University Publications - UBC Library Staff Meeting Minutes

[UBC Library Staff Meeting Minutes] Mar 31, 1964

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Array MINUTES
March 31o 1964* No„ 301
Reporting Division Heads Meetings and Other Matters of Interest to the
University of British Columbia Library staff.
Presents  TKN, IFB, SR, RH, MD, DS, RJL, JO'R, EW, AMS, GD, DD, RB, AL,
HA, EH, AD, BSS
Music Journals
Miss Dwyer, in the course of compiling a Union Catalogue of Music Journals
in Canada, has discovered that the UBC Library and the Vancouver Public
Library in combination possess the best representation of journals of any
region in Canada.
Information Desk
It was decided that unless there is a great demand for service, the
Information Desk will be discontinued after April 4, 1964.
Second Xerox
Catalogue will now be using the machine as originally planned until 12 noon
each day together with Serials who use the machine for about 10 hours per
weeks Other staff who have been using the machine in the mornings are now
requested to make other arrangements*
Microfilm Projects
The Midwest Interlibrary Center has declared its intention of acting as
a clearing house for cooperative microfilm projects. This service may be
useful to us in acquiring out-of-print research materials.
Library Cards
Student library cards for the 1964/65 winter session will bear a photograph
of the student and will be plastisized. Color codes and printed codes will
be used to identify lower year, upper year, and graduate students,,
Staff Travel
The University Library budget contains a sum for staff travel. This money
is allocated by a staff committee consisting this year of Miss Maureen
Wilson, Miss Anna Leith, Mr. John Cummings and Miss Gerry Dobbin as
Chairman™
Bindery
The Bindery has once again broken previous records by producing over
16,000 volumes in the past year. -  2
Building
Despite the fact that estimates for the building have exceeded
again the amount of money made available by the Board of Governors,
the Clients Committee has decided to ask for bids. As a means of
reducing the cost of the building the Library has been asked to
look into the possibility of operating on a 9 to 5 schedule during
the Summer Session. The consensus was that if special provisions
could be made in the College Library for extended hours and special
access to education journals that the amount of inconvenience
could be reduced. No final decision can be made Without further
investigation of the consequences.
The Library's First Printed Catalogue
The Asian Studies Division has issued the first of a tri-yearly
series of printed catalogues of books in the collection, arranged
in L.C. classified order. The catalogue has been made by copying
the shelf list cards by xerox onto an offset master. It has been
distributed to 33 institutions with Asian libraries,, chiefly in
North America, and to the faculty of the Asian Studies Department.
The Machine Age
To investigate the possible library applications of data-processing
and information retrieval machinery a Working Committee on Automation
has been formed, consisting of the following members: Bs Stuart-
Stubbs, I. Bell, G. Turner, R. Butterfield, D„ Shields, G. Dobbin,
J. O'Rourke, S„ Johnson and R. Harris.
Resignation
It is with regret that we announce the retirement of Miss Edith
Stewart, who has found the climate of Salt Spring Island too
hospitable and therefore will not be returning to the Extension Library,,
PERSONNEL
Appointments:
Miss Anne Bolton, Clerk I in Acquisitions, effective April 1, 1964.
Miss Barbara Lindberg, Library Assistant in Cataloguing, effective
April 6, 1964*
Resignationsg
Mrs.ft Diana-Rose Kerr, Clerk I in Circulation, effective April 30, 1964.
Miss Sharon Garrard, Clerk 1 in Cataloguing, effective April 30, 1964.
Miss Doreen Dowd, Librarian II in Humanities, effective June 30, 1964. Report on Automated Circulation Systems
at Southern Illinois University and the University of Missouri
Last spring an automated circulation control system was discussed with Mr.
Jim Poole, Director of the University Tabulating Centre'. Mr. Poole suggested
a discussion with Mr. Syd Lewis, Sales Representative for I.B.M.'s Data Processing Division. A series of meetings, attended by Mr. Poole, Mr. Lewis,
Dr. Ranz. Mr. Harris and Mr. Bell, followed and continued until Septembero
By then tw systems of automation had been discussed and the outlines worked,
ouat. It was suggested at this time that Mr. Bell go to the University of
Missouri to look at their automated circulation system when he was in the
East recruiting staff. In later discussions with Mr. Stuart-Stubbs it was
suggested that wider observations, to include acquisitions, serials and
catalogue automated data processing systems, should be carried out and that
Mr« Turner and Mr0 Harris should also go east.  Subsequently Mre Bell spent
some time gathering information about ONU.LP (Ontario New Universities Library
Project) at the University of Toronto, where a computer - produced and computer-
maintained book catalogue is being prepared; Mr. Harris and Mp0 Bell visited
Southern Illinois University to ' see their computer-controlled circulation
system; Mr.' Turner visited the Medioal Library at Washingtin University in St.
