University Publications - UBC Library Staff Bulletin

UBC Library Bulletin Nov 1, 1974

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 No. 113
November 1, 197U
SALE OF SURPLUS LIBRARY BOOKS
The Collections Division has concluded an agreement with the University's Finance
Department whereby the Library will be able to sell its surplus books through the
Gifts & Exchanges Division and deposit the receipts into one of its own accounts.
These receipts will be reported regularly to the UBC Finance Department and the money
will be used strictly for the purchase of books for the Library's collections.
In order to simplify the sale procedures, while at the same time favoring the University community, we have worked out an arrangement with the UBC Bookstore for the
maintenance of a special used book table. The Bookstore has offered to buy batches of
books from us to sell them at clearance prices on a regular basis. We hope to begin
this experiment in November when the Bookstore has reorganized its floor plan.
Books which are not suitable for sale through the Bookstore will be set aside in
the Gifts and Exchanges Division to be sold in more appropriate ways.
A special.embossed seal, indicating that the book in question has been discarded
from the UBC Libraries will be applied to the title page of every book which has ever
een  identified in any way as Library property. This is for the protection not only
of the institution but of any subsequent owners and will be used in every discarded
Library book, regardless of whether it is to be sold, given away, or recycled.
ELECTIONS TO THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS
<L
The new Universities Act makes provision for a Board of Governors consisting of
the Chancellor, the President, two faculty members, two students, one  full-tiae non-
faculty university employee, and eight persons appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council, two of whom shall be appointed from among persons nominated by the Alumni
Association.
At its meeting of October 9th, the Senate accepted a report from its Committee on
the Implementation of the Universities Act which placed all library employees, both
librarians and supporting staff, in the category of full-time non-faculty university
employee, for the purposes of election to the Board of Governors,
The elections will be conducted by the Registrar, who called for nominations  from
this category on October 28th, 1971*.    Each candidate must be nominated in writing,  and
the nomination must be signed by seven persons entitled to vote in the election; in
other words, both the candidate and his or her supporters must be full-time non-
faculty university employees.    The candidate must indicate willingness to stand for
election, and supply a brief curriculum vitae, which must be sent to the Registrar
by the deadline of November 12th.    Elections will be conducted by mail ballot on
December 10.    The new Board will assume its responsibilities sometime after January
I, 1975. -2-
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR THE STAFF ROOM COMMITTEE
We all use the staff room facilities but the work involved in maintaining them is
often left to a few. We have found our duties, which include responsibility for the
staff room, the sick bay, and also various activities at Christmas time, to have been
interesting. We feel the experience gained has made the work we did worthwhile.
The staff room committee would like to ask for volunteers to serve on this committee for the coming year. This would be a great opportunity for people who would like
to see some changes in the staff room and sick bay to come forward. How about it?
Any interested people please contact:
Louise Axen
Laine Ruus
Joan Cosar
- Members of the 1973/1971* committee
REPORTS FED TO SHEEP
"CANBERRA (Reuter) - An Australian government organization has found a new use for
its reports - feeding them to sheep.
Research scientist Dr. Barry Coombe of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial
Research Organization has been using old printed reports as part of an experimental
diet for sheep, and the latest bulletin says the animals are thriving."
NOISE
It's sometimes easy'to forget that the Library exists and is maintained for the
needs of users.  One of these needs is a reasonable degree of quiet in study areas.
A few complaints have been made in recent weeks by carrell users about the amount of
noise made by staff members when passing through the stacks, particularly stack level
2 where groups of staff members come to or go home from work via the mail room, and
at the south end of stack level 1 during coffee and lunch periods. Enough said.
TAXI EXPENSES - THE LATEST WRINKLE
The Director of Personnel now requests that all claims for taxi expenses be signed
by the staff member making the claim, and also by the appropriate Division or Branch
Head. Staff members should be aware that the procedures for claiming taxi expenses
had to be devised on the spur of the moment by the Librarian's Office, in the absence
of any arrangements being made by the Personnel Office, All forms which have been
received by the Librarian's Office have been submitted to the Personnel Office promptly.
Changes in procedures may be forthcoming from the Personnel Office,  In the meantime,
excuse the inconvenience.
Pane] on Headache
see
Ad Hoc Committee on Headache, -3-
NEW WORK PATTERNS III: PART-TIME WORK, SOUND WAVE OF THE FUTURE
Social Sciences reference librarian Barbara Pearce writes:
Perhaps all of us feel, at one time or another, that In the rush of holding a
full-time job, some part of our life is beinp short-chanr,cd. Our children are growing
up and out into the world at an overwhelming pace.
Or there nay he some sort of desired personal
development for which there is never enough time.
Flexible or compressed hours of work, and leaves
of absence will ease the strain in some cases;
part-time work could be another answer*
As it stands now, part-time work does not
easily fit into a person1« sense of commitment
to her or his career; working part-time, it
seems, would be like an extra activity; it
couldn't be as maximally satisfying as a job should be. What's more, opportunities
for part-time work are few.
