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A list of Japanese maps of the Tokugawa era Beans, George H., 1894-1978 1951

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 THE LIBRARY
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THE UNIVERSITY Of
BRITISH COLUMBIA
     A List of
JAPANESE MAPS
of the Tokugawa Era
    A List of
JAPANESE MAPS
OF THE TOKUGAWA ERA
By GEORGE H. BEANS
TALL TREE LIBRARY
Jenkintoum 1951
 LIBRARY
Publication No. 23
 CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION 3
LIST OF MAPS 7
REFERENCES and INDEX 45
  LIST OP ILLUSTRATIONS
	
World map of the Shoho Period, 1645.2
Frontisp
iece
Plan of Edo, 1664.2
facing page
13
The Tokaido Highway, [1672.3]
14
Plan of Kyoto, 1691.1
16
Japan by Ryusen, 1697.1
17
Suruga Province, 1701.12
18
Polar hemispheres, 1708.5
20
World map based on Chinese sources, 1710.1
21
Harima Province, i 749.1
22
Nagasaki, 1764.1
23
Japan by Sekisui, i 779.1
24
Iceland and Greenland, 1789.24
27
World map from Dutch sources, i 796.1
29
Kamakura; its shrines and temples, 1798. i
30
India, 1828.1
34
Suruga Province, 1837.13
37
China by Hokusai, 1840. i
38
Yokohama, 1859.1
42
Hokkaido, 1859.2
43
  A List of
JAPANESE MAPS
of the Tokugawa Era
 ABBREVIATIONS
p page. We have sometimes used this term to denote one side of a
folded sheet but page numbers are used only in connection with books
bound in western style.
s sheet or sheets. Here used to denote a sheet bound in a book with
printing on one side only but folded once and the "free" edges held
in a binding. The numbers (not always present) should be sought at
the fold where the thumb normally holds the open book. All measurements are in inches. They are approximate; old Japanese paper is
often very elastic and close measurements are meaningless.
*   this symbol signifies the map is represented in the Tall Tree Library.
 INTRODUCTION
EARLY Japanese cartography offers a certain appeal to the map collector who seeks a
field more or less remote from the standards that govern the collecting of occidental
maps. At least, that was our excuse for embarking on an adventure utterly strange to us. We
wanted to try something different.
There were good reasons for confining the collection to the To\ugawa Era, which became
established in 1615 and ended in i86j. Japanese maps of the sixteenth century or earlier
are too rare; after 1867 they became too plentiful. Also, it is pleasant to contemplate that our
maps are of an era of feudalism, beginning with a self-imposed isolation, and ending before
a single mile of railroad had been constructed within the confines of Japan:
The present compilation will, it is hoped, be helpful to others who may care to study old
Japanese maps. It had its inception in an attempt to bring some order out of the confusion that
confronts the novice in things Japanese. The foundation of our compilation has been the listing of important periods of Japanese history from the standpoint of the cartography of that
country. The next step has been to enter in the proper place a short description of maps mentioned in various wor\s of reference. The final step has been to obtain those maps, whenever
possible, and where successful in this respect, to describe the entries more fully. Occasionally we have succeeded in acquiring maps not encountered in earlier lists.
Throughout the period of our maps Japan, for governing purposes, was made up of three
major divisions. These in turn consisted of provinces. The accompanying diagram will clarify the numerous references to groups of provinces encountered in our list.
In the absence of any universally recognized standard, we have tried to let common sense
govern our description of our maps and the tomes in which we have found them. We shall
let the collector discover for himself some of the surprises in store for the reader who, for the
first time, opens an old accordian-folded Japanese boo\, whether it be bound or within loose
boards. In our bibliography attention is called to helpful studies of some of the problems
which we here can merely mention casually.
Unless described either as Ms., painting or copper-engraving, our map entries are to be
understood as being printed from wood blocks. In 1792 we encounter our earliest metal-
engraved map, but long after that date the earlier method of printing continued to compete,
and woodcut maps were made right up to the end of the To\ugawa Era, and even later.
Many of the earlier wood blocks had a long life and were sometimes put to press in after
years. This raises the \notty problem of reprints. We are not too sure even the experts will
always agree on the age of certain prints. However, the moderate cost of most Japanese prints
will usually serve to temper what otherwise could be a serious problem. Personally we are
 4 INTRODUCTION
more distrustful of undated maps. Their ancient aspect can be very deceptive and it seems
best to describe them as being of a certain type rather than of a certain period, unless some
independent evidence serves to place them, chronologically.
In numbering the maps in our list the date is enclosed in brackets [ ] where the item bears
no date but is believed to be of the period under which it is listed. Maps of which we have no
clue at all, as to approximate age, are omitted entirely from consideration.
Japanese maps present certain problems to the occidental collector because our ways of
making and preserving maps are different. Many of them are very large. However, being
printed on exceedingly thin paper, they conveniently fold into a surprisingly small space.
The collector will quickly discover that, if he folds these maps as the Japanese do—accordion
fashion—the folding is easy; if he seeks to improve on their method, he is headed for trouble.
Slip cases are indispensable. There is no other way that Japanese maps can conveniently be
labeled and filed. Even Japanese books should be housed in slip cases because their natural
format provides no spine for labeling or numbering convenient for our bookshelves. Aside
from providing slip cases, we have preferred to tamper as little as possible with the separate
maps. At times the ravages of silver fish make it necessary to mount a map but as a rule they
are best left as we find them. The old Japanese paper is tougher than it looks, and it has survived astonishingly well.
The ideal way to convey the description of each map in our list would be to reproduce it,
along with a translation of salient inscriptions. Since that is not practicable in a limited work
of this character, we have had to content ourselves by reproducing a few that are typical.
Those Japanese maps that derive from European sources are, of course, important in showing the impact of western map-making on the art in Japan. However, the collector who is
already familiar with western cartography will find greater novelty in the truly native Japanese maps. In mapping their own islands, provinces and cities the Japanese were unhampered by European tradition, and it is in these native maps that we shall find a novelty not
to be expected in designs copied from western sources.
In depicting mountains, for instance, the symbols had long been standardized in the
West, where we find them shaded on their southeastern slopes. In the Orient the artist was
bound by no such convention. Here we find mountains depicted in all their glory and with an
abandon that does not hesitate to place the observer in several places at one time. Neither does
it matter if a mountain is drawn in perspective on a scale so exaggerated as to hide half a province lying in its shadow. A number of our illustrations, we must confess, have been selected
with special regard to their gorgeous mountain scenery.
The collector who cannot read Japanese—the present writer is in that category—should
cultivate the assistance of a competent seller of Japanese books and prints. Such a dealer can
 INTRODUCTION 5
furnish sufficient information as regards title, author and date to enable the collector to intelligently classify his acquisitions. With this indispensable assistance and with a few standard reference books at hand, a difficult subject can be brought within the sphere of the amateur.
Our indebtedness to a number of writers will repeatedly be made apparent in the pages
that follow. Particularly, we acknowledge our indebtedness to Mr. Glen Dawson of Los
Angeles. Without the benefit of his encouragement we should never have had the courage to
even start a collection of this kind, and we owe nearly all of our collection to his constant interest. Also, we wish to thank Mr. Takashi Katsuki who has kindly checked our findings
and who has been of great assistance in establishing uniformity in the difficult work of transliterating and translating the Japanese titles. The writer alone should be blamed for any
boners that may have crept in, despite all the efforts of our friends to keep us straight.
George H. Beans
  LIST OF MAPS
645 The first mention of geographical maps in the history of Japan occurs in con
nection with land reforms. The tendency for vested interests to constantly
acquire land at the expense of the crown and the peasants is a reoccurring
one in the early history of the country and it is no coincidence that we hear
of maps at those periods when serious efforts are made to correct the evil. In
645 Kara becomes Emperor Kokoku. He introduces the reforms of Taika
(Taika Period 645-649). Among the many abuses he sets out to correct are
those having to do with land holdings and irrigation rights. Following an imperial edict of 646, decreeing that the boundary linef of the provinces be surveyed, we encounter the first mention of maps. They are cadastral maps
(denzu).1
710 Nara is selected as the first capital of Japan, giving some stability to the govern
ment. Cadastral maps are repeatedly drawn during the Nara Period (710-
784), indicative of the efforts to restrain the landed classes. None of these
cadastrals has survived but there is evidence that they were very detailed.
Plans of landed estates (shoenzu) follow the cadastrals when the reforms begun in the Taika Period fail, and noble families acquire vast domains.1
738 Provincial and district maps (kokugunzu) are prepared by imperial order. None
has been preserved.1
770 Printing, from blocks of wood or possibly stone, begins in Japan.
[784]        First attempt to draw a general map of Japan is probably made at about this
time. This type is preserved in a copy circa i6oo.s
794 Kyoto is established as the capital of Japan by Emperor Kammu; at times it is
superceded as actual seat of government but it remains the classical capital
until 1869, when the government is removed to Tokyo.
796 Kammu tries to restrain the old evil of land acquisition by powerful interests,
and in 796 there is further mention of provincial and district maps.
End 8th-   A map of Japan, known as the Gyogi type, is believed to belong to the Heian
middle Period; a time when great estates continue to grow. The earliest example is a
9th cy. copy of 1305 (no. 1305.1). Issued in printed form in 1651 (no. 1651.1). It is
1 Ramming, 1937, p. 17. One of these plans is reproduced in Takagi, illustration 4. 2 Ramming, 1937, p. 18.
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 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS 9
not until near the close of the seventeenth century that decided improvements
appear in general printed maps of Japan.
End 8th-   The Map of the Five Indies, a world map of Buddhist origin, is probably intro-
middle duced in Japan about this time, from China. Copies are preserved in several
9th cy. temples.8
13th cy.     The Kanto provinces become a part of the Empire.
[ 1200.1 ] Kan-in Dairi Keijo Zu. Bird's-eye view of Kyoto. Ms. dating from the Kama-
kuraPeriod (circa 1200).Formerly owned by Bunkyu-do; destroyed by fire.
Represented in our collection by a copy sketched in 1892, prior to the destruction of the original. Colored, 36% x 67.
1305.1 Earliest existing copy of the Gyogi type map, which originated in the ninth century.
1365.1     Go Tenjiku Zu. "Map of the Five Indies." Ms. drawn by the priest Zyukai
14     .    and preserved in the Horyuji Temple at Nara. It is a world map derived from
ancient Buddhist sources, brought to Japan from China circa 835/
[ 1457.1 ]    Map of Edo, made in Choroku (1457-1459) preserved in a copy made in 1806.
1542 The Portuguese visit Japan and begin a trade that continues until their exclusion
in 1638. At first they make their headquarters on the little island of Hirado,
the first trading port opened to foreign vessels. Later they are removed to
Deshima.
1549 Christianity is introduced by St. Francis Xavier. The Jesuits and other European
visitors send maps home from time to time and these bring about a general
revision in the western cartography of Japan. In our compilation we shall only
be concerned with the reverse influence—the changes brought about by western cartography on the maps produced in Japan.
1590 European-type world maps taken to Japan. At about this time the Japanese Empire is united, and outlying provinces conquered.
3 Nakamura, p. 16.
4Nakamura, pp. 16-18; reprodui
 io A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Keicho Period, 15 96-1615
[1596] Maps, painted on screens, are prevalent in this and in the following periods.
They are based on European models. This type of painting is represented in
our collection in no. 1645.2.
[ 1596.1 ]    Earliest known printed map of Japan. Taken from a book of the Keicho period."
1600 The Battle of Sekigahara ushers in the Tokugawa Era; one of the most important dates in Japanese history.
1603        The Tokugawa Dynasty of shoguns begins, to continue until 1867.
[ 1604 ] The fourth of the maj or islands—Hokkaido—becomes a part of Japan at about
this time. Its development is very slow economically. Cartographically its existence north of Honshu is barely hinted at, until a much later time.
1605        The first land survey in Japan.6
1605 The world map of Matteo Ricci, printed in China in 1600, is in use at the Academy of Princes at Kyoto.7 It is based on western sources.
161 o        The Dutch carry on trade at Hirado until 1641, when they move to Deshima.
1611        The Spaniard Vizcaino makes a coastal survey that is reflected in some Japanese
maps.
1613        The English have a factory at the port of Hirado, until 1624.
Genjtfa Period, 1615-1624
1615 This year of Genwa 1 marks the end of the wars of Osaka, and the real beginning of complete Tokugawa control. The long period of peace that follows
brings to all classes of society a chance for cultural development. Our collection of maps is intended to be broadly representative of one phase of this development, the cartographical, beginning with the early monuments and leading in time to the popular and cheap maps for the man on the street.
Kan-ei Period, 1624-1644
[ 1624]      Western methods of surveying are introduced in Japan.8
6 Reproduced in Kurita, text, frontispiece. T L. Carrington Goodrich, "China's First Knowledge of
6 Ramming, 1937, p. 19. the Americas." Geographical Review, July 1938, p. 405.
8 Boxer, p. 13.
 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS n
1627 A color-printed woodcut appears in a Japanese book* but hand-coloring remains
in common practice for a century.
1631.1 Bushu Toshima no Edo Shozu. "Plan of Edo in Musashi Province." The
earliest known map of Edo.10
1635.1     A map of Nagasaki, in Ms., with the earliest representation of Deshima.11
1636 Deshima, an artificial island constructed from reclaimed land at the head of Nagasaki harbor, is completed in this year and leased to the Portuguese until 163 8.