Louis to observe their automated data processing system for serials? and Mr«
Turner, Mr„ Harris and Mr. Bell visited the University of Missouri to see
their various automated .systems0
Mr» Bell will outline briefly the automated circulation control systems which
he saw at Southern Illinois University and the University of Missouri. Mr6
Turner will discuss at the next meeting the automated serials system at
Washington University of St. 'Louis and the acquisitions system, at the University of Missouri.
Automated Circulation Control at Southern Illinois University
1. An IBM card has been prepared for the -central collection of books* Only a
punched and printed eaii number is on the card.
2. The circulation file is processed onto a magnetic tape and print-offs are
made for the Library.
3. Each borrower is Issued an I.B.M. card in whichrhis number is punched and
on which his name and borrowing number are embossed. The University Data
Processing and Computing Center has on magnetic tape a current file of
borrower addresses and numbers*
The borrowers card is embossed, as well as punched, so that with a minimum
of trouble borrowers may borrow material which lacks I.B.Mo book cards.
4. When a borrower presents his card and a book at the circulation desks
(i)  the borrowers ea.rd and the book card are placed into an I.B0M. 357
data collector which is the input units
(ii)  the desk elerk sets In the variable return data.
(iii)  the input unit activates an adjacent 026 I.B.M. key-punch to which it
is attached by electric cable.  The key-punch punches two cards, a
Charge Card and a Return Card with all the information from the input
unit i.e. borrowers number, call number and due date. -  2
(iv)  The Return Card and Book Card are placed in the book pocket and the
book and borrower's plaster card are given to the borrower.
(v)  The Charge Card cards for all books charged out during the day are
taken to the Data Processing and Computing Centre at the end of the
day.
(vi)  When books are returned to the Library the Return Card is taken from
the book and the book is returned to the stacks. The Return Cards are
sent to the Data Processing and Computing Centre.
(vii) Each day up-dated print-offs of books in circulation are prepared for
the library.
(viii)  The magnetic tape is searched periodically for overdues and an automatic overdue notice is printed up to go in a window envelopes
(ix)  Return card are processed for late returns and automatic fine notices
are printed to go in a window envelope.
Automated Circulation Control at the University of Missouri
The automated circulation system at the University of Missouri is a tabulating system which makes use of a model 357 I.B.M. input unit, an I.B.M. model
0 26 printing card punch, an I.B.M, sorter and collator but not a computer.
When a borrower gives his borrowers card and a book to the desk elerk, the
book card and the borrowers card are dropped into the I.B.M0 357 input unit
and the return date entered. This information is transmitted to the model
o26 printing card punch where it is punched onto an I.B.M. card.
These Charge-Out cards are then sorted and collated Into the Circulation File
which is kept at the Library.
When a book Is returned the Book Card is inserted into the I0B0M. 357 input
unit and a Return Card is created by the 026 printing card punch. Return
cards are sorted on an I.B.M. sorter, and when run through the collator
with the circulation file will select matching charge cards.
These are the skeleton outlines of the Missouri and Illinois automated
circulation control systems^ Further information is in our Automation
Library for those interested. February 27, 196-4
ONTARIO NEW UNIVERSITIES LIBRARY PROJECT
COMPUTER GENERATED BOOK FORM CATALOGUE
a progress report
The tack of compiling, by 1967, five 35»00O-volume college library
collections along with catalogues for five new Ontario "universities and
colleges* zm&e  It necessary for the University of Toronto Library to review
the various available methods of compiling and maintaining multiple library
catalogues.
The existing duplicate card catalogues which the University of Toronto
Central Library maintains in Its various subsidiary libraries have afforded
extensive and valuable experience in dealing with multiple card catalogue
records. This experience has indicated that to compile and to keep up to
date such catalogues accurately and promptly, even for collections not
exceeding 10,000 volumes, is a difficult task even when these subsidiary
•£.its are manned by qualified personnel responsible to the Central Library.
'Hie difficulty of subsidiary card catalogue maintenance increases with the
sise of the collection, the number of such subsidiary units, and their
distance from the central processing department.
These considerations, along with processing speed required by the
Ontario. New Universities Library Project (ONULP) and the apparent
advantages to be gained by applying electronic data processing methods to
Erindale and Scarborough Colleges frcaa the very beginning, were the
determining factors in deciding to base the cataloguing of the five collections
on automated procedures and to issue the catalogue record in book form.
Oar system of computer-produced and computer-maintained printed book
catalogues is designed to provide for the five new institutions an ^
author-title union catalogue, a subject union catalogue in book form, and
individual shelf lists on 3* x 5*cards. When necessary, individual book
catalogues can bs issued for any of the five institutions. Similarly, the
shelf lists car be issued in book form if desired.
Prise importance in the ONULP catalogue system is given to the contents
and format of the master record to be kept on magnetic tape. Major considerations are flexibility, machine readability, and thoroughness in recording
all pertinent data for a title. This same record is planned to provide all
required permutations of information, and to tie in with and to carry out
other library procedures apart from catalogue production* mechanization of
acquisition procedures, systematic analysis of the collection, computation
of required stack space, circulation control, bibliographic information -2-
retrieval, selective dissemlnaticn of bibliographic information, and
statistical reporting of any desired profile or detail.
