual Meeting the
nominating committee shall prepare a slate
of elective members, and shall send, or
cause to be sent, to each Branch a copy
thereof. Each Branch may then make further nominations for any office or offices;
such nominations to be submitted to the
Secretary not later than three days prior to
the Annual Meeting. Further nominations
may be made from the floor of the said
meeting. At the conclusion of the nominations at such meeting, or if there be no
such nominations, the meeting shall proceed to elect from the persons nominated
in any of the manners aforesaid a sufficient
number of persons to fill the elective offices.
CLAUSE 8.    PERIOD OF OFFICE
Members of the Executive shall hold office for one year from the date of their
election or appointment, as the case may
be, or until the next succeeding election or
appointment. Casual vacancies in the Exe-
utive may be filled by the executive or appointing body, as the case may be.
CLAUSE 9.   VOTING
(a) Only Ordinary Members and Life
Members present in person or by proxy
shall be entitled to vote at any meeting
of the Association or to hold office therein
or in any Branch thereof, and all proxies
shall be lodged with the Secretary of the
Association before the transaction of business at any meeting at which they are to
be used, provided that no member shall be
entitled to vote by proxy if the meeting
of the Association is held in the City in
which such member resides;
(b) Where no poll is demanded the vote
shall be "Yea" or "Nay" or by a standing
vote. No poll shall be granted except on
the demand of 20 per cent of the persons
present at the meeting where the poll is
demanded;
(c) In case of a tie the President shall
have the casting vote.
CLAUSE  10.    APPOINTMENTS
(a) Each organized Branch of the Association shall notify the Secretary forthwith
after its elections or voting in that behalf
of the name and address of its president
or other officer who shall be its member on
the Executive of the Association, and thereafter such person shall be entitled to all
the privileges and rights of a member of
the Executive;
(b) In each year the Graduating Class
of that year shall at the time of, or forthwith after, Convocation in that year notify
the Secretary of the name and address of
its president or other officer who shall be
its members on the Executive of the Association, and thereafter such person shall be
entitled to all the privileges and rights of a
member of the Executive.
CLAUSE 11. MEETINGS
The Executive shall meet at the call of
the President, or in his absence of the Vice-
President, or on the written request of any
two members thereof stating the purpose
for which the meeting is required. At least
two weeks' written notice of meetings of
the Executive shall be given to each member thereof stating as nearly and as fully
as may be the purposes for which the meeting is to be held. A member of the Executive who by reason of his residence at a
place, other than the place of the meeting
of the Executive, is unable to be present
at any meeting may instruct the Secretary
to cast a vote on his behalf on any question or questions arising at such meeting.
The full minutes of all executive meetings
shall be mailed forthwith to all members
of  the  Association.
CLAUSE 14. COMMITTEES
Committees may be appointed from time
to time by the Executive or by the officers
of the Association as may be required to
perform the administrative duties and purposes of the Association.
B. That there be added as subsection "c"
to Clause 12 of the Constitution the following:—
(c) Of each annual fee paid by a member who is a member of, or resides in an
area where there is an organized Branch,
an amount not to exceed 25c shall be deducted and paid into or retained by the
treasury of the Branch concerned for the
use of that Branch.
DATED at Vancouver, B. C, this first
day of  May,  A.D.   1942.
ISABEL ARTHUR,
Secretary.
The above amendments are designed
to give a greater opportunity of participating in all the functions of the
Association to the Branches and to
members resident outside of Vancouver. Heretofore there has existed a
council comprising representation from
the Branches and the Vancouver
Executive. This, however, has been
apart from the Executive and has been
found impracticable.
The amendment as regards fees is a
result of discussions held over some
period of time and its purpose is obvious.
These proposed amendments have
been the subject of discussion among
the members of the Association and
the Branches for some months and
any other comments and observations
would be welcome.
The calling of the meeting by notice
in these columns is designed to avoid
unnecessary expense.
The Treasurer's Corner...
April 20th, 1942.
The present issue of the Chronicle is, as every graduate who may read it can well observe, an attempt on the
part of your Executive, to build and expand the magazine
into a publication worthy of the best traditions of the
University from which the Alumni Association stems. The
objective of your Executive is to develop and enlarge this
publication, from issue to issue, until it attains the stature
and status of a journal of news, views and opinions which
may ultimately make some worthwhile contribution, even
though small, to the larger body of Canadian opinion
generally. This should be, as your Executive sees it, the
real purpose and meaning inherent in the continued publication of the Chronicle.
To carry through such a program requires money,
and by money I am referring only and solely to the annual
fee expected from each graduate, of $1.00. I would suggest that each of us begin to consider his or her annual
fee as, in effect, a yearly subscription to the Chronicle.
That is the way I look at it, now that I have seen and
taken part in the tremendous amount of work involved in
preparing and getting out the two recent issues of this
publication over the past several months, and the work
which I have done is small indeed, in comparison to the
effort expended by other members of your Executive. Each
of us should bear in mind that the realization of the
plan upon which your Executive is presently working with
regard to this journal, will depend for its success in no
small measure, upon the number of individual annual fees
of $1.00 received by your Treasurer (to say nothing of
life membership fees of $10.00 which are always welcome.)