Deshima is only 600 feet long and 250 feet wide.
1639 Trade with the Portuguese is prohibited.
1640 Deshima is evacuated.
1641 Deshima becomes the residence of the Dutch East India Company'when Japan
is closed to all foreigners, except the Dutch and Chinese. For two centuries
Japan is isolated; Nagasaki is to be the only port kept open and that only to
the Dutch and Chinese. For a time the Chinese are permitted free access to
all of Nagasaki but the Dutch are allowed to leave Deshima only once a year,
when they make a journey to Edo to report to the shogun. There are usually
six or eight Dutch agents in residence to carry on a restricted trade. Not only
is Japan closed to foreigners; foreign travel of Japanese is forbidden. This
isolation is imposed just when Japanese traders abroad are beginning to produce material for a native map embracing foreign parts.
Shoho Period, 1644-164 8
/ 1645.1 Bankoku Sozu. "Map of the World." Known as the Shoho world map, as it is
inscribed "published at Nagasaki Harbor in the Hinoto Tori year of the
Shoho era."12 Actually this inscription is found, not on the map itself, but at
the top of an accompanying sheet which is devoted to forty-two types of for-
I © T ' eigners. This pair of prints follows a type in vogue at this time, being frequent
ly represented in painted folding screens.18 Our next entry is a painting of this
9 Encyclopaedia Britannica, XII, 965. map in the history of print-making at Nagasaki and
10 Listed by Ramming, 1934, no. 52, after a printing of presents arguments in support of the age of the map.
1780. f. (\ I See also Boxer, pp. 71-72; reproduced in Mody, plate
II Boxer, p. 123. 23, and Kurita, no. 1.    M&r\b*-,/#ur«
12 Mody, p. xviii. He explains the importance of the 1S Boxer, p. 9.
 12 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
kind. This type of map has its origin in western cartography, the only good
source available to the Japanese for the design of a world map.
Z 1645.2* Bankoku Sozu. "Map of the World." Cartographically similar to the preceding
but in Ms., brilliantly painted. The numerous descriptive boxes distributed
over the map are gilded. Accompanied by a separate painting, divided into
forty boxes, depicting types of foreigners. As in the case of the printed version,
listed above, it is here that we find the reference to the time of printing, but
\ 0^ apparently not the place of printing. The painting is damaged just where we
j t would seek the inscription. The map proper measures 22 x 44%; the sheet of
foreigners matches it in size. In modern times the two paintings have been
mounted in scroll form.
<M
[ 1646.1 ]   Nagasaki Oezu. "Great Map of Nagasaki." Painted in colors on paper.14 It includes the recently constructed island of Deshima.
Keian Period, 1648-1652
1651.1     Nihon Koku no Zu. "Map of Japan." Keian 4. It is of the ancient Gyogi type."
Sho-6 Period, 1652-1655
[ 1652]      We have no maps of this period.
Meireki Period, 1655-165 8
1656 Maps of the ancient Gyogi type are still being sold in Edo. This exemplifies the
great decline in Japanese cartography following the isolation policy. On the
other hand, an important revival in provincial maps is encouraged. These local
maps are more truly representative of Japanese cartography than are those of
foreign parts.
1657.1 Shinpan Osaka no Zu. "New Edition Map of Osaka." Published by Kono
Michikiyo, Osaka, Meireki. 3. It is the earliest plan of Osaka bearing the publisher's imprint.18
* Reproduced in Mody, plate 25. original is preserved in the University of Kyot
15 Ramming, 1934, no. 17, after Kurita, no. 12. The 16 Ramming, 1934, from Kurita, no. 49.
   A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS 13
Manji Period, 1658-1661
1661.1     Shinpan Bushu Edo Shozu. "New Edition Map of Edo." Manji 4."
Kanbun Period, 1661-1673
[1661.2] Nagasaki Oezu. "Great Map of Nagasaki." An undated woodcut of the Kanbun Period. It is considered the earliest Nagasaki-printed map, except for
the world map of the Shoho Period.18
[1661.3]    Nihon Koku no Zu. "Map of Japan." Circa Kanbun Period.19
1662 The downfall of the Ming Dynasty in China causes many Chinese scholars to
seek refuge in Japan.
1661.1     Fusokoku no Zu. "Map of Japan." Kanbun 2.20
1664.1 Plan of Edo. Published by Kawano Dosei in Kanbun 4, in the month of February. See no. 1664.2, a later impression of the same year.
3 1664.2*   Bushu Edo no Zu. Plan of Edo dated Kanbun 4, the month of November. Hand-
1    (yf^ij^-   colored, 48 x 3354. "This was first printed in February (no. 1664.1). The
blocks were immediately sold to another party, who made a number of prints
in November of the same year. This is called Ihan or different print and not
K b a second edition nor reprint."
1666 A printed atlas of the provinces of Japan, possibly the first, appears this year/1
The earliest example of such an atlas in our collection is described under the
year 1701.
1667.1 Shinpan FJeianjo Narabini Rakugai no Zu. "New Edition Heianjo (Kyoto)
and its suburbs." Kanbun y.M
1671.1 Bankoku Sozu. Map of the world, derived from the Shoho map, but on a smaller
scale. Published by Hayashi Tsugiemon of Kyoto, Nagasaki, Kanbun 11.
17 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 40. 20 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 14.
18 Mody, xviii; reproduced in plate 26. 21 Kurita, no. 15.
19 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 13. 22 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 47.
1664a  PLAN OF EDO
 H
A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Hand-colored. Adjoining the map are forty pictures, each depicting a type
of foreigner, in male and female costumes. These pictures are on the same
sheet as the map.28
1671.2     Shinpan Edo Soto Ezu. "New Edition Map of Suburbs of Edo." These are the
'=>    suburbs Fukagawa, Honjo and Asakusa. Kanbun n.24
'<$
1672.1     A picture-roll of the sea and land routes from Edo to Nagasaki, published at
Kyoto. It includes the earliest printed representation of Deshima.2"
1672.2
Tokaido Saikaido Saiken Zu. The Tokaido Highway. By Inso of Kyoto. Mim-
ura Genshi. Kyoto, 1672.2*
4. [1672.3]* Tokaido Roko no Zu. The Tokaido Highway. Hand-colored, 23 x 52. 4*+ i
&WL7 Tk  ?** ,4^ . 27        ,Ui
1672.4     Tozai Kairiku Zu. Pictorial map, east-west, sea and land. Kanbun 12.27
; *■■ .-*• i, Enpo Period, 1673-1681
[ 1673.1 ]    A reduced version of the map of Nagasaki of the previous period (no. 1661.2 ) is
published at Edo during the Enpo Period.
1677.1     Seikai no Zu. "Picture of the West Sea." Enpo 5.28  1
\U<-*      s, 1678.1     Dai Nihon Zukan. The Territorial Map of Japan. Enpo 6.29
1678.2*   Edo no Oezu. "Large Map of Edo." Published by Hyoshiya Ichirobei, Edo,
C Wik f) Enpo 6. Hand-colored, 53% x 47-
0.1*   Zoho Edo Oezu. "Enlarged Map of Edo." Published by Hayashi Yoshinaga,
Kyoto, Enpo 8. Hand-colored, 59 x 4874. One inset:
ffX)
\tf>    /z68o.2*   Kameido. i8x 13/4.
23 Reproduced in Mody, plat
24 Reproduced in Kurita, no.
26 Boxer, p. 123.
26 Ramming, 1934, no. 145.
27 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 73.
28 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 76.
29 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 16.
[1672.3]   The TOKAIDO HIGHWAY
   A UST OF JAPANESE MAPS 15
Tenna Period, 1681-1684
1683.1 Zoho Edo Oezu. "Enlarged Edition, Map of Edo." By Hayashi Yoshinaga of
the Map Office. Tenna 3.80
Jokyo Period, 1684-1688
y 1687.1     Honcho Zukan Komoku. General map of Japan. Corrected by Ishikawa. Published by Sagamiya Tahei, Edo, Jokyo 4. See no. 1689.2, a later printing from
f[ Z f"       the original blocks.81
1687.2 Shinsen Zoho Osaka Oezu. "New Revised Map of Osaka." Corrected by Ishi
kawa. Jokyo 4.82 See no. 1691.3, a later edition.
Genroku Period, 168 8-1704
[1688] Ishikawa Toshiyuki (Ryusen) designs, during this and the following period,
large maps that are colorful and rich in nomenclature. Several examples are
described herewith.
1688.1 Bankoku Sokai Zu. World map. Designed by Ryusen. Published by Sagamiya
Tahei, Edo, 1688.33
\y\ 1688.2]   Dainihon Enbi Zu. Map of Japan with statistics of rice production in each prov-
-'    1700 2"       ince. Genroku period.84
1689.1*   Edo Zukan Komoku. "Plan of Edo." Designed by Ryusen. Published by Sagamiya Tahei, Edo, Genroku 2. Guide book and map, bound separately. The
map is hand-colored, 49 x 54-85 This large map has one inset and the guide
book has two outline maps:
'*q\ !+•     1689.1.1* Kameido, a part of Edo. Inset, 13% x 10, irregular.
1689.1.2* Edo Castle, and surroundings. Outline map. Double page, 11 % x 8%.
1689.1.3* Bancho, a part of Edo. Outline map. 5% x 8%.
10 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 42. S3 Ramming, 1934, no. 3, after a photograph of the
11 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 17. original in the Sloane collection in the British Museum.
12 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 50. S4 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 19.
85 Reproduced in Kurita^no. 43.
 16 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Mil
Honcho Zukan Komoku. "General Map of Japan." Published by Hayashi,
Kyoto, Genroku 2. Colored. 51 % x 22%. First printed in Teikyo 4 (1687)
by Sagamiya Tahei. The present map is printed from the original blocks.
[ 1690.1 ]    Map of Edo. Designed by Ochikochi Doin, drawn on a scale of approximately
^g f-j    p' II  G 79 £4- y8 inch to 6 feet. Mentioned in the preface of a map published in 1690, so
presumably dated that year, or earlier. See no. 1690.3.
[ 1690.2] Map of Edo. Designed by Ochikochi Doin, drawn on a scale of approximately
Y8 inch to 18 feet. Mentioned in the preface of a map published in 1690, so
presumably dated that year, or earlier. See no. 1690.3.
1690.3* Tokaido Bunken Ezu. "A Measured Pictorial Map of the Tokaido." Designed
G- ~^°l i>1 Dy Ochikochi Doin. The artist, Hishikawa Moronobu, signed Eshi Hishika-
wa Kichibei. Published by Hangiya Shichirobei, Edo, Genroku 3. A road
map in five volumes, folded album. Volume 1, Edo to Odawara, 24 folds;
volume 2, Odawara to Fuchu, 25 folds; volume 3, Fuchu to Yoshida, 29
folds; volume 4, Yoshida to Kameyama, 29 folds; volume 5, Kameyama to
Kyoto, 24 folds. Scale approximately % inch =120 yards. Our description
has been taken from Toda,88 who gives a list of the fifty-three postal towns
included in the important towns named on the map. We are also indebted to
Toda for the information that the preface to this map makes mention of two
maps of Edo that Doin had designed. See nos. 1690.1,1690.2.
9 1691.1*   Kyo Oezu. "Plan of Kyoto." Published by Hayashi Yoshinaga, Kyoto, Genro-
G 1£*       ku 4. Hand-colored, 65 x 49. Kurita no. 48 is a revised edition, 1699.
1091.2     Nihon Kaizan Choriku Zu. "Map of Japan, sea, mountain, ocean and land."
(r ??^ '       Genroku 4."
/o 1691.3*   Osaka Oezu. "Map of Osaka." Hayashi Yoshinaga, Kyoto. Genroku 4. For an
^ ? , earlier edition see no. 1687.2. Colored, 46% x 53.
1693.1*   Edo Zu|5h6 Hokan. "Map of Edo." Published by Sato Shiroemon, Edo, Genroku 6. Hand-colored, 60 x 56. There are two insets:
1693.2*   "Abbreviated Map Inside Edo."
1693.3*   Neighborhood of the Kameido Shrine in Edo.
1 b
86 Toda, pp. 109-110. Three sections are reproduced by Kurita, no. 74. sr Reproduced in Km
PLAN OF KYOTO
  is
mMM
 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
J7
1695 The first work printed in Japan dealing with the outside world, appears in this
year. It has no maps. Under the year 1708 we list two maps included in an expanded form of the work.88
[1695.1]* No tide. General map of Japan. Drawn by Mabuchi Jikoan. Description by
Okada Jishoken, n.d. Hand-colored, 47 x 30. Superior, cartographically, to
Ryiisen'swork.
I too 2
1697.1=
1697.2=
: xS
Kokoku Ezu. "Map of Japan." Designed by Ryusen. Published by Sagamiya
Tahei, Edo, Genroku 10. Hand-colored, 67 x 32.89 Our next entry is a smaller
version of the same design.
Nihon Zukan Komoku. Edo, Genroku 10. Hand-colored, 51 x 23. Ryiisen's
map of Japan, drawn on a smaller scale than no. i697.i.Seealsono. 1702.1,
a later issue.
f ^   1697.3*   Edo Zusho Daizen. "Map of Edo." Drawn by Onseiken. Corrected, Spring,
Genroku. Published by Sato Shiroemon, Edo. Hand-colored, 60% x 55%- It
itf has an inset:
1697.4*   Abbreviated map, places of interest in Edo.