The roaster tape record will be assembled from punched cards on the
IBM 1401 computer system. A basic concept of variable field lengths within
the variable-length record for each title will allow unlimited length of .
bibliographic cczspcneats to be displayed in a flexible arrangement. Tight
control over these components within the record, however, will allow ccaplete
readability of the record-by a computer.
Catalogue entry record® generation will bs carried out by a Cobol
programme written for the IBM 7090 system; then the entry record will be
sorted, set up in page or card forssats and listed on a Easter. Sorting
will be done on a computer-produced sort field containing cc&troi characters
and made up of several bibliographic cesnpoaenta in order to adhere as
closely as possible to the Library of Congress filing rules.
For the output it is planned to use upper aad lower case letters,
special characters used in bibliographic work, and diacritical marks for
the mora widely used languages.
An important part of the system will bo the automatic inclusica of
name and subject references in the catalogues. All references to name and
subject entries, and all entry history records and subject scope records
will be stored on separate tape files. These tapes will be compared by the
computer with the tapes ce&taining generated catalogue entry records, and
only references, history records and scope records pertaining to the entries
recorded on the entry record tapes will be incorporated in the entry record
tapes.
Other features are: automatic generation of title added entries and
analytical entries (in added entry fona) frca the contents note as required,
and automatic contraction of all secondary entry records to a short form.
Processing of the ONULP materials follows the accustcased patterns of
acquis!tios, cataloguing aad physical preparation. It Is only in the Eethod
and fona of recording the catalogs; information that the procedure departs
froEi the accustoaed typing on a 3t! x 5* card. Catalogue infarssaticn is recorded
on.a work-data sheet In the saiue tuiquence as this Information has to bo keypunched into the specially designed Hollerith cards. The required codes for
special features, as well as codes far all secondary bibliographical approaches,
are also included on the data sheet
• As it Is coaaonly used ia connection with catalogues, the term * entry*
is ambiguous and say signify at least three different things. To avoid
tills ambiguity, we are using the following terminology:
Entry - neae (personal or corporate), title or subject under which a
work is entered
Record - catalogue inforasatica pertaining to a work (or group of works)
Entry record - record of a work printed in a catalogue, usually qualified
as sain entry record, added entry record, or subject entry
record The attached illustration shows the lay-out of the specially designed
Hollerith card.
Since bibliographical inform:-lion retrieval and selective dissea&natioa
of bibliographical informatics are planned to be based on the LC classification
systess of the collection, it is ert'eatial that the LC class number be recorded
accurately^ corresponding to the decimal values of the nussber aystea. Edition
st&teseat appears both In the full forsa and in the abbreviatsd fors when this
statement is not mechanically divisible, in order to allow for correct
contraction of the secondary entry record. Size of the worlc Is recorded in ■ .
two dimensions - height and thickness (assusalng that the third dimension -'
depth cf ths shelf - Is not important) in order to permit calculations of
voluse of the existing collection as well as projection of future space
requirements for the collection.
City, country, and language of origin of the work are recorded to make
possible ecxspilatioas of demand-bibliographies ccabiadng these features as
necessary with analytical aspects obtainable frcsa the hierarchical systea of
tha classification, or with the form of the publication. It should be added,
however, that the effectiveness of retrieval and inforssatica disseainatiea
functions is limited by the hierarchical structure of the LC classification
system. It ha3 becesae apparent that a classification system of heterogeneous
nature is necessary to oicplolt to a largerextent the potential of retrieval
of bibliographic information.
Page format of the printed catalogue will be 8 l/2 x 11 inches divided
into three colussns listing the entry records. This forjsat will be obtained
by reducing ths computer-printed original page hf 47 %.   It is hoped to
include on a page over 30 roain and secondary entry records. Ccsspact listing
of bibliographical information in page fora presents problems of readability,
and for this reason it was necessary to modify ths accustosad indention systea
and to assign a different place to the call mzsber (see illus). Ths principal
characteristics of catalogue listing format, however, are retained.
The OMLP catalogues will appear in monthly and cumulated Issues.
Monthly issues covering tha currently acquired aad processed material are
planned to be issued for the first two months of each quarter of the ysar,
current quarterly cussalatloais for ths first and third quarters of the year,
sesd-arcmal cusulatica for the first half of the yozr and a total cusulatica
at the end cf each year. Such ccveraga offers tha E©3t ecoacaical balance
between reprinting cost and ease cf consultation* for an item searched at sny
tisse, up to an average meiber of three Issues would have to be consulted and
an average of three printings waasld bo required for each unit of bibliographic
record.
