UBC Library Digitization Centre Special Projects

A list of Japanese maps of the Tokugawa era : Supplement A Beans, George H., 1894-1978 1955

Item Metadata

Download

Media
specialp-1.0373615.pdf
Metadata
JSON: specialp-1.0373615.json
JSON-LD: specialp-1.0373615-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): specialp-1.0373615-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: specialp-1.0373615-rdf.json
Turtle: specialp-1.0373615-turtle.txt
N-Triples: specialp-1.0373615-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: specialp-1.0373615-source.json
Full Text
specialp-1.0373615-fulltext.txt
Citation
specialp-1.0373615.ris

Full Text

  THE LIBRARY
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
   A List of
JAPANESE MAPS
of the Tokugawa Era
SUPPLEMENT A
   'I Pf&i
sUfe
?4J<a
/ »vf!>   v TV-'
 A List of
JAPANESE MAPS
OF THE TOKUGAWA ERA
By GEORGE H. BEANS
Supplement A
TALL TREE LIBRARY
Jenkintown 1955
 LIBRARY
Publication No. 24
 CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
LIST OF MAPS
REFERENCES and INDEXES
3
5
37
  LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Inland Sea Route, 1672.4 (detail) Frontispiece
Tokaido Highway by Hishikawa Moronobu, 1690.3 (detail) facing page   11
Ezo, 1820.1 20
Tokaido Highway by Hiroshige, [1854.4] (detail) 28
  A List of
JAPANESE MAPS
of the Tokugawa Era
SUPPLEMENT A
 ABBREVIATIONS
p page. We have sometimes used this term to denote one side of a
folded sheet but page numbers are used only in connection with books
bound in western style.
s sheet or sheets. Here used to denote a sheet bound in a book with
printing on one side only but folded once and the "free" edges held
in a binding. The numbers (not always present) should be sought at
the fold where the thumb normally holds the open book. All measurements are in inches. They are approximate; old Japanese paper is
often very elastic and close measurements are meaningless.
*   this symbol signifies the map is represented in the Tall Tree Library.
 INTRODUCTION
IN this supplement we describe the Japanese maps that have been added to our collection
since the appearance of the original List, and the new catalogue numbers will dovetail
into the List. In addition to these new entries, we augment some of our earlier listings with
details that were not available before. In these instances it is important to consult both the
List and the supplement because the latter entry usually becomes fully intelligible only if
read in connection with the former.
Our original Introduction will bear re-reading since it outlines the scope of our compilation. We continue to shun maps of unknown date and where a map has had numerous publishers we have felt justified in listing just one, or at most a very few. We must leave to the
specialist the task °f recording the many publishers, booksellers and places of publication
where a map, otherwise unchanged, appeared at numerous centers of publication. If we
have become severely selective in the later periods of the Tokugawa Era it is because we feel a
collection can be broadly representative without becoming littered with countless repetitions
of certain types of cartography.
On the other hand, we now have a better representation of those publishers who had their
shops in centers other than Edo and of certain types of maps previously inadequately represented. The highway maps deserve special mention. Those that are devoted to the land routes
between the important towns frequently depict in charming fashion the life of the road—the
little figures of daimyo and peasant, soldier and porter, merchant and pilgrim, all on their
way, regardless of the weather. Pictures of castles and hovels, paddy-fields and mountain
trails, ferries and fords, help us to appreciate just what land travel was like in Tokugawa
times, while the water route maps remind us that, in a very mountainous land like Japan, a
circuitous boat trip may be easier than land travel.
Again we wish to thank those who have assisted us. Dr. John A. Harrison, who is especially conversant with the history of Ezo, has helped us describe our maps of those northern regions. Mr. Katsuki has continued to translate the map titles.
George H. Beans
  LIST OP MAPS
Keicho Period, 15 96-1615
1604 The first shogun of the Tokugawa Era is Ieyasu. His genius for organization is
reflected in the measures taken, early in the new era, to inaugurate fresh surveys of the provinces and to improve the roads and make them safer for travelers. The Nihon-bashi, a bridge in Edo, becomes the starting point for the
measuring of distances and in 1604 markers are erected to officially establish
distances between places, to control porterage and other charges.1 These
markers are earthen mounds with a tree atop each mound and are roadside
features in many of the road maps of later periods.
1609 The Ryukyu Islands, mentioned in Japanese history as early as 1187, are occupied
in 1609 by the annexation of the O-shima group.
Genjtfa Period, 1615-1624
1621.1 The Jesuit missionary Jeronymo de Angelis visits Matsumae in southern Hokkaido and draws a small map of Japan based on knowledge obtained locally.
Possibly five copies are dispatched from Japan to various officials of the Jesuit
Order. These Mss., in the course of time, are lost; a copy made in Europe survives but has no place in our List, which is restricted to maps made in Japan.2
1622 An attempt is made at about this time to map Sakhalin (Karafuto) but the mapping party is driven back by the severe winter weather.8 Knowledge of Sakhalin's insularity, established by the Russians about a century later, percolates
through to Japan very slowly and confusion in this regard persists until 1808.
Kan-ei Period, 16 24-1644
[ 1624] Printed street diagrams of Kyoto appear during this period.4 Later, derivatives
keep pace with the growing city. Large-scale plans of the principal cities of
Japan soon become an important feature in the cartography of the country.
1 jjall p. jco. 4 Reproduced in Kyoto-shi-shi, plates 14-15. The perfect
2 J. F. Schutte, Map of Japan by Father Girolamo de grid pattern of Kyoto was laid out in 794, being based
Angdis, Imago MundilX, p. 76. on that of a Chinese town, Tchang-ngan, but the inven-
8 Harrison, 1950, p. 263. tion. dates back to pre-historic times in India.
 6 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Shoho Period, 1644-1648
1644.1 Early in the seventeenth century the local authorities of Ezo are commanded to
draw up a map of that region but it does not reach Edo until 1644. Probably the
earliest map of the entire island but it lacks detail beyond the southern coast.5
[1645.1]* Bankoku Sozu. The Shoho world map in printed form.8 There is some cliffer-
^>C?    ence °f opinion as to whether this is the earliest Nagasaki-e or whether it may
I £ 1 have been produced in Osaka or Kyoto/ Hand-colored, 22% x 50%. Modern
C        kakemono mounting.
7 [1646.2]* No tide. Polar hemispheres derived from western sources, probably via China.
C ^QCO Attractively painted in earth pigments. Each hemisphere approximately 22
lRO £ inches diameter. N.p., n.d. Modern kakemono mounting. A guide to the date
of this map may lie in an inscription found in a printed version of later date,
no. 1708.5,8 where the author, KobayashiKentei, is named. This is a courtesy
name of Kobayashi Yoshinobu, born in Nagasaki in 1601, a son of Higuchi
Kyubei. He later assumes the family name of Kobayashi. He studies mathematics under Hayashi Kichizaemon, and during the Kan-ei Period studies
western surveying methods under a visiting Hollander. He is imprisoned from
1646 to 1667 under suspicion of being a Kirishitan (Christian). After his release he opens a school in Nagasaki, where he teaches mathematics, astronomy
and chronology. In the latter connection he is credited with being the first
Japanese to spread western chronology in Japan. In 1683, the year before his
death at the ripe age of eighty-four, he points out errors in the calendar in use
in Japan, and correctly predicts that a lunar eclipse called for in that calendar
will not take place. It is clear from the above that he has two periods of activity. If we can accept the attribution of authorship as applying to the painting
as well as to the printed map—they have many points in common which cannot be ignored—we seem to be left with a choice of late Kan-ei, Shoho or else
after the imprisonment, late Kanbun. The style and other characteristics seem
to make any of these periods reasonable. We have chosen the time prior to the
imprisonment, although the presence of a rather well-defined Ezo might
argue for a later date.
8 Harrison, 1953, p. 26. 7 Refer to List, notes 12 and 13.
8 A Ms. copy is reproduced as the frontispiece in our 8 Reproduced in List, plate facing p.:
List.
 SUPPLEMENT A
Keian Period, 164 8-1652
1652.1 Hei an jo Tozai Nanboku Machi Nami no Zu. "Map of East-west, South-north,
Streets of Kyoto." Published in Keian 5."
Sho-6 Period, 165 2-165 5
[1652] From time to time Japanese sailors involuntarily find themselves in strange
lands, having been carried by storm, contrary ocean currents, or even by pirates, to distant shores. Those who eventually find their way home—and
sometimes in jail, for having violated the edicts affecting foreign travel—relate their experiences and their narratives are frequently supported by maps. A
group of these wanderers returns in Sho-6 and produces a map which does not
appear in printed form until many years later. As the years go by, similar experiences eventually result in a considerable array of castaway narratives, both
in Ms. and printed form. The maps that accompany these stories, while noticeably unscientific, often relate to places that are otherwise unrepresented in
contemporary Japanese cartography.
[1652.2] Polar hemispheres, painted and mounted as a two-paneled screen, probably
similar to no. [1646.2], but Keian at the earliest.10
1653.1 Shinkai Rakuyo Narabini Rakugai no Zu. "Revised Map of Kyoto and its
Suburbs." Published Sho-6 2."
1654.1* Shinpan Heianjo Tozai Nanboku Machi Narabini . . . "New Edition,
f "2QLW Kyoto, East-west, South-north, Streets . . ." Portion of title missing but the
title of a similar map of later date suggests that the title would continue "and
Suburbs." The title is in white against a black background. This style is in imitation of a rubbing from an inscription in stone and woodcuts designed to give
this effect are called "stone prints."12 Numerous Japanese maps before 1700
have their titles in this style. Published by Musan, Shugakuinji Village, Kita-
yama, Kyoto, Sho-6 3. Hand-colored, 33 x 511/2. Our copy seems to be unique.18
9 Reproduced in Kyoto-shi-shi, plate. 16. Plate 15 repre- " Reproduced in Kyoto-shi-shi, plate ]
sents the same map undated.                                                  12 Binyon, p. ix.
10 Fuiita, p. 386. 1S Reproduced in Imago Mundi, XI.
its*
 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Meireki Period, 1655-1658
1655.1*   Shinpan Settsu Osaka Tozai Nanboku Machi Shima no Zu. "New Edition,
Map of Osaka of Settsu Province, with East-west, South-north Streets and Islands." Published in Honnoji-mae, Teramachi, Kyoto, Meireki 1." Hand-
l ^ colored vertical scroll (kakemono) on original wooden roller, 30% x 47.
1657
Edo is devastated by a terrible fire, fanned by a hurricane.111
Manji Period, 1658-1661
[ 1658]      We have encountered no additional material in this period.
Kanbun Period, 1661-1673
1662.2 Shinpan Heianjo Tozai Nanboku Cho Narabini Rakugai no Zu. "New
Edition, Map of East-west, South-north, Streets of Kyoto and Suburbs." Published in Kanbun 2.18
1666 Nihon Bunkei Zu. "Map of Japan." Known as the earliest printed Japanese
atlas. Published by Nakano Kozaemon, Kanbun 6. Kurita names a different
publisher, Yoshida Tarobei, of the same year. The provinces are in 16 hand-
colored maps, grouped with an eye to page size and are oriented with the west
at the top." Highways, water routes and distances between stations are indicated. Except as noted, each map occupies two pages in an awkward back-to-
back arrangement,18 each page measuring 4% x6%:
14 Kurita (p. 80) describes this map as the first of its
type. Sako, plate (2), reproduces the particular copy in
our collection, a fact established by the design sculptured
by those pesky little insects that do such extensive damage to paper in Japan.
15 The changes wrought by the conflagi
with in no. 1664.2, reproduced in List, pi;
18 Reproduced in Kyoto-shi-shi, plate 18.
17 When unhampered by western tradition the Japanese
map-maker, in laying out his work, would be governed
by the space to be filled. A rectangular world map might
be stood on end when destined for a screen (bydbu); in
atlases of provincial maps we frequently encounter each
province turned to whatever direction best suits the
are dealt
ingp.13.
page; in a highway map the compass will be turned repeatedly to prevent the road from running off the paper
and in some maps that happen to be without a prominent tide to serve as a guide the nomenclature and pictures can be so disposed as to give the print no "top."
For these reasons we seldom refer to orientation in describing our Japanese maps.