1699.1     Shinsen Zoho Kyo Oezu. "Revised Pictorial Map of Kyoto." By Hayashi
Yoshinaga. Genroku 12.40 No. 1691.1 is an earlier edition.
*~ 1701 Jinkpku-kj. Geography of Japan. PubUsher, Suhara Mohei, Edo, Genroku 14.
Two volumes. Volume 1 contains 35 maps; volume 2 contains 33 maps. These
represent the 66 provinces and the two islands. When single page they measure approximately 5% x 8, but, as noted below, many of them occupy several
pages. For late derivatives of these maps see under the years 1834 and 1837:
Volume i
Volume 2
1701.1*
Yamashiro. s 2.
1701.36* Tamba. s 2.
1701.2*
Yamato. s 3.
1701.37* Tango, s 3.
1701.3*
Kawachi. s 4.
1701.38* Tajima.S4-
17014*
Izumi. s 5.
1701.39* Inaba. s 5.
1701.5*
Settsu. s 7.
1701.40* Hold. s6.
1701.6*
Iga.s8.
1701.41* Izumo. s 7.
1701.7*
Ise. Two facing pages, s
9-10.
1701.42* Iwami. Two pages, s 8.
3SCf.Bo>
er, p. 16.
Vol. VI, plate facing p. 39.
39 Ramming, 1934, no. 19; reproduced
in Imago Mundi,
40 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 48.
1697.1   JAPAN BY RYUSEN
L
 18                                   A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Volume i continued
Volume 2 continued
1701.8*   Shima. s n.
170143* OkiRett6.s9.
1701.9*   Owari. s 12.
1701.44* Harima. s n.
1701.10* Mikawa. Two facing pages, s 13-14.
170145* Mimasaka. s 12.
1701.11* Totomi. Two facing pages, s 15-16.
1701.46* Bizen. s 13.
1701.12* Suruga. s 17.
170147* Bitchu. s 14.
1701.13* Kai. s 18.
170148* Bingo, s 15.
1701.14* Izu. s 19.
170149* Aki. Two pages, s 16.
1701.15* Sagami. s 21.
1701.50* Suwo. s 17.
1701.16* Musashi. Two facing pages, s 22-23.
1701.51* Nagato. s 18.
1701.17* Awa. s 24.
1701.52* Kii. Two pages, s 20.
1701.18* Kazusa. s 25.
1701.53* Awaji Island, s 21.
1701.19* Shimosa. Two facing pages, s 15-26.
1701.54* Awa. Two facing pages, s 22-23.
1701.20* Hitachi. Two facing pages, s 27-28.
1701.55* Sanuki. S23.
1701.21* Omi. s 30.
1701.56* Iyo. Four pages in groups of two,
1701.22* Mino. Two facing pages, s 31-32.
s 24-25.
1701.23* Hida. s 33.
1701.57* Tosa. Three pages, s 27-28.
1701.24* Shinano. Two facing pages and one
1701.58* Chikuzen. Two facing pages, s 29-30.
page following, s 34-36.
1701.59* Chikugo. s 31.
1701.25* Kozuke. Two facing pages, s 37-38.
1701.60* Buzen. s 32.
1701.26* Shimotsuke. s 39.
1701.61* Bungo. Two facing pages, s 34-35.
1701.27* Mutsu. Ten pages in groups of two
1701.62* Hizen. Four pages in groups of two,
facing, s 42-46.
s 36-38.
1701.28* Dewa. Four pages in groups of two
1701.63* Higo. Three pages, s 39-40.
facing, s 47-49.
1701.64* Hyuga. Two pages, s 41.
1701.29* Wakasa. s 50.
1701.65* Osumi. Two facing pages plus a third
1701.30* Echizen. s 51.
page for the two islands Tane ga Shima and
1701.31* Kaga. s 53.
Yaku Shima, s 42-43.
1701.32* Noto. S54.
1701.66* Satsuma. Five pages, s 44-46.
1701.33* Etchu. s 55.
1701.67* Iki no Shima. s 47.
1701.34* Echigo. Four pages in groups of two
1701.68* Tsushima, s 48.
facing, s 56-58.
1701.35* Sado Island, s 58.
ijx      1702.1*   Dai Nihonkoku Seito Zu. Ryuse
n's map of Japan on a slightly smaller scale
than no. 1697.1, and printed from the same blocks as no. 1697.2.
1704.1     Diagram of Deshima, found in Nagasaki Mushi-Megane. Published in Osaka,
Genroku 17.41
41 Boxer, p. 130.
1701.12   SURUGA PROVINCE
  >t
20 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
1704.2     Kawachi Sakai Shinsen Ezu. "Map of New River Bordering Kawachi Province." Genroku 17.42
Hoei Period, 1704-1711
[1704.3]    Map of the Jindai shrine. The second oldest undated map published in Nagasaki. Produced at about this time.48
1708.1     A late issue of Ryusen's world map of 1688. Published by Suhara Mohei at Edo.44
In Nishikawa Kyurinsai (editor) of Nagasaki, Zoho Kai Tsusho Ko. Published
by Umemura Yemon and Furukawa Saburobei, both of Kyoto. Kyoto, Hoei
5. Five volumes:46
u r W°x        J 7°8-2*   "Abbreviated Map of the Fifteen Provinces of China." 9% x 7- Volume 1, s 4.
^ *t        ^1708.3*   "General Map of the World." 9V2 x 6l/2. Volume 3, s 1.
1708.4     Bankoku Sokaizu. Map of the World. Corrected by Ishikawa Toshiyuki, artist
„ of Edo. Published by Suhara Mohei, Edo, Hoei 5.46
GMsb  |7W 18      ; J
,   1708.5*   Bankoku Enbizu. "Thoroughly Prepared World Map." Made by Kobayashi
it-os °        Kentei, n.p., Hoei 5. Polar hemispheres, hand-colored, each 16% diameter.
1709.1     Kawachi no Kuni Ezu. "Map of the Province of Kawachi." Hayashi Joho.
G- 7 461       Made by Yoshida Goroemon, Osaka.47
1710.1* Nansen Bushu Bankoku Shoka no Zu. "World Map." Designed by Zuda
(3 2>20\ Rokashi (Priest Hotan). Published by Nagata Chobei, Kyoto, Hoei. 7. 57
x 4554- Chinese text by Zuda Rokashi. The author has set out to improve on
the Chinese sources from which this map derives but Nakamura finds it "nothing but a mutilated copy of the Map of the Five Indies, made up from a confusion of heterogeneous and anachronistic materials."4S
[ 1710.2]    A much reduced version of the preceding, n.p., n.d. The text is now in Japanese.48
42 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 80. 47 Ramming, 1934, no. 37.
43 Mody, p. xviii. 4S Ramming, 1934, no. 4. For a more complete descrip-
44 Ramming, 1934, no. 3, note. tion cf. Nakamura, p. 16. Kurita's reproduction, no. 3,
46 Cf. Boxer, p. 17. names a different publisher—Bundaken Uhei.
48 Boxer, p. 18; reproduced in Kurita, no. 2. 49 Nakamura, p. 17.
1708.5   POLAR HEMISPHERES
  ft$
Ml
sS5S?
II
©VV^P
^S^WsSt-^SP;
3 *^^^P^WN**B#i^^
W  ill
ill )   i
mx ''
zLWil, \V^MwMw^( m)\ /(W/k
J
 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS                                  21
Shotoku Period, 1711-1716
1712
In the encyclopaedia Wa~\an-sansaiZue, published by Terajima Ryoan:50
1712.1
Seieki Go-Tenjiku no Zu. "Map of the Western Regions and of the Indies." A
reduced version of no. 1710.1.
L        ,
t **■>
■
1715.1*
1715.2*
-JWk^n Edo Djstszu. Detailed map of Edo. Author, Ishikawa Ryusen. Published by Yorozuya Seibei, Edo, Shotoku 5. 43% x 48%. This map has an
inset:
Kameido. 12% x y%.
Kyoho Period, 1716-1736
1729.1
Saikoku Sanjusangasho Hogaku Ezu. "Map of Directory of Thirty-three Sacred Points in Western Japan." Author, Noda Tomoyoshi of Nanki, n.p.
Kyoho 14." The thirty-three points are temples to be visited.
1735-1
y.3
Yamato no Kuni Oezu. "Map of Yamato Province." Author, Nakamura Kan-
jisai of Izumi. Designed by Takagi Kosuke Sadatake of Osaka. Publisher,
Hondaya lemon, Osaka, Kyoho 20.52
/V A
Genbun Period, 1736-1741
[I736.I]
Map of Nagasaki, published in Nagasaki by Chikujuken Nakamura Sanzo,
probably during this period. It is the third undated map of that city."8
1736.2
Sei-iki Zu. "Map of the Western Regions:" A copy or reconstruction by various hands of a very ancient (8 th cy ?) map of foreign origin, originally Go
Tenjiku Zu, "Map of the Five Indies."54
1740
The first two-color print appears in Japan.65
Kanpo Period, 1741-1744
[1741.1]
Map of Nagasaki, the fourth undated map of that port, is printed in Nagasaki
at about this time, being published by Chikujuken.58
60 Nakamura, p. 17 and note 43.                                        st Nakamura, p. 16.
51 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 75.                                           6B Encyclopaedia Britannica, XII, 965.
02 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 27.                                       88 Mody, I, xix.
58 Mody, I, xix; reproduced in plate 27.
1710.1   WORLD MAP BASED ON CHINESE SOURCES (see page 20)^
                                     -                             ,,                 -..,...            -*i
 let-
22 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
8 1742.1* Omi no Kuni Oezu. "Map of Omi Province." Author, Yamashita Shige-
L 1 lb^     masa. Published by Murakami Ihei, Osaka, Kanpo 2. Colored, 32 x 54.""
Enkyo Period, 1744-1748
k°[ 1745.1* Shinkan Nagasaki Zu. "New Edition, Map of Nagasaki Harbor." Author,
(f\V° Hassendo. Published by Hayashi Jizaemon, Kyoto, Enkyo 2. 45 x 20%.58
1746.1     Nagasaki. By Toshimaya.59
Kanen Period, 1748-1751
• 1748.1     Settsu no Kuni Meisho. "Pictorial Map of Noted Places of Settsu Province."
&*%\-& Kanen i.60
0 1749.1* Harima no Kuni Oezu. "Map of Harima Province." Author, Yamashita
(,. ? 1 C ^ Shigemasa of Kashu (and checked by six others). Published by Murakami
H ^ Ihei, Osaka, Kanen 2. Hand-tinted, 48% X41V2.81
Horeki Period, 1751-1764
1752.1 Nagasaki Higashihama-cho. Published by Chikujuken. Revised by Nakamu
ra Sozaburo, Nagasaki, Horeki 2. Discovered by Mody.92
1752.2 Nanyo-so Hogaku no Zu. "Map of Direction of Southern Ports." Japanese
coast from Edo to Odawara. Author, Anzenmaru Saikichi. Horeki 2.88
/i 756.1     Naniwa Oko Zu. "Map of Ancient Osaka." Artist, Tsukioka Tange. Pubhsher,
Cr 1y        Buneido and three others, all of Osaka. Horeki 6.44
1754   To
1763.1     Sesshu Hirano Oezu. "Map of Hirano, Settsu Province." Author, Hino
Bunrindo Nagahisa. Publisher, Fujiya Chobei and two others, all of Osaka.
Horeki 13.*5
67 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 34. 62 Mody, I, xviii; reproduced in plate 29.
88 Mody, I, xix, plate 28. Our example is not tinted. 6S Reproduced in Kurita, no. 77.
89 Mody, I, xviii. 64 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 85.
60 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 29. 6B Reproduced in Kurita, no. 55.
81 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 37.
1749.1   HARIMA PROVINCE
 -*
?ww
1
?yl^^:^^^ ]   d
*/!w^^^^^f
!@^i?mfe^
 ^^$&Q&§fl
1
KffMrf? ?■ XSHI?/IJ ill j*45
1 y^--^ ' ^^¥>r *
 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
23
1764.1 * Hishu Nagasaki no Zu. Nagasaki harbor and plan of the city. Published by
£ ? 4 6 4 Obatake Bunjiemon, Nagasaki, Horeki 14.88 351/2 x 24. Boxer, who describes
p/ 2 ' this print in detail, considers it the rarest of all maps of Nagasaki.87 It is hand-
colored. In this year the first many-colored prints are made; the earliest map,
so printed, in our collection, is no. 1778.1.
Meiwa Period, 1764-1772
[1764] During the last century of Japanese isolation there flourishes in Nagasaki an extensive trade in inexpensive woodcut prints, both black-and-white and colored. They are sold to visitors as "souvenirs from Nagasaki." Among the
subjects are a considerable number of maps and plans, especially of the
town itself.68 The earlier of the plans of Nagasaki take in the entire harbor,
but after 1752 the tendency is to omit the outer harbor so that the prints become definite town plans.
