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The Graduate Chronicle 1942-12

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 I.
I!
II
U
A
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E
•°?ft~
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Alumni Association
of the Ur|
British   doiQlfto1
AUG
J4i- =
1
-
in the WAR
...tu*dt"
The curved and crystal clear windows of a
bomber . . . the fuse cap of an anti-aircraft
shell... the instrument housing of a ship's
controls ... these and many other vital components of Canada's war machines are
today being made ofplastics... For plastics—
the varied and versatile family of synthetic
materials which have been developed
by science out of coal, air, water, salt
and limestone — are today in "Battledress"
. . . simplifying production . . . solving
construction problems . . . speeding
output . . . conserving metals . . .
releasing machine tools . . . saving
many   thousands   of  man   hours!
Under the impact of war, plastics are
forging ahead rapidly. When peace returns
"these developments will be available for
a myriad of domestic applications . . .
plastics for building . . . plastics for planes
and cars . . . plastics for furniture . . .-
plastics for clothing ... And remember—
leading the plastics industry in Canada,
with the longest experience and with
large production and processing facilities,
is Canadian General Electric.
If you have a problem in war production which plastics might possibly
solve, call your nearest C.G.E. office.
CANADIAN  GENERAL   ELECTRIC  CO.
LIMITED
Read Office: Toronto, Sales Offices in All Principal Cities THE GRADUATE (JMtOIICLE
A Magazine Published by and Devoted to the Interests of the
Alumni  Association  of  the  University  of  British  Columbia
Vol. IV
VANCOUVER, B. C, DECEMBER 1942
No. 2
the PLumni Reunion onnce
CALLING ALL GRADS . . . CALLING ALL GRADS . . .
The Alumni Reunion Dance is scheduled for DECEMBER 25,
at the COMMODORE, with dancing from 10 o'clock to 2 o'clock.
Due to being unable to obtain accommodations for Boxing Day
(Saturday), please note that the Dance this year is on Christmas
(Friday) night.
IMPORTANT . . . The four dollar ($4.00) per couple fee
that will be charged to attend this affair, will be turned over to
war work purposes. Therefore by coming to this dance, you will
be helping the war offort as well as having a MERRY Christmas.
—RON ANDREWS.
Presenting Our New President
bruce a. ROBinson
And His Message
Do you want to win this war? Do
you want every citizen and soldier
to have the right and ability to enjoy
a normal healthy life?
At this time, in the fourth year of
the war, it is satisfying to note the
active interest being shown in the
U.B.C. Alumni Association in respect to the welfare of the University
and the imperative need for main
tenance and continuance of all educational effort.
Now, when both industry and the
fighting forces urgently need scientific, technical, and medical graduates and undergraduates, it is un-
comprehendable to alumni that tha
need and value of the University is
even questioned.
Alumni should at every opportunity, effectively bring to the attention
of all persons the value of the Uni-
Page 1
versity to the nation and fighting
forces. The University and the University only, is equipped to scientifically, medically, and technically
train men and women for the present
mechanized, winged, and water-
born war.
The authorities know and recognise this or they would not grant
bursaries and temporary military
deferments to students undertaking
to train themselves for varied exigencies of this conflict. It is regrettable that some first class trainees
have been influenced by well-meaning but horribly short-sighted self-
appointed soapbox recruiting officers
to discontinue their educational
training.
Surely the authorities in possession   of   military   requirements   are
(Continued on Page 12)
THE GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 1942 PUBLIC   HEALTH   II   WARTIME
In the Author's Valhalla, the
pronouncer of "history repeats itself", being an observant man, has
undoubtedly bestowed a blessing
upon the originator of "circum
stances alter cases".
When Kaiser "Bill" overran the
fixed military defences of Belgium,
the clash of arms resounded throughout Canada. The call-to-arms was
answered enthusiastically by the
whole nation and, among our troops,
marched the physicians from towns
and villages, until 1918 saw 35 per
cent of Canada's doctors in service.
The civilian shortage of medical assistance did not become acute until
the close of the war when, along
with the rest of the world, Canada
suffered that disastrous epidemic of
influenza.
When Corporal Adolf overran
the fixed mental defenses of Europe,
the somewhat muffled sound reached Canada. At first it was like
distant thunder, but soon the lightning flash sent us reeling. Again the
call-to-arms! One by one, the locks
on office doors were snapped shut
with more than usual finality. "My
doctor's gone to war" is heard with
increasing frequency. By now,
nearly one-quarter of the medical
profession is in uniform. We are
approaching the point where the
pinch is felt. As the armed forces
must have first call on medical service, the pressure is still on. And
we must prepare for the hurt! Because "circumstances alter cases"!
Something happened between
the heydays of the Kaiser and the
Corporal. After 1918 the physicians
returned to take part in a quiet,
dignified, professional revolution
The idea of preventive medicine was
nurtured, cultivated: its fruits were
plentiful. Organized public health
broadened. Medical research gained
support. The physician in private
practice began to play a new role.
His were wider fields; he no longer
attended only the sick. He undertook the task of health adviser,
thereby doubling his usefulness and
redoubling his indispensability.
And now the doctor goes to war!
Patients are turned over to remain-
LAWRENCE E. RANTA
M.D., D.P.H.
Junior Director of Connaught
Laboratories of Canada
(Western Division)
ing colleagues. With skeleton staffs.,
public health services struggle grimly to retain the achievements of two
decades. Medical research dons
war-paint to tackle new problems.
The military demand is great; until
March, 1943, one hundred physician-
recruits are required each month.
Thereafter, "circumstances" will
govern the demand. Thereafter, as
with many another service, we maj
find that the indispensible will have
to be dispensed with.
At present every effort is being
bent to avoid a serious shortage of
medical care for civilians. Especially
has the supply problem received attention. Medical schools have enrolled students to capacity. By reducing the duration of summer holidays, and of internships from twelve
months to eight, the medical candidate, if he can stand the pace, has
been brought a full year closer to
his diploma: and this is achieved
without sacrificing quality for accelerated production. To compensate
for the reduction of working time
during holidays, bursaries have been
provided, so that worthy candidates
may not be excluded by shortage of
funds. Furthermore, to ensure a
source for future army requirements, medical students are taken
on military strength as privates
(with living allowance) twenty-four
months before expected completion
of the internship term. These adjustments cover the contingency of
a long war.
But what of the immediate
future? It may become necessary
for the medical profession to undertake a systematic reallocation of
civilian physicians. From those
centres where the supply is relatively good, some physicians may go to
the rescue of a hard-pressed colleague who, like Noah's stock-taker,
would find pleasure in being merely
busy. Perhaps the solution will develop from the proposal that physicians in uniform, but posted in Canada, may spend part of their time
attending civilians. It is to be admitted that the operation of this
suggestion, would necessitate extensive organization and would, most
probably, be in the form of public
clinics for ambulatory patients.