18 Kurita no. 15 reproduces four pages but as each page
has only half a map his four illustrations are fragmentary. In later years this arrangement is happily avoided
and as a further improvement each province is a separate
map, arranged in the order of the historic circuits. See
under 1701,1834,1837,1849, and 1865.
 SUPPLEMENT A
'\#?
666.1*   Mutsu, Dewa.
666.2*   Shimotsuke, Hitachi, Shimosa, Kazusa, Awa, Kozuke, Musashi, Sagami, Izu.
666.3*   Echigo, Sado.
666.4*   Shinano, Kai, Suruga, Totomi, Mikawa, Etchu.
666.5*   Noto> Kaga, Echizen, Hida, Mino.
666.6*   Owari, Omi, Wakasa, Yamashiro, Yamato, Iga, Ise, Shima.
666.y*   Tango, Tamba, Tajima, Harima, Inaba, Settsu, Kawachi, Izumi.
666.8*   Kii, Awaji.
666.9*   Mimasaka, H6ki,'Bitchu, Izumo, Bingo, Bizen.
666.10* Sanuki, Awa, Tosa.
666.11* Oki. Single page.
666.12* Iwami, Aki, Iyo.
666.13* Nagato, Suwo, Buzen, Bungo, Chikugo, Chikuzen.
666.14* Hizen, Iki.
666.15* Higo, Hyuga, Satsuma, Osumi. 3 pages.
i.16* Tsushima. Single page.
1667.2* Tokaido Roko no Zu. The Tokaido Highway. Published in Shijo Nakamachi
Ql^CZ (street), Kyoto, Kanbun 7. Hand-colored, 15% x 21%. Dimensions include
text along right side giving inn rates and other information of interest to travelers. Same type of map as no. [1672.3] and with identical title. It is possible
that a publisher's name has been cut from the margin at left side.
p2
HI?
]* Kyo Bat Ezu. Large map of Kyoto, by Hayashi Yoshinaga, Kyoto, n.d. Hand-
colored, 49 x 64. Our date is based on an inscription "Makino, Governor of
k*
Sado Island, resides here." He held office 1652-11
* 1671.2* Suburbs of Edo. Large-scale survey of Fukagawa, Honjo and Asakusa districts.
By Ochikochi Doin. Published by thekyojiya (mounter) Kahei, Edo, Kanbun 11. Streets hand-tinted in yellow, 41 x 7954. This augments our earlier
entry. See also no. 1671.3.
1671.3*   Suburbs of Edo. Survey of Asakusa, Somei and Koishikawa districts. 49% x
~\^o Al? 63^2- Same project as no. 1671.2, covering the northern and eastern suburbs.
1672 The Japanese establish a fishing station on Karafuto. By 1700 they have twenty-
two settlements there but the terrain and climate retard the mapping of the
region.
 io A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
16724* Tozai Kairiku Zu. This title, recorded in our List, actually embraces two sepa-
Gyoii? rate maps. One is of the Tokaido Highway19 and the other is of Saikairiku
5 3 if f r Saikenzu. Chart of the Saikaido. Since voyages abroad are prohibited—it is
even forbidden to construct ships capable of ocean navigation—there is no
need for ocean charts, but water travel between the many islands of Japan requires this counterpart of the land route map. Horizontal scroll (makimono)
18 feet x 12 inches, on wooden roller. For a later version of both maps see no.
[1716.1].20
Enpo Period, 1673-1681
1674.1* Edo Oezu. "Large Map of Edo." Published by Nakamura Ichiemon, Edo,
Enpo 2. Hand-colored, 53 x 58^. Compare nos. 1676.1 and 1678.2.
1676.1* Shinpan Edo Oezu Eiri. "Large Illustrated Map of Edo, New Edition." Published by Hyoshiya Ichirobei, Edo, Enpo 4. Hand-colored, 53% x 47. No.
1678.2 is a later edition.
&-   .
£S AST
\iU
1677.1 * Seikai no Zu. Having acquired this chart, we augment our former entry: Water
route from Osaka to Nagasaki. Editor and publisher Jiroemon, Shlmotachi-
uri, Kyoto, Enpo 5. Hand-colored makimono 22 feet x 12 inches, on wooden
roller.
1678.1*   Japan. Additional details: Hand-tinted. The Tokaido Highway and various
C ?°l b'       water-routes are indicated in red. 37 x 26%.
Tenna Period, 1681-1684
[ 1681 ]      We have encountered no additional material in this period.
Jokyo Period, 1684-1688
[1686.1]* Shinpan Heianjo Rakugai no Zu. "Revised Map of Kyoto and Suburbs."
Publisher Honya Riemon, Kyoto, n.d. 22% x 34%. Date conjectural. Very
similar to no. 1667.1, an earlier edition.
rU
19 Not represented in our collection. which is probably the case, our entry no. 1672.1 is a du-
20 If Boxer's reference to the earliest representation of plication.
Deshima in a printed map refers to our chart no. 16724,
  -jysp
^ ft V
 SUPPLEMENT A n
1686.2* Large map of Kyoto by Hayashi Yoshinaga, Kyoto, Jokyo 3. Hand-colored,
48 x 66.21 No. [1668.1 ] is an earlier edition.
• 1686.3*   Shinsen Zoho Osaka Oezu. "New Revised Map of Osaka." Published by Hayashi Yoshinaga, Kyoto, Jokyo 3. Hand-tinted, 47% x 55.22
1 fig
1607.1*   Japan. Additional detail: Hand-colored. Compare no. 1689.2, a later printing.
Q ~?q6( A1  llB + TS
1688.01 Shinpan Heianjo Narabini Rakugai no Zu. "New Edition, Map of Kyoto
and its Suburbs." Published by Hayashi Yoshinaga, Jokyo 5.28
Genroku Period, 1688-1704
1690.1 *   Bunken Edo Zu. "Measured Map of Edo." Publisher Hangiya Shichirobei, Edo,
Qltftk       Genroku 3. Hand-colored, 50% x 44%. This augments our tentative entry no. [1690.1 ] and definitely establishes the date.
1690.3* Tokaido Highway. Additions to our earlier description: The European Kaemp-
fer, traveling this highway at this period, describes it as being "upon some
days more crowded than the publick streets in any of the most populous town
in Europe."24 The workmanship in this map is fully worthy of the artist, Hish-
ikawa Moronobu, a distinguished name in the art of the woodcut. Our illustration represents the highway near Hara. The overall length of the entire
map is 116 feet.
1691.2* Japan. Additions to our earlier description: Author Ishikawa Ryusen of Edo,
r?%l publisher Sagamiya Tahei, Edo, Genroku 4. Hand-colored, 6y x 32% • There
"*"    are two small volvelles at lower left. See no. 1703.1, a later edition.
1694.1*   No title. Map of Edo. Publisher Kaifuya Gonzaemon, Edo, Genroku 7. Hand-
Q f 9 (, V       colored, 33 x 22%. This map gives details of northern sections of the city, absent from the smaller version of two years later, no. 1696.1.
21 No title appears on the face of this map. This is also 22 Reproduced in Sako, two plates following p. 32.
true of several other early maps of Kyoto. There may 2S Reproduced in Kyoto-shi-shi, plate 20.
have been cover-labels, worn away in the course of years. 2i Hall, p. 152.
The cover-labels are the most fragile part of these folded
1690.3   TOKAIDO HIGHWAY BY HISHIKAWA MORONOBU (detail)
01
 g?
12 ^ L/5T OF JAPANESE MAPS
1696. i*   No title. Map of Edo. Publisher Kaifuya Gonzaemon, Edo, Genroku 9. Hand-
(j. ~f-°fb 1     colored, 211/2 x 22%. See no. 1694.1, an earlier form. At this period the popu-
I to °l b lation of Edo exceeds that of any European city; it totals a million or more.
K X Many publishers find it profitable to issue numerous editions of these city
plans, often with minute details.
1696.2     No title. Large map of Kyoto, published by Hayashi Yoshinaga, Genroku 9.25
[1700.1]* Daimin Kyuhen. Bankoku Zenzu. World map from the center of China. Published by Umemura Yahaku from a Chinese original of 1663. Kyoto, n.d.
Hand-colored, 47 % x 47%. Those portions of the earth that are occupied by
.. q "the barbarians" appear as minor appendages in these Chinese world maps,
thus reflecting the Chinese view of the relative unimportance of foreign
lands.28
1703.1 *   Nihon Kaizan Choriku Zu. "Map of Japan, Sea, Mountain, Ocean and Land."
G "V\ i '       Author Ryusen. Published by Sagamiya Tahei, Edo, Genroku 16. Hand-
- A a,        colored, 67 x 32 %. Compare no. 1691.2, an earlier edition.
Hoei Period, 1704-1711
1708.4*   World map. Additional details: Hand-tinted, 50 x 21%. For earlier edition see
no. 1688.1. Cancel entry 1708.1 which represents the same map as no. 17084,-
1708.5* Polar hemispheres. Additional details: The author Kobayashi is of an earlier
Q, 32°b period than the date when this map is printed. An inscription on the map explains its origin,—"This map was made by [my] teacher Kobayashi Kentei
... who made astronomical and geographical maps. ... I, Inagaki Mitsuo, a
pupil of Kobayashi, verify [the fact that this is one of his maps]." A painted
map in our collection, no. [ 1646.2], could be the prototype of the printed ver-
1709.1*   Kawachi.
Additional detail:
Osaka, Hoei 6
57X20J4.
One
of the earliest, if
K    t
FM1
not the
first of the large printed provincial
maps.27
vu
26 Reproduced
n Kyoto-sh
-shi, plate 21.
2T Reprodu
:ed in Ku
no. 28.
w Reproduced
in Imago Mundi X, fig. 3, following
P-
124.
 SUPPLEMENT A 13
1709.2 Kyo Ezu. Plan of Kyoto, published by Kameya Seibei, Hoei 6.28
1710.3 Arimasan Ezu. 'Tictorial Map of Mount Arima.", n.p., H6ei y.29
1710.4*   Bankoku Shoka no Zu. "A Map Showing Numerous Countries as Sweets in
Cb>20\   Hand." Printed from the same blocks as no. 1710.1 but published by Bundai-
ken Uhei, Edo, H6ei 7. This is the publisher referred to in our List, note 48.
Our present translation of the title is more literal and more interesting than
the general phrase "World Map."
Shotoku Period, 1711-1716
1714.1*   Edo Annai Junken Zukan. "Guide Map of Edo." Author Ryusen. Publisher
Sudo Gonbei, Edo, Shotoku 4. Hand-colored, 64 x 39. Symbols of animals
X
representing the twelve directions appear around the sides.
Kyoho Period, 1716-1736
[1716.1]* Tokaido Saikenzu; Saikairiku Saikenzu. "Detailed Map of Tokaido High-
(y ?%7      way; Detailed Map of Saikairiku Seaway." Introduction by Mimura Gen-
G seki. PubUsher Nishida Katsubei, Kyoto, n.d., but Kyoho Period.80 Four vol-
17 7,0 H.       umes (two for each route), accordion-folded. Hand-colored. Total length 54
feet, height 13^4 inches. Derived from no. 1672.4.
1720        In Nishikawa Joken, Nihon Suido Ko, published by Ibaraki Tazaemon, Kyoto,
Kyoho 5, two crude maps, each 10x7%, hand-tinted:
1720.1 Japan.
1720.2 Asia.
1723.1     No title. Large plan of Kyoto by Hayashi Yoshinaga, Kyoho 8.81
1735.1*   Yamato. Additional details: Engraver Furukawa Chubei of Osaka. Hand-
£?%:?    tinted, 41x59/2.
yi
17 V>
28 Reproduced in Kyoto-shi-shi, plate 22. so Kurita, text, pp. 106-107.
29 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 56. S1 Reproduced in Kyoto-shi-shi, plate 23.
 14 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
1735.2*   Sakai Oezu Kaisei Komoku. "Corrected Map of Sakai." Artist Kawai Yukan
G  J ? £ ^   Morikiyo, corrected by Seta Masanari, both of Osaka. Published by Murakami
£ "2. Ihei, Osaka, Kyoho 20. 24x42 x/2,82
If 3>T
V<X
Genbun Period, 1736-1741
1736.3*   Izumi no Kuni Ezu. "Illustrated Map of Izumi Province." Author Nakatani
(V ? f £ 1     Kozan, publisher Iseya Shimbei, Osaka, Genbun 1. 22% x 53.