1767.1      Hokkai-so Hogakuno Zu. "Map of Direction of Northern-sea Ports." Meiwa
4-69
Anei Period, 1772-1781
[ 1772.1] Muyder Poort. Leydtse Poort. Amsterdam Harbor, ascribed to Toshimaya
by Boxer.70
[ 1772.2]    Anei Shinkoku Fushimi Ezu. "Anei New Print. Map of Fushimi." Published
by Akitaya Heitaro and Kawachiya Genbei, both of Kyoto.71
/ 1775.1     Kaisei Nihon Yochi Rotei Zenzu. "Revised Map of Japan." By Nagakubo
Sekisui.72
if 11a  A/g
66 Reproduced in Mody, plate 30.
87 Boxer, p. 77.
68 We are indebted to Mody for much of our information concerning Nagasaki-printed maps and views.
Mody, writing in 1939, commented on the sharp advances in the prices asked for these souvenirs of Nagasaki since they have attracted the attention of modern collectors, as compared to the insignificant prices that prevailed in Japan in earlier years. Lest the prospective col
lector of Japanese maps be discouraged, our experience
in 1950 may be cited. Most of the maps in our Japanese
collection were purchased in this one year and the cost
of the entire collection has been less than the price f re-
quendy demanded for a single rare western map or adas.
69 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 79.
70 Boxer, pp. 80-81; reproduced in Mody, plate 54.
71 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 54.
72 Ramming, 1934, no. 20.
1764.1   NAGASAKI
 .24      J^ A UST OF JAPANESE MAPS
J< /
r   v/52   1775-2*   Kaisei Nihon Yochi Rotei Zenzu. "Revised Map of Japan." By Kunihiko
%lqV Shiba. Colored, 37 X24.78
r  [1775.3 ]    Chikyu Bankoku Sankai Yochi Zenzusetsu. "Map of the World." Nagaku-
G- 3 ^ o •       bo Sekisui of Mito. Bookseller, Asano Yahei, Naniwa (Osaka). Not dated
r? ^10-9 but printed between Anei 2 and Kansei 6. Color-printed, 64 x 36*4.74
^* ..-..",.
5 3 1778.1*   Nagasaki Ezu. Plan of Nagasaki. Published by Obata Bunjiemon, Nagasaki,
Anei 7. Color-printed in a grey tint, 35 x 24% -75
JW   0 3
.„, 5H 1778.2*   Yamashiro-shu Oezu. "Map of Yamashiro Province." Author, Rakuge Hya-
G-11 £ 7     kuga. Artist, Shimokabe Shusui of Kyoto. Publisher, Yano Chobei and five
Ynyg others, all of Kyoto. Anei 7. 73 % x 38 % .78
1778.3     Washu Nanto Ezu. Plan of Nara. Published by Shibugawa Seimon and Ya-
nagihara Kihei.77
he
55 1 yyg. 1 *   Nihon Yochi Rotei Zenzu. Topographical map of Japan. By Nagakubo Genj u
&19L 1 (Mito Sekisui). Published by Seibundo, Osaka, Anei 8. Hand-colored, 33 x
53^4. This map constitutes a landmark in Japanese cartography. Sekisui em-
__   ploys meridians and a scale, reducing the purely decorative element and greatly increasing the number of place names. In later years this map is revised and
augmented. See nos. 1791.2, 1811.1, 1865.1.
779.2*   Plan of Yodo Castle. Drawn in Anei 8. A number of drawings pasted on a sheet
] x 15 t4- This castle was reduced to ashes in Horeki 6 (1756).
Vj ft1*
1780.1 Deshima Oranda Yashiki Kei. "Plan in perspective of the Dutch setdement
on Deshima." By Toshimaya Bunjiemon, Nagasaki. Anei 9.™
1780.2 Toj in Yashiki Kei. Plan in perspective of the Chinese settlement at Nagasaki.
By Toshimaya Bunjiemon, Nagasaki. Anei 9-79 Boxer describes these two
prints (nos. 1780.1,1780.2) in detail and speaks of them as exceedingly rare,
especially the one of Deshima.80 ." >
73 Ramming, 1934, no. 21. 1934, no. 38; Nordenskiold, no. 370.
74 John Carter Brown Library. Represented in our col- 77 Ramming, 1934, no. 118.
lection by a photoprint.                                                             78 Reproduced in Mody, plate 32.
78 Reproduced in Mody, plate 31; Kurita, no. 71. 79 Reproduced in Mody, plate 33; Kurita, no. 89.
78 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 26. Compare Ramming, 80 Boxer, pp. 78-80.
1779.1   JAPAN BY SEKISUI
 m
^*__    u
Hasp
  l
A UST OF JAPANESE MAPS                                 25
jjhttl.l
1780.3
Bushu Toshima no Edo Shozu. Plan of Edo. Reprint of a plan dating from
1631-1632.81
Tenmei Period, 1781-1789
1783.I
Chikyu Ichiran Zu. "The Globe at a Glance." World map. Publishers, Onogi
Ichibei of Osaka and Asai Shoemon of Kyoto. Osaka, Tenmei 3.82
W--
1783.2*
KA3
Kyushu Ezu. "Pictorial Map of Kyushu. Published by Toshimaya Bunjiemon,
Nagasaki. Tenmei 3.88 33 l/2 x 23.
1784.1
Mikawa no Kuni Sozu. Map of the Province of Mikawa. Ms. by Fujiwara
Tadehide (Nakagawa Chuei).8*
t wop*    <
{k Uc-( L
^785
) 1785-1
1785.2
T785-3
1785.4
1785.5
Hayashi Shinei, Sangoku Tsuran Zusetsu, Edo, Tenmei 5. One volume of text
and five folding maps:85                 ' ■   *       "
General map of Japan    £. 7-162 £f   1 ?es  H 7
Yezo
Korea
Ryukyu Islands
Mujin-shima or the uninhabited isles. The Bonin Group.
L
1785.6*
G- nn
s t ■
Daishin Koyo Zu. Map of China. By Nagakubo Sekisui. Publishers, Suharaya
Ichibei and Ihachi, Edo, Tenmei 5. Color-printed, 74% x 73.
1785.7
Chikytj Bankoku Sankai Yochi Zenzu. A world map based on Matteo Ricci.
Published by Sekisui.88
I785.8
Sangoku Tsuran Yochi Rotei. "Three Countries Road Map." Japan and
neighboring countries. Author, Hayashi Shihei of Sendai. Publisher, Suharaya Ichibei of Edo, Tenmei 5.87
1785.9
Ezo no Kuni Zenzu. "General Map of Ezo." (Hokkaido) same author and
publishers as no. 1785.8. Tenmei 5."
81 Ramming, 1934, no. 52.                                                    85 Boxer, p. 19; Nordenskiold, no. 137.
82 Boxer, p. 18; Ramming, 1934, no. 5; Kurita, no. 4.        80 Ramming, 1937, p. 19.
88 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 22.                                         8T Reproduced in Kurita, no. 23.
84 Ramming, 1934, no. 39.
 26 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
^c ^1787.1     Zoho Osaka Zu. "Plan of Osaka." Published by Kikuya Shichirobei and Hari-
A787
maya Kyubei, n.p.88
In Minamoto Ryukyo, Seiyo Senpu, Izumoji Bunjiro Kyoto and six others.
Tenmei 7. A work devoted to a collection of European coins and medals:
1787.2* Europe. 5% x 7% • s 50. Boxer89 describes the book at some length and refers to
this map as the first separate one of Europe printed in Japan, known to him.
Under the year 1789 we list a series of maps of the countries of Europe. Among
the very attractive reproductions of medals that illustrate the present work,
two are of somewhat remote cartographical interest:
1787.3* Entrance to Carthagena Harbor. 11/2 diam. s 48. This litde map is on the reverse
of a commemorative medal "Admiral Vernon the Preserver of his Country
Took Carthagena 1741." and must be the earliest local map of South American interest to appear in Japan.
1787.4* Rhode Island in North America. 1 % diam.s 49. This little map is on the reverse
of a medal commemorating the exploits of Admiral Howe off Rhode Island
in 1778. It is not much of a map—the bell-shaped island was derived from
an island of somewhat similar shape on maps of a century earlier90—but it
gives the smallest of the thirteen colonies of North America the distinction of
being represented in Japan long before Japanese cartography began to recognize the subdivisions of the New World.
1788 In the latter part of the eighteenth century contact with European scholarship
is resumed through the researches of the so-called Holland experts, the
Rangakusha. The first fruits of the scholars of this school appear in Edo in
1788 in the form of a sixteen volume work Taisei Yochi Zusetsu.91 We list
this work in an edition of the following year. Ramming credits this monu- -
mental work, together with Kokan's map of 1792, with a lasting influence on
the geographical knowledge of the Japanese.
1788.1* Funkan Edo Oezu. "Great Map of Edo." Designed by Kanamaru Hikogord.
Publisher, Suharaya Mohei, Edo, Tenmei 8. Hand-colored, 65 x 77.
1789 Taisei Yochi Zusetsu. "Atlas and Description of the Western World." Preface
by Hatotani Kohei. Author, Saiundo (Kuchiki Ryukyo), Edo. Tenmei 9.
88 Ramming, 1934, no. 113. 90 Compare "A Map of New-England" in Wm. Hubbard,
89 Boxer, p. 20. The Present State of New-England, London, 1677.
91 Selected from Ramming, 1937, p. 20.
   A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
rM
789.1*
789.2*
789.3*
789.4*
789.5*
789.6*
709.7-
789.8*
789.9*
789.10*
789.11*
789.12*
789.13*
789.14*
789.15*
789.16*
789.17*
789.18*
789.19*
789.20
789.21*
[789.22*
[789.23*
[789.24*
[789.25*
[789.26*
[789.27*
[789.28*
One of the earliest works circulated in Japan giving an accurate idea of the
geography of foreign parts. The list of contents calls for seventeen volumes.
Our set is evidently incomplete, since we have only the following: Volume 1,
general introduction to Europe; volume 4, France; volume 6, Netherlands;
volume 9, Germany; volume 11, Poland; volume 15, volume of maps as
listed below (these maps are based on European models and measure approximately 5% x 7% single-page or 10% x jl/4 when double-page):
Eastern hemisphere.
Western hemisphere.
Europe. Two facing pages.
Asia Minor and Greece. Two facing pages.
Course of the Danube. Two facing pages.
Western Asia and Russia, featuring the Dnieper, Don and Volga river systems.
Two facing pages.
Arctic Russia. Two facing pages.
Riga and vicinity. Two facing pages.
Dnieper River system. Two facing pages.
Sicily and Sardinia. Two facing pages.
Italy (except southern portion which is in preceding map) and Corsica. Two
facing pages.
Low Countries. Two facing pages.
Northern Germany. Two facing pages.
Austria Hungary. Two facing pages.
Arctic Scandinavia. Two facing pages.
Finland and lower Scandinavia. Two facing pages.
Northern portion of Denmark. Two facing pages.
Denmark, a continuation of the preceding. Two facing pages.
England and Ireland. Two facing pages.
Scotland.
Region of Calais.
France. Two facing pages.
Spain. Two facing pages.
Iceland and Greenland. Two facing pages.
Plan of Paris. Two facing pages.
Plan of London.
Plan of Utrecht.
Nova Zembla and Spitsbergen.
(.24   ICELAND AND GREENLAND
 28 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Kansei Period, 1780-1801
Todo Rekidai Shugun Enkaku %u- "History of Provinces and Districts of China
in the To Dynasty." Sekisui, n.p., Kansei 1. One volume, thirteen maps, numbered 1-13, color-printed, double-page, accordian-folded. Each approximately 15x13:
,.29* Route Map of China, Shin Dynasty (began 1662).
^.30* China in Wu (pre-historic) times.
.31* China in Shu times.
1.32* China in Shunju Period.
.33* China in Sengoku Period.
.34* China in Shin Period (221 b.c.-2o6b.c).
.35* China in Seikan Period.
1789.36* China in Tokan Period.
I 1789.37* China in Sangoku Period.
J 1789.38* China in Nanboku Cho Period.
i 1789.39* China in To Dynasty.
/  1789.40* China in Ming Dynasty.
I 1789.41* China, Siberia, the Pacific area and a small portion of North America.
"1790 In Shiba Kokan, Seiyu Ryotan, "Accounts of the Western Trip," Edo, Kansei 2,
five volumes, bound in one, there are many sketches made by the author, but
we list only five that can be considered of some cartographical interest. The
decorative element predominates in all of these sketches and the collector of
maps must decide for himself just where to draw the line between map, view
and scene. In the present instance we have the work of an artist who achieved
prominence as a map-maker, and here is a logical place to call attention to the
close relationship that often exists between scenic view and primitive map.
J 1790.1 * A view of Nagasaki from Nishisaka. Volume 3, two facing pages, s 6-y.
j 1790.2* The Dutch settlement at Deshima. Volume 3, two facing pages, s 11-12.
J 1790.3* A view of Wakitsu. Volume 3, two facing pages, s 20-21.
J 1790.4* The town of Hirado. Volume 4, s 2-3.
\ 1790.5* Ikitsuki Island. Volume 4, s 8-9.
1791.1     Karaku Oko Zu. Map of ancient Kyoto. Kansei 3.92
92 Reproduced in Kuril
 -*
  A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS 29
1791.2 Kaisei Nihon Yochi Rotei Zenzu. "Revised Road Map of Japan." Author,
Cho Sekisui of Mito. Publisher, Asano Yahei of Naniwa (Osaka), Kansei 3.9S
This map went through a number of revisions. See no. 1779.1.
1792.1 Yochi Zenzu. "The Atlas of the World." Kansei 4.94 An early state of 1792.2,
before insertion of views and background on the copper-plate.