However, this expedient would release civilian physicians to devot;
themselves to the bed-ridden and
more acute cases, while military
physicians attached to defense units
could practise their art, rather than
wait (with fond hope) for a patient
from among their robust troops.
But even this would not solve
the problem at hand. The demand
for medical services from every
civilian physician has increased'
three must now do the work of four.
In order that these members of the
profession may continue to provide
the maximum assistance, their patients must co-operate to the utmost.
Anew they must learn the way to
the doctor's office, for the unnecessary home call is an extravagant
waste of doctor-hours. Again they
must remember that the early case
gets the quicker cure. Especially
must they recall that prevention
obviates cure.
In the broad campaign for victory nothing matters so much as a
high level of national health. To
cling to that which we have, we
must continue to maintain, even to
expand, our public health facilities,
lest from the seeds of neglect we
reap disaster and, in that disaster,
learn that presumed security, based
upon a fortuitious past, is a mental
defense, fixed, obsolete and worthless, when "circumstances alter
case:;".
TH3 "GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 1942
Page 2 01   (MIS   111. II i I \ (.   FRONT
Brigadier Sherwood Lett (B.A. 16)
returned to the city in November, o
happy although not completely well
man. The former Vancouver barrister
and veteran of the First Great War,
took part in the opperations at Dieppe,
along with other high-ranking Canad
ian officers and soldiers. He was be--
lieved to have been in charge of the
Canadian landing forces at Dieppe. In
this battle he received wounds of a
serious enough nature to warrant his
coming home, but at the time of this
writing, his one worry is whether or
not he will be able to return to the
front. This nation- ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■«
al World War II
hero, has added a
D.S.O. to the Military Cross he won
in the last war and
in March was promoted from the
rank of Lieutenant-
Colonel to his present station.
Another of our
fighting men to receive mention i s
Lieutenant Thomas
E. Ladner (B.A.
'37). He commanded one of the two
Royal Navy trawlers that took part,
in the destruction
of three Nazi E
boats.
Major-General H.
F. G. Letson (B.Sc.
'19), adjutant-general of the Canadian Army was a-
mong those who
received the award of a Belgian military decoration. This award was given
in appreciation of aid given the Belgian
forces in this war.
Pilot Officer Ralph V. Manning (B.A.
'37), played a vital part in the slashing
attack against supply ships off Tobruk.
He was responsible for the demolition
by torpedo of an enemy tanker.
Capt. R. R. Laird, of Oliver, formerly
listed as missing at Dieppe, is a prisoner of war in Germany.
"Hunk" Henderson, who has been in
a Nazi Internment Camp for almost the
duration of the war, had broken his
BRIGADIER SHERWOOD LETT
WE HONOUR
III I! WORLD HII! II. HEROES
The Honor Roll of those students who have been killed
or are listed as missing in action in the Second World War
is as follows:—
I
David H. Armitage, B.A. '39
Charles L. Backley
John L. Clarke, B.A. '35
Arthur H. Coulter, B.A. '37
Charles P. Davidson, B. Com. '35
Lionel P. Douglas, B. Com. '37
Gynne G. Gibbin
J. Keefer Kennedy
Henry Law, B.A. '36
Geoffrey deF. Mackie
Clarence H. McDougall
Charles B. W. Rogers, M.S.A. '41
William Ryall, B.A., B.Com. '37
Thomas S. B. Sherman
Donald E. Stewart
Lloyd L. Armour
Oscar L. Auer
William T. Bruan
Gordon W. Coldwell
William T. Cormack
Eric S. Ditmars
William McM. Fraser
Arthur H. Goulding
William G. Dunn
Sidney R. Horswill
Richard P. Locke, B.S.A. '34
W. Francis Millerd
Colin S. Milne
Francis H. McMullin
Carson S. Proby
John A. Quick
George F. Strong
Alex N. Urquhart, B.A
C. Blake Wallace
Frederick G. White
Arthur W. WiUoughby
Stuart Lane, B.A., B.Com.
Leys Beaumont
John Henry, B.A. '41
Robert F. Mclntyre, B.A. '40
Robert Mather
ARTHUR W. WILLOUGHBY
leg playing football when last heard
from.
U.B.C. grads who are in the services
are many in number. A few of these
include:—Lieutenant A- W. Markham
(B.Sc. '41), of the Royal Canadian
Engineers, and Jim Mainguy (B.A. '41)
who was one of the heroes of the recent episode in which the H.M.C.S.
Ajssiniboine rammed and sand a Nazi
submarine of the Eastern Canadian
Coast. Recent graduates of Gordon
Head, the Canadian army officers'
training centre on Vancouver Island
include: Lieutenant J. O. Moxon (B.
^^^^^^^^^^ Com. '42), Lieutenant T. W. L. Butters, Lieutenant B.
C. Herd (B.A. '41),
Lieutenant E. D
Jones (B.A. '41).
Numbered among
naval graduates
from the Canadian
Naval Officers'
Training Centre at
Halifax, are Gregory Crowley, Victoria, John R. Cunningham, John E.
Milburn (B.A. '35),
and Arthur R.
Monahan, all of
Vancouver-
Promotions have
not been without merit. Promotions in t h ?
army have been received by Lieut. M.
L. Brown, (B. A.
'39); Major Alex.
^^^^^^^ J. Miller, (B.A..
^^^^^^^™ B.Com. '37) who
received the rank of captain after the
Dieppe action, and Second Lieutenant
R. F. "Tony" Osborne (B.A. 33) who
has been called up as full-time instructor of the U.B.C. contingent of the
C.O.T.C.
The Airforce men have had their
share of glory, as well. Flying Officer
J. R. Pogson, (B.A.Sc. '40) has been
appointed officer commanding of the
servicing squadron at Brandon, Man.
Flight-Lieutenant Gordon F. Pearce,
(B.Sc. '40), has recently been promoted
from the rank of Flying Officer. Pilot
Continued on Page 11)
•41
36
Page 3
THE GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 1942 THE   CAMPUS   DO-EDS   II   WARTIME
Have you a young sister, cousin
or niece in her first year at Varsity9
The record of her experiences
sounds strangely familiar no doubt
—the same excitement of new
friendships, something of the same
feeling of confusion in a new environment, the same worries, the same
hopes. Every girl of every Freshman class has gone through this
transition period and the casually
dressed, ankle-socked student of
1942 is, in all but externals, very
nearly a replica of the freshette of
1921 who, clad in accordion-pleated
skirt which swept the ankles, paraded with the snakelike slink of the
year.
But if you talk about Varsity to
one of this generation of women
students you will hear her mention
things strangely unfamiliar in our
days—Keep Fit, camshafts, pressure points. . . If you ask her what
it is all about hse will probably answer, "Oh, Compulsory War Work,"
and pass on to topics more vital, for
it seems to be part of the student
code of etiquette to appear casual
and non-committal.