1738 The Japanese are impressed with the importance of defensive measures in the islands north of Honshu, where the Russians have penetrated, but they are
handicapped by a lack of maps of those regions.88
Kanpo Period, 1741-1744
1741.2*   No title. Plan of Kyoto. Published by Hayashi Yoshinaga, Kyoto, Kanpo 1.
(y 1 °f £ ^    Revised from Jokyo 3, no. 1686.2. We have only the southern half, meas-
K ^ &        uring 48 x 34X/2.M
\7tit
Enkyo Period, 1744-1748
1746.1     Cancel this entry. The map is correctly fisted under no. 1764.1.
Kanen Period, 1748-1751
1748.1 *   Settsu. Additional details: Publisher Kimura Juyodo, Kyoto. Hand-tinted, 481/2
1750.1* The title, in particularly difficult Chinese ideographs, translates along these
(y 78* " lines: "The Best Collection of Ancient and Modern Work Concerning the
Historical Events Throughout the Dynasties. By the Monastery of Shao-lin"
(Honan). Map of China copied from a map published in that country in
1679. Published by Suharaya Mohei, Edo, Kanen 3. 63 x yol/2.
I?*
It
V
12 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 53. S4 Reproduced in Kyoto-shi-shi, plat
18 Harrison, 1950, p. 262.
 SUPPLEMENT A 15
Horeki Period, 1751-1764
1752.3 *   Tokaido Bunken Ezu. Road map of the Tokaido Highway. Published by Yoro-
zuya Seibei, Edo, Horeki 2. 77 feet x 5 inches, including 2 pp. of text at front
(x, V /1 *f   and seven at back, accordion-folded.
1754.1     No title. Map of Kyoto. Drawn by Kogetsudo, engraved by Yamamoto Kahei,
published by Kikuya Chobei. Second edition. Horeki 4.85
1756.1 *   Map of ancient Osaka. Additional details: 32 x 31 x/2, plus a small flap fisting in-
Q- ? <? * *+     teresting places.88
OS S«
Meiwa Period, 1764-1772
.   1767.2*   Zoho Osaka Zu. "Revised Map of Osaka." Publishers Kikuya Shichirobei,
(j. 7- £((, 4     Kyoto and Fujiya Chobei, Osaka, Meiwa 4. An early example of color-print-
Q $  E ^3£" nig. The tints are quite dull but this seems to be characteristic of early color-
/ 7-17- printing in Japanese maps. 16 x 19%. Heavy paper with a circular diagram
of directions pasted on reverse. Compare no. 1787.1, a map with similar title.
Anei Period, 1772-1781
1776.1*   Kawachi Saiken Zu. "Detailed Map of Kawachi Province." Author Narui
(^ 7"? £ 2      Hyoemon. Drawn by Takagi Masatsune. Engraved by Itamiya Shinshichi.
Corrected by Kawachiya Kibei. Published by Shioya Heisuke, Osaka, Anei
5. 50x21"
Tenmei Period, 1781-1789
1783.1     World map. Additions to our earlier description: Author Mitsuhashi Kinkaku.
Hand-colored, 59% x 29. No. 1783.3 is the same map with three publishers.
1783.3 *   Chikyu Ichiran Zu. World map printed from the same blocks as no. 1783.1 but
naming three publishers; Onogi Ichibei of Osaka, Umemura Saburobei of
G-3Z0Q
3   '7*3
Kyoto and Suharaya Ichibei of Edo. Tenmei 3. Hand-colored.
86 Reproduced in Kyoto-shi-shi, plate 25. 8T Nordenskiold, no. 368.
*• Sacco, plate 1 represents the same map without the
flap.
 16 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
J55
1785        Hayashi Shihei, Sangoku Tsuran Zusetsu. "Retrospect of Three Countries."
Publisher Suharaya Ichibei, Edo, Tenmei 6.88 The three countries referred to in
the title are Ezo, Korea and the Ryukyus. This work is destined to achieve the
status of a textbook among the people. This is brought about by Hayashi's
112i>     writings on a general subject of widespread interest, the government's policy
towards the frontier problem. He so stirs the people by his warning of the
dangers resulting from frequent visits of foreign vessels that the Shogunate
in 1792 confiscates this work, destroys the wood blocks and confines the
author. He dies in 1793. This does not decrease the popularity of his writings. The present book and five maps that accompany it as supplements
continue to circulate in numerous Ms. copies. Hayashi is neither explorer nor
cartographer. His maps, compiled from second-hand material, emphasize the
nearness of frontiers but do not reflect any improvement in the mapping of
those regions. The printed maps are listed here as a group although they are
issued as separates and, it seems, not all simultaneously:
1785.1*   Sangoku Tsuran Yochi Rotei Zenzu. "Three Countries Road Map." Author
Cr 7 ^ 12      Hayashi Shihei of Sendai. Publisher Suharaya Ichibei of Edo, Tenmei 5.
Hand-colored, 28^ x 20%. Japan in relation to the adjacent continent and
islands. Sakhalin appears as part of the mainland and again as a large island.89
1785.2     Ezo no Kuni Zenzu. "General Map of Ezo."89 Same author and publisher as the
& ?9il       general map above, it being an enlargement of the northern portion of that
£  c map. The printed version is missing in our set and has been replaced by a Ms.
copy drawn and colored by Kikkoen Kanehiro in Bunsei 8 (1825). 19% x
36%. A complete set in Ms. is listed under the year [1792]. ,
1785.3*   Chosen Koku Zenzu. "General Map of Korea." Hand-colored, 2834 x 19%.^^ <$ <
1785.4*   Ryukyu Kowu Zenzu. "General Map of Ryukyii." Ryukyii Islands, with sea
if ir H7_     routes and distances to Japan and the mainland. Hand-colored,. 28 J4 x 26.
17^5.5*   Munwto no Zu. "Map of Uninhabited Country." The Bonin Group, with distances and sea routes to Japan. Hand-colored, 10 x 24%.
1787.5*   Tajima no Kuni Oezu. "Large Illustrated Map of Tajima Province." Author
Uemura Ugen. Publisher Maekawa Rokuzaemon, Edo, Tenmei 7. 39 % x
31/2.
88 Acquisition of this work, both printed and in Ms., year when the author completed the work. The date of
has enabled us to expand our earlier tentative entry. publication is the following year, Tenmei 6 (1786).
Cancel nos. 1785.8 and 1785.9, now grouped with the 39 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 23.
companion maps. We retain the date 1785 which is the
 SUPPLEMENT A 17
Kansei Period, 1789-1801
\ [1792] The destruction in 1792 of Hayashi's published text stimulates the demand for
Ms. copies of his work. Numerous such Mss. survive in contrast to the printed
work, which becomes a rarity. Our example of the work in Ms. retains the
date of the published original'but we prefer to list the Ms. as approximately
of the year 1792 when the need for Ms. copies arose. Our copyist conceals his
real name by signing the Ms. Ganzo (Ryosho Dojin). A set of five Ms. maps
that now accompanies this text, but as separates and of uncertain date, agrees
with the printed edition in size and other details:
[1792.5]* Japan.
[1792.6]* Ezo.
/   [1792.7]* Korea.
[1792.8]* Ryukyii Islands.
[1792.9]* Bonin Group.
a" \j797-1]* Ezo Roryo Manshu Ichiranzu. Map of Ezo and Russian Manchuria. N.p.,
n.d. Color-printed, 15% x 26%. In the absence of a date our approximate year
Q. ^8^ has been based on the cartographic evidence. Even on this basis, it could be
any time between 1786 and 1806. The map is a composite. Dr. Harrison finds
the Russian areas are derived from a chart, the Russian names being very well
rendered in Kana characters. In Kamchatka there are names of Russian fortresses founded 1735-1752. Southern Sakhalin, the Kuriles, Hokkaido and
northern Japan are well done from solely Japanese sources but Mamiya
Rinso's discoveries of 1808-1809 do not appear; there is a peninsular Karafuto
ana an insular Sakhalin. The wording of the title suggests a date after circa
1785 when the Japanese are much concerned with the title of the northern islands.
1799.1 *   Tamba no Kuni Oezu. "Large Map of Tamba Province." Editor Yano Sadato-
shi, revised by Miyawaki Takatsugu. Published by Nakagawa Toshiro,
T V Kyoto, Kansei 11.42% x 35J4-
1800 In Tachibana Morikuni, Settsu no Kuni Arimayama Shokfi Zu. "Picture of
Fine View of Mount Arima in Settsu Province." Publisher Izumiya Jubei,
Osaka, Kansai 12:
1800.1 * The foot-paths connecting the hot springs of Mt. Arima. Color-print in three sections (each ioy2 x yl/2), joined.
A *   <* ^etfso   Woht   f slni-ZO  (ft v«?"> tHof**- **• #»"» m ^eprcv^ce of  tetTsu
ItOO PcmUd * ior#*i«  &ost>ken Tachibana /to Hor'ihni £')       Osaka.: hom^o- Tu   *',
' Tfnmei  £ (m2)    rtpr'ntd  kin&&-< 17 (l%oo). Call'y*p»cr '*«"»' H'^S-
AH-
 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Uruppu, the third main island in the chain running northeast from Hokkaido,
becomes the dividing line between Japanese and Russian control in the
Kuriles.40 This becomes official, by treaty, in Ansei 3, when the line is drawn
between Uruppu and Etorofu.
&*'
V 2
Kyowa Period, 1801-1804
1801.2 Map of Nagasaki published by Yamotoya, Kyowa 1.41
1801.3 Map of Nagasaki published by Baikodo, Kyowa 1."
1803 Yamamura Shoei, Zoyaku S air an I gen. World geography. Shoei of Tsuchiura
appears as the translator. Corrected by Sugita Tsutomu of Wakasa, examined
by Otsuki Shigetada of Sendai. Ms. Thirteen volumes of text and one volume
of maps. N.p., Kyowa 3. The maps are colored, except the last four, where the
colorist has not progressed beyond outlining the boundaries in red. The
Western derivation is emphasised by the absence of detail in the regions that
include Japan. With one exception, as noted, each map occupies two facing
pages, each page approximately 5l/2 x8:
803.1*   Europe.
803.2*   Southwestern Europe.
803.3*!   Scandinavia and British Isles.
803.4*   Balkans, Black Sea region and Asia Minor.
803.%)  Russia and Poland.
803.6*   Asia.
803.7*   China.
803.8*   Southern Asia.
803.9*   Malaya, single page.
803.10* Africa.
803.11* South America.
803.12* North America.
Bunka Period, 1804-1818
In Mito Sekisui, "Nagasaki Travelogue," published by Morimoto Tasuke and
five others, Osaka, Bunka 2:
40 Harrison, 1953, p. 44, note 11.
41 Reproduced in Mody, plate 35.
42 Reproduced in Mody, plate 36.
 IOv>l
0oH
SUPPLEMENT A
(T 1805.2*   Tenmangii Shrine, Kyushu. 3 pp., beginning s 25.
1 1805.3*   Itsukushima Shrine, s 58.
(^1805.4*   Lake Biwa in Omi Province. 2 pp., beginning s 72.
*9
1806.1
[1807]
Choroku Edo Zu. "Map of Edo, made in Choroku." The Choroku Period was
1457-1459. Bunka 3."
Otsuki Shigetada, Kankai Ibun. "Curious Stories of the Surrounding Ocean."
Ms., 10 vols. N.p., n.d. Other Mss. exist with the date 1807. Narrative of a
Japanese crew of sixteen, carried by storm to the Aleutians in 1793, from
whence, after a long interval, they reach St. Petersburg via Siberia. With
further Russian assistance four of them, who elect to return to Japan, arrive
home in 1804. Otsuki, the recorder of this narrative, is one of the scholars who
interrogate the returned seamen. There are a number of drawings in color, of
cartographic interest:
[1807.1]* Chart showing the return route from the Baltic, across the Atlantic via the Canaries and Brazil, around Cape Horn, and eventually reaching Kamchatka
and home. It is odd that only the return voyage is depicted, because these
four sailors are the first Japanese to circle the globe. Double-page and running
over to a third page. Vol. 1,18 x 10%.