1792.2 Chikyu Zu. "The Map of the World." Eastern and western hemispheres. By
Shiba Kokan, Edo. Kansei 4. The first Japanese copper-engraved map. Important, not only in this respect, but also because it exerts lasting influence on
Japanese cartography.95
1792        In Kokan, Yochi Ryaku Setsu, Edo, Kansei 4:98
1792.3 Eastern and western hemispheres.
1792.4 Pacific Ocean area. By Kokan.97
^1793        In Shiba Kokan, Chikyu Zenzu Ryakusetsu. "Brief Explanation of the Map of
the Globe." Engraved by Shumparo, Edo. Kansei 5. Among numerous diagrams, the following globe pictures:
. 1793.1*   Eastern and western hemispheres. Each 2% diam. s 3. Compare no. 1792.3.
1793.2*   Eastern hemisphere. 2 diam. s 5.
1793.3*   Eastern hemisphere. 2% diam. s 7.
1796.1* Oranda Shinyaku Chikyu Zenzu. "The Map of the Whole World, Newly
Translated from Dutch Sources." Engraved by Kobayashi Heihachi of Osaka
and Ogawa Tazaemon of Kyoto and "examined by Nagakubo Sekisui of
Mito," Kokan's elder contemporary. Eastern and western hemispheres, each
13 diam., printed on a sheet 36% x 20%, with text surrounding the map.
Copper-engraved. Colored and heightened in gold. Edo, Kansei 8. Folded, in
17<5j} ) original covers, the latter having the Dutch title Algemeene Waereld Kaart
embossed thereon. Boxer98 mentions editions of this same year without the
embossed Dutch title. Cartographically quite similar to Kokan's map of 1792
except less advanced in a few respects. Here the outline of Australia omits the
eastern half entirely, whereas in the engraving of 1792 the entire continent is
93 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 20. 96 Boxer, p. 21. Apparendy our no. 1793.1 is a later im-
94 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 5. pression from the same block.
95 Reproduced in Mody, plate 193; Kurita, no. 6, eastern 97 Boxer, p. 21.
hemisphere only. 98 Boxer, p. 22; reproduced in Kurita, no. 7.
1796.1   WORLD MAP FROM DUTCH SOURCES
 L
30 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
shown. Also California is drawn as an island where in the map of 1792 it1S
shown as a peninsula.
1796.2     Hishu Nagasaki Zu. "Map of Nagasaki in Hishu." Plan. Published by Toshimaya, Nagasaki, Kansei 8. Color-print.98
1798.1*   Kamakura Shogai Zu. "General Map of Kamakura." Actually devoted to the
shrines and temples of this historic town. Made by Hata Okumaru. N. p.,
K 7 Kansei 10. Hand-colored. The map proper measures 23 x 35 but there is at
tached a strip with a collection of poems, making the overall length 52. Of
curious interest is a hinged flap which makes it possible to show both sides
of the mountains surrounding the Kenchoji Temple. The cover is decorated
with rubbings of ancient tiles of Kamakura.
1800        Ino Chukei surveys the southeastern coast of Hokkaido. Mamiya Rinzo carries
out a complete coastal survey of the island between 1812 and 1816.100
Kyowa Period, 1801-1804
( 1801       In Heiten-giZukai. Supplement. Published by Gankyo Koudo, Osaka, Kyowa 1:
11.1*   Northern hemisphere. The map is the smallest of four volvelles that make a
"5\ °[ o movable astronomical diagram and measures 3 % diam. Colored. For descrip-
it
\%°j! tion of the work of which we have here the supplement, see under 1802.
1802        In Heiten-gi Zukai. Published by Gankyo Koudo, Osaka, Kyowa 2:
1802.1*   Eastern hemisphere.
802.2* Western hemisphere. Each hemisphere occupies two facing pages and measures
yY8 diam. Oriented with the south at the top. We have here an early work in
Japanese giving western discoveries in astronomy. In addition to the two maps
listed above, there are several celestial maps. Under the year 1801 we have
listed a small volvelle that is present in a supplement to the work.
1802 In Heiten-gi Zukai. Published by K. Yumahashi, Osaka, Kyowa 2, a popular
edition of the preceding, the illustrations include the celestial maps already
referred to; also the two hemispheres, printed from the same blocks as nos.
1802.1 and 1802.2:
1802.3 Eastern hemisphere.
1802.4 Western hemisphere.
99 Ramming, 1934, no. 124; reproduced in Mody, plate 34. 10° Pye and Beasley, p. 180.
1798.1   KAMAKURA; ITS SHRINES AND TEMPLES
   -1
A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS                                  31
/^2l,%
1^5*
Hishu Nagasaki Zu. "Map of Nagasaki in Hishu (Hizen)." Published by Bun
stf±p22~^
kindo in Nagasaki, Kyowa 2. Color-printed, 35 x 26.101 "The earliest print of
~~~CrVUU-
this firm that can be dated with certainty." Boxer.
rvyAt  IS^I  £g
1802.6
Planof Nagasaki. Published by Bunkindo in Nagasaki. Approximately half the
size of the preceding.102
1802.7
Nagasaki. By Imamiya in Nagasaki.108
PS 1802.8*
Title, if any, missing. Plan of Nagasaki. Published by Bunkindo in Nagasaki,
1   i.                  &W
Kyowa 2. It differs from no. 1802.5 (which corresponds to Mody plate 37)
A/2£
in minor details. For instance, the point of land near the upper left corner has
i8tl
buildings in no. 1802.5, where this map has an inscription. This map pre
sented to the Tall Tree Library by Mr. Glen Dawson.
1802.9
Sekka Shu Suison Mura-mura Kaisei Ezu. "Map of Flood Damaged Vil
lages in Settsu and Kawachi Provinces." Published by Kamekido, Osaka,
Kyowa 2.10*
1802.10
Enkyu Bankoku Chikai Zenzu. "The Whole View of the Globe, Ocean and
Land." Kyowa 2.105
[1802.11
*Saihan Shinkai Oedo Ezu. "Second Edition, New Map of Edo." Drawn and
1           G W4k
B 3
published by Eijudo, Edo, Kyowa Period. Colored, 30% x 34.
/?oi
Bunka Period, 1804-1818
[1804]
Ino Tadataka (Chukei) after surveying in 1800 a portion of Hokkaido, under
takes a detailed survey of Japan at his own expense. He compiles 225 maps,
mosdy large scale. This great survey is completed in 1816 in his seventieth
year; the construction of the maps continues until 1821. This inaugurates the
modern period in Japanese cartography and some of these surveys continue
to have authority for a century.108
7 1805.1*
Oranda Hinkai Zu. Chart of the route from Japan to the Cape of Good Hope.
Copied and engraved by Shiba Kokan. Published by Shumparo, Edo, Bunka
101 Ramming, 1934, no. 125; Boxer, p. 88; reproduced in          10t Reproduced in Kurita, no. 81.
Mody, plate
37.                                                                          ]06 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 8.
102 Ramming, 1934, no. 126.                                                     106 Ramming, 1937, p. 20. Pye and Beasley give the dates
103 Boxer, p
94; also p. 88 where the map is described          when the various phases of Chukei's surveys were com
quite fully.
pleted.
 -yoo
1810.2*
%\%
1810.3*
*ra
1810.4*
1810.5*
Gv^r
1810
%Ho  /c
1810.6*
)
1810.7*
32 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
2. Copper-engraved and colored. 21 x 15.107 The islands of the Indian Ocean
and East Indies are shown in detail. This map to accompany Shiba Kokan,
Oranda Tsuhaku. Two volumes. At the end of the first volume of text there
are two short chapters devoted to European style painting and copper engraving.
1806.2     Plan of Osaka. First edition of a map described under no. 1844.2.
Cr?94*+   b%  t*6t>   OS*
1808.1 Enoshima Ichibo Zu. "General View of Enoshima." Published by Izuya Zen-
bei, Enoshima, 1808.108
1809.1*   Bankoku Ichiranzu. World map to accompany Furuya Harumoto, Bankpku
G 3206      Ichiran Zusetsu, Osaka, Bunka 7. The map is dated Bunka 6. Copper-engraved, hand-colored, 50% x 41%- See remarks under no. 1810.7 regarding
K & the purpose of this large map. The outlines of the continents are distorted in
startling fashion.
1809.2 A map of Echigo by Hokusai appears in Tachibana Shigeyo, Hokuyetsu Kidan,
n. p., Bunka 6.109
Shintei Bankoku Zenzu. "New Revision. Map of the World." Eastern and
western hemispheres. By Takahashi Kageyasu. Bunka 7. Copper-engraved
by Aodo and hand-colored. Each hemisphere 36 diam.; overall dimensions
72 x 5i%.110 The four corners of this very large map are occupied by insets
(each 6% diameter):
Hemisphere centered in Japan.
North polar hemisphere.
Hemisphere centered in South Adantic.
South polar hemisphere.
In Furuyano Genrin, Bankoku Ichiran Zusetsu, "Brief Illustrated Descriptions
of all Countries." Engraved by Ganshodd, Osaka. Bunka 7 (two volumes) :1X1
South polar hemisphere. 5 diam.
North polar hemisphere. 5 diam. A large world map to accompany this work,
but dated one year earlier, is listed under no. 1809.1. "The map and text were
not prepared for sale; they were given to pupils for study at private school
only."
07 Mody, plate 195. ll° Reproduced in Kurita, no. 9, two sheets.
08 Ramming, 1934, no. 138. U1 Compare Toda, p. 440.
09 Toda, p. 252.
 UST OF JAPANESE MAPS
33
^
1811.1*
p 2
1 ?''
.1813.1
^1815
Kaisei Nihon Yochi Rotei Zenzu. "Complete Map of Japan with Distances.
Revised." Nagakubo Genju. Publisher, Suharaya Mohei, Edo, Bunka 8. Color-
printed, 55 x 33. Other editions are listed under no. 1779.1.
Kyushu Kukakoku no Ezu. "Map of the Nine Provinces of Kyushu." By Bunkindo, Nagasaki. Bunka 10. 112
Hiyama Yoshichika, Honcho Oko Enkaku Zusetsu. "Atlas of Ancient
Events of Japan," with description, historical map of Japan, showing who
was ruling over certain regions. Published by Kitajima Choshiro, Edo, Bunka
12. First edition of this historical atlas. A single woodcut of Japan, 16% x 11,
is repeated, with varying coloring and nomenclature, to illustrate different
periods in Japanese history:
Japan in 1184.
Japan in 1337.
815,1*
815.2*
815.3*
815.4*
815.5*
815.6*
815.7*
815.8*
815.9*
815.10^
815.H1
: 1816.1* Dai Nihon Setsujo Sangoku no Zenzu. "Map of three countries surrounding Japan." Published by Bunsokaku, Nagoya, 1816. Color-printed, 27 x
18.113 Actually we have here a map of Japan, with three insets to which we
assign separate numbers:
Korea.
Hokkaido.
Okinawa.
Japan in 1392,
Japan during the war of 1467.
Japan in 1509,
Japan in 1556
Japan in 1568
Japan in 1577
Japan in 1582,
Japan in 1586.
Japan in 1615
Il6.2*
li6.3*
;i6.4*
1817.1     Bunken Kaiho On-Edo Ezu. Pocket-size topographical plan of Edo. Published by Suharaya Mohei, 1817.1"
2 Boxer, p. 91; reproduced ii
8 Compare Ramming, 1934,
 34 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Bunsei Period, 1818-1830
[1818.1]    Plan of Edo. Designed by Nansensho Somabito (Somando). Published by S6-
fj^    zando Nishimura Soshichi, Eijudo Nishimura Yohachi, Edo, during the
j^n        Bunsei Period.115
1821 The drawing of Chukei's great map of Japan and its smaller scale derivatives is
completed. The original drawings are probably lost but Ms. copies, made
both before and after the end of the Tokugawa Era, are deposited in various
places in Japan and some survive.118
1821.1     Map of Nagasaki in Hishu. Published by Toshimaya, Nagasaki, Bunsei 4.117
1823 Hiyama Yoshichika, Honcho Kokugun Kenchi Enkoku Zusetsu. "Illustrated Map of the Founding of the Provinces of Japan." Published by Suharaya, Edo, Bunsei 6. Accordian-folded. Seven maps, double-page, color-printed. The double-page sheets measure 17 x 12 y2 but the three maps that include
Korea are irregular, having extensions pasted on to accommodate the out-
1^4' lying parts:
;  1823.1 *   Japan in circa 660 b.c
\Z 2/        1823.2*   Japan in circa a.d. 71.
1823.3*   Japan and Korea in 201.
<   1823.4*   Jap311 and Korea in 593.
1823.5*   Japan and Korea in 655.
1823.6*   Japan in 715.
1823.7*   Japan in 824.
/"1824        In Sato Sukekore, Shoten Zusetsu Shokai. Published by Untonsai, Sendai, Bun-
sei 7, three volumes:
■A 1824.1*   Eastern hemisphere. Double-page, approx. $y2 diam.
/ 1824.2*   Western hemisphere. Double-page, approx. 8% diam.
1827.1 Suruga no Kuni Ezu. "Pictorial Map of Suruga Province." Published by Matsu-
bado, Sunshu (Suruga), Bunsei io.118
1828.1* Tenjiku Yochi Zu. "A Map of India." Made by Tokaiin ka Santo. Bunsei 11.
22i/4x5i/2.