Yet this Women's War Work Programme is the result of student demand and is receiving very real
support. It was the ambition of two
war generations of Women's Under
graduate Society executives and
was approved by Senate in response
to their request. This year it is,
of course, still in the nature of an
experiment but it is hoped that the
results this session will establish
justification for its existence. If
such is the case, its success will be
due in no small measure to the
thoughtful planning and never-
failing interest and support of Dean
Mawdsley who has been tireless in
promoting it. Apart from the ends
in view, I think that the plan is contributing something to the spirit of
campus life, for the women now feel
that they are demonstrating their
willingness to shoulder a responsibility which approximates — as
nearly as our facilities allow ■— the
increased burden put on the men
by military training.
Our facilities on the campus have
in some measure determined the na-
By Dr. G. Joyce Hallamore
ture of the work required of the students and the amount of time they
are to devote to it. The plan is divided into two parts: Part A—Physical Conditioning and Part B—Red
Cross Work and War Courses. Each
undergraduate woman student is
required to complete one hour per
week in each part. The Physical
Conditioning programme under
Miss Gertrude Moore offers a wide
variety of classes—golf, rhythms,
Keep Fit, archery, folk dancing,
badminton, etc. Students on registering for each part were given
three choices so that, barring timetable clashes, no one was obliged to
be enrolled in a class which did not
interest her. Every student must
this year have a medical examination which passes on her fitness to
take part in this branch of the work.
From 8:30 to 12:30 five days a
week some 700 students go through
their paces in the gym. The path
along past the tennis courts is becoming almost as well-trodden as
that to the caf. One hour a week
per student may seem all too little
but I believe the girls will agree
that, not only are they themselves
benefiting directly, but they are
learning at the same time methods,
drills and group play which later
will be of practical value in community life.
In Part B the choice is, I think,
proving of interest to most students.
Under this heading comes the work
in the Red Cross Room, which is
directed by Mrs. Soward. Two
rooms in Brock Hall have been set
aside for this purpose and these are
open 16 hours a week.      Mrs. So
ward is being assisted by a group of
most generous volunteer workers
and the assembly line method they
have evolved is producing an amazing quantity and quality of work.
Smocked dresses and boy's serge
pants are these days running off
that line with a precision which
would do credit to any war plant.
Five war courses are offered as
alternatives to the Red Cross Work:
Home Nursing, First Aid, Motor
Mechanics, Map Reading and Drafting, and Day Nursery Care. Each
of these courses is being given by
a member of the teaching staff as a
voluntary contribution to the success of the plan. The last two of
these courses may require some explanation. The Map Reading
Course is similar to that given le
the men students. It, in a sense,
complements the Motor Mechanics
course and gives the specialized
training demanded of army drivers.
What do you do if you are obliged
to "drive blind"? — no signposts
which have been removed to confuse the enemy—no familiar landmarks. The answer is given in the
Map Reading course. One of these
days we are going to see this group
of students doing a bit of surveying
—a destination until now, reserved
for the Engineers on those balmy
spring days of early May.
The Day Nursery Course meets
the needs both or wartime emergency and the condition of peacetime. It offers a brief introduction
to Day Nursery organization, methods and care and introduces the student to the needs which exist and
the manner in which they are being
met. Visits to Day Nursery centres
supplement the lectures. Should
supervisors of children ever be
needed in public air raid shelters in
this province, here is a small group
of young women able and willing to
fill that definite place.
This then is the programme. It
has been accepted willingly by the
women as a whole and is being supported enthusiastically by their
leaders. Having thus assumed this
responsibility, they are standing up
to it squarely.   Wish them success!
THE GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 1942
Page 4 \
S  REPORT
Reading of the Treasurer's column in the Chronicle must
become somewhat of a bore to most alumni as each time It
contains another plea for fees.
But this year the situation is more serious. It now remains
for the alumni to decide whether or not they wish to have their
executive continue publication of the Chronicle. This year wa
have managed to get a very good working agreement whereby
the Chronicle can be printed at a very reasonable cost. Last year
we lost money through the year's operations. This year we cannot
lose money. For if we continue to do so it will be necessary to
discontinue the magazine.
Therefore your executive leaves it entirely up to you.
Elsewhere :n this issue you will find a form which we ask you
to fill out and mail to us along with your $1. Then too, if you see
fit, you could dispense with the bother of yearly fees by mailing
us your cheque for $10.00 to cover your life membership.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION — UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of Receipts and Disbursements
For the Period October 23, 1941 to October 24, 1942
GENERAL ACCOUNT
RECEIPTS:
Fees:
322 Annual Dues, 1941-42 ...- $ 322.00
10 Annual Dues, 1942-43       10.00
38 Life Memberships  *    380.00 $ 712.00
Reunion Dance,
Receipts  ~  1292.00
Expenses    807.91     484.0a
Total Receipts   $119703
DISBURSEMENTS:
Chronicle, Printing and Mailing
(3 issues)   - $910.10
Less Receipts from Advertising (net)   119.33     790.77
Secretarial and Office Expenses   66.76
Executive Meetings   29.53
Annual Meeting (net expense)  51.60
Convocation  Dance—Printing       18.90
Deficit       10.00       28.90
Bursary     50.00
Postage and Exchange   11.96   1029.52
Excess cf Revenue over Expenditure   167:^l
Cash on hand and in Band, Oct. 22, 1942 420 03
Cash in Bank, Oct. 24, 1942   587.60
SAVINGS ACCOUNT
RECEIPTS:
Bank Interest   1.21
Bond Interest   - 1  7.50        8.7:
DISBURSEMENTS:
Purchase 2nd Victory Loan Dominion
of Canad? 3% due 1954  500.00
Excess of Disbursements over Revenue .. 491.29
Cash in Bank, October 22, 1941   545.49
Cash in Bank, October 24, 1942   $   54.20
I have examined the accounts of the Alumni Association
of the University of British Columbia for the period October 23,
1941 to October 24, 1942.
An amount of $190.00 is owing by the General Account to
the Savings Account representing $5.00 for each life membership
paid during the period.
Subject to the foregoing, in my opinion the attached
statement of Receipts and Disbursements is properly drawn up so
as to exhibit a true and correct view of the transactions of the
THE GRADUATE CHR01HCLE
A Quarterly Journal owned by and cevoted to the interests of
The Alumni Association of the University of British Columbia
EDITOR   —   Dcrothj   Wallace   —   1945  Haro   Street,  Vancouver
ASSC.   EDITORS—Shirley  Wismer,   Pat  Kenmuir,   Ron  Andrews
BUS. MANAGER—Jordon Guy—1500 Royal Bank Bldg. Vancouver
EDITORIAL
DO YOU ENJOY READING "THE GRADUATE
CHRONICLE"?