My new address is 1500 The Royal Bank Building,
Vancouver, B. C.
JORDAN GUY.
May,  1942
Page  13 The Contribution of the University of British Columbia to the War Effort
1. There has been no change in the
administrative organization except the
appointment of a Committee on Military Education, which deals with general policy, and a sub-committee on
applications for exemptions and other
details.
2. The following members of the
Faculty are serving with the forces:
Army: Dr. T. G.  Henderson.
Dominion Government Advisory:
Mr. H. F. Angus.
Technical (Navy): Capt. J. F. Bell.
Research (National Council): Dr.
K. C. Mann.
Research (Industrial): Dr. A. M.
Crooker.
Technician (Instrument Maker):
Mr. W. Fraser.
Staff members in several departments have been selected to undertake
highly specialized work of a confidential nature. Investigations are being
conducted in explosives, munitions,
gases, and war minerals and metals,
also in electrical and short-wave detection devices and radio.
Certain agriculture projects in the
production of supplies which can no
longer be imported are under way.
3. There have been no changes in
admission requirements. The only new
courses instituted as a direct result of
the war are:
Chemistry 25—Chemistry of Munitions.
Physics 17(a)—Elementary Principles of Electricity and Acoustics.
Physics 17(b) — Optical Instruments.
Physics 17(c)—Mechanics of Flight
and Ballistics.
Physics 17(a), (b), (c) were offered
in 1940-41, but were not offered in
the present session.
The content of certain courses in
Metallurgy was revised to deal more
directly with the metallurgical aspects
of strategic materials necessary to the
successful prosecution of the war.
In the Department of Mechanical
and Electrical Engineering, special
emphasis has been placed on radio
work and short wave studies in order
to provide men well trained in these
subjects  for  the Active  Forces.
Page 14
By C. B. Wood, Registrar
Some changes in the courses in
Structural Design, Water Power Development, Surveying and Mapping
in the Department of Civil Engineering were made with the same purposes
in view.
4. Military Training of Students:
Since September, 1940, in accordance with the agreement between the
Inter-Universities Conference and the
Departments of National Resources
Mobilization and National Defence,
the University has required all physically fit male students to take military
training. The University of British
Columbia Contingent, C.O.T.C, has
been organized in two groups. Basic
Training is given to men in the junior
years who have had no previous military experience, and Officer Training
to seniors and those who have had
training with some other unit. Physical Training forms an integral part of
the Basic Training. In the session
1940-41 the total strength of the unit
reached 1738.
In addition to the above, the University has provided on a voluntary
basis:
(a) Courses in First Aid leading
to the St. John's Ambulance certificate, for men and women.
(b) A course for women in Home
Nursing leading to the Canadian Red
Cross Certificate.
A course in Motor Mechanics was
given to women students by the Ford
Motor Company at its plant.
In the Spring of 1941 a course,
eight weeks in length, on Fire Protection in relation to Air Raids, was given
to a group of members of the Fire and
Police Departments of Vancouver and
vicinity. This included lectures and
demonstrations on the elementary phy-
cics and chemistry of explosives, gases,
etc., lectures on elementary law and
the control of sabotage, and discussions and demonstrations of instructional methods including visual aids.
It was intended that those taking the
course should become instructors in
A.R.P. work in  local districts.
During the session 1940-41, a course
for instrument makers was given in
the Physics Work Shop under the auspices of the Dominion - Provincial
Youth Training Plan.
Since May, 1941, the University has
conducted a course for Radio Technicians in the R.C.A.F.
Since the adoption of compulsory
military training, academic credit has
not been given for either Basic or Officers' Training.
5. Extension Department:
Youth Training Programme
(a) Instruction in agricultural subjects conforms as closely as possible to
the Dominion Government's wartime
agricultural policies.
(b) Classes in nutrition, dietetics,
and physical education are intended
to help to produce a healthier population prepared to face the rigors of war
and the dangers of post-war epidemics.
(c) Training in first aid has an obvious value for those facing actual
warfare and for those engaged in home
service.
(d) The classes in citizenship help
to strengthen faith in the democratic
way of life and to increase awareness
of the issues involved in the present
war.
Visual Instruction Service
Motion picture films from the Department's library have been used
widely for war purposes—in recruiting
campaigns, in the Victory Loan Drive,
in A.R.P. work, in campaigns for the
Canadian Red Cross, and in military
stations for men of the three services.
Close co-operation has been maintained with the Canadian Legion War
Services in providing Educational and
recreational films for men on active
service. The Department receives all
new releases of the National Film
Board, and circulates its films throughout the Province.
Wartime Nutrition
The Department has co-operated
with the Vancouver Health League in
sponsoring ten courses in wartime nutrition in various parts of the Lower
Mainland.