The availability of part-time work, on a career basis, with the possibility of
moving from full-time to part-time and vice versa as our needs change, would not only
give us that additional time for ourselves, as private people, but would allow us to
pursue our careers seriously and to escape the feeling that we are merely playing
with work.
The scaling of fringe benefits would not be too difficult. Nor would scheduling
be too great a problem.  Some applied effort and experimentation could settle the
details. The major problem would be continuity both in the work as a whole and in the
feelings/approach of each individual,,.The people in a  particular work-ai ca---a division
or whatever—would have to set up definite communication procedures, test them for
effectiveness, and then stick to them.
Part-timer Isabel Pitfielcl writes:
In June I began working two dc.ys a week in the Interlibrary Loan 0rfi.ee. The m:\in
reason for my wanting to work part-time was a need to reconcile the demands of a family
(which, incidentally, I find to be challenging and rewarding most of the time—,1ust not
ay. the time!) with a desire for activity and stimulation as an individual.  Also, I
enjoy library work and wanted to keep involved, even in & small way, with developments
in the library world. I'm sure such reasons are fairly standard*
In my case, part-time work has meant th;?.t one position is shared between tv/o people:
myself and lladine Baldwin, Such position-sharing obviously requires a certain amount of
communication (which I think wc manage to achieve via our frenzied little notes to one
another, and over the occasional-cup of coffee).
It may not always be feasible to hire part-time staff. This depend;; mainly on the
requirements of particular jobs, and on the employer's willingness to experiment.  In
instances where it i^n feasible, I think employers benefit because they cxn  make use of
the largely untapped potential of people who cannot or do not want to work full-time.
Part-time work permits women, especially, to contribute to the professions for which
they were trained and, at the same time, to meet domestic responsibilities.  In the
future, we may find that—with or without families—women ar}d_ men are interested in
varying their daily activities...more and more people may he educated ffjr more than one
type of work. Part-time employment has become more common in the last few years; I
think it will continue to p.ain  acceptance as more employers and employees find it is
to their mutual benefit.
As for me, my work in Interlibrary Loons continues to be interesting and different
every day.  I find two days a week is just enough, and I look forward to the mental
stimulation and contact with other librarians that the job affords. I hope many
other librarians will have similar opportunities to work part-time.
c -<l-
ANNOUNCEMENTS
MAIN LIBRARY RECYCLABLES
Due to the lack of space in the storage room, recyclables should now be deposited
in the corridor, where they were before. *
FACULTY GUIDE
Copies of the latest issue of the U.B.C. Library News, the "Faculty Guide, 197J»/75llf
have been distributed to faculty members and professional staff on campus.  The Guide
is a reasonably complete and detailed account of public services offered by the Library,
Any staff member who didn't - and wants to - get a copy, can pick one up in the Information & Orientation Division.
TENNIS ANYONE?
The Information & Orientation Division has an extra U.B.C. campus map, approximately 18" x 36rr, mounted on cardboard. Can any branch library or division use it?
Phone 2076.
WANTED
The following items are needed to complete Library holdings an<J/or to fulfill
exchange commitments:
B.C. Motorist v.9 no.2 (1970); v.10 no.2 (1971)
Journal of Business Administration  v.*4 no.l (1973)
New Canadian. (Vrncouver)  v.37 no.5^ (July 1973)
Ubysscy  v.56 no.l (September 10, 197J0  13 copies
UPWAKD MOBILITY
The following recruitment notices have been x*eceived by the Library recently.
For more complete job descriptions and contact addresses, get in touch with Michael
Kasper in the I & 0 Division (2076).
Indiana University, Bloomington, Head, Journalism Library. (Date posted Oct. 9.,197M
University of Itew Brunswick. Fredericton. Head, Science Library. ( Oct, 18,197*0
University of Washington. Seattle.  Library Personnel Officer.    (  "   Sept,30,197*0
NEW APPOIHTMEMTS, PROMOTIONS, TRAMSFEES, SEVERANCES
NEW APPOINTMENTS
P. Barnes
P. Chan
V. English
G. Forster
M. Meredith
J. Neamtan
S. Shuff
R. Young
L.A.I
Woodward
KPO 1
Acquisitions
L.A.I
Interlibrary Loans
L.A.I
Sedgewick
L.A.I
Catalogue Prep.
L.A.I
Government Pubs.
L.A.I
Catalogue Prep.
Librarian
Government Pubs.
PROMOTIONS
D. Gray -L.A.I Woodward to L.A.II Interlibrary Loans
TRANSFERS - none
RESIGNATIONS
J. Chong
J. Carrigan
S. Edwards
C. Heywood
B. Jung
M. Meyer
J. Munro
P. Piddington
T. Sanders
L.A.II
I.L.L.Woodward
L.A.I
Fine Arts Division
L.A.I
Woodward
L.A.II
Catalogue Prep.
L.A.IV
Sedgewick
KPO I
Catalogue Prep.
L.A.II
Curric Lab
Librarian
Government Pubs.
L.A.I
Woodward
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