Yes, we mean you, the grads of our University.
Wher The CHRONICLE" was first issued, it war.
the policy of your executive to have the quarterly
primarily a news issue. However, in the past number
of issues, the policy has been slightly changed. Formerly the news of cur graduates was given a primary
position, but since then, your executive has thought
that articles of current interest contributed by members of the University staff, on topics relating to local
and world affairs, should be given more prominence.
Your executive feels that with this make-up, the issues
are far superior tmd the tenor of the publication is in
line  with  its  growth  and  that  of  our Alma  Mater.
However, it has been drawn to the attention of
your editor that the material in "The Chronicle" still
lacks interest and punch. We are sorry we cannot
make a "Time Magazine", a "Harper's Bazaar" or an
"Esquire" out of it, for we are rather handicapped
financially and otherwise, but we can do our job well
and that is what we are aiming to do.
We publish news of current interest on the campus, for are we still not members of our Alma Mater?
We publish news of our University and its community
problems, for who of you in distant places does not
remember the times you walked Vancouver's streets
and saw the City's life, even if it was only while participating in a freshman snake parade? We publish news
of our graduates in all fields of endeavor, their fortunes
good or bad, for who of you does not know at least one
name appearing in these issues?
Hence we enquire, what is it you want? Shall we
turn into potential Winchells and give a little lowdowc
on some of the private lives ofi our grads? If you feel
that this will develop interest in your paper, then by
all. means let us know by letter, wire or carrier pigeon,
just what you want. We will welcome your criticism,
good or tad, and also any news or articles you may
wish to contribute.
Let us hear from you Grads ....
Let us know what you like .....
Just give us a little encouragement and we will
give you what you want ....
GIVE AND YOU WILL GET!
Association,  according  to the  explanations given to me  and  as
shown by  the books of the Association.
Vancouver, B.C. S. SCOTT McLAREN,
October 25, 1942. Auditor
Page 5
THE GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 1942 DAVE CAREY (Arts '38) has been
playing the Devil in a crack
morale - building musical revue
"Pull Together Canada" in Ontario. The Second Victory Loan
used this revue to soften the Ontario territory, and whenever they
played, quotas were doubled. During the summer, Dave helped
publish  a booklet  entitled  "You
. Can Fight For Canada".
We hear that two of our grads have
have been stationed at the coast
LIEUT. BRUCE MACKEDIE,
who is instructing at Gordon
Head, and LIEUT. GEORGE W.
WELD (Arts '33), who has just
completed O.T.C. in Halifax.
Seen out on the
campus recently,
to teach the Un-
dergrads a thing
or two, was the
famous T. C. WILLIAMS (Arts'41).
now a Pilot Officer at Patricia
Bay.
Ottawa has called many of our
grads, a recent one being JEAN
PRATT (M.S.A. '42) who is now
an assistant in the Central Experimental Farm last year. Jean received one of the two awards made
annually to the two most outstanding research students at the
University.
MARIE WISHERS (Arts '42), our
little Dutch grad, who speaks
French and German perfectly, has
now an appointment with the
Censor Board in Ottawa.
It takes courage to do this, and
SHIRLEY (MICKEY, to you)
LYNN (Arte '39), did it. She
packed her bags to go for a holiday in Toronto, where she did not
know a soul, and after being there
a week, found herself with a good
job on the "Toronto Star."
The "little America of the North,"
namely Prince Rupert, can claim
two of our grads, if not more.
EILEEN RUSHWORTH (Arts '42)
is laboratory technician for the
Provincial Laboratories. While
DOROTHY SHERRATT (Arts
'40) is teaching school.
GRADS
—Courtesy Daily Province.
CLARE BROWN HARRIS
News was received quite recently
from CAMIE BROWN HARRIS
(Arts '35), who since her marriage, has done a great deal of
travelling, but is now living in
Los Angeles. During the summer.
Camie was busy relocating Japanese Students in Eastern Universities. This fall she started working
for Dr. Kunkel, a European refugee and a renowned psychiatrist.
Besides working and keeping
house, Camie is very interested in
pottery molding, "an adult form
of making mud pies," as she
expressed it.
The University of Toronto claims
many of our grads, namely—MEG
HOWISON, ISABEL HOGGAN,
and OLIVE MEREDITH, all of
Arts '42, who are taking librarian
courses. Associated with the Public Health Department at Toronto,
is DOROTHY STAMATIS (Arts
'42), who in the true Stamatis
style, is experimenting with a new
influenza vaccine, under the instruction of Dr. Fraser.
Continuing his studies in medicine
at Toronto, is RONALD LA-
MONT-HAVERS (Arts '41).
The president of the Class of '42,
DON PARHAM, and his close associate, the treasurer, HOWARD
POULSON, are both working for
C.I.L. The former in the East,
while the latter is doing his bit at
James Island. Their other pal.
HARRY GREY, is working for
Imperial Oil Ltd. in loco.
Still keeping up with her book larnin' is NORA GIBSON (Arts '39),
who is one of the librarians at the
Kitsilano Branch of the Vancouver Public Library.
Two of the class of '38 who are back
on the old campus grounds again,
but this time as part of the staff
in the Alma Mater office, are
BARBARA HALL BUTCHARD
and NAN THOMSON.
LES GOULD (M.A. Sc. '38) who
stepped into the married class last
June, is now delving into the
chemical mysteries of synthetic
rubber in Sarnia, Ont.
LOIS NICHOLSON (Arts '42), the
very efficient president of the
Women's Undergraduate Society
of her year, has recently turned
her energies to the Department of
Munitions and Supplies in Vancouver.
Somewhere in England, as so many
of our grads are, is KATHERINE
McINTOSH (Arts '36), who is doing war work to help put Jerry
under.
BILL LYNOTT (Sc. '41) is in the
process of converting himself from
a geologist into an aeronautical
engineer, and has completed his
course in Montreal.
LEN WRIGHT finds himself in
charge of the new nitric acid plant
of Alberta Nitrogen Co. in Calgary. Also working with him is
BOB LOWE (Sc. '41).
VIRGINIA GALLOWAY (Arts '40)
is a recruit to the British Ministry
of Supply in Washington, D.C.
One of our grads has gone Hollywood on us, not figuratively, but
literally, for not so long ago did
MARY McLEOD (B.A. '40), go to
the fair city of the stars and take
the   lead   in   M.G.M's.   "London
THE GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 1942
Page 6 Near and Far
Blackout Murders."    Be sure to
see it at your local theatre.
JOE MORGAN (M.S.A. '42) is busy-
salting fish back in Halifax. We
also hear that the Aggies had a
reunion there with Joe, RON
HUNTINGTON, JACK CLARK,
JACK TURNER, two artsmen and
an Australian present. Joe reports that it was a little hazy to
him how the Australian got there.