[1807.2]* Dock facilities at Kronstadt. Vol. 8, double-page, 14 x 10^4.
[1807.3]* Petropavlovsk Harbor, Kamchatka. Vol. 9, double-page, 14 x 10% •
[1807.4]* Nagasaki Harbor. Vol. 9, double-page, 14 x 10%.
[1807.5]* Lake Baikal with adjacent rivers, copied from a Russian map of about 1800.
Vol. 10.51/2x61/4.
[ 1807]       In another Ms. of the above narrative (15 volumes, bound in 6) we find a colored
drawing not present in our copy:
[1807.6]    The reconstructed Gottorp terrestrial globe being viewed by the Japanese from
the pavillion in which it is housed. Both Mss. have a drawing showing the
four visitors, inside the globe, viewing the celestial sphere which is constructed
on the interior." Vols. 8-10, 2 pp.
[1810.8]* Tokaido Ichiran Zu. View of the Tokaido Highway. Drawn by Kuwagata,
(r ?? C7   better known as Keisai. Published by Sanoya Ichigoro, Izumoji Manjiro and
18 Reproduced in Kurita, no. 83.
14 Ramming (Imago Mundi, IX, 1952,
33-105) de
scribes the narrative and the globe, and reproduces the
two pictures of the latter.
 I
A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Izumiya Hanbei, all of Edo, n.d. Color-printed, 52 x 24. An early example of
large color-print combining decorative and cartographic qualities.
1811.2*   Kaisei Nihon Zu. "Revised Map of Japan." Publisher Asano Yahei, n.p., Bunka
i. Color-printed, 21 %xi6%. A small version of the oft-printed map of Sekisui.
1813.1*   Kyushu. Additional details: Color-printed, 23 y4 x 34. This issue and no. 1813.2
derive from Toshimaya no. 1783.2.
1813.2*   Kyushu. Generally similar to no. 1813.1 but without publisher's imprint. Color-
^!j printed, 22% x 34.
1817.2     Tango no Kuni Oezu. "Large Illustrated Map of Tango Province." Author
Saito Jinzaemon, publisher Asano Magobei, Osaka, Bunka 14. 33 % x 24.
Bunsei Period, 1818-1830
818.1]* Shinka Oedo Ezu. "Revised Map of Edo." Additional details: "Bunsei Period,
revised every week." Color-printed, 36 x 30.
cm
1820.1* Ezo Zu. "Map of Ezo." Copied by Sejrin Orihashi in Bunsei 3. Ms. with large
Q-l^il water-color painting of Ainu hunter and wife. 60 x 40. Interesting for its dec-
£/! orative qualities and as an example of "popular" cartography. Less colorful
but more accurate maps are available in published form. It illustrates the growing interest in these northern regions, but the artist has used material that, in
part at least, goes back to the very faulty map by Hayashi Shihei, no. 1785.2.
1821.2* Hishu Nagasaki Zu. "Map of Nagasaki in Hishu." Published by Bunkindo in
G ~\ 1 (> *+      Nagasaki, Kyowa 2, revised in the year of Kanoto-mi (1821)." Color-printed,
35 x 26. Compare no. 1802.8, the earlier edition.
(V8
1823 The artist Hokusai turns his talents to landscape. Some of his multi-colored prints
are maps-in-perspective and they add a new and attractive element in Japanese cartography. His follower Hiroshige also produces prints of this kind.
45 The time of revision, previously overlooked, moves 1821.2. Mody, plate 37, represents the latter, not the
this map from 1802 to 1821. Cancel no. 1802.5. The ref- original issue,
erences to no. 1802.5 under no. 1802.8 apply to no.
   SUPPLEMENT A 21
[ 1823.8] * Sagami no Kuni Zenzu. "Complete Map of Sagami Province." Author Tsuru-
Or }9&2      mine Hikoichird. Publisher Kikuya Shichirobei, Kyoto, n.d. Color-printed,
29% x 38- Believed to have been published in Bunsei 6; the style of coloring
o makes this date a reasonable assumption.
1824.3* 0mi no Kuni Oezu. "Large Illustrated Map of Omi Province." Yamashita
Shigemasa's map of 1742 (no. 1742.1) revised by his son and pupils and published by Kawachiya Gisuke, Osaka, Bunsei 7.54^ X3214.
O b
n
1830.1.1 * Ise no Kuni Ezu. "Map of Ise Province." Publishers Yamashiroya Sahei and Yo-
Cr 'rHLX       shinoya Nihei, both of Edo, Bunsei 13. 56 x 41.
1 5*
IS30
Tenpo Period, 1830-1844
1831.2* Nagasaki Dochu Hitori Annai. Detailed map of Nagasaki Road between
Kyoto and Nagasaki, giving distances, fares and freight charges. Published
by Takehara Kobei, Kyoto (and five other publishers in four places), Tenpo
2. Color-printed. A portion occupies the reverse side, the two parts measuring,
respectively, 16 x 10% and 8 x 10%.
[1835.1]* Choi Ichiran. "Map of Ch'ing China." Delineated by Seitaien, Osaka, and examined by Sen-in, Nagasaki. Copied after a map made in China in Tenpo 6.
Color-printed, 22 % x 251/.
1835.2 Shinano no Kuni Oezu. "Large Illustrated Map of Shinano Province." Author
Ikeda Tori. Sold by several booksellers, Edo, Tenpo 6. 661/2 x 41/l.
[1835.3 ] * Oshu Shiogama Matsushima no Ryakuzu. Map in perspective of the many islands in Matsushima Bay, with fairly extensive nomenclature. Signed Zen
Hokusai Tamekazu Hitsu (= painted by). N.p., n.d. Hokusai, who uses
many different signatures during his long life, signs many of his prints in this
fashion about the time that we place this print. Color-printed, 22% x 16*4.
1836.2* Settsu no Kuni Meisho Kyuseki Saiken Oezu Sinkaisei. "Large Corrected
Detailed Map of Famous and Historical Places in Settsu Province." Detailed
by Yamada Wasuke of Osaka, corrected and drawn by Shitomi Kangyu.
Published by Kawachiya Gisuke and Kawachiya Kibei, both of Osaka, Tenpo
7.511/2x45/2.
 22 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
[ 1836.3 ] Chikyu Bankoku Zenzu. "Complete Map of all Countries of the World." Copper-engraved, n.p., n.d. Hemispheres in a projection encountered in nos.
1810.2 and 1810.4. Made by Gihei Matsuda.4*
1839.1 Kiso Dochu Zu. "Map of Kiso Road" by Hokusai. Edo, 1839. Color-printed,
22/2 x i6/2.47
1840.3*   Karaku Oko Zu. Map of ancient Kyoto. Author Naito Hiromae. Tenpo 11.
32 x 38. This map corresponds to Kurita's no. 84 where the date is apparent-
^41 ly based on an earlier edition. Compare our no. 1791.1.
[1840.4]* Kyo no Mizu, Dai Dairi Onzu. Plan of Imperial Palace, Kyoto, n.d. 21% x
* « M 27* ^"s *s an enlargement of a portion of no. 1840.3 and both the workman-
tfl •    ship and cover design leave no doubt these two plans belong together.
[1840.5]* Dainihon Saiken Dochu Zukan. "Road Map of Japan." Artist Tomoshima
Shokyoku of Osaka. No place or date given but a popular pilgrims' map that
appears in numerous editions at this period. Compare no. 1843.2. Color-printed, 57 x 13 y2, plus added tables of information for travelers. Presented to the
Tall Tree Library by Mr. Melvin P. McGovern.
I 2
IE1*2
"T 6
1842.2
l    l842-3*
ami
y*
c   1842.4^
The Izu Group. Additions to our original description: The author Tojo Shinko.
Corrected by his pupils Abe Akito of Edo, Takada Shinsho of Izu and Soejima
Seishin of Hirosaki. Color-printed, 42 x 30, including much text and the inset:
Bonin Islands. 14 x 15.
Kaiho Kai no Kuni Ezu. "Pocket Map of Kai Province." Author Gimando.
Publisher Murataya Kotaro, Kofu, Tenpo 13. Color-printed, 34y2 x 26. Compare no. 1849.2, a later edition.
Tenpo Kaisei Bungo no Kuni Ezu. "Map of Bungo Province, Revised in Tenpo."
Author Okada Shuntosai, engraved by Hirai Kahei. Published by Hida Teki-
\ % *+ 2 tekiken Kosui, Kyoto, Tenpo 13. 28% x 36^4•
1842.5*   Echigo no Kuni Saiken Oezu. "Large Map of the Details of Echigo Province."
Author Ikeda Tori, publisher Omiya Sataro and others, Kyoto, Tenpo 13.
fj&2        72x35/2.
48 Imago Mundi X, 128. Reproduced fig. 4. 4T Tutde, Cat. 262, item 348.
 SUPPLEMENT A 23
1843.1 Fujimi Jusanshu Yochi no Zenzu. Map of the thirteen provinces from which
Fujisan is visible. Akimaya Einen (Bokusen) and others. PubUshed by Shu-
seido, Edo, Tenpo 14. Color-printed, 68 x 59. This is a revision of our original entry.
1843.3*   The same map as no. 1843.1 but with a second publisher added: Yamashiroya
£ ??*,' Sahei.
1843.4*   O Kawa Binran. "Travel Map of the Big River." Course of the Yodo River from
9 C2       Kyoto to Osaka. Artist Takashima Shunsho. PubUshed by Akamatsu Kuhei
?    of Osaka and Takehara Kobei of Kyoto, Tenpo 14. Color-printed, accordion-
folded, approximately 14% feet x 7% inches, including introductory and concluding text.
T3
u 1844.01* Chikyu Bankoku Sankai Yochi Zenzu. "Complete Map of Numerous Countries on the Globe." Author Nagakubo Genju Mito. Revised by Den Rinko-
ku. Re-engraved Tenpo 15. Outlined in color, 15% x 10, plus a sheet of text
of approximately the same size as the map.
1844.02 Tokaido Nakasendo Ekikan Ritei Ichiran. Table of distances between stations on the Tokaido and Nakasendo highways. Author Fujita Toemon. Publisher Iwabuchi, Tenpo 15. 24 x 16%. This is one of several types of tabulations in use as travel guides. Some are diagrams more or less map-like in
character48 but the present example is in no sense a map. Names of stations
are arranged in columns so that, by reading across, distances between any two
stations may easily be found.
1844.1*   Nara. Additional details: Tenpo 15. Color-printed, 2il/2 x 1654.
W2T-    I8<*<4     £1
1844.2* Sesshu Osaka Chizu Zoshu Kaisei. Plan of Osaka, corrected and revised.
Drawn by Okada Gyokuzan, corrected by Fujimura Naoyuki, artist. Copied
by Yoshida Masaaki, engraved by Higuchi Yohei. Published by Akamatsu
Kuhei. Permitted Tenmei 3 (1783), engraved Bunka 3 (1806), again engraved Osaka, Tenpo 15. Waterways tinted in light blue, 55/4 x 6o.49 This
is a revision of our earlier description.
48 Hall reproduces three examples, plate facing p. 155. Sako, plate facing p. 72, reproduces the first editi
49 Ramming, 1934, no. 115, names a different publisher. no. 1806.2.
 24
A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Koka Period, 1844-1848
*
^1844
Sakai Junzo, Aboku Shinwa, "New Story of America." Ms., 3 vols., n.p. Koka 1.
&«* **
The story of a castaway, Hatsutaro, as told by Sakai. Among the numerous
•kt^*
colored drawings there are three of cartographic interest:
' tf*   i
" 1844.3*
Chart tracing Hatsutaro's course, starting from Japan in the winter of 1841, his
shipwreck in February, rescue by a Spanish vessel, arrival at Lower California
r> ^ ^
\
and Mexico and eventual return to Canton. Drawn by Sakai Junzo, checked
by Kitano Yukita and plotted by Koide Chojiiro. 14 x 9%.
1844.4*
Mazatlan Harbor. 13 x 9.
1844.5*
Canton Harbor. 14 x 9%.
s
-1847.1*
Osaka Shisho Zu Zoshu. "Corrected and Enlarged Detailed Map of Osaka."