The desiga of the ONULP catalogue systera has emphasised ths Inadequacy
of our present ssthods of bibliographical organisation for the purposes of
electronic data processing. The consistency and logic of the electronic
data processing systems cannot be notched by the structure- of present
bibliographical organisation. Ths results cf data processing applications to
bibliographic ccaxtrol therefore can not exceed the limitations inherent in
our usthods of bibliographical control. -4-
A major and jnost effective characteristic of electronic data processing
is its abilityP at high speeds, to scan, compare, systematise and rearrange
large sa.-sos of inforsEaticn. This ability is ideally suited for retrieval
and display of bibliographical informlion. However, if entry is to remain
the bibliographic approach .of the future, a acre systematic entry system
will be neededj ar.d a rsuch sore leglce.I and organically co-ordinated system
of analytical structure of concepts (classification) and system of analytical
terminology of concepts (subject headings, descriptors) required.
Entry is the principal elessaat of Identification and approach in our
present bibliographical system. Za ofisr to penait a higher level of
organisation of entries for retrieval.;, it is essential that forra and
structure of the entire variety of entries should ccafora to the level of
the logic of the computer5 or at least should attempt to approach It. The
present font an3 structure of entry;, particularly in the corporate field,
really do not perssit any complex logical aanipalatlcas of entry, and output
cannot excceed the complexity of the input. It is essential therefore to
standardise the form of entry by eliminating deviations within the larger
groups of entry. Thus the personal na^e entry would have to eliminate
variations arising froa the presence or absence of full first names or
Initials, or the presence or absence of dates of birth and death. Even aore
important Is the standardisation of tae structure of corporate entry, and
possible the limitation of the mxisrs, length of an entry. The rules of
entry have to be freed froa the diversity of the structure of the corporate
bodies and divisioas these entries represent. Heedless to say, the philosophy
of our filing predilections has to to reappraised aad simplified.
This is a tresssndcsis task, but the advent of electronic data processing
requires a basic review of the very foundations of our bibliographic thinking-
It appeal's that we nay need a new Nev Code of cataloguing - a requirement that
still eoess to be neglected by cataloguers and the IFLk  ccs552is3ioa for
catalogue code revision.
Even acre striking is the need far a co-ordinated systea of analysis of
subject matter treated in the bibliographic units. The present dichotomy of
the systems of classification and tcsslnology for display of subject natter is
an historical phencsasnon based ca t-ho seed t© reconcile tercdnol©<gr vsith
systeaatisatlon, tied t© a ccsrprcsriso botweea analysis of subject setter and
storage of bocks, in principle thoro Is no reason to require two channels of
approach to ths saee information. Required^ really,. Is a co-ordinated structure
of systematisatioa and teaiaology, i.cu, a systeaa of concept terasinology
(subject headings, descriptors) thai ccrrespcsds to and is readily and
xaschanically traaslateabl© into a systcsa of concept structurisation (classification).
Instead of fields of knowledge r*nd their empirical and theoretical sub-
divisicas, tho concept should form th& basis of this co-ordinated systea.
However, structure based oa concepts does not characterise the Eost widely
used classification systems. It is true that the existing subject headings
and descriptor systess esiplcy concept structure to a large degree, but taoy hardly
can claia to contribute to the systa^stlsatdoa of the inforsation they espress. -5-
The design of the OHULP catalogue system has not provided a solution for
these problems. Accepting the presently unavoidable limitations, the
project has proceeded to the programming stage which now is nearing
completion. It is expected that the first issues of the catalogue will be
produced this Spring. These first issueswill be printed with a standard
IBM Fortran chain until the special chainT containing the characters selected
for bibliographical work is received, and the result of our work should not
be judged by these early issues*
The ONULP catalogue has been planned to serve a Multiple purpose. It
will be the only catalogue for the two new University of Toronto colleges,
Scarborough and Erindale which are to open their doors in 1965 and 1966
respectively. It will also serve as a readily available undergraduate
catalogue for the entire university, as well as a bibliographical list that
could be used by any college library. The project will also provide a
testing ground for some of the technical aspects of atechanising bibliographical control, thus pointing the way for the introduction of automated
procedures into the general operation of the University of Toronto's library
system.
Rltirars Brogsis
Assistant Librarian
(Technical Services)
University <& Toronto -6-
APPENDIX
SUBJECT.  OR AUTHOR  REFERENCE
CALL  NUMBER
CLASS
NUMBER
_L
CUTTER   NUMBERS
EDITION
NO.
OF
VOLS.
CTRY   CITY   L«N8.      DATE
SPECIAL
ASPECT
Jl
proc.