115 Ramming, 1934, no. 56. 117 Boxer, p. 74.
us pye ancj Beasley, p. 183. 118 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 31.
1828.1   INDIA
 i^^m^A 9*** fA *> I gsyaa^1
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il
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Ifili If1 IllFlllfl
ifll
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«*!
1
ft    *   ft   R   4
*i « * .* * i
i 5 ?  » |
fJ5*«* *£
*!**
1
Ms** **
is
« « *s*
»v** * * #
*24
>*«*** All .
*AJg3  *#*
|ft'
**
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lijil
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-   *
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4.
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1
ill!
* £ * •
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NcMfl
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£*.*.
J; • »
  A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
35
L
1X0
181°
[1830]
(s 3355
E
«3f
Toto Kinko Zu. "Map of Edo and Surrounding Country" with places of interest. Designed by Nakata Koreyoshi for visitors who desire to visit shrines,
temples etc., Edo. Revised edition of Bunsei 13. 23% x 29-
Tenpo Period, 1830-1844
Maps appear, based on new land surveys. They are rich in nomenclature but
topographically very inaccurate.119 Maps derived from foreign sources are
now appearing regularly in large numbers.
[1830.2]    Map of Japan, painted on a porcelain plate during this period.120
1831.1*   Kyo Machi Ezu Hosomi Taisei. "Detailed Map of the City of Kyoto." Artist,
^  Nakamura Yurakusai. Corrected by Ikeda Toritei of Edo. Publisher, Bunsodo
Takehara Kobei, Kyoto, Tenpo 2. Color-printed, 551/2 X70.121
^1834 Dai Nihon Yochi Binran, "Handy Atlas of Japan," edited by Matsu, Kyoto,
Tenpo 5. Two volumes, sheets not numbered, accordian-folded, with seventy
color-printed maps engraved by Shogetsudo, 14 x 10%:
Volume i
834.1* Japan, general map.
834.2* Yamashiro.
834.3* Yamatq.
834.4* Kawachi.
834.5* Izumi.
.6* Settsu.
.7* Iga.
834.8* Ise.
.9* Shima.
834.10* Owari.
834.11* Mikawa.
834.12* Totomi.
834.13* Suruga.
834.14* Kai.
834.15* Izu.
834.16* Sagami.
7* Musashi.
834.18* Awa.
Volume 2
1834-37*
Harima.
1834.38*
Mimasaka.
1834.39*
Bizen.
1834.40*
Bitchu.
1834.41*
Bingo.
1834.42*
Aki.
1834.43*
Suwd.
1834.44*
Nagato.
1834.45*
Tamba.
183446*
Tango.
1834.47*
Tajima.
1834.48*
Inaba.
1834.49*
Hoki.
1834.50*
Izumo.
1834.51*
Iwami.
1834.52*
Oki.
1834.53*
Kii.
1834.54*
Awaji Island.
9 Ramming.
10 Ramming, 1934,1
121 Nordenskiold, p. 179, no. 60. He lists (no. 378) a
other plan of the same-year but slighdy different tide.
 36
A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Volume i continued
Volume 2 continued
) 1834.19*
Kazusa.
1834.55*   Awa.
r IVS         l834,2°*
1834.21*
Shimosa.
1834.56*   Sanuki.
Hitachi.
1834.57*   Iyo.
)t               1834^2*
Omi.
1834.58*   Tosa.
18 V+     /   1834.23*
Mino.
1834.59*   Chikuzen.
1834.25*
Hida.
1834.60*   Chikugo.
Shinano.
1834.61*   Buzen.
1   1834.26*
Kozuke.
1834.62*   Bungo.
1834.27*
Shimotsuke.
1834.63*   Hizen.
1834.28*
Mutsu, in 4 parts, numbered 1, 2, 3
1834.64*   Higo.
and 4.
1834.65*   Hyuga.
1834.29*
Dewa, in 2 parts numbered 1 and 2.
1834.66*   Osumi.
1834.30*
Wakasa.
1834.67*   Satsuma, in 2 parts numbered 1 and 2.
1834.31*
Echizen.
1834.68*   Iki no Shima.
1834.32*
Kaga.
1834.69*   Tsushima.
1834-33*
Noto.
1834.70*   World.
1834.34*
Etchii.
I834-35*
Echigo, in 2 parts numbered 1 and 2.
~r: v
^ 1834.36*
Sado Island.
1836.1
Musashi no Kuni Yochi Zenzu
"Map of Musashi Province." Publisher, Kita-
jima Junshiro and two others,
all of Edo, Tenpo 7.122
/1837
Aou Tokeku, Koku-gun Zenzu.
"Sectional Map of Japan, showing each prov-
f
ince makes a section." Published by Kawachiya Kihei, Osaka and others,
Tenpo 8. Two volumes. Volume i contains 36 maps; volume 2 contains 33
J;   2 ^kV?
maps. Each map occupies two
larger ones, as noted:
Volume i
facing pages (13 x 8%) except some of the
Volume 2
1837.1*
Japan, oudining the provinces.
1837.37* Tamba. s 1-2.
1837.2*
Yamashiro. s 1-2.
1837.38* Tango, s 2-3.
0 c 3
i 1837.3*
Yamato. s 2-3.
1837.39* Tajima.s3-4.
(r «P'     J 18374*
Kawachi. s 3-4.
1837.40* Inaba. s 4-5.
At
1   1837.5*
Izumi. s 4-5.
183741* Hoki. s 5-6.
utf
|   1837.6*
Settsu. s 5-6.
1837.42* Izumo. s 6-7.
1837.7*
Iga. s 67.
183743* Iwami. s 7-8.
1837.8*
Ise. s 7-8.
1837.44* OkiR.ettd.s8-9.
1837.9*
Shima. s 8-9.
183745* Harima. s 9-10.
1837.10*
Owari. s 9-10.
1837.46* Mimasaka.s 10-11.
1   1837.11*
Mikawa. s 10-n.
1837.47* Bizen. s n-12.
122 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 32.
1
   _                                      ^
/i LZ5T OF JAPANESE MAPS                                 37
l.\
Volume i continued                                               Volume 2 continued
1837.12* Totomi. s. 11-12.                                          1837.48* Bitchu. s 12-13.
1837.13* Suruga. s 12-13.                                           * 83749* Bingo, s 13-14.
A6
1837.14* Izu. s 13-14.                                                 1837.50* Aki. s 14-15.
iM       /
1837.15* Kai. s 14-15.                                                 1837.51* Suwo. s 15-16.
ofti  /
1837.16* Sagami. s 15-16.                                           1837.52* Nagato. s 16-17.
1837.17* Musashi. s 16-17.                                          I837-53* Kii. s 17-18.
1    /
1837.18* Awa. s 17-18.                                                 1837.54* Awaji Island, s 18-19.
1837.19* Kazusa. s 18-19.                                           1837-55* Awa. s 19-20.
/
1837.20* Shimosa. s 19-20.                                         1837.56* Sanuki. s 20-21.
1837.21* Hitachi, s 20-21.                                          x837-57* Iyo. s 21-22.
w.
1837.22* Omi. s 21-22.                                               1837.58* Tosa. s 22-23.
1837.23* Mino.s 22-23.                                              x837-59* Chikuzen. s 23-24.
1837.24* Hida. s 23-24.                                                1837.60* Chikugo. s 24-25.
1837.25* Shinano. s 24-25.                                          1837.61* Buzen. s 25-26.
1837.26* Kozuke. s 25-26.                                          1837.62* Bungo. s 26-27.
1837.27* Shimotsuke. s 26-27.                                    l837-63* Hizen. s 27-28.
1837.28* Mutsu. Eight pages, s 27-31.                        1837.64* Higo. s 28-29.
1837.29* Dewa. Four pages, s 31-33.                           J837-65* Hyuga. s 29-30.
1837.30* Wakasa. s 33-34.                                          1837.66* Qsumi.s 30-31.
1837.31* Echizen. s 34-35.                                          1837.67* Satsuma. Four pages, s 31-32.
1837.32* Kaga. s 35-36.                                              1837.68* Iki no Shima. s 33-34.
1837.33* Noto-s 36-37-                                              1837.69* Tsushima, s 34-35.
1837.34* Etchu. s 37-38.
1837.35* Echigo. Four pages, s 38-40.
EL
1837.36* Sado Island, s 40-41.
Z_oc f
1837.70* Kaiho Oedo Zue. "Pocket Map of Edo." Published by Suhara Mohei, Edo,
£     /:;?■ c
Tenpo 8. Engraved. 22% x 34%, plus an added piece 6 x 13%.
1837.71   Kan Hasshu Yochi Rotei Zenzu. "The Eight Provinces Constituting the
Kanto." Shukasai Sakai Yoshinori. Published by Suharaya Mohei, Edo,
1837.1"
<W/       &3
[1837.72] *Kozuke no Kuni Zenzu. "Complete Map of Kozuke Province." By Murakami
Q 796 2        Wagao of Edo. Published by Yamashiro-ya of Edo and others. Eleven book-
Is £            sellers are named; two of them correspond with two of the dealers who sold
the work described under no. 183 7.1. This fact, combined with the striking
similarity in the coloring, has influenced us in placing under circa 1837 this
undated map. Colored, 40 x 48.
123 Ramming, 1934, no. 31.
1837.13   SURUGA PROVINCE
 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
•$**■?+
11
1830.1* Kaei Kotei, Tozai Chikyu. Bankoku Zenzu. "Published in Kaei Period.
JbO World Map." Author, Kurihara Shincho. Publisher, Chojiya Heibei, Edo,
Tenpo 9. Eastern and western hemispheres, each 111/2 diam. Colored. There
are also four insignificant inset hemispheres, each 2 inches diam. Overall dimensions, including attached sheet of text, 24 x 2474. This attached sheet of
text, by Rakusai Abe Yoshito, informs us that this map is "based on a French
chart of 1835."
1840.1* Togoku Zenzu. "The Whole View of China." Done in perspective by the celebrated Japanese painter Hokusai, who did this at the age of eighty-one. Engraved by Egawa Sentaro. Published by Seiundo, Tenpo 11. This color-print
is a real work of art. 21^4 x 16% •"*
\.2J    Map of Japan. By Hokusai, n. p. Described by Ramming as "after 1834." Approximately the same size as no. 1840.1."5
842.1 Zotei Izu Hichito Zenzu. "Revised and Enlarged Map of the Izu Seven Is
lands." The Izu Group and the coast of Sagami, Musashi, Awa, Kazusa and
Shimosa. Tojo Shinko. Tenpo 13.126 There is an inset:
842.2 The Bonin Group.
843.1 Fujima Jusanshu Yochi no Zenzu. Map of the thirteen provinces visible from
Fujisan. Akimaya Einen (Bokusen) and others. Published by Shaseido, Edo,
843.2*   Dai Nihon Hay ami Dochu Zuki. Tourist Map of Japan. Published by Chojiya Genjiro of Kyoto, Ky5to, Tenpo 14. Colored, 46% x 14.
Koka Period, 1844-1848
844.1 Washu Nara no Zu. Plan of Nara. Ezuya Shohachi, Nara, i844.12T
844.2 Zoshu Kaisei Sesshu Osaka Chizu. Plan of Osaka. By Okada Gyokuzan. For-
? Hi ^      warded by Fujimura Naoyuki. Published by Sekitendo.128
'* Kamming, 1934, n
6 Ramming, 1934, n
!6 Reproduced in Ku
reproduced in Kurita, no. 11.
a. 2i; Ramming, 1934, n. 32.
127 Ramming, 1934, no. i
128 Ramming, 1934, no. i
1840.1   CHINA BY HOKUSAI
 sfctf"SK^SMfl^«ll^¥SSSi«ffiSmMt^w^mm^m^MU-m)WWmw nl
$
1   M
  LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
39
1846. i     Kaisei Nihon Yochi Rotei Zenzu. General Map of Japan. Shiba Kunihiko.
Published by Suharaya Mohei and others, Edo, 1846.129
0 1846.2* Tenpo Kaisei. Oedo Oezu. "Revised in Tenpo Period. Large Map of Edo."
Drawn by Takei Ranzan. Original edition Genroku 9 (1696), supplemented
Bunsei 5 (1822), revised Tenpo 14 (1843), corrected Koka 3 (1846). Bookseller, Izumoji Manjiro. Publisher, Okadaya Kahichi, Edo. Colored, 46% x
52.
Kaei Period, 1848-1854
1848.1 Itsukushima Shato no Zu. Plan of Itsukushima Shrine. N. p., 1848.130
1848.2 Map of the Kanto. Nagayama Kan. Published by Suharaya Ihachi and Waka-
bayashi Kihei, Edo, 1848.131
1848.3 Plan of Edo. Published by Nishimura Yohachi.182
1848        In Shin ni Kyo Juhasshu Yochi Zenzu, an atlas of the provinces of China under
the Manchu Dynasty, Tojo Ko. Published by Izumoji Bunjiro. There are
twenty-two maps to which we merely assign numbers, not having seen this
work:183
1848.4
1848.5
6
7
Dai Nihon Kokugun Yochi Zenzu. "General Map of Japan." By Takashiba
Hidezo. Published by Tsutaya Kichizo, Edo, 1849.134
Kaiho Kofu Ezu. "Pocket Map of Kofu." Yomando Murataya Kotaro, Kofu,
Kaei 2.135
10
[848.16
1848.22
II
[848.17
1848.23
12
[848.18
1848.24
13
1848.19
1848.25
B£
1848.20
15
1848.21
£ *M
K
m
18^-?