Newly engraved by the Sekitendo engraving firm. PubUshed by Harihiaya
17?    ^
Kyubei and three others, all of Osaka, Koka 4. 2014 x 15V2J with an added
strip 514 x yl/2. Waterways are tinted in blue.50 Printed on heavy paper with
another map on reverse:
1847.2*
Yodogawa Suji no Zu. "Map Along the Yodo River." The course of the many
channels of the Yodo River, above and within the city of Osaka. Drawn by
1
Hokkyo Gyokuzan, examined by Ooka Shunko, details by Higuchi Yohei.
Color-printed, 2014 x 15^4.
Kaei Period, 1848-1854
,      .           ■    /7(|
[1848.26]
*World map "published in Kaei Period." Previously described by us under its
F''^"
G-3260
earlier date Tenpo 9, in error. See no. 1838.1. Also read Abe Akito, not Abe
I8H8
Yoshito.
Kfc
1848.27*
Kaei Zoho Kaisei Yamato no Kuni Saiken Zu. "Detailed Map of Yamato
lot-1
GflU
Province, Revised and Enlarged in Kaei." Author Sekigyokuho Shujin of
Y* g
Osaka, corrected by Sasaki Seiri and Hase Usho. PubUshed by Suharaya
Mohei of Edo, and four others, Kaei 1.38 x 51.
1849
Sixteen districts of Edo, plotted in Kaei, are referred to under the year 1869.
L
1849.1*
Japan. Additions to our original description: "Revised in Kaei Period." Dated
Kaei 2. Color-printed, 5672 x 28%.
60 Reproduced in Sako, plate facing p. 70.
 SUPPLEMENT A
25
1849.4*
G rlCl
[1849]
Kofu. Additional details: Color-printed, 2014 x 18%.
G- W*   K?  /?H   >~ g
Kaisei Kan Hasshu Saiken no Zu. "Detailed Map of the Eight Provinces of the
Kanto District, Revised." Author Doi Empei. PubUsher Izumiya Hanbei,
Edo, Kaei 2. Color-printed, 22 x 19.
Takashiba Hidezo, Dai Nihon K.okugun-yu Zenzu. "General Map of Provinces
and Towns of Japan." N.p., n.d. A Ms. atlas of the provinces of Japan, in two
volumes, sheets not numbered. The maps are beautifully drawn in ink with an
extremely fine brush, and neatly tinted.51 We place this Ms. in Kaei Period on
no better authority than our entry no. 1849.1, a pubUshed map of Japan by the
same author. The details resemble those in our printed atlas of 1834 except in
a few respects; the map of Japan has meridians and parallels and Shima is
oriented with south instead of east at the top. In this respect it resembles no.
1837.9. Takashiba, where a map is in more than one part, does not repeat the
title beyond the first part; otherwise his titles are identical with the 1834 atlas,
even as regards their location on the page. The maps in volume 2 follow the
arrangement in the atlas of 1837, rather than the sequence in the 1834 atlas.
Volume i
Volume 2
[1849.5]*   Japan, outlining the provinces.
[184941]* Tamba.
[ 1849.6 ] *   Yamashiro.
[184942]* Tango.
[1849.7]*   Yamato.
[184943]* Tajima.
[1849^]*   Kawachi
[184944]* Inaba.
[1849.9]*    Izumi.
[184945]* Hoki.
[1849.10]* Settsu.
[184946]* Izumo.
[1849.11]* Iga.
[184947]* Iwami.
[1849.12]* Ise.
[184948]* Oki Retto.
[1849.13]* Shima.
[184949]* Harima.
[1849.14]* Owari.
[1849.50]* Mimasaka.
[1849.15]* Mikawa.
[1849.51]* Bizen.
[1849.16]* Totomi.
[1849.52]* Bitchu.
[1849.17]* Suruga.
[1849.53]* Bingo.
\2S-Z
81 More than one Ms. work has come from Japan with
the description "original Ms." or "Ms. of unpublished
work." We have resisted the temptation to retain these
phrases in our own descriptions. The most laborious
copying of text and maps could be done so cheaply i
Japan in early times that it is risky to assume tl
such as these are the first and sole originals.
t Mss.
Incidentally, the western collector will better appreciate the patience and skill of the Japanese craftsman
after he discovers that some work of many volumes,
casually identified as being printed from wood blocks,
turns out to be hand-written throughout. Also, a woodcut map may be so finely cut as to pass, in the eyes of the
uninitiated, for a metal-print.
 -
26
A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
t4
Volume i continued
Volume 2 continued
[1849.18]* Kai.                                                       |
1849.54]* Aki.
[1849.19]* Izu.
1849
55]* Suwo.
[1849.20]* Sagami.
1849
56]* Nagato.
[1849.21]* Musashi.
1849
57]# Kii.
[1849.22]* Awa.
1849.58]* Awaji Island.
[1849.23]* Kazusa.
1849
59]* Awa.
[1849.24]* Shimosa.
1849
60]* Sanuki.
[1849.25]* Hitachi.
1849
61]* Iyo.
[1849.26]* Omi.                                                     [
1849
62]* Tosa.
[1849.27]* Mino.
1849
63]* Chikuzen.
[1849.28]* Hida.                                                       [
1849
64]* Chikugo.
[1849.29]* Shinano.
1849
65]* Buzen.
[1849.30]* Kozuke.
1849
66]* Bungo.
[1849.31]* Shimotsuke.
1849
67]* Hizen.
[1849.32]* Mutsu.
1849
68]* Higo.
[1849.33]* Dewa.
1849.69]* Hyuga.
[1849.34]* Wakasa.
i849
70]* Osumi.
[1849.35]* Echizen.
1849
71]* Satsuma.
[1849.36]* Kaga.
1849
72]* Iki no Shima.
[1849.37]* Noto.
1849
73]* Tsushima.
[1849.38]* Etchu.
[1849.39]* Echigo.
[1849.40]* Sado Island.
1850        Bankoku Chiri Saizu. "Detailed Map of the World." N.p. Kaei 3. Accordion-
folded with three maps colored in outline:
1850.5*   Eastern and western hemispheres, each 4% diam.
1850.6*   Polar hemispheres, each 2 diam.
1850.7*   World on Mercator's projection. 14% xn^.
1850.8* Shintei Bankoku Zenzu. "Revised World Map." Eastern and western hemispheres. Author Shirai Tsuki of Utsunomiya, pubhsher Senryukutsu, Edo,
Kaei 3. Copper-engraved by Egawa Sentaro and Takeguchi Teisai and hand-
colored in outline. Hemispheres each 22 diameter. Overall, including text,
54^4 x 25. An excellent modern map, infinitely superior to the cheap world
maps of this same year, previously listed by us.
[1850.9]* Nikko Gyosan no Ezu. "Map of Nikko Temple and Mountain." N.p., n.d.
34% x 22. Our approximate date is conjectural.
V3
 SUPPLEMENT A
27
■?•)»
1850.10 Map of Sakhalin by Matsuura Takeshiro, based on his surveys of 1846-1848.62
See no. 1859.4, ^s great map of Hokkaido and the Kuriles.
1851 Mitsukuri Genpo, Hakkp Tsiishi, "Sites and History of Europe and North Pole."
These two seemingly disassociated regions are joined in the minds of educated Japanese, who are greatly concerned with the power of Russia, which
they think of as pressing down from the far north against a vital Japanese
frontier. Published by Katsumura Jinemon, Kyoto and Akitaya Taemon,
Osaka. Six volumes. Volumes 1,2 and 3, pubUshed in 1851, deal with Europe.
Volumes 4,5 and 6 are Usted under the year 1855. Volume 1 has a map;
1851.1*   Europe "copied from a German map." Copper-engraved, outlined in color. 14 x
[i853-7]
1854
11854.02'
1854.03*
T4
1854
Kairiku Okatame Basho Zuke. Roster of Feudal Lords for Sea and Coast Defence. Map of Edo Bay showing line of defence against the American fleet,
also pictures associated with the event. Contemporary newsprint, color-printed, based on painting by unknown artist, 37 x 13%, n.p., n.d."
In Yoshida Bunji, Hyokaku Kidan, "Remarkable Story of a Castaway," Ms.,
n.p., Kaei 7, the story of Nakahama Manjiro, a sailor rescued by an American whaler in 1841 and taken to the United States, where he and his three
companions remain until 1852:
! North and South America. Almost diagrammatic in its simpHcity but degrees of
latitude are given, along with the route from Golden Gate-to New England,
via ChiU and Cape Horn. 6x8.
* Kaisei Ezo Zenzu. "Revised Map of Ezo." Hokkaido, Sakhalin and the Kuriles.
Author Sendai Tamamushi. PubUshers Yamashkoya Sahei and Harimaya
Katsugoro,n.p. Kaei 7. Color-printed, 16/2 x 20%. Dimensions include text
across the top in the form of a Japanese-Ainu vocabulary. The smaller of two
boxes at lower right explains, among other things, the probable error in latitude and longitude, as weU as the degree of accuracy of the maps.
In Kaigailbun "Story of a Castaway" (5 vols, in 2), n.p., 1854" a printed version of the narrative that is represented in our coUection in Ms. under the year
2 Harrison, 1950, p. 264; Harr
8 Tutde, Cat. 273, item 109.
 28 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
1854.04 Chart tracing the route of the castaways.
1854.05 Mazatlan Harbor.
1854.06 Canton Harbor.
Ansei Period, 1854-1860
1854        The treaty obtained by Perry opens the ports of Hakodate and Shimoda to American ships. We promptly encounter large-scale maps of these ports.
[1854.4] * Tokaido Gojusan Tsugi Ichiran. "Panorama of Fifty-three Stations of Tokai
do Road." By the celebrated artist Hiroshige. N.p., n.d. Our approximate date
T 4 A 3>5" is based on the period of the artist's activity. Color-printed, accordion-folded,
ten panels each 9% x 14/4? or 97x J4!4 overall joined. Each panel except the
first and last is numbered, 2 to 9, and the end panels are drawn to resemble an
unrolled makimono.
Gr?
At
1854 In Shinkjk^ Zushi Tsufai "Complete Translation of Description of the New
Country." Translated from the European into Chinese by Lin Tze-hsu or Rin
Sokujo and from Chinese into Japanese by "Anonymous," 4 volumes, Edo
1854. Among numerous illustrations:55
1854.5 Boston Harbor.
1854        In Uehara, Ezo Gosen. Ainu-Japanese Dictionary, n.p., 1854:58
1854.6 Ezo.
855 In "Sites and History of Europe and North Pole," described under the year 1851:
1855.2* North Pole Regions. Copper-engraved and outUned in color, 14% x 12%. Volume 4, frontispiece.
1855.3* Hakodate Zenzu. Map of Hakodate with sailing distances from point to point.
G- ?46H Publisher Harukido, n.p. Ansei 2. Color-printed, 29% x 27. This port and
j^ $f those of Shimoda and Nagasaki are opened to Russian ships.
[1855.4]* Fuji Ryodo Ichiran no Zu. "General Map Showing Two Ways to Climb Mt.
Fuji." Drawn by Gountei Sadahide, engraved by Komakichi, pubUshed by
65 Turtle, Cat. 273, item 101. 86 Turtle, Cat. 273, item 472.
[18544]   TOKAIDO HIGHWAY BY HIROSHIGE (detail)
   mf°^>v
XI855
1i855.5*
1855.6*
i
k%U2
£t   PI
SUPPLEMENT A 29
Moriharu, Edo, n.d. Sadahide, a prominent artist, is active at around this
time. Color-printed, two triptychs joined, 28 x 28. When separated the above
title appUes to the upper triptych at which time a tablet Fugaku Dochu
Ichiran "Panorama of routes to Mt. Fuji" in the lower triptych becomes a
title for the latter. It is marked "part 2."
In Tagawa Shindo, Gaiban YoboZuga. "Barbarians in Costume," artist Kurata
Togaku. Publisher Kinkado Suharaya Sasuke, 2 volumes, Edo, Ansei 2:
Oval world map. 11 x 8%.