The R.C.A.S.C. have claimed a number of the graduates of the class of
'42. Numbered among these artj
DOUGLAS MALONEY, GORDON McFARLANE, JOE NAY-
LOR, HARRY HORNE, and BOB
PARKINSON.
BERT HOSKINS (B. Com. '40) was
recently in a crack up off the
coast of England and had to crawl
more than a mile over soft marsh
to reach help. His injuries consisted of concussion and broken
ribs. We are glad to report that
Bert is well again.
WILLIAM M. SIBLEY (M,A. '40)
was awarded a University Junior
Fellowship at Brown University
for the second semster of 1942-43.
News was received from ED. W.
DISHER (B.A. '39), who after
graduating from U.B.C, obtained
an L.L.B. degree from Dalhousie
University in '41. For the past
year and a half, Ed. has been doing
convoy duty on the NORTH
ATLANTIC in a Canadian
Corvette.
We had an interesting letter from
BILL PHILLIPS (B.Sc. '27), who
is in Britain again after serving in the Abyssinian Campaign
with the Nigeria Regiment. While
he was in East Africa, he met
Britton Brock (B.A.Sc. '26) and
his wife BARBARA STIRLING
(B.A. '26). Brit is serving in the
Navy on an Indian station. Bill
also met G. A. GLASS (B.A. '40)
who is in charge of an M.L. chasing U. Boats out of Lagos.
—Courtesy Daily Province.
RALPH MANNING
(Turn to Page 3)
WALLY MYERS, one of our famed
basketballers, is back in Vancouver again. Wally is with the
R.C.A.F.
There is quite a little group of University graduates working at the
• Canned Fish Inspection Laboratory. Managing to crowd in a-
mongst the cans of salmon and
herring, are FRANK CHARN-
LEY (M.A. '37), the chief chemist;
REG. BOLTON (B.A. Scr '32),
PATRICIA CUMMING LESLIE
(B.S.A. '41), BETTY MORTON
(B.A. '42), PAMELA RUNKLE
(B.S.A. '40), and DOROTHY
WALLACE  (B.A. '42).
By the time that this issue will have
been put to press, we understand
that our grads in Ottawa will have
had their quiet evening together
in the form of a "Tom and Jerry
party. The arrangements for this
sedate party were in the hands of
one, FRED DEITRICH. We, ou,
here in the west, understand that
about 180 U.B.C. grads were to be
present. Probably numbered
among those were LES ALLEN
(B.A '37), who is working for the
National Film Board, along with
JIM BEVERIDGE (B.A. '38),
MARGARET  PALMER,  who   is
co-producer in the production
"World in Action," MARGARET
ECKER, a former Chronicle editor; SQUADRON OFFICER
PEGGY JONES (B.A. '38) of the
R.A.F. Women's Division; MAR-
GOT BURGESS (B.A. '41), REX
PARKER (B. Sc. '41), MARGARET MORRIS (B.A. '41),
MOLLY FIELD, JACK GILLIES,
and SGT. DORWIN BAIRD.
DOROTHY M. BRUCE (B.A. '31)
has for the past five years been on
the High School Staff of Saanish,
B.C., and is now on leave of absence to join the Women's Royal
Canadian Naval Service.
BIRTHS
J
1
To MR. AND MRS. G. MATHIAS,
M.A. '41, (nee ODETTA HICKS,
M.A. '41) in Vancouver, on August 31, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. MILTON OWEN
nee MARION REID, Arts '39, in
Vancouver, on June 19, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. DAVID ELLIS,
B.A. '32, (nee MARGARET BUCHANAN, B.A. '36), in Vancouver,
on June 13, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. JACK HALSE
(nee JEAN LOWRIE, B.A. '37),
in Vancouver, in July, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. GORDON
DRAESKE, B.A. '36, (MILDRED
GOW, B.A. '38), in Vancouver,
a son.
To MR. AND MRS. DEACON (nee
MARY EACRETT, B.A. '39), in
Mission, on September 22, e.
daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. A. E. PIKE, B.
A. Sc. '33 (nee MARY MacLEAN)
in Vancouver, on September 28, a
daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. JOHN LECKY
(nee BEVERLEY CUNNINGHAM), in Toronto, on July 23, a
son.
To LIEUT. AND MRS. H. C. K.
HOUSSER, B.A. '37 (nee
LOUISE FARRIS, B.A. '36) in
PORT ALBERNI, on August 15,
a daughter.
(Continued on Page 8)
Page 7
THE GRADUATE CHRONICLE - DECEMBER 1942 BIRTHS—Continued
To MR. AND HAROLD KING,
B.A. '31, (nee KATHLEEN GOW -
EN), in North Vancouver, on August 15, a daughter.
To Dr. AND MRS. L. S. CHIPPER-
FIELD,   (FRANCE WILSON, E.
A. '33)   in New Westminster,  on
September 12, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. A. F. MERCER.
B. Com. '33 (ETHLYWYN PAT
ERSON, B.A. '28), in Vancouver,
a  son.
To MR. AND MRS. N. HOCKIN,
(Aggie '39), in Vancouver, September 21,  a son.
To MR. AND MRS. W. R. CORN-
WELL, in Vancouver, on October
28, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. F. S. BOLTON,
(Sc '32), in Vancouver, on June 7,
a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. KIMBAL
NICOLS, B. Com. '31, (nee JEAN
TELFORD, B.A. '31), in Vancouver, in August, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR
LAING, B.S.A. '25, in Vancouver,
on October 19, a daughter.
To PO AND MRS. R. I. EARRING -
TON, (nee ISABEL BAIN), in
Vancouver, on October 7, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. KEITH W.
MIDDLETON, (nee BARBARA
BENNY, Arts '38), in Vancouver, on September 15, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. DOUGLAS
WORTH, Arts, '40, in Vancouver,
on September 19, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. PAT LARSON.
B.A. Cc. '39, in Vancouver, on
September 19, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. H. BOYCE (nee
VERNA BOLTON, Arts '31), on
February 3, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. R. P. ROBERTS, B.A. '40, (nee RUTH HEY-
ER), on November 15, in Vancouver,  a daughter.
To PILOT OFFICER AND MRS.
H. G. MACKENZIE, (nee PATRICIA CAREY, B.A. '40), on
November 13, in Calgary, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. REG. HAMMOND, B.A. '31, on July 27, in
Victoria,  a son.
I
DEATHS
I
In June, the accidental death of STRUAN
ROBERTSON (B.A. *39) came as a great
shock to many of his friends in Victoria
and Vancouver. His brilliant record as ^
student culminated in his gaining a PhD. in
Economics at Berkeley a few months before
his death.