129 Ramming,
1934.
130 Ramming,
1934.
131 Ramming,
1934.
132 Ramming,
1934.
13 Ramming, 1934,1
14 Ramming, 1934,1
is Reproduced in K
 fl\
40 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
1849.3*   Dai Nihon Dochu Saiken Ezu. "Detailed Road Map of Japan." By Hiranoya
Q, iq(,l       Mohei, Kyoto, Kaei 2. Colored, 55 x/2 x 13 %• One of numerous examples in
our collection where the map has been "bent" to conform to the paper. This
\ $ H1 orientation straightens the outline.
1850. i     Plan of Nagasaki. Published by Bunkindo.186
1850.2* Chikyu Bankoku Sankai Yochi Zenzu Setsu. "World Map with Explana-
C 3>ZoO tions." Originally designed by Cho Sekisui of Mito. Revised by Yamazaki
Yoshinari. Published by Takatani, Edo, Kaei 3. Color-printed, iSy2xiy3/4.
The continents are outlined in the crudest possible manner. Maps of this
standard could only have been intended for a most uncritical market. Arbitrarily we list here a rather similar woodcut that lacks a date:
[ 1850.3 ] * "World Map and figures of Foreigners." Published by the firm of Eijudo in Na-
O 3201 gasaki. Color-printed, 17% x 12%. It is more crude, if possible, than the
*<b k preceding. There are eleyen pictures devoted to types of people.
1850.4*   Chikyu Bankoku Sankai Yochi Zenzu Setsu. Published by Takatani, Edo,
Cr
120G
Kaei 3. Color-printed, 23% x 16. It resembles no. 1850.2, except for size.
1852.1* (Zotei) Dai Nihon Kokugun Yochi Rotei Zenzu. "General Map of Japan."
By Nagakubo Sekisui. Forwarded by Suzuki Kien. Published by Izumidera
Manjiro, Kyoto, Kaei 5. Color-printed, 72 x 40.11"
1852.2 Shintei Chikyu Bankoku Hozu. World Map. Published by Toryo Suido Ho,
Edo (?), 1852.188
1852.3* Shintei Konyo Ryaku Zenzu. "Revised Map of the World." Copper-engraved
by Takeguchi Teisai. Published by Takagi Kozo, n.p., Kaei 5. Colored in outline. 28^2 x 15^4, excluding two tablets of text, pasted at side.
/'1853.1* Chikyu Bankoku Hozu. World map. N.p., Kaei 6. Follows no. i852.2.18fl
Color-printed, 49 x 25%. At lower left, four inset hemispheres, each 4%
diam.:
/ 1853.2*   South polar. 1853.4*   Eastern.
C  ^53-3*   North polar. 1853.5*   Western.
16 Mody, plate 39. 138 Ramming, 1934, n
IT Ramming, 1934, no. 28. 139 Ramming, 1934, n
J
 A UST OF JAPANESE MAPS 41
1853.6     Plan of Edo. Recorded by Ramming after a later edition of 1858.140
1854        In Kaigai Ibun, Strange Information from the Other Side of the Sea. Kaei 7:
1854.01   A map illustrating this account of thirteen Japanese sailors who drifted across
the Pacific to the coast of the United States in 1841."1
Ansei Period, 18 54-1860
1854 Commodore Perry forces the first commercial treaty upon Japan. The arrival of
foreign ships results in a keen curiosity on the part of the Japanese in the
manners and customs of the foreigners. There follows a flood of inexpensive
prints of all phases of foreign life, including illustrations copied from foreign
geographical works.
1854.1 Dai Nihon Enkai Yokyo Zenzu. Map of the sea-areas surrounding Japan. By
Kudo Tohei, n.p., 1854.142
1854.2*   Ezo Kokyo Yochi Zenzu. Map of Hokkaido. By Junsai Fujita Ryo. Pub's. * lished by Harimaya Katsugoro Edo, Kaei 7. Color-printed, 36 x 45^4.
1854.3     P^an of Ed°- Published by Kyokukodo Murataya, Hikobei, 1854."*
1855.1 Zushu Shimoda Ko-no Zu. "Map of Shimoda Harbor." Published by Yama-
shiroya Sahei, Edo, Ansei 2.145
1856 Nichiyo Hayami, Guide to Everything in a Nut Shell. Published by Yorozuya
Heishiro, Edo, in Ansei Period. Color-printed. A sheet (20 !4 x 32) divided
into many small compartments, dealing with all sorts of subjects. Three of
the compartments are of minor cartographical interest:
( [1856.1]* Map of Japan. 4% x 8.
/ [1856.2]* Plan of Greater Edo. 5x7%.
/ [1856.3]* An insignificant hemisphere. 2% diam.
f [1856] Chikyu Setsuryaku. Geography of the World. There is a second title, the design
of which is copied from some American geography. This Japanese copy retains three initials "R.Q.W." and the western date 1856. Three volumes.
The maps are obviously excellent copies of western prototypes:
"° Ramming, 1934, no. 60. "8 Ramming, 1934, no. 35.
ltt Toda, p. 441. "4 Ramming, 1934, no. 58.
142 Ramming, 1934, no. 10. 14B Kurita, no. 60.
 42 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
I  [1856.4]* Eastern hemisphere. Approximately 8 diam.
[1856.5]* Western hemisphere. Approximately 8 diam.
(r ^0° J [1856.6]* Asia. 8!4 x y%.
Vl*     II t    [1856.7]* Europe. 8'/2x yl/2.
<yJ * \   [1856.8]* Africa. Sl/2 x 8.
j   [ 1856.9 ] * North America. 8 % x 1 o y2.
[_ [i856.io]*South America. 8% x ioy2.
1858.1*   Yochi Kokai Zu. "Navigation Chart of the World." Originally engraved 1845,
Q 330 I       edited by "an Englishman." Translated by Takeda Kango. Publisher, Juto-
kudo, Edo, Ansei 5. Copper-engraved and colored in outline. 61 x/2 x 341/4> in-
f 8 *>%        eluding panels of text along the right side. An excellent modern chart, drawn
\° on Mercator's projection.
1859        Japan is opened again to foreign trade, after two-and-a-quarter centuries.
1859.1*   Gokaiko Yokohama no Zenzu. "Panorama of the Open Port of Yokohama."
(,. 79 £if.     Drawn by Gyokuransai Hashimoto. Engraved by Sugita Kinsuke and Asa-
y£   r\ 3T   kura Tetsugoro. Publisher, Hozendo Maruya, Edo, Ansei 6. Colored, 72% x
2414.146 This large panorama shows steamers of various foreign nations in
Yokohama Harbor after opening of the port to foreign trade, as viewed by
the artist "from Koyasu Village."
1859.2*   Ezo Matsumae Ichienzu. Hokkaido, Sakhalin, Kurile Islands and adjacent
Q. 14 L2      portions of Siberia. Published by Bunki-do, Ansei 6. Colored, 39l/2x 55%.
The mountainous character of the islands is strikingly emphasized by the
l£Sl coloring.
1859.3*   Yokohama Meisai Zu. "Detailed Map of the Developed Port of Yokohama,"
G- fH^       Ansei 6. Color-print, 18 x 13%. Our copy lacks the small extension at lower
left, shown in Kurita's reproduction, bearing the date.147
-n
1859.4     Tozai Ezo. Sansen Chiri TorishirabeZu. 14. "East and west of Ezo (Hok-
1»       kaido). Map of Geographical Research of Mountain and River." Ansei 6.148
6 Ramming, 1934, no. 128
7 Reproduced in Kurita, n
8 Reproduced in Kurita, n
1859.1   YOKOHAMA
   A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS 43
Man-en Period, i860
1860.1 Hakodate no Zu. "Map of Hakodate." The port. Man-en i.149 There are two
insets:
1860.2 Plan of Hakodate.
1860.3 Panorama of Hakodate.
1860.4 Plan °f Edo. Printed by Kikakudo Baba Iwakichi, Edo, 186o.180
Bunkyu Period, 1861-1864
1862.1 Kankai Koro Shinzu. "New route Map of Sea Girt." World chart. Bunkyu 2.151
1862.2 Bankoku Kokaizu. "World Navigation Map." There is also a Ms. title in
English, "A Map of the World in Japanese by Ed. Schnell. Yokohama, February 1862." Colored in outline. Map proper 53 x 34%. An earlier printing
from the same copper-plates is listed under no. 1858.1.
Ganji Period, 1864-1865
1864.1     Hiroshima Machi-machi Michishirube. "Street Guide to Hiroshima Town."
Ganji 1."2
1865.1*   Shinkoku Dai Nihon Zenzu. "Newly Revised General Map of Japan." By
(yl^iO      Okamoto Chikusii of Washu. Corrected by Matsukawa Hanzan of Osaka.
Ganji 2. Color-printed, 39J4 x 28%. Derived from no. 1779.1. The number
of place names is much greater than in the earlier map, but the workmanship
is inferior.
Keio Period, 1865-1868
1866.1     Nagasaki Kyoryu jo Zen Zu. Plan of the foreign settlement at Nagasaki, with
foreign steamers in the harbor. Published by Rinkado, Nagasaki, Keio 2.153
149 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 72. 152 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 69.
150 Ramming, 1934, no. 61. 153 Reproduced in Mody, plate 40; also Kurita, no. 90.
151 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 82.    .
1859.2   HOKKAIDO (see page 42)
 1
44 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
( [1867]      We arbitrarily Ust here three maps that are undated but possibly belong to the
end of the Tokugawa Era:
~ J [1867.1]* Ezo Zenzu. Hokkaido. 46% x 251/2.
Jla )   [ 1867.2]* Chosen. Korea. 15% x Ir%.
/ [ 1867.3 ] * Ryukyii. Zenzu. Ryukyii Islands. 15^x11%. These three maps are color-printed.
Hokkaido is bound separately. The other two each occupy one of a series of
five sheets joined. The remaining three sheets in this second cover are devoted
to text and to pictures of the Ainu people.
. /V(c     [1867.4]* Mutsu Dewa Kogugun Kotei Zenzu. "Complete Map of Mutsu and Dewa
G- H41       Provinces." Drawn and published by Gyokuransai Hashimoto. Not dated.
*   Ramming (no. 48) dates this map (1868). Colored, 36 x 57.
HZ
1867 The shogunate is abolished.
1868 The Meiji Era begins with the emperor's resumption of direct rule. Occidental
civilization is rapidly adopted.
 REFERENCES & INDEX
 References
Boxer, 1950. C. R. Boxer, Jan Compagnie in Japan 1600-1850, second revised edition. The Hague,
1950.
The collector will need this book.
Kish, 1949. George Kish, "Some Aspects of the Missionary Cartography of Japan during the Sixteenth Century." Imago Mundi, VI, 39-47.
Kiss, 1947. George Kiss, The Cartography of Japan during the Middle Tokugawa Era: A Study in
Cross-cultural Influences. Reprinted from the Annals of the Association of American Geographers,
XXXVII (June 1947), no. 2,101-119.
Kurita, 1932. Mototsugu Kurita, Nihon Kohan Chizu Skusei. "Collection of Old Printed Maps of
Japan." Tokyo and Osaka, 1932.
A standard work, with Japanese text. We have given the numbers and translations of tides of some of the
splendid plates, ninety in number, in this work.
Mody, 1939.   N. H. N. Mody, A Collection of Nagasaki Prints and Paintings. London and Kobe, 1939.
Standard work on Nagasaki prints. A number of maps of the Tokugawa Era are beautifully reproduced.
Nakamura, 1947. Hirosi Nakamura, "Old Japanese World Maps Preserved by the Koreans." Imago
Mundi, IV (1947), 3-22.
Nordenskiold, 1883. Catalogue de la Bibliothbque Japonaise de Nordenskiold,... par Leon de Rosny.
Paris, 1883.
The translations of Japanese characters will be found helpful but in general the descriptions are inadequate where individual maps are concerned.
Pye and Beasley, 1951. Norman Pye and W. G. Beasley, "An Undescribed Manuscript Copy of Ino
Chukei's Map of Japan." The Geographical Journal, June 1951,178-187.
Ramming, 1934. M. Ramming, Katalog der Ausstellung alter Japanischer Karten und Plaene.
Japaninstitut, Berlin, 1934.
An excellent Est of nearly two hundred Japanese maps, most of them within reach of the collector.
Ramming, 1937. M. Ramming, "The Evolution of Cartography in Japan." Imago Mundi, II (1937),
17-21.
Takagi, 1931. Kikusaburo Takagi, Nihon Chizu Sokuryo Shoshi. "Brief History of Surveying in
Japan." Tokyo, 1931.
Toda, 1931. Kenji Toda, Descriptive Catalogue of Japanese and Chinese Illustrated Books, in the
Ryerson Library of the Art Institute of Chicago. Chicago, 1931. With separate Addenda and Supplement.
There is a description of the format of the Japanese book and a diagram illustrating the relationship between the Japanese and western calendars during the Tokugawa Era.
 1	
INDEX
Brackets
[ ] denote
approximate dates. A star *
signifies the
map is in the Tall Tree Library.
n signifies note.
World.   A]
* hemispheres
and ma-
1853-5*
Bizen.   One of the eight provinces
jor portions
thereof.
1854.01
of the San-yodo.