Citizenship
In planning lecture series and in arranging individual lectures for various
organizations, a particular stress has
been placed on the problems of citi-
The Graduate Chronicle zenship in wartime. In connection with
the Department's evening classes, a
course has been offered during the last
two years dealing with the background
and issues of the war, and the problems of post war reconstruction. A
new study group course is now available entitled, "Canada and the Postwar World." In purchasing new books
and pamphlets for the Extension Library and the Department's growing
pamphlet service, emphasis has been
placed on literature dealing with the
war and reconstruction.
Cultural Activities
Feeling that the cultural life of the
community must not be sacrificed if
civilian morale is to be maintained,
the Department has continued to sponsor a variety of activities which are
less directly related to the war effort.
Assistance has been given to community drama organizations in all parts
of the Province. Many of the plays
produced during the past year have
been benefit performances, with the
proceeds being turned over to the Red
Cross or to other war service organizations. Encouragement has also been
given to music appreciation groups and
to numerous study groups dealing
with a wide variety of subjects.
6. None of the University buildings
or equipment has been commandeered
by or loaned to the Defence Department.
7. A new Armoury has been built at
a cost of approximately $50 000. This
was financed almost entirely by the C.
O.T.C, which had contributed its
training pay annually since 1928 to a
fund for this purpose.
An extension has been made to the
Science Building to accommodate the
Radio Technicians' Course being conducted for the R.C.A.F.
8. The University Library contributes through the Canadian Legion
War Services (Pacific Defence Area)
Headquarters for books and libraries
which operates through the Vancouver
Public Library.
9. The total registration for the
present session as at October 15th,
1941, was 2631 as compared with 2650
on the corresponding date last year.
There is a slight increase in First Year
Arts and Science and Second Year Applied Science and a decrease in Gradu
ates, Directed Reading and Extra-
Sessional students.
During the year September 1, 1940-
August 31, 1941, the C.O.T.C. reported that 218 members left the Unit to
go on active service. Of these, 34 enlisted in the Navy, 69 in the Army
and 115 in the Air Force.
10. During the past year the Alma
Mater Society raised the sum of $3,-
161.72 for the Overseas Fund of the
Red Cross, by means of:
(a) Waivers of caution money
(b) Admission charges to pep meets
(c) Coca-Cola Day
(d) Apple Day (with Kinsman
Club)
(e) Weekly "self-denial day".
In addition, a Red Cross Ball and
Raffle sponsored by the Sororities
and Fraternities netted approximately
$1700.00.
During the present year several new
plans have been adopted for raising
funds for the Red Cross.
The University is also participating
in the Blood Donor Campaign,
By resolution of the University
Council on Athletics and Physical Education, all Intercollegiate sport has
been discontinued. It is also agreed
that no University teams shall be entered in extra-mural league games
which would interfere with military
training.
Some effort has been made to reduce
the number and cost of social events.
When Clothes are not
Becoming to You, they
Should be Coming
to Us.
DON'T DELAY-
PHONE TO-DAY
MArine 4131
*
The Star Laundry
Kelowna Alumni
The Kelowna U.B.C. Alumni held
its annual meeting in September, and
awarded a U.B.C. scholarship to a former Kelowna High School student.
The new executive, and a social convenor were elected. A tentative programme for the year was then drafted.
Monthly meetings were held at the
home of various members. At these
gatherings the members heard and
discussed the following addresses:
"Drugs," by Miss Monica Frith.
"Modern Poetry," by Miss N. Gale.
"Art," by Mrs. J. Allin.
In February, several members, directed by Mrs. J. Logie, produced a
playlet before a large and appreciative
audience. On another occasion films,
including one on Dunkirk, were shown
at the home of Dr. Newby.
Certain members also met at informal meetings to hear programmes of
classical records, lent by the Extension
Department of the U.B.C.
The club plans a musical evening for
the final meeting in May.
• Annuities
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Consult
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Agency Representative
THE IMPERIAL LIFE
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640  WEST   HASTINGS  STREET
PAcific 3335 Vancouver, B. C.
May, 1942
Page 15 FOR BEAUTIFUL GARDENS
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Georgia Pharmacy Limited
777 WEST GEORGIA STREET
MArine 4161
PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTS
Leslie G. Henderson
Oc  P.  '06
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U.B.C.  '33
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Arts '31
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Page 16
The Graduate Chronicle SPEED THE BOMBERS
DEUTSCHLAND BOUND
You Can't FLY a Bomber .. .
but You CANHelpBUYOnel
Your chance to help smash the Nazi may not be by
flying a bomber or pressing the trigger on a Bren Gun,
but everybody has a chance to help provide the tools for
victory through the regular purchase of War Savings
Certificates to buy ships, shells, planes, tanks and guns.
You can help end the devastating career of these
"Bandits of the Crooked Cross" and end the threatening
danger to yourself and Canada. The all-out effort which
Canada must make demands self-denial on the part of
each one of us.
Invest the dollars you don't need to spend and after
victory is won they will come back to you with interest.
War Savings Certificates can be purchased through your
firm's payroll or through any bank or post office. Sign
up today as a regular War Saver!
u=j«SSp3-' V
J^iock
%^r—J
J
CANADA
POSTAGE  PAID
PORT PAYE
NO.      3 4 4 2
VANCOUVER

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