To DR. AND MRS. CARL, M.A. '32,
(nee JOSEPHINE HART, M.A.
'31), in March, a son.
To MR. AND MRS. COLIN CURTIS, '38, in September, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. RANN MATHI-
SON, B.A. '39, (nee ELSIE
STRANGLAND, B.A. '39), in
July,  a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. E. ARMSTROG
(nee MARJORIE HILL, '37), in
September, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. C. LOCKHART
KNOWLES, (nee MARION
HANES, '32), on April 2, a daughter.
To MR. AND MRS. ALLAN
JONES, Sc. '28, (neen GERTRUDE HILLAS, '28), on February  1,   a  son.
To MR. AND MRS. JORDON GUY,
B.A., '31, on October 7, in Vancouver, a son.
Notice was received from TRAIL
ALUMNI of a meeting and banquet scheduled for November 14,
1942, with Dean N. Finlayson from
U.B.C. as the guest speaker.| We
hope that they had a very successful evening.
MRS. NORMAN HAGER, (CONSTANCE ELIZABETH McNEE-
LEY, (Arts '36) died after a brief
illness on June 29, in Vancouver.
PEERS, DOUGLAS, was killed in
action at Tobruk.
Long associated with the Imperial
Oil Company, CLIFFORD E.
STONE (B.A. SC. 21) died in
August after a long illness. His
death came as a great shock to
the community of loco, B.C., for
it was through his efforts that the
community thrived and prospered.
!  mARRIAGES
i
i
JEAN McINTYRE to SUB. LIEUT
DOUGLAS MAITLAND, on September 2, 1942, in Vancouver.
PATRICIA C. CUMMINGS (Aggie
'41), to JOHN D. LESLIE, (M.A.
41),  on  June  12,  in  Vancouver.
JEAN CLUGSTON (Arts '42), to
ROD GRIERSON, SUB. LIEUT.,
on July 22, in Vancouver.
MERLE TURNBULL, (Arts '38), to
R. KEITH PORTER, (Com. '42),
on July 12, in Vancouver.
DOROTHY M. HIRD, (Arts '42), to
WILLIAM WALLACE, (Sc. 41),
on July 15, in Vancouver.
VIVIAN RUTLEDGE to JOSEPH
M. PEARCE, (Aggie '42), in June.
MARJORIE J. STANDISH to WILLIAM TREMAINE, (Arts '39), on
August 28, in Vancouver.
MARJORIE MARKKA Mto GEO.
HARFORD, ( Sc. '41), on October
17, in Vancouver.
ESTHER GALPIN to CECIL GRAHAM KILLAM, (Sc. '41), in September,  in Vancouver.
EDITH ROBINSON to ROBERT
BRYANT McLELLAN, in September, in Vancouver.
JOSEPHINE FRANCES LEYLAND
to JOHN MUNRO GUNN, (Sc.
'40), in September, in Vancouver.
THE GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 1942
Page 8 ELIZABETH EILEEN BLAIR to
FRANK HOVE PENDLETON
(Com. '41), on November 3.
RUTH   CLARK   to   JOHN   MA--
GUIRE, on August 8, in Vancouver.
JANET AUDREY BOUCHER to
LAC ARTHUR HAROLD PHILLIPS, on August 30, in Vancouver.
NORMA BEW to JAMES OWEN
SHEFFIELD, (Arts '41), on October 9, in Vancouver.
VIDA MAXWELL WARDEN to
GEO. EDWARD LIGHTHALL,
(Sc.) on October 10, in Vancouver.
MARGERY (PEGGY) WHITE-
HOUSE to FLT. LIEUT. ARTHUR EDMOND BULLER, (Sc.)
on October 30, in Vancouver.
KATHLEEN SKAE, (Arts '41), to
SGT. PILOT BRUCE EDWARD
EMERSON, on October, in Vancouver.
RHUNA OSBORNE to FLT.
LIEUT. RONALD ARLETT, R.A
F., on October 31, in Medicine
Hat.
MARY BERNADETTE CORCORAN to LIEUT. CHARLES W.
NASH, (Sc. '41), on October 31, in
Victoria.
SO. MARION SUSANNAH
VANCE, (Arts '39), to FO LEONARD R. POCOCK, on October
21, in Vancouver.
ANN JEREMY to LAC WILLIAM
GRAND, (Arts '41), on Octobex
10, in Vancouver.
SARAH CHAN to MOSES LONG,
on June 21, in West Lafayette, Indiana.
ROSMARY EDMONDS to KENNETH W. WRIGHT, on October
12,   in   New  Westminster.
LUCY M. EMERSON to ERIC
STANLEY TURNILL, in Vancouver.
MARY CAMERON EDDIE to SC.
LIEUT. OLIVER JOHN
HAYLES, on October 4, in Chilliwack.
YRMA MITCHELL, (B.A. '30), to
LIEUT. MARK McCLUNG, on
October 10, in Victoria.
ZOE BROWNE-CLAYTON to JACQUES LOUIS BEILER, in Montreal.
PHYLLIS BARBARA DAYTON to
SGT.-PT. CHARLES GEORGE
ROBSON, on August 10, in Vancouver.
MARGARET I. KELLER to EDWARD J. BARRIE, (Arts '41), on
August 8, in Vancouver.
MARJORIE VICTORIA USHER,
(Arts '41), to THOMAS REID,
(Arts '40), on July 31, in Vancouver.
ADRIENE RUTH SOUTHIN, (Arts
'41), to JOHN MUIR RUSSELL,
(Ed. '39), on October, in Vancouver.
A. G. MARGARET WORTHING to
DR. JOHN   DAVIES,    (Sc.  '39)
on September 5, in Vancouver.
FRANCES LIPPINCOTT SMITH,
to C. MOODIE, (B.S.A. '37), on
August 1, in Spokane, Wash.
PAT CARTON, R.N., to CADET-
OFFICER HARRY JAMES
HORNE, (Com. '42), on October
12, in Vancouver.
ELINOR   MAUDE   RICHARDSON
to  ALBERT  HENRY  ELLIOTT
Sc. '40), on September 15, in Van
couver.
MARY VIOLET FRASER to JOHN
WILLIAM CLEMENT, (Aggie
'42), on November 21, in Vancouver.
FRANCES EILEEN HUMPHREY
YOUNG to ROY GERMYN, in
mid-November, in Powell River.
SARAH JUANITA WILSON to
HENRY MICHEAL POGUE, (Sc
'40), on August 20, in Chilliwack.
DOROTHEA M. SCHE1DEKER to
DR. THOMAS NIVEN, (Arts '34),
on September 6, in Duluth, Minn
KATHLEEN SELLENS, (Arts '40),
to JOHN TAYLOR, in August, in
Vancouver.
BARBARA NEWMAN, (Arts '43),
to ROBERT BONNER, (Arts '42),
in July, in Vancouver.