8th cy.   n
1854.1
1701.46*
1365.1
[1856.4]*
1834.39*
1645.1
[1856.5]*
1837.47*
1645.2*
1858.1*
1671.1
1862.1
Bonin Islands.   Group of fifteen is
1688.1
1862.2
lands south of Japan. First known to
1708.1
the Japanese about 1600; first colo
1708.3*
Africa
nized, by Europeans and Hawaiians,
1708.4
[1856.8]*
1830.
1708.5*
Awa.   One of the
ix provinces of
I785-5
the San-yodo.
1842.2
[1710.2]
1701.49*
Bunco.   One of the nine provinces
1736^
1834.42*
of the Saikaido.
[J775-3]
1837.50*
1701.61*
1783-1
Amsterdam
1834.62*
1785.7
1789.1*
1789.2*
1789.41*
[1772.1]
Asia
1837.62*
Buzen.   One of the nine provinces
1789.4*
of the Saikaido.
1792-1
1789.6*
1792.2
[1856.6]*
1834.61*
1792-3
Austria-Hungary
1837.61*
17924
1793.1*
1793.2*
1789.5*
Carthagena in South America.
1789.14*
I787-3*
J793-3*
Awa.   One of the fifteen provinces
Chikugo.   One of the nine prov
1794.2
of the Tokaido.
inces of the Saikaido.
1796.1*
1701.17*
1701.59*
1802.1*
1834.18*
1802.2*
1837-18*
1837.60*
1802.3
Awa.   One of the
ix provinces of
Chikuzen.   One of the nine prov
1802.4
the Nankaido.
inces of the Saikaido.
1802.10
1701.54*
1701.58*
1805.1*
1810.1*
i834-55*
I837-55*
1834.59*
1837.59*
Awaji Island.   One of the six prov
China
1810.3*
18104*
inces of the Nankaic
1701.53*
6.
1708.2*
1785.6*
1810.5*
1834.54*
1789.29* to 1789.41*
1810.6*
i837-54*
1840.1*
1824.1*
1824.2*
Bancho.   A part of Edo.
1848.4* to 1848.25*
1689.1.3*
Denmark
1834.70*
Bingo.   One of the
eight provinces
1789.17*
1838.1*
of the San-yodo.
1789.18*
1850.2*
[1850.3]*
1850.4*
1852.2
1852.3* .
1853-1*
1834.41*
1837.49*
Bitchu.   One of the eight provinces
Deshima.   Island in Nagasaki Har-
1636 n
of the San-yodo.
164m
1853.2*
1701.47*
1704.1
1853.3*
1834.40*
1780.1
1853.4*
1837.48*
1790.2*
 48
INDEX
Dewa.   One of the
of the Tozando.
170108*
1834.29*
183709*
[1867.4]*
eight
Europe.
1787.2*
1789.3*
[1856.7]*
Ezo, sec Hokkaido.
Echigo.   One of the
of the Hokurikudo.
seven
provinces
1789.16*
I834-35*
1837.35*
1789.22-
Fujiyama.   Maps and views of the
territory   visible   from   the   sacred
Echizen.   One of the seven prov
inces of the Hokurikudo.
1843.1
1701.30*
1834.31*
Fushima.   A suburb of Kyoto.
1837-31*
Ii770j]
Edo.   Founded 1457. Capital of To
Germany
kugawa Shogunate from 1603 and
1789.13*
after the Restoration of  1868, re
Greece
placed Kyoto as imperial capital. Its
17894*
name then changed to Tokyo.
[i457-i]
1631.1
1789.24*
1661.1
Hakata
1664.1
Hakodate.   Formerly chief city of
1664.2*
Hokkaido. First opened to foreign
1671.2
1678.2*
1680.1*
1683.1
1689.1*
trade in 1854.
1860.1
1860.2
1860.3
1689.1.2*
Harima.   One of the eight provinces
1689.1.3*
of the Sanyodo.
[1690.1]
170144*
[1690.2]
1749.1*
1693-1*
1834.37*
1693.2*
183745*
1697.3*
•     Hida.   One of the eight provinces
16974*
of the Tozando.
1715.1s
1780.3
1788.1*
[1802.11]*
1701.23*
183434*
1837.24*
1817.1
[1818.1]
Higo.   One of the nine provinces
of the Saikaido.
1830.1*
1701.63*
1837.70*
1834.64*
18460*
1837-64*
1848.3
Himeji Castle
18536
1854.3
[1856.2]*
Hirado.   Island off the northwest
coast of Kyushu.
18604
1542 n
i6ion
England, Ireland.
i6i3n
1789.19*
17904*
Enoshima
Hiroshima
1808.1
1864.1
EtchC.   One of the seven provinces
Hitachi.   One of the fifteen prov
of the Hokurikudo.
inces of the Tokaido.
1701.33*
170100*
1834.34*
183401*
1834-63*
1837.63*
170140*
183449*
183741*
Hokkaido. The northernmost of
the four main islands of Japan. It
was named Ezo long before its extent was known. Commercially it
was not developed until after the era
of our maps.
[1604] n
1785-2
1785.9
1786.3
1800 n
1816.3*
1854a*
18590*
18594
[1867.1]*
Hyuga.   One of the nine provinces
of die Saikaido.
1701.64*
1834^5*
1837-65*
1701.6*
*834.7*
1837-7*
E NO URA
Iki no Shima.   Island between
shima and the coast of Kyushu.
1701.67*
1834.68*
1837.68*
Ikitsuki Island
1790.5*
1701.39*
1834-48*
183740*
1834-8*
1837-8*
   ""*
INDEX
49
ITALY
1775.2*
K11.   One of the six provinces of the
i789.II*
1779.1*
Nankaido.
Itsukushima.   Island     southwest
1785.1
1785.8
1791.2
1701.52*
l834-53*
I837-53*
Itsukushima Shrine
1848.1
1815.1* to 1815.11*
1816.1*
Kioto, see Kyoto.
Iwami.   One of the eight provinces
1823.1* to 1823.7*
Kofu
of the San-indo.
[18300]
1849.2
1834.51*
I837-43*
1834.1*
1837.1*
[18400]
18430*
Korea
I785-3
1816.2*
Iyo.   One of the six provinces of
1846.1
1823.3*
the Nankaido.
1849.1
18234*
1701.56*
1849.3*
-    1823.5*
I834-57*
1852.1*
- [18670]*
I837-57*
[1856.1]*
1865.1*
Kozuke.   Otoe of the eight provinces
Izu.   One of the fifteen provinces of
of the Tozando.
the Tokaido.
Jindai Shrine
170105*
1701.14*
[I704-3]
183406*
"1834.15*
1837.14*
Kai.   One of the fifteen provinces of
the Tokaido.
1837-26*
[1837.72]*
Izu Group
1701.13*
Kurile Islands.   Chain   of   some
1842.1
1834.14*
thirty islands between Kamchatka
Izumi.   One of the five home prov
1837-15*
and Hokkaido.
18590*
inces.
Kaga.   One of the seven provinces
17014*
I834-5*
1837.5*
of the Hokurikudo.
Kyoto.   Established  as  capital of
1701.31*
Japan in 794; at times superceded as
1834.32*
actual seat of government but re
Izumo.   One of the eight provinces
1837-32*
mained  the classical capital  until
of the San-indo.
Kamakura.   A very important town
1869, when the government was re-
170141*
historically and  site  of  the great
1834.50*
Buddha cast in 1253.
794a
183742*
1798.1*
[1200.1]  * •
1667.1
1691.1*
Japan.   Maps that include two or
Kameido.   A part of Edo, site of
more of the four main islands are
the Kameido Shrine.
1699.1
included here.
1680.2*
1791.1
[784] n
1689.1.1*
1831-1*
8th cyn
1305.1
[1596.1]
1693.3*
Kyushu.   The southernmost of the
1715.2*
four main  islands  of Japan. The
1651.1
Kanto.   Group of eight provinces
nine provinces of this island com
1656 n
centering around Edo.
prise the Saikaido or western-sea cir
[1661.3]
13th cyn
cuit
1662.1
1837-71
1783-2*
1672.1
16724
1677.1
1848.2
1813.1
Kawachi.   One of the five home
London
1678.1
provinces.
1789.26*
1687.1
[16880]
1701-3*
1704.2
Loochoo Islands, see Ryukyii.
16890*
1709.1
1802.9
Low Countries
[1695-1] *
18344*
1789.12*
1697.1*
16970*
1837.4*
Mikawa.   One of the fifteen prov
Kazusa.   One of the fifteen prov
inces of the Tokaido.
1702.1*
inces of the Tokaido.
1729.1
1752.2
1701.18*
17841
1767.1
1834.19*
1834.11*
1775.1
1837-19*
^1837.11*
 INDEX
Mimasaka.   One of the eight prov
inces of the San-yodo.
1701.45*
1834-38*
1837.46*
1834-17*
1701.27*
1834.28*
1837.28*
[18674]*
Nagasaki. Not important in Japanese history until it was opened to
trade about 1568 and became chief
center of intercourse with foreigners.
Served as entry point of Christianity
into Japan. Made an imperial city in
1587. Visited by Spanish, Dutch and
Portuguese ships; only port kept
open to Dutch and Chinese when
rest of Japan closed (1637-1641) to
all foreigners, until 1859.
1635.1
164m
1646.il
16610
1673-1.
1736-1.
[1741.
1745.1*
1746.1
I752-I
1764.1*
1778.1*
1780.2
1790.1*
1796.2
1802.5*
1802.6
Nagato.   One of the eight pro
of the San-yodo.
Nakasendo Highway. One of the
three main highways of Tokugawa
Japan. It followed an island route
through Yamashiro. Omi, Mino,
Shinshu, Kozuke and Musashi.
Naniwa, see Osaka.
Nankaido. The southern-sea circuit. Six provinces.
Nara. The oldest capital of the
Japanese Empire, 710-784.
710 n
1778.3
1844.1
North America
[1856.9]*
i834-33*
I837-33*
Nova Zembla
1789.28*
Okinawa
1816.4*
Oki Retto. Archipelago off west
coast of Honshu. One of the eight
provinces of the San-indo.
1701.43*
1834.52*
1837.44*
1742.1*
1834.22*
183702*
1657.1
1687.2
1691.3*-
I756-I
Oshukaido. One of the three ma
highways of Tokugawa Japan. It r:
between Edo and Aomori, at t
north end of Honshu.
Osumi.   One of the nine provinc
of the Saikaido.
1701.65*
1834.66*
1837.66*
1701.9*
1834.10*
1837-10*
Paris
1789.25*
Rhode Island.   In North America.
17874*
Russia
1789.6* to
1789.9*
Ryuky/u Islands.   A chain of fifty-
five islands extending from south
of Japan almost to Formosa.
1785.4
[1867.3]*
Sado Island
of Honshu,
inces of the
Off northwest coast
Dne of the seven prov-
Hokurikudo.
1701.15*
1834.16*
1837.16*
Saikaido. The western-sea circuit.
Nine provinces.
Sakhalin Island. First visited by
Japanese about 1630. Explored by
them about end eighteenth century.
Sanindo.   The mountain-back <
cuit. Eight provinces.
Osm
: Gun-
1701.55*
1834.56*
1837-56*
Satsuma.   One of the nil
of the Saikaido.
1701.66*
1834.67*
1837.67*
Scandinavian Regions
Scotland
1789.20*
 Settsu.   One of the five home prov-
INDEX
1802.9
1834-6*
1837-6*
The smallest of the fot
ids of Japan.
1834.9*
1837.9*
Shimoda.   Seaport in Izu peninsula.
Opened   to   American   commerce
1854. Closed to foreign trade 1859
and Yokohama opened instead.
Shimonoseki.  Seaport southwestern
extremity of Honshu.
1701.19*
183400*
1837.20*
1701.26*
1834.27*
183707*
1701.24*
1834.25*
1837.25*
South America
[1856.10]*
Spain
1789.23*
Spitzbergen
1834.13*
1837.13*
Suwd.   One of the e
of the San-yodo.
1701.50*
183443*
1837.51*
1834.47*
i837-39*
Tamba.   One of the eight provir
of the San-indo.
I834-45*
I837-37*
1701.37-
183446*
1837-38*
Fifteen provinces.
Tokaido Highway. One of the
three main highways of Tokugawa
Japan. It ran eastward along the
coast from Osaka and Kyoto to Edo.
[1672.3]*
1701.11*
1834.12*
1837.12*
Tozando.   The   eastern-mountain
circuit. Eight provinces.
Tsushima.   Island in Korean Strait.
1701.68*
1834.69*
1837.69*
Utrecht
1789.27*
JWAKASA-   One °f die seven provinces of the Hokurikudor-
1701.29*
1834.30*
1837.30*
Wakitsu
1790.3*
One of the five home
1837.2'
Yamato.
J735-I
I834-3*
I837-3*
1701.57*
1834.58*
1837.58*
Yodo Castle.   Just south of Kyoto.
1779.2*
Yokohama. Only a fishing village
in feudal period. Visited by Commodore Perry in 1854; opened to
foreign trade in 1859.
1859.1*
I859-3*
  A List of Japanese Maps of the Tokugawa Era has been
composed and printed in an edition of one hundred and
fifty copies by The Anthoensen Press, Portland, Maine.
The binding has been done by John W. Marchi, Portland,
Maine, and the collotype plates by the Meriden Gravure
Company, Meriden, Connecticut.
    *&
 

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