Ezo Kairiku Kotei Zenzu. "Sailing Chart of Ezo and the Adjacent Seas, and
Continent." Author Onodera Ken, Sendai, Ansei 2. Color-printed, 23% x
3314. Map of the disputed territories in the north, compiled after diplomatic
negotiations fail to delimit the frontier. Krusenstern's voyage of 1805 is
marked by a black dotted line. Japanese voyages along the Sakhalin coast are
indicated by red lines. In effect, this map seeks to ascertain what are Russian
and what are Japanese claims. The legend on the map deals with the delimitation proposals and with the number, purpose and condition of Japanese settlements in Sakhalin and the Kuriles. In line with the terms of the Treaty of
Shimoda, negotiated at this time" this map, and many that follow, adopt
a practice of depicting only the two southernmost of the Kurile Islands; those
that Ue north of Etorofu now belong to Russia and the tendency is to omit
them from maps of Ezo.
1855 Gyotu Kaisei, Meriken Shinshi "New Account of America." 5 volumes, Edo,
Ansei 2. This work may be important as the first printed Japanese book exclusively about America, but the numerous pictures of American heroes and
historical events merely emphasize the great distance from authentic sources.
There are three double-page maps, color-printed, each page 5x7:
1855.7* World. There is a reminder below Cape Horn that the weather is "kaalt." Volume 1, s 2-3.
1855.8*   Western hemisphere labeled "Soid Amerika" and "Noord Amerika." Volume
M3-4-
1855.9*   United States. Volume 2, s 5-6.
87 Signed Ansei i, ratified Ansei 3. Harrison, 1953, p. 165.
T2
 30 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
1855.10* Sendai Ishinomaki Minato Zenzu. Port of Ishinomaki near Sendai. By Ono-
18/* 3 5"    ^era K-en' Sendai, Ansei 2. 46 x 11.
1855 Twelve districts of Edo, plotted in Ansei, are referred to under the year 1869.
1856 The first consul general of the United States arrives at Shimoda.
1857 Americans given right of permanent residence at Shimoda and Hakodate. Naga
saki opened to American ships. The Russians settle in Sakhalin.
[1857.1]* Dainihon Fujisan Zetcho no Zu. "Map of Summit of Mt. Fuji." Paths lead-
G f^L^ mg to and from the crater and the shelters for climbers, with extensive no-
5 £ T £        menclature to local features. Drawn by Sadahide. Not dated but there is a
seal-date year of the snake. This denotes either 1845 or 1857. Color-printed
triptych. 30 x 14%-
1859.4* Ezo. Additional details: Large-scale topographic map of Hokkaido and the
Kuriles by Matsuura Takeshiro, Ise Province, Ansei 6. The work consists of
28 small volumes. The first, not numbered, is accordion-folded with text introductory to the map. There is a key map (7% x 6ys ) which shows the proper
arrangement of the 26 sections of the great map:
876543
15  14  13  12  II  IO   9
24 23  20  19  l8  17  16
26 25 22 21
The irregular arrangement is due to sections 1-23 being devoted to Hokkaido
and the last three sections, 24-26, to the Kuriles. The south is at the top. The
26 sections have individual covers and comprise volumes numbered 1-26.58 If
arranged as directed in the key map they make a great map measuring'close
to 12 feet x 8 feet. Color-printed. A final volume, not numbered, has the concluding text.
1859.5* Kanagawa Ko Ezu. Map of Yokohama Harbor. Artist Ichigyokusai. PubUsher
q. "^ [}\ Shineido, Yokohama, Ansei 6. Color-printed, 29 x 20y2. No. 1859.3 1S a
M £ p£5   smaller version of this same map.
58 Kurita, plate 25 reproduces sections 14 and 24.
 SUPPLEMENT A 31
1859.6 Yokohama by Gyokuransai (= Sadahide). A variant of no. 1859.1, with seven
large foreign ships in the foreground, instead of eight. In 1859.6 the ships'
hulls seem to be constructed of blocks (resembling masonry!); in 1859.1 the
hulls are properly depicted.
i860        In Suzuki Sakei, Karafuto Nikfy "Diary of Sakhalin Expedition," exploration
by the author in 1854, pubUshed by Bunenkaku, Edo, Ansei 7 (2 volumes):
J 1860.01* Map of Shushuya Pass drawn by Takeshiro. (Volume 1, s 6-y. 10% x8.)   [
Man-en Period, i860
i860       Three districts of Edo, plotted in Man-en, are referred to under the year 1869.
Bunkyu Period, 1861-1864
1861        Several districts of Edo, plotted in Bunkyu, are referred to under the year 1869.
1861 The Russians for a short time occupy Tsushima. They are driven out by the Eng-
Ush fleet but the Russian threat over Japan continues from the direction of
Sakhalin.
1861.1 * Shinkan Yochi Zenzu. World chart on Mercator's projection with numerous
ocean routes. PubUsher Sato Seiyo, Edo, Bunkyu 1. Copper-engraved and
color-printed. The map proper (46% x 35) is surrounded by a frame of 159
flags of foreign nations in color. Overall dimensions, including attached text,
51x49.
di861 Hsu Chi-yu, Ying Huan Chih Liao or Eikan Shiryaku "Outline of World Geography," adapted for Japanese reading by Inoue Shunyo and others. Chinese
text. Published by Taibikaku, Tokushima, Bunkyu 1.10 volumes. There are
43 maps, the first two being color-printed. Unless otherwise stated, they
measure approximately 14 x io1/^. Although brought from China, they ac-
from Western cartography:
1861.5*   Asia.
1861.6*   Japan, oudine.
1861.7*   Malaya. 7 x 10%.
fffS-
tuaUy derive i
Volume i
1861.2*   Eastern hemisphere.
1861.3*   Western hemisphere.
1861.4*   China.
 32                                  ^ LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
\
Volume 2                                   1861.26* Italy. 9% x 10%.
\
1861.8*   East Indies.                                               1861.27* HoUand. n x 10%.
1
1861.9*   Pacific Ocean. 10 x y%.                               1861.28* Belgium.
Gl|b"    1
Volume 3                                                               Volume 7
H 2
1861.10* Burma.                                                       1861.29* France.
I8tl,
1861.11* India.                                                          1861.30* Spain. n}4 x 9.
O11
1861.12* Arabia, Persia.                                             1861.31* British Isles. 7 x 10^.
1861.13* Trans-Caspian region.                                 1861.32* England. 7 x 10/2.
1861.33* Scotland. 7 xio1^.
Volume 4                                     1861.34* Ireland. 7 x ioY2.
1861.14* Europe. 9% x 7%.
1861.15* Russia in Europe. 11% x 10^.                                                 Volume 8
1861.16* Russia and Siberia.                                      1861.35* Africa. 10% x 854.
1861.17* Scandinavia. 7 x 10.                                    1861.36* Egypt. 7 x io^.
1861.18* Denmark. 7x10.                                                                     TT
Volume 9
Volume 5                                     1861.37* North America.
1861.19* Austria-Hungary. 11% x 7%.                      1861.38* South America.
1861.20* Prussia. 13^4 x 7%.                                     1861.39* St. Lawrence River region.
1861.21* Western Germany.                                      1861.40* United States. 18% x 10%.
1861.22* Western Germany, continued.
1861.23* Switzerland. 13 x 8.
1861.41* Mexico. 9% x 8.
Volume 6                                     1861.42* South America. 7 x 10%.
1861.24* Greece, Asia Minor.                                     1861.43* Brazil. 7 x 10%.
^1861.25* Morea. 11 x 8%.                                          1861.44* West Indies- 9lA x 8.
1863.1*   Kokuho Osaka Zenzu. "Revised Map of Osaka." PubUshers Sekiten Kan and
L
q l°i m      three others, all of Osaka. Osaka, Bunkyu 3. Color-printed, 26 x 39, plus an
0 |^          added piece 9% x 6%.
t 1
1863.2*   Seikai Ichiran. Chart of Ise Bay. Artist Tansai Shofu, introduction by Tenko-
CrtUl        do. N.p., Bunkyu 3.30% x 21^.
1843
T2
Ganji Period, 1864-1865
1864       Three districts of Edo, plotted in Ganji, are referred to under the year 1869.
1 1865       Dai Nihon Koku Saizu. "Detailed Map of Japan," pubUshed and distributed by
G ^
numerous concerns in various centers; six are named in Kyoto alone. Ganji
 SUPPLEMENT A                                            33
K <?°c
2. Two volumes, accordion-folded, sheets not numbered. There are 76 double-
page maps, 7% x 6. Being copper-engraved, their diminutive size does not
W
prevent them from being an improvement on the earlier, large, cumbersome
/                     woodcut provincial maps. The engraver is Gengendo Ryokuzan. The gen
eral arrangement of the provinces follows the traditional sequence observed
I                       in the Tokugawa Era:
1                                Volume i                                                                 Volume 2
1865.2*   Japan.                                                         1865.44* Tamba.
IV
1865.3*   World on Mercator projection.                    1865.45* Tango.
rf\
1865.4*   Yamashiro, in two parts numbered.            1865.46* Tajima.
I - VJ
1865.5*   Yamato.                                                      1865.47* Inaba.
1 0*
1865.6*   Kawachi.                                                    1865.48* Hoki.
1    1865.7*   Izumi.                                                         1865.49* Izumo.
1   1865.8*   Settsu.                                                         1865.50* Iwami.
1865.9*   Iga-                                                             1865.51* Oki.
1865.10* Ise, in three parts numbered.                       1865.52* Harima.
!    1865.11* Shima.                                                        1865.53* Mimasaka.
1865.12* Owari.                                                        1865.54* Bizen.
1865.13* Mikawa.                                                     1865.55* Bitchu.
1865.14* Totomi, in two parts numbered.                  1865.56* Bingo.
1865.15* Suruga.                                                     1865.57* Aki.
1865.16* Izu.                                                          1865.58* Suwo.
1865.17* Izu Seven Islands.                                      1865.59* Nagato.
1865.18* Kai, in two parts numbered.                       1865.60* Kii.
1865.19* Sagami.                                                    1865.61* Awaji.
1865.20* Musashi, in two parts numbered.                1865.62* Awa.
/
1865.21* Awa.                                                        1865.63* Sanuki.
1865.22* Kazusa.                                                       1865.64* Iyo.
1865.23* Shimosa.                                                     1865.65* Tosa.
1865.24* Hitachi.                                                      1865.66* Chikuzen.
1865.25* Omi.                                                        1865.67* Chikugo.
1865.26* Mino.                                                       1865.68* Buzen.
1
1865.27* Hida.                                                        1865.69* Bungo.
1865.28* Shinano, in two parts numbered.               1865.70* Hizen.
[
1865.29* Kozuke.                                                    1865.71* Higo.
1
1865.30* Shimotsuke.                                              1865.72* Hyuga.
1865.31* Mutsu, in four parts numbered.                  1865.73* Osumi.
1865.32* Dewa, in two parts numbered.                   1865.74* Satsuma.
1865.33* Wakasa.                                                    1865.75* Ryukyii Islands.
 34
LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
t
Volume i continued
.34* Echizen.
.35* Kaga.
.36* Noto.
865.37* Etchu.
865.38* Echigo, in two parts numbered.
.39* Sado Island.
40* Sakhalin.
.41* Hokkaido and the Kuriles.
.42* Hachijo Is. Derived from no. 1842.1.
.43* Bonin Islands. Derived from no. 1842.2.
1865.76*
1865.77*
Volume 2 continued
Iki.
Tsushima.
Keio Period, 1865-1868
A district of Edo, plotted in Keio, is referred to under the vear 1
Tl
ft
1* On Edo Kirizu. "Sectional Map of Edo." A collection of street plans of districts
of Edo on 30 sheets, published by Kinrindo, a firm operated by Owariya
Seishichi, Edo, v.d., 1852-1869. Sizes vary from 351/2 x 19% to 21 x i91/2,but
the sheets are uniformly folded to 3 y2x 61/2, with a standardized cover label.
Our set reached us "unopened," with each map individuaUy wrapped by the
publisher. It is on some of these wrappers, which would be discarded by the
customer, that we find the general title. Each wrapper repeats the title of the
individual map within. The maps are color-printed. The collection is housed
in a case of the period (4% x 8% x 7%), made of paulownia wood, with a
removable door. This gathering of large-scale plans, rich in information,
brings to a culmination the long array of plans of Edo pubUshed during the
Tokugawa Era. In our set the dates run from 1852 to the second year of Meiji69
so it seems best to catalogue the group at the very end of our list, at the same
time noting the dates that are retained on the individual sheets:
By Tomatsu Masanow
Asakusa. Newly engraved Kaei 6-
Okubo. Newly engraved Kaei 7.