MONA HUNTER, (Arts '40), to
SUB. LIEUT. WM. CALDER.
Arts '40), on April 8, in Edmonton, Alta.
EFFIE MORRIS, (Arts '39), to
JOHN KEAYS, (M.A. Sc. '42), on
June 7, in Nelson, B.C.
DOROTHY BRYANT to EARL
JOHNSTON, (Sc. '42), on June 5,
in Vancouver.
DORIS   JOHNSON   to   HADDON
SKELDING, (Sc. '42), on October
9, in Vancouver.
JULIETTE SULLIVAN, Arts '36).
to LLOYD GRAY, on June 13, in
Trail, B.C.
JOSEPHINE KENNEDY, (Arts
'40), to BILL DURKIN, in June,
in Toronto.
MAY BUTLER to VERNON GRAS-
SIE, (B.A. '39), on November 19,
in Vancouver.
JEAN ECKHARDT, (B.A. '42), to
JAMES BARDSLEY, (B.A. Sc.
'34), in July, in Vancouver.
MAY MOORE, (B.A. '30), PTE.
HERBERT C. DROUGHT, iu
February, in Victoria.
• Annuities
• Life   Insurance
9  Specialized
Service
Consult
P. D. CELLE
Agency  Representative
THE IMPERIAL LIFE
ASSURANCE CO.
OF CANADA
640 West Hastings Street
PAcific 3335     Vancouver, B.C.
Page 9
THE GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 1942 homecoming md n\iii, meeting   ilium war work
In view of the present war situation, Homecoming this year was
crowded into a one day event held
on Saturday, October 31, 1942. The
first feature of Homecoming were
two Big Block Luncheons held at
12:30. It is noted with particular interest to some of the graduate women that this was the first year that
a Big Block Luncheon was held for
the women on the campus. These
luncheons were followed by two
Senior League games, the first English rugby, Navy vs. Varsity; and tho
second, Canadian football, Boeings
vs. Varsity. It was a big day for
Varsity as both games were won by
our team.
As has been the custom in the last
few years, the Alumni Association
annual meeting and banquet was
held in the Brock Memorial Building from 6:00 to 8:30, approximately
85 being present. Since the occasion occurred on Hallowe'en night,
the tables were effectively decorated
with pumpkins and squash and candles placed in apples. Tommy
Campbell, past president, introduced
Dean Daniel Buchanan, who gave a
very short but pointed and witty
speech on the use of graduates in the
post-war world. Members of the
new executive were introduced and
the meeting adjourned. During the
banquet and meeting, a potlach was
held for the undergraduates in the
auditorium. The Home - coming
Dance concluded the festivities with,
as usual, more undergraduates than
graduates present.
At the Alumni Association annual
meeting the new executive for the
year 1942-43 were elected.
PRESIDENT:—Mr. Bruce A. Robinson, B.A. Sc. '36, who is the
Plant Superintendent of the Empress Manufacturing Co.
1st VICE-PRESIDENT:—Mr. R. D
Jordan Guy, B.A. '31, who is a
lawyer with Walsh, Bull, Housser, Tupper, Ray  and Carroll.
2ndw VICE-PRESIDENT: — Miss
Mary Fallis, B.A. '32, who is teaching school at Lord Byng Junior
High School.
TREASURER: — Mr. Rod C. Andrews, B. Com. '38, who is an accountant for the Canadian Fishing
Co. He is married to Barbara
Pearce, B.A. '39
SECRETARY:—Miss Patricia M.
Keamiur, B.A. '39, who is intermediate Girls' Work Secretary of
the Y.W.C.A.
EDITOR O FCHRONICLE: — Mrs.
Dorothy Wallace, B.A. '42, who is
Senior Laboratory Technician for
the Canned Fish Inspection Laboratory. She married William
Wallace, B.A. Sc. '41.
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVE —
Mr. J. C. Berry, B.S.A. '27; M.S.A.
'29; Ph.D. '39.
MEMBERS AT LARGE — Mr. E. E.
"Ted" Baynes, B.A.B. Sc. '32, engineering contractor; married to
Jean Cameron, B.A. '32.
Mr. Mark Collins, B.A.B. Comm.
'34; Production Department of B.
C. Packers; married to Phae Van
Dusen, B.A. '35.
GRADUATING CLASS REPRESENTATIVE — Miss Elizabeth
Hebb, BA. '42.
The Players' Club Alumni have
gone to War! Their part in the war
effort is the entertainment of troops.
Under the auspices of the Alumni
Association of U.B.C, they are directing their talents towards the
very important project of producing
plays for the boys in barracks. Their
first effort will be "The Man Who
Came to Dinner." This play, it will
be remembered by many, was the
smash hit production in December
last year. Few plays in recent years
have been so successful as "The Man
Who Came to Dinner." Royalties
paid to its authors, George Kaufman
and Moss Hart, run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. It
should make first-class entertainment for the troops.
Most of the Players' Club Alumni
Executive are in the cast. Doris
Buckingham, the new President, is
playing the part of Maggie Cutler,
secretaary to the famous Sheridan
Whiteside, who is again being played by Bill Buckingham; Betty Buck-
land, the Secretary, is Miss Preen;
Betty Boscovich, the Treasurer, is
Mrs. Stanley; Dick Harris Mr. Stanley; Dan MacDiarmid is Mr. West-
cott; Lacey Fisher is Dr. Bradley.
Dave MacDonald is again playing
the part of Banjo. The production
is being directed by Mr. Lacey
Fisher.
There are small expenses connected with this project for scenery,
properties, etc., etc. To meet these
expenses there may be a public performance of some kind which, it is
hoped, U.B.C. Alumni will support
by buying tickets.
^utrmat . .
Hiahea, in # (®lb
(Uraotttntt, for a . .
If appg, ProattprnuH, Itttorums
. . . 1043
STAR STEAM LAUNDRY
Co. Ltd.
R
eunion
D,
ance
CHRISTMAS NIGHT
December 25, 1942
10-2    —    $4.00 per Couple
Tickets At Door
Commodore Cabaret
Phone PAc. 0413 for Table,
Reservations
THE GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 1942
Page 10 i
news noTEs Atom victoria
i
Three grads find themselves on
leave of absence from their various posts. NEIL PERRY (B.A
'33), on leave from his post as
director of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, won the
Littauer fellowship at Harvard
where he is doing post-graduate
work in government administration under Dr. Alvin Hansen
Neil's work, during his absence,
is being done by EUGENE CANT-
WELL (B.Com.'35). Last year,
Victoria missed WILLIAM.
ROBBINS '30 who completed his
PhD. in English at Toronto. Bill
is back in Victoria again with his
wife (MARGARET ROSS, B.A.