DATE
SEOUENCE
NUMBER
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
1 1 1 4  S  I   7 I I 1(11 II DM »ll 17 II It JO 21 221324 25 20 27 212130 31 32 33 34 35 M 37 38 39 40 4142 43 44 45 4147 4149 SO SI 92 S3 94 H H S7HS1WII12 t3MI5MI?MI9 70 71
1  1 1 1  11  1 1 1 1 1  1  1 1 1 1 1 1  1  1  1  1 1 1  1  1 1 1  1 1 1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1 1 1  1  1 1  11  1 1  1  1 1 1  1  11 11 1 11 1  1  1 1 1 1  1  11 1 1 1
PAGES   OR   VOLU
MEs//
ILLUS   STATEMENT
o U
E*
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 I 3 3 j 3 i 3 3 3
VARIABLES
55555555555555555555 5555555555 55555 55555 55555 55555555555555555555555555
CONTENTS
AUTHOR    TITLE
//
7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 77 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 777
NO. LOC   NO.  LOO   NO-  LOC NO.   LCC  NO.  LOC.   NO.  LOC   NO.  LOC.   NO. | LOC   NO.  L0C.  NO   LOC  NO.   LOC   NO.  LOC. NO.   LOC  NO  IOC  NO   LOC  NO.   LOC  Na   LOC
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 99 9 9 9 9 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 99 9 9 9 9 99 9 9 99 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 99 99 9 9 9
00
73 74
11
22
33
44
55
66
77
88
99
00000
79 71 77 7171
11111
22222
33333
44444
55555
66666
77777
88888
11)411  J » » 10 II O 13 W BB 17 II tttO2l2t23l42Stl272ia303l3233343538373»3S4a4l424344484t474>4l50»IS2»3S45SS0»S«i»Mtl02lll40SWWWW7O>l
II6.4   -
99999
71|73T4I5 7IT7»
0
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
win
Fig. 1.      IBM card layout for title record
fci-l r.viQ f curre'D umrf \
£j*J2&L.
CONS/ertTlONSll- TlTL.e
T ITLC
1   £Di-norj    trflrr.
'J c
TrtPtfiuT
1    PH6IHG        |IUUS.     ST^TgM^fWr I      I       fr^P;
ryorei
/sfoT £i
<i.
TRQCINGI*
1
\*«oc I        lex,* I W^m \U*m-l \TR£N1
Fig. 2.      Format of main entry record
flPDeO
ED ["ol iOAref
£"fs/rrti?~
L
r< rue
dafi?\   I p/)& trial
-£alL&iL
H
J fro.       *7f)T.
10LPH)
Fig. 3.      Format of added entry record ONUL Project
No, 1 Newsletter November 4, 1963
The purpose of this newsletter is to give you, the members
of the University Library staff, information about the progress
of the Ontario New Universities Library Projecto This project
is being undertaken by our library at the request of the Province
of Ontarioo
As you know, the University of Toronto is establishing two
new off-campus colleges- Scarborough College and Erindale College.
It is expected that students will enrol in September 1965 for
Scarborough College and shortly after for Erindale Gollege0 It
is our responsibility to acquire and process a basic book
collection for each of these two colleges* Three new universities —
UfL^Ja"  Brock, Trent and Guelph havo need of similar book collections0
Indeed, Trent University's need is even more urgent than ours
because their classes begin in September 1964D
Since the funds for these institutions come from the same
source, and since the University of Toronto Library'would be
selecting and processing a book collection in duplicate for the
University's two off-campus colleges, it was suggested that we expand
our plan and include the other three universitieso It was agreed
by all of the universities concerned that this would be practical
and the Ontario New Universities Library Project came into beingo
It was announced in September that the Project would begin on
October lo As yet no books have been ordered. There has been a
slight delay. Until the fund was officially established, it seemed
unwise to hire staff or order equipment o This is being done now
and gradually ths organisation is taking shape <, As soon as the
special order fonas are received and a few other details are ironed
out we shall go into action0
The selection of title? will be made in the ONUL Project
• Office, Boom 25» The processing will be done by the Acquisition^
and Catalogue Departmentso Books for Scarborough and Erindale
Colleges will be stored on campus somewhere until those libraries
are ready for them*. Books for the other participating libraries
will be shipped to them as soon as thay are processed,. In a later
issue of OHUL Project News you will be hearing from tho processing
department <. Tnc K::'ir of our select'on will bo o.<r present, undergradcaly
i.o'1. Lecuionn,.  bat wa tdiall s'..o>>  '-•  duplicatJ.-]g  c,?:cse entirely,,    Ou;*.