Sugamo. Newly engraved Kaei 7.
59 Ramming, 1934, nos. 62-99, describes a collection with
dates 1851-1862. Kurita's dates are 1854-1860. The latter
reproduces, no. 44, two of the districts.
 SUPPLEMENT A 35
By Tomatsu Masanori continued
Meguro and Shirokane. Newly engraved Kaei 7, revised Ansei 4.
I Koishikawa. PubUshed in Kaei 7, revised Ansei 4.
1 Otowa. Newly engraved Ansei 4.
I Kobinata. Newly engraved Kaei 5, revised Man-en 1.
I Yushima in Hongo District. Corrected Man-en 2 (= Bunkyu 1).
f Azabu. Newly engraved Kaei 4, revised Bunkyu 1.
Fukagawa. Revised Bunkyu 2.
Shitaya. Newly engraved Kaei 4, revised Bunkyu 2.
Honjo. Revised Ansei 2, corrected Bunkyu 3.
Yotsuya. Newly engraved Kaei 3, revised Bunkyu 3, corrected Ganji 1.
By Kageyama Chikyo
Mukojima in the District of Sumida-gawa. Newly engraved Ansei 3.
Yanaka in the District of Negishi. Newly engraved Ansei 3.
Takanawa. Revised Ansei 4.
Atago Shita in the District of Shiba. Revised Man-en 2 (-= Bunkyu 1).
Soto Sakurada Nagata Cho (street). Newly engraved Kaei 3, corrected Ganji 1.
Ban Cho. Newly engraved Kaei 3, second edition Ansei 5, corrected Ganji 1.
Akasaka. Second edition Ganji 2.
Tsukiji. Revised and reprinted Meiji 1.
By Inoyama Yoshttomo
Okura-mae in the District of Asakusa. Revised Bunkyu 1.
Delineator not named
Ichigaya and Ushigome. Newly engraved Kaei 6, revised Ansei 4.
Aoyama and Shibuya. Newly engraved Kaei 6, corrected Ansei 4.
Ushigome. Newly engraved Kaei 7, revised Ansei 4.
Kanda Hama Cho. "Hama Street in Kanda District." Newly engraved Kaei 3, reprinted second edition Ansei 6, corrected monthly.
Sendagaya in the District of Shinjuku. Revised and reprinted Bunkyu 2.
South of Nihon-bashi. Second edition, Bunkyu 3.
Surugadai Ogawa Machi (street). Second edition Keio 1.
Daimyo Koji. Newly engraved Kaei 2, revised and reprinted Meiji 2.
  REFERENCES & INDEXES
  References
Ayusawa, 1953. Shintaro Ayusawa, "The Types of World Map made in lapan's Age of National
Isolation," (with remarks on the reproduced maps by M. Ramming), Imago Mundi, X (1953), 123-128.
Beans, 1951.   George H. Beans, A List of Japanese Maps of the Tokugawa Era. Jenkintown, 1951.
The List to which the present volume is a supplement.
Binyon, 1916. Laurence Binyon, A Catalogue of Japanese & Chinese Woodcuts ... in the British
Museum. London, 1916.
Boxer, 1950. C. R. Boxer, Jan Compagnie in Japan 1600-1850, second revised edition. The Hague,
1950.
Dawson, 1952. Dawson's Book Shop, Asiatic Books, a series of catalogues, 1949-1952. Los Angeles,
1952.
FujrrA, 1942. Fujita Motoharu, Nihon Chiriga\ushi. "History of the Science of Topography in
Japan." Tokyo, 1942.
Hall, 1942. Robert B. Hall, "The Road in Old Japan." Reprinted from "Studies in the History of Culture," February 1942,122-155.
Harrison, 1950. John A. Harrison, "Notes on the Discovery of Yezo." Reprinted from the Annals of
the Association of American Geographers, XL (September 1950) no. 3,254-266.
Harrison, 1953.   John A. Harrison, Japan's Northern Frontier. GainesviUe, 1953.s •
Kish, 1949. George Kish, "Some Aspects of the Missionary Cartography of Japan during the Sixteenth Century." Imago Mundi, VI, 39-47.
Kiss, 1947. George Kiss, The Cartography of Japan during the Middle Tokugawa Era: A Study in
Cross-cultural Influences. Reprinted from the Annals of the Association of American Geographers,
XXXVII (June 1947), no. 2,101-119.
Kurita, 1932. Mototsugu Kurita, Nihon Kohan Chizu Shusei. "Collection of Old Printed Maps of
Japan." Tokyo and Osaka, 1932.
Kyoto-shi-shi, 1947. Kyoto-shi-shi, Chizu-hen. "Ancient Maps of Kyoto, Supplement to the History
of Kyoto." Compiled and published by the Kyoto Municipality, 1947.
Reproductions of 44 early maps.
Mody, 1939.   N. H. N. Mody, A Collection of Nagasaki Prints and Paintings. London and Kobe, 1939.
Nakamura, 1947. Hirosi Nakamura, "Old Chinese World Maps Preserved by the Koreans." Imago
Mundi, IV (1947), 3-22.
 40 A LIST OF JAPANESE MAPS
Nordenskiold, 1883. Catalogue de la Bibliotheque Japonaise de Nordenskiold,... par Leon de Rosny.
Paris, 1883.
Papinot, 1910. E. Papinot, Historical and Geographical Dictionary of Japan, litho-print. Ann Arbor,
1948.
A standard reference work. Names are rendered both in English and Japanese characters.
Pye and Beasley, 1951. Norman Pye and W. G. Beasley, "An Undescribed Manuscript Copy of Ino
Chukei's Map of Japan." The Geographical Journal, June 1951,178-187.
Ramming, 1934. M. Ramming, Katalog der Ausstellung alter Japanischer Karten und Plaene.
Japaninstitut, Berlin, 1934.
Ramming, 1937. M. Ramming, "The Evolution of Cartography in lapan." Imago Mundi, II (1937),
17-21.
Sako, 1924. Keizo Sako, Kohan Osaka Chizu Kaisetsu. "Explanation of Old Printed Maps of Osaka."
Osaka, 1924.
Contains twenty-two plates reproducing early maps.
Takagi, 1931. Kikusaburo Takagi, Nihon Chizu Sokuryd Shdshi. "Brief History of Surveying in
Japan." Tokyo, 1931.
Toda, 1931. Kenji Toda, Descriptive Catalogue of Japanese and Chinese Illustrated Books, in the
Ryerson Library of the Art Institute of Chicago. Chicago, 1931. With separate Addenda and Supplement.
Tuttle, v.d.   Charles E. Tutde catalogues. Rudand, Vermont, v.d.
 Index of Place Names
This index is now cumulative. The symbols L, A in combination indicate that entries both in the original List and in Supplement A should be consulted. An A, alone, denotes the entry should be sought
only in that Supplement. Where neither symbol appears it signifies the entry occurs in the List only.
Brackets [   ] denote approximate dates. A star * signifies the map is in the Tall Tree Library, n signifies note.
8th cy.
1365.
[1645.
[rf45-
[1646.
[1652.
1671.1
1688.1
[1700.1]* A
1708.3*
17084* L, A
1708.5* L> A
1710.1*
[17102]
1712.1
1736.2
[1775-3]
1783.1 L, A
I783-3* A
1785.7
1789.1*
1792-3
17924
1793.1*
1802.3
1805.1*
[1807.1]* A
18104*
1810.5*
18106*
1810.7*
1824.1*
1824.2*
1834.70*
[1836.3] A
1844.01* A
Arima, Mt.   In Settsu Provk
1844.3* A
north of Kobe.
[1848.26]* A
1710.3 A
1850.2*
1800.1* A
[1850-3]*
18504*
Asakusa.   A suburb of Edo.
1850.5* A
1671.2* A
1850.6* A
1671-3* A
1850.7* A
1850.8* A
Asia
1852.2
1852.3*
1789.4*
i853-i#
1789.6*
1853.2*
1803.6* A
I853-3*
1803.8* A
18534*
[1856.6]*
I853-5*
1861.5* A
1854.01
1854.02* A
Asia Minor
1854.1
1803.4* A
1855.2* A
Austria-Hungary
1855.5* A
1855.7* A
1855.8* A
[18564]*
1789.5*
1789.14*
1861.19* A
[1856.5]*
Awa.   One of the fifteen pr
1858.1*
of the Tokaido.
1861.1* A
1701.17*
18613* A
1861.9* A
1834-18*
1837.18*
[184942]* A
1862.1
18624
1865.21* A
1865.3* A
Awa.   One of the six provii
the Nankaido.
Africa
1701.54*
1803.10* A
I834-55*
[1856.8]*
1837.55*
1861.35* A
[1849.59]* A
1865.62* A
Aki.   One of die eight provii
ices of                        .
Awaj 1 Island.   One of the sl
inces of the Nankaido.
170149*
183442*
1837-50*
1701.53*
1834.54*
I837-54*
[1849.58]* A
1865.61* A
[1849.54]* A
1865.57* A
Amsterdam
Baikal, Lake.   In Siberia.
[I772.I]
[1807.5]* A
Arabia
Balkans
1861.12* A
28034* A
 42
INDEX
Bancho.   A part of Edo
1837.61*
Echigo.   One of the seven provinces
1689.1.3*
[1849.65]* A
of the Hokurikudo.
Bingo.   One of the
eight
provinces
1865.68* A
1701.34*
1809.2
1834-35*
of the San-yodo.
Canada
1701.48*
1861.39* A
1837-35*
1834.41*
1837.49*
Canton
1842.5* A
[1849.39]* A
[1849-53]* A
1844.5* A
1865.38* A
1865.56* A
Carthagena in South America.
Echizen.   One of the seven prov
BttchO.   One of the
eight
provinces
I787-3*
inces of the Hokurikudo.
of the San-yodo.
Caspian Region
1701.30*
1701.47*
1861.13* A
1834-31*
1834.40*
1837-31*
1837-48*
[1849.52]* A
1865.55* A
Chikugo.   One of
inces of the Saikaido.
1701.59*
he nine prov-
[1849.35]* A
1865.34* A
Edo.   Sub-divisions and suburbs of,
Biwa, Lake
see under 1869.
18054* A
1837.60*
[1849.64]* A
Edo.   Founded 1457. Capital of To
Bizen.   One of the
eight
provinces
1865.67* A
kugawa Shogunate from 1603 and
of the San-yodo.
after the  Restoration  of  1868, re
1701.46*
Chikuzen.   One of
the nine prov-
placed Kyoto as imperial capital. Its
i834-39*
inces of the Saikaido.
name then changed to Tokyo.
I83747*
1701.58*
[i457.i]
[1849.51]* A
1834.59*
1631.1
1865.54* A
1837-59*
[1849.63]* A
1657 n A
1661.1
Black Sea Region
1865.66* A
1664.1
1803.4* A
China
1664.2*
Bonin Islands.   Group of fifteen is
1708.2*
1671.3* A
1674.1* A
1676.1* A
1678.2*
1680.1*
lands south of Japan.
First
known to
1750.1* A
the Japanese about
600;
first colo-
1785.6*
nized, by Europeans
and Hawaiians,
178949* to 1789.41
*
1830.
1803.7* A
1785.5* A
[1835.1]* A
1683.1
[1792.9]* A
1840.1*
1689.1*
1689.14*
1689.1.3*
18424* L, A
18484 to 1848.25
1865.43* A
18614* A
1854.5 A
Denmark
1789.17*
1789.18*
1861.18* A
Deshima.   Island in
1690.1* L, A
[16904]
1693.1*
Brazil
1861.43* A
Nagasaki Har-
16934*
1696.1* A
British Isles
bor.
1697.3*
1861.31* A
163611
1640 n
1697.4*
1714.1* A
Bungo.   One of the
nine
provinces
1715.1*
of the Saikaido.
1704.1
1780.3
1701.61*
1780.1
1788.1*
1834.62*
1837.62*
1842.4* A
[1849.66]* A
1790.2*
Dewa.   One of the
eight provinces
[1802.11]*
1806.1 A
1817.1
of the Tozando.