'30) and small son Peter. On leave
of absence from Esquimalt High
High School to continue his
studies, under a fellowship, at
Toronto University, is JACK.
GRANT ('34, M.A. '41). Jack was
married last summer to BETTY
FLOWER of Vancouver.
Toronto really seems to have the-
call for our grads, because ROGER
BISHOP (B.A. '38), who assisted
>^&sm^&e>&s^"&&&siist&&&&?ii&&&&w^&is
in English at Vancouver College
last year, is studying there on a
fellowship.
JOHN GOUGH (B.A. '28) left his
position as instructor at the Victoria Normal School to become
inspector of Saanich Schools. He
thus took up work similar to that
of his former classmate, and colleague. HAROLD CAMPBELL,
who is Municipal inspector of Victoria Schools.
GEORGE GREGORY (B.A. '38),
after graduating from Harvard
Law School returned to Victoria
and graduated a year ago as Sub-
Lieutenant from Royal Roads. He
was home for three weeks recently after surviving the sinking of
the "Charlottetown".
Also with the navy, is JOE
ROBERTSON  (M.A. '37).
It seems that Victoria will miss their
teachers, as two more, GEORGE
BRAND '30 and FRASER LISTER '23, have given up their positions to instruct in the Air Force.
Early in November, Fraser directed the R.A.F. show, "Ceiling
Unlimited", at the Royal Victoria
Theatre.
DONALD BUCHANAN (B.A. '35)
who   was  for  some   time  on  the
ON  OUR  FIGHTING  FRONT—
(Continued from Page 3)
Eicer A. Mansfield Beach (B.A. '40
has been awarded the D.F.C. Lieu!
enant Gordon W. Stead, (B.Com. '33
B.A. '34) R.C.N.V.R., has been a-
warded the Distinguished Service
Cross for "minesweeping at Malta"
As can be expected, this is only
a brie.* report of the activities of
our grads in the fighting forces.
There are numerous who deserve
honourable mention, but who must
be omitted due to lack of knowledge as to their whereabouts.
However, may we urge them on to
a mightier and speedier victory,
and remind them that those who
are left behind are with them to the
end.
staff of the Bureau of Economics,
has recently received his M.A.
from Berkeley.
The WALLACES are in the news!
BOB, of Arts '32, is still teaching
at Victoria College, and has a son
BRIAN JOHN, born in September. JACK, of Arts '36, is teaching
at Oak Bay High School, and wai
married in the spring to PEGGY
MURRAY. LAWRENCE of Arts
'38, was married to LOIS LEEM-
ING of Duncan, after graduating
as a Sub-Lieutenant from Royal
Roads last May. He is now on
the Atlantic.
J
I
THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
To the Treasurer,
RONALD ANDREWS,
2374 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B. C.
Enclosed please find:
My Correct Post Office Address      - - ( )
1941-42 Annual Fee of one dollar - - ( )
Life Membership of ten dollars -    - - ( )
Name        Class	
Address..               Year..
Present Occupation
.<st@steie(gteig(etE«isig4g(@gtgte^^«@e«s-^^-ie-«s^
Page 11
THE GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 194? PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE—
(Continued from Page 1)
better qualified than uninformed
civilians to decide whether or not
the University should train these
men and women.
instead of being curtailed, the
- acilities of the University should be
xpanded immediately for the pur-
)ose of providing ever more of these
trained fighters for both the frontline and the very important supporting line of industrial production.
We cannot produce more munitions, equipment and foodstuffs, if
we have not the trained technicians
to adequately and properly supervise
this increased production. Why
build shell-loading or gun plants if
you have not the chemist to produce
the explosives and the metallurgist
to produce the metals?
Further, the man at the front or
the man and woman on the bench
must be on the job every day that he
or she is needed. Sick leave does
not win the battle or produce the
tools of war. We need more and
greater health services for civilians
and fighting forces.
We need, now, the sooner the
better, more nurses, more doctors,
more dentists, more pharmacists,
adequate Government Health laboratories, and faculties of medicine,
dentistry, and public health, to train
these public servants for your protection.
The Provincial Department of
Health is quietly but very efficiently
doing a first class job under the most
trying conditions and accommodations. The alumni should recognise
and support this fight behind the
lines to maintain a consistantly high
community bill of health. Only as
long as the health of a community is
good can that community supplv
men and women in good health to
the fighting forces.   "For the want
of a horseshoe nail the battle was
lost", for the want of a healthy man
at the machine or in the line, there
may still be battles lost.
It is the national duty of all
Alumni to support to the utmost
every educational demand and requirement. Do this by supporting
your alumni discussion groups.
Phone any or all, (but at least one)
committee chairman and tell them
that you are interested in their effort. Your ideas, thoughts, and efforts are needed now in these discussion groups. Do your part now
and keep your head above water.
Committee on U.B.C.
Fred Bolton, KErr.
PAc. 8111.
Athletics —
1435-Y   or
Committee on Public Relations —
Jordan Guy, PAc. 6121.
Committee on War Work and Literary  and  Scientific  Activities.—Alan
T. Campbell, PAc. 9164 or KErr.
2995-L. Mrs. Jean Telford Nichlos.
KErr. 1927-L.
Committee on Publications—Mrs.
Dorothy Hird Wallace, HAst. 4664
or PAc. 1494.
Committee on Public Health—Bruce
A. Robinson, PAc. 7335 or KErr.
3530-L.
Committee    on    Convocation    and
Alumni  Association  Co-operation—
Paul Whitley, KErr. 1248-L.
Committee on Alumni Affairs, (Re-
Union   Dance 'Etc.)—G.   E.    (Ted)
Baynes,    MAr.    7840    or    West
898-R-2. Mary Fallis, BAy. 2035-R,
DELNOR
Fresh Frozen
FOODS
Seventeen Varieties of Fruits
and Vegetables for All
Types of Recipes
and Servings
CHALLEnGER
Everybody's Watch
For Everyday Service
Challenger Watches are noted for
their accuracy and reliability under
all conditions. Smartly styled
models for men and women from
$25.00
BIRKS
JEWELLERS
Vancouver
TMq GRADUATE CHRONICLE — DECEMBER 1942
Page 12 News and Views from
Front Lines and World Capitals
by
WILSON
For his information, Mr. Wilson draws upon the
world-wide sources of British United Press, and
brings you, with shrewd insight, the significance
of news happenings in the world capitals and front
lines as well as on the home front. Mr. Wilson's
views and comments are his own—not necessarily
those of The BAY. You'll enjoy his broadcasts.
Tune in tonight—and every week night. CJOR
is 600 on your dial. It's just another 'extra'
service by The BAY.
•
MONDAY - SATURDAY
7:30 P.M.
SUNDAY
2 P.M.
l^ttfaon>15flii dfompang
INCORPORATED    2""   may   'te/O 

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