<oj iec^our. have boon built, n;> o'<r-c a period of yean- and many of
\Uo. ->,it.lcr. ait- now out of prii.w'.,.     i'-br tho ^■iojcct wo shall ycnu;ir\>
only .'u -or) no monograph tn-o <->orb-'"i -:     If imtcid.al cannot Do nurch-jpoH
;>-;t-bound i t will remain unbound.     Mo binding  for the Project will
bo dor.o by th.ir library <,    Mo on    jna to rial *; will bo ordered.    No
Fcvialr will be ordered 0    Thi:; w.'ll rorAnct ur somewhat 'in
{.a'nulring a nn.table colioe !,;;.< >p bacfmrc racny essential Items am
o-p ■ and  in rcra.nl form.,    llowuvur,   tho participating llbrarier,
wis j  fill   in tho gaps later-,    We have .installed a Verifax copier
)a Room 25 and will use this wy of reporting to the participating
1 i'-j-aricr when dor :tred itomr .nro  found  to bo a,p0
boon ;j5»   *n addition t.o  i p'? a -;sjt  'die selection office for tho
O'-dl. Project,  b^ an 'Ifndorgrach >;; l, ? book: Selection Office*' for \,b&
en. ■;:," stair Lol'b'Ci.ionc..    We h.'V'o  '."oi-n pnrKuvmg orders for N'tw
Co.! ingo for the pant uhrco w>2\;-     II j;. expected that the
tb:-<.' College Library will open a>o.it> a year from, now?    itoanwhile
tby New College books will do cirovrjated from tho University
College Libraryn    This collection will bo similar to that in
University College, but with a  fow additional subjects now taught
in  h'ne Faculty of Arts*
Tho public j-or-zica deparUioni.s will, of courses continue 'to
select for tho on-carapur- uudej-gradua'C-e collections, and we arts
counting on their co-operation and helpful suggertions for the
Projecto    The Circulation Department is already routing orders
for the Wallace boom through us uo  <»ho Order Section,, ?o that somo
of thecc can be copied for tho other colleeldonso    We !x)pe the
Science end I-tedicine Department will do something sSflrilarc    The
participating libraries have been invited  to send in recommendations
ard  two* iists have come from Tr^nu OniversHy this week*.    Wo shall
be seeking the advice of our acuity., olsoc    Wrta all these
•s^consnendaoionr. coming to this office it may well be that the new
un1ver:--iiier will r-erve to add something new to our own collectionso
Thl:;, bettor was just about to bo copied cy "ditto* when tho
Projoot order clipr arrived so we are pleased  to add the
announcement that the first order requerts have already been
for*urd«d to the Acquisition Department.>    The first title to be
Cidored will be The Macmillan dictionary of Canadian biography*
3rd orb, re\a. and onl.., edited by wb S~ Wallaceo
7bi*.cr:    Vb Taylor,
.'. ordinator
2'jL Project,, Ol'JUL Project Newsletter
Mc 2 Baceaber 4, 1963.
V.hea c^u* first Newsletter v*.s sent to you the OMUL Project was
preparing for action, bat bow wo nrs definitely in business as the
foliating progress report Kill indicate.
Aeqri -v.iticK.v_.Psparts36rit
Wilder the- terns cf the arrangerac-at with thy Oatario Government
only in-print, non-serial, material will bo ordered by the Project,
aad no binding will bo provided for items received unboucd*    As fee
Oetcbar 1, 1963 press release of the Oatario Coveramont stated Beo.cl»
College ewHl2 purchase its ova pcxloMcals, uerial publications,
out-of-print materials and additloc.sOL boek$ which relate to the uolquo
characteristics of the Institution>n<.
As iba acquisition of this restricted typs of publication should
not be cofflplioatod, ar.d In order to keep fcooie-fceeping and processing
cotits lowK it hax? baeu decided to contrail kg the purchasing as much
&s possible,,    Tho Co-operative Boei Csatrc* of Canada Ltd0 \w& hem
selected as tho chief agoat for Eopiioh language publications, and
va are negotiating with Martlnuo KI,5hoff of Toe Hague to act as our
sgent for Foreign-language publicstionn«    Since to many Earopaan booka
are sold unbound, wo *ro asking NX j ft off to pre-blssd the roluwea far
uai before dipping them.    A representative of the firm is coming to
seo us, and we hope to complete our arrangements with this firm shortly..
10 DATS WE CAN EEPOHT AS IOLLOWS*
lo    Tag chief accountant of ths University h«e notified
ua feat tho sra of <32','09000 baa been received froa
the Province of Ontario t-o buy books for the Project
during 1963/64>«
2o    In the first throe wooka we ha^o placed orders for
.446 Titloo, at an estimated cost of $209067oQQ«
These represent Engltch language titles onlyo
3«   ^a ar© holding £ Titles for yarolga-Lan£»ag8 miter-
ial until our Nijhoff arrangements are completedo 4o    We tiro oegeriy uw7iU.xig the first shipacnt frca
tho Co-op*    Ho books have bscn delivered to date.
STOP PRESS8    15 cartons from Co-op have just been delivered to
the Order Section*.
She Project Catalogue Section eagerly await the above mentioned
cartona* Is you have perhaps hoard they plan to introduce us to book
catalogues*
SKSd^d^^^22.'^rL22ddA9JL^
Each of the five libraries in the Ontario Haw Universities Library
Frojoot, Brack, Erindale f Guelphs Scarborough „ Trent, will have at the
coaptation of the Project in 1967 about 17*£00 titles or 35»000 vol-
UT.sr.j    To construct catalogues for five libraries of this aiza by the I ^
uwiei. jae'thods, using unit cards with secondary headings added arid constructing five separate networks of references, would in itself require
s. larga expenditure of tisa and sir-fib, but„  to smintain and fcot&p these
catalogues up to date, using conventional methods with more tfe«.A two
htis-drod volucoa being processed daily- would not be economically fe&-
sibloo    It was decided instead to offer the particip'stin.g unl^sraitiec
an autbor-title book catalogue,? a subject Mob cntal©^aes aad a ebolf- "
lists.    Initially these will be union: book catalogues giving the holdings of all fi«e libraries,,    Later* howerar, tho Ual7uivity of Toronto'a
t^x* «if*ca.!3spco colleger., Scarborough and Erindale„ ssay haws separate
C-af^leguof.^ which could also contain Eaterlal in their collections
th'-i %6 not part of xbe Project.    It Is planned to Iesuc the catalogues
jsonthly with qti&rterly and oomi-ennvisl currant cumulations and ixfimaal
to-date cuas'ulaticcsis..    The first issue is aigpocted sometime during
February*
After the participating libraries had agreed to accept book catalogues,  the ccntr-tcst. for 'the design of the system was awarded to
Interaction! Su^iaeca flachineoo    Mr., George low.lr9 Account rop.re-
««j.ateslve, >-isd Mr* Tcay Slack,, Syatcrsa engineer froa IEM, are n>w working ca the di'sigAo    KiTo Rregaies Head of Technical Sorvisoa, end Mr»
SadUl>» flesh of the Project Catalogue Seotion, work with thos la ordar
to ir'tarpret the library" s' reqaireTiic&ta for tho design gyatew*; ^ttg%as>erOo
.fIn-3 Information for'titles ia tho Project will be recorded
«,, ^.^..-a ^u--.;»tsj in .an order which, for moohanic.il reasons, differs scae-
w7>at fros ths eowhatioool cataloguing order, though in the final print-
cn.il:. t,sa> f&?c> of the i-atry will be the same as at pr&santo    A Hbrary
jii,.3l:'.-tant will  th«js keypunch tee information fma the data esh«et oa to
li-.M e.-u-dso    Tor this pnrpooe, a keypx^cb machine will be installed la the
MfCsul Unit sfc the beginning of December, and uelected library assist-
austa vi.il attend & four day training course in keypunching gtess fey the Once a Konth the punched IBM cards will ha aont to the Unimorally !o Data Processing Depertcnont, where tho keypunch Information vill
be tronsforrod 'to cagnetio tevpa.    Ihia tape will beeomo tho porcaneat
master racordo    According to tho programme written by 'the IK4 engineers for tho Project's various requirements, the information en fee
mastfir record can be copied end rearranged on other tapes to fors the
author-title or subject cataloguer»    This nevJy -rearranged tape copy
will then by run off on a high speed computer-printer which will produce tho Enator pages for the desired catalogue.    Ihese nsaster pages
will be stat to the University of Toronto Press v*hlch9 after reducing ths slrio of the prlnts will produce hy off-set the required nusa-
hzr of copioo of the cataloguee
Further information on the doaiga of the Project0n book catalogues,, and the procedures followed in fee Project Catalogue Section,
will be given in future issues of tho Newsletter*
JglftoUoa^
During the month of Nove&bor, 622 titles ha«"e boon aeleetcd end
order olipa for -4591 voluaoo have haaa seat to the Order Section*
lb«i3e titles arc for courses in English literature, history,, psychology , and a number of general reference hooka„ dleticuarisa cad
encyclopediaso Wo tire now selecting for courses ia political science9
sociology and French literature «>
A draft copy of tho "Srent Gnlvorsity Calendar for 19&V-5 was- received in tho Project Office aad it I® interostiag to soe hou such
progress has been made in Peterborough alraadyo Ihey have &  considerable nuaber of faculty liistodo It is not known.whether they are
all ia residence yet, but they aro making thoir presence felt )>y
goading reoccisiondation3 to this office through their librariano
Cuastlorit"
I? you have any quoatlonst you would liho ©sewered about tho
Proj.;5t^ p?.saso eead thea to tho editor, Boos 25o She will forward
yam- question to a m>-^>if of tho Ghat? Ccsxaittae host qualified to
ansus?© If you ha^o any suggestions they vould be aoct welcosueo
Editorj 70 Taylors
Co -ordiKator j,
ONUL Projects ONUL Project Newsletter
No. 3 March 19, 1964..
In December we reported that the first shipment of books
had arrived from the Co-operative Book Centre. Other shipments have followed and we have now received our first shipment
from Nijhoff. We have discovered that at least two months are
required by an agent to supply an in-print book„
On March 6th the Order Section reported that 2968 titles,
estimated at $100,000 had been ordered. Of these titles the
suppliers reported that 167 titles were unobtainable. At that
.date 879 titles had been received - the cost was $40,000. At
present the Order Section reckons the average cost per volume
from Co-op to be $5.94 and from Nijhoff $5-53. It is expected
that the Nijhoff average cost will rise when their binding
charges are added. As yet we have not received from them any
volumes that required binding.
By the end of February 793 titles had been received, processed and shipped or stored. The total number of volumes was
5575, each participating library receiving 1115 volumes. The
Erindale and Scarborough collections have been stored temporarily in the Reference Department work room. Within a few days
the storage room in the Borden Building on Spadina Crescent
should be ready and the Reference Department will be relieved.
We thank them sincerely for having suffered this inconvenince
so patiently,
Mr. Bregzis tells us that within a few weeks the first
issues of the ONULP book catalogue will be produced. The
following paragraphs are a part of Mr. Bregzis' progress report on this Computer generated book form catalogue. If you
wish to read the balance of his report, please let us know.
"Our system of computer-produced and computer-maintained
printed book catalogues is designed to provide for the five
new institutions an author-title union catalogue, a subject
union catalogue in book form, and individual shelf lists on
3" x 5" cards. When necessary, individual book catalogues can
be issued for any of the five institutions. Similarly, the
shelf lists can be Issued In book form If desired.
Prime importance in the ONULP catalogue system is given
to the contents and format of the master record to be kept on
magnetic tape. Major considerations are flexibility, machine
readability) and thoroughness in recording all pertinent data for a title. This same record is planned to provide all required permutations of information, and to tie in with and to
carry out other library procedures apart from catalogue productions mechanization of acquisition procedures, systematic
analysis of the collection, computation of required stack space,
circulation control, bibliographic information retrieval, selective dissemination of bibliographic information,  and statistical reporting of any desired profile or detail.
The master tape record will be assembled from punched
cards on the IBM 1401 computer system. A basic concept of
variable field lengths within the variable-length record for
each title will allow unlimited length of bibliographic components to be displayed in a flexible arrangement. Tight control over these components within the record, however, will
allow complete readability of the record by a computer.
Catalogue entry record generation will be carried out by
a Cobol programme written for the IBM 7090 systemj then the
entry record will be sorted, set up in page or card formats
and listed on a master. Sorting will be done on a computer-
produced sort field containing control characters and made up
of several bibliographic components in order to adhere as*
closely as possible to the Library of Congress filing rules.
For the output it is planned to use upper and lower case
letters, special characters used in bibliographic work; and
diacritical marks for the more widely used languages.
An important part of the system will be the automatic
inclusion of name and subject references in the catalogues.
All references to name and subject entries5, and all entry
history records and subj ect scope records will be stored on
separate tape files. These tapes will be compared by the
computer with the tapes containing generated catalogue entry
records, and only references, history records and scope records pertaining to the entries recorded on the entry record
tapes will be incorporated in the entry record'tapes.
Other features are? automatic generation of title added
entries and analytical entries (in added entry-form) from the
contents note as required, and automatic contraction of ail
secondary entry records to a short form.
Processing of the ONULP materials follows the accustomed
patterns of acquisition, cataloguing and physical preparation.
It is only In the method and form of recording the catalogue
information that the procedure departs from the accustomed
typing on a 3" x 5" card. Catalogue- Information is recorded
on a work-data sheet in the same sequence as this information
has to be key-punched into the specially designed Hollerith __— 3 -
cards. The required codes for special features, as well as
codes for all secondary bibliographical approaches, are also
included on the data sheet.
Since bibliographical information retrieval and selective
dissemination of bibliographical information are planned to be
based on the LC classification system of the collection, it is
essential that the LC class number be recorded accurately, corresponding to the decimal values of the number system. Edition
statement appears both in the full form and in the abbreviated
form when this statement is not mechanically divisible, in order to allow for correct contraction of the secondary entry
record. Size of the work is recorded in two dimensions -
height and thickness (assuming that the third dimension - depth
of the shelf - is not important) in order to permit calculations of volume of the existing collection as well as projec—
tion of future space requirements for the collection.
City, country, and language of origin of the work are recorded to make possible compilations of demand-bibliographies
combining these features as necessary with analytical aspects
obtainable from the hierarchical system of the classification,
or with the form of the publication. It should be added, however, that the effectiveness of retrieval and information dissemination functions is limited by the hierarchical structure
of the LC classification system. It has become apparent that
a classification system of heterogeneous nature is necessary
to exploit to a larger extent the potential of retrieval of
bibliographic information.
Page format of the printed catalogue will be 8-1/2 x 11
inches divided into three columns listing the entry records.
This format will be obtained by reducing the computer-printed
original page by 47 °/o . It is hoped to include on a page
over 30 main and secondary entry records. Compact listing
of bibliographical information in page form presents problems
of readability, and for this reason it was necessary to modify
the accustomed indention system and to assign a different-place
to the call number. The principal characteristics
of catalogue listing format, however, are retained.
The ONULP catalogues will appear in monthly and cumulated
issues. Monthly issues covering the currently acquired and
processed material are planned to be issued for the first two
months of each quarter of the year, current quarterly cumulations for the first and third quarters of the year, semiannual cumulation for the first half of the year and a total
cumulation at the end of each year* Such coverage offers the - 4
most economical balance between reprinting cost and ease of
consultation; for an item searched at any time, up to an average number of three issues would have to be consulted and an
average of three printings would be required for each unit of
bibliographic record.
The design of the ONULP catalogue system has emphasized
the inadequacy of our present methods of bibliographical organization for the purposes of electronic data processing. The
consistency and logic of the electronic data processing systems
cannot be matched by the structure of present'bibliographical
organization. The results of data processing applications to
bibliographic control therefore can not exceed the limitations
inherent in our methods of bibliographical control."
Any questions?
Editors V. Taylor,
Co-ordinator,
ONUL Project. /1
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