[1818.1]* L, A
1865.69* A
1834.29*
1830.1*
1837.70*
Burma
1837^9*
1846.2*
1861.10* A
[1849.33]* A
1848.3
Buzen.   One of the
of the Saikaido.
nine
provinces
1865.32* A
[18674]*
1853-6
[1853-7] A
1854-3
[1856.2]*
1701.60*
East Indies
1834.61*
1861.8* A
1860.4
 INDEX
43
1861.36* A
England, Ireland.
1789.19*
1803.3* A
1861.32* A
Etoh*.   One of the s<
of the Hokurikudo.
I70i-33*
1834.34*
I837-34*
[1849.38]* A
1865.37* A
Europe.
1787.2*
1851.1* A
[1856.7]*
Ezo. Early name given to the islands north of Honshu, before their
extent was known. In Tokugawa
times the island of Hokkaido was
called Eastern Ezo; Sakhalin or Ka-
rafuto was called either Northern or
Upper Ezo and the Kuriles, sometimes called Chishima, were considered an extension of Eastern Ezo.
Individually and collectively they are
here indexed in a single list although
in our text they are for convenience
frequendy identified by their later
[1604] n
[1622] n A
1644.1 A
1738 n A
1785.2 A
[1792.6]* A
[1797.il* A
1800 n
1816.3*
1854*3'
A
18544*
1854.6 A
1855^*
A
i859J»
18594*
L,A
1860.01*
A
186540*
A
186541'
A
[1867.1]'
Finland
France
178941*
178942*
I83745*
[1849.49]* A
1865.52* A
1861-29* A
Fujisan.   Maps associated with the
1843.1 A
Hida.   One of the eight prov
of the Tozando.
170143*
1834.24*
1843-3* A
[18554]* A
[1857.il* A
1837.24*
[1849.28]* A
1865.27* A
Fukagawa.   A suburb of Edo.
1671.2* A
Higo.   One of the nine provi
of die Saikaido.
Fushlma.   A suburb of Kyoto.
1701.63*
1834.64*
[17724]
Germany
1789.13*
1837-64*
[1849.68]* A
1865.71* A
1861.20* A
Hirado.   Island off the northwest
1861.21* A
coast of Kyushu.
1861.22* A
1542 n
Go-Kaido or Five Great Roads. The
i6ion
i6i3n
large general maps of Japan usually
depict the highway system of the
17904*
country as a whole, with post sta
Hiroshima
tions and other information. Maps
1864.1
especially devoted to the five great
roads are indexed under the names
Hitachi.   One of the fifteen prov
of the roads and the numerous sec
inces of the Tokaido.
ondary roads will be indexed when
1701.20*
encountered as separate maps. Some
1834.21*
road maps, especially those that are
1837.21*
diagrammatic in form, do not fit con-
[1849.25]* A
veniendy in any of these categories:
1865.24* A
1604 n A
[1840.5]* A
1843-2
Hizen.   One of the nine provinces
of the Saikaido.
1844.02 A
1701.62*
1834.63*
Greece
1837-63*
17894*
[1849.67]* A
1861.24* A
1865.70* A
1861.25* A
Hoki.   One of the eight provinces
Greenland
of the San-indo.
1789.24*
1701.40*
Hachijo.   Group of three islands at
1834.49*
southern end of the Izu group.
1837.41*
1865.42* A
[184945]* A
1865.48* A
Hakodate.   Formerly chief city of
Hokkaido.   The  northernmost  of
Hokkaido. First opened to foreign
trade in 1854.
the four main islands of Japan. See
under Ezo.
1854 n A
1855.3* A
Honjo.   A suburb of Edo.
1857 n A
1860.1
1671.2* A
1860.2
Hyuga.   One of the nine provinces
1860.3
of the Saikaido.
Harima.   One of the eight provinces
1701.64*
of the Sanyodo.
1834-65*
170144*
1749.1*
1837.65*
[1849.69]* A
I834.37*
1865:72* A
 ^
44
INDEX
Iceland
Iyo.   One of the six province
1789.24*
the Nankaido.
Iga.   One of the
ifteen
provinces
1701.56*
I834-57*
1837.57*
of the Tokaido.
1701.6*
[1849.61]* A
1834.7*
1865.64* A
1837.7*
[1849.11]* A
Izu.   One of the fifteen provi no
1865.9* A
the Tokaido.
Iki no Shima.   Isla
ndbet
ween Tsu-
1701.14*
shima and the coast
of Kyushu.
1834.15*
1837.14*
1701.67*
[1849.19]* A
1834.68*
1865.16* A
1837.68*
[184972]* A
Izu Group
1865.76* A
1842.1* L, A
Ikitsuki Island
1865.17* A
1790.5*
Izumi.   One of the five home p
Inaba.   One of the
eight
provinces
inces.
of the San-indo.
1701.4*
1701.39*
1736.3* A
183448*
1834-5*
1837.40*
[1849.44]* A
I837-5*
[1849.9]* A
1865.47* A
1865.7* A
India
Izumo.   One of the eight provi
1828.1*
of the San-indo.
1861.11* A
1701.41*
Indies.   The Five,
see w
orld.
1834.50*
183742*
[184946]* A
Ise.   One of the fif
een provinces of
the Tokaido.
1865.49* A
1701.7*
1830.1.1* A
1834-8*
1837.8*
Japan.   Maps that include tw
more of the four main islands
included here.
[1849.12]* A
[784] n
1865.10* A
8th cyn
Ise Bay
1305-1
[1596.1]
1863.2* A
1621.1 A
Ishinomaki Bay
1651.1
1656 n
1855.10* A
[1661.3]
Italy
1662.1
1789.11*
1861.26* A
1666.1* to 1666.16* A
1672.1
1672.4
Itsukushima.   Island      southwest
1677.1
Honshu.
1678.1* L, A
1687.1* L, A
Itsukushima Shrin
[1688.2]
1805.3* A
1689.2*
1848.1
[1695-1]*
1697.1*
1697.2*
Iwami.   One of the
eight
provinces
of the San-indo.
1701.42*
1834.51*
1703.1* A
183743*
1720.1 A
[1849.47]* A
1739-I
1865.50* A
1752.2
1767.1
1775.1
1775.2*
1779.1*
1785.1* A
1791.2
[1792.5]* A
1811.1*
1811.2* A
1815.1* to 18
1834.1*
1837-1*
[1840.2]
1843.2*
[1849-5]* A
1852.1*
[1856.1]*
1861.6* A
[i7°4-3]
1701.13*
1834.14*
1837.15*
1842.3* A
[i«
;.i8* A
1701-31
1834.32*
1837.32*
[1849.36]* A
1865.35* A
Kamakura.   A very important town
historically and site of the great
Buddha cast in 1252.   1 '
1798.1*
1693-3*
17154*
Kanto.   Group of eight provinces
centering around Edo.
1837-71
1848.2
1849.4* A
 INDEX
45
Kawachi.   One
of the five
home
Kyoto.   Established as  capital of
provinces.
Japan in 794; at times superceded as
1701.3*
actual seat of government but re
1704.2
mained the classical capital until
1709.1* L, A
1869, when the government was re
1776.1* A
moved to Tokyo.
794 n
18344*
18374*
1652.1 A
[1849.8]* A
1653-1 A
1865.6* A
1654.1* A
1662.2 A
Kazusa.   One 0
the fifteer
prov-
1667.1
inces of the Toka
do.
[1668.1]* A
1701.18*
[1686.1]* A
1834.19*
1686.2* A
1837.19*
1688.01 A
[1849.23]* A
1691.1*
1865.22* A
1696.2 A
1699.1
1709.2 A
K11.   One of the
six province
ofthe
Nankaido.
1723.1 A
1701.52*
1741.2* A
I834.53*
I754-I A
I837-53*
I79I-I
[1849.57]* A
183H*
1865.60* A
1840.3* A
1849.2* L, A
Koishikawa.   A part of Edo.
1671.3* A
Korea
1785.3* A
[1792.7]* A
1816.2*
1823.3*
18234*
1823.5*
[1867.2]*
KoshO-Kaido. One of the five ma
highways of Tokugawa Japan. It r;
from Edo to Shimosuwa.
1701.25*
1834.26*
1837.26*
[1837-72]*
[1849.30]* A
1865.29* A
Kronstadt
[1807.2]* A
Kurile Islands. Chain of some'
thirty islands between Kamchatka
and Hokkaido. See under Ezo.
[1840.4]* A
Kyushu. The southernmost of the
four main islands of Japan. The
nine provinces of this island comprise the Saikaido or western-sea cir-
1783-2*
1813.1* L, A
1813.2* A
London
1789.26*
Loochoo Islands, see Ryukyii.
Low Countries
Malaya
1803.9* A
1861.7* A
Matsushima. Group of more than
eight hundred tiny islands in Matsushima Bay.
[1835-3]* A
1834-11*
1837-11*
[1849.15]* A
1865.13* A
Mlmasaka.   One of the eight provinces of the San-yodo.
1701.45*
1834.38*
1837.46*
[1849.50]* A
1865.53* A
1834.23*
1837.23*
[1849.27]* A
1865.26* A
Mujin-Shima, see Bonin Islands.
Mus
1834.17*
1836.1
1837.17*
[1849.21]* A
1865.20* A
Mu-
1834.28*
1837.28*
[1849.32]* A
[18674]*
1865.31* A
Nagasaki. Not important in Japanese history until it was opened to
trade about 1568 and became chief
center of intercourse with foreigners.
Served as entry point of Christianity
into Japan. Made an imperial city in
1587. Visited by Spanish* Dutch and
Portuguese ships; only port kept
open to Dutch and Chinese when
rest of Japan closed (1637-1641) to
all foreigners, until 1859.
1635-1
[16&1]
16614]
1673.1]
1736.1]
i74i.i]
1745.1*
I752.I
1764.1*
1778.1*
 46
INDEX
1801.3 A
1666.11* A
Rhode Island.   In North America.
1802.6
1701.43*
1787.4*
1802.7
1834.52*
1802.8*
1837.44*
[1807.4]* A
[184948]* A
1789.6* to 1789.9*
1821.1
1865.51* A
1803.5* A
1821.2* A
1861.15* A
:es                1861.16* A
1850.1
Omi.   One of the eight provin
18570 A
of the Tozando.
1866.1
1701.21 *
Ryukyiu Islands.   A chain of fifty-
Nagasaki-Kaido.   The   Nagasaki
1742.1*
1824.3* A
five islands extending from south
of Japan almost to Formosa.
18314* A
1834^2*
1785.4* A
1837.22*
[1793.8]* A
Nagato.   One of the eight prov
inces
[1849.26]* A
1865.75* A
[1867.3]*
of the San-yodo.
186545* A
1701.51*
i83444*
1837.52*
[1849.56]* A
Osaka
Sado Island.   Off northwest coast
1655.1* A
of Honshu. One of the seven prov
i657.i
1686.3* A
1687.2
inces of the Hokurikudo.
1865.59* A
1701.35*
1834.36*
Nakasendo.   One of the five
main
1691-3*
1837.36*
highways.   It  followed  an  ii
land
1756.1* L, A
[184940]* A
route from Edo to Kyoto. Also
ailed
1767^* A
1865.39* A
Kiso-kaido.
1787-1
1839-1 A
Naniwa, see Osaka.
Nankaido.   The   southern-sea   circuit. Six provinces.
Nara.   The oldest  capital  of  the
Japanese Empire, 710-784.
Oshukaido. One of the five m.
highways of Tokugawa Japan. It 1
between Edo ana Aomori, at 1
north end of Honshu.
1778.3
Osumi.   One of the nine prov
1844.1* L, A
of the Saikaido.
Nikko.   Famous   for   its
shrines and scenery.
temple,
1701.65*
1834.66*
1837.66*
[1850.9]* A
[1849.70]*  A
Nikko-Kaido.   One c
f the five main
1865.73* A
highways. It ran from
Edo
to Nikko.
Osumi Gunto.   Group   of   is
North America
just south of Kyushu.
1803.12* A
[1856.9]*
1861.37* A
Owari.   One of the fifteen provi
of the Tokaido.
1701.9*
Noto.   One of the a
1834.10*
of the Hokurikudo.
1837-10*
1701.32*
[1849-14]* A
I834.33*
1865.12* A
1837.33*
[1849-37]* A
Paris
1865.36* A
178945*
Nova Zembla
Persia
1789.28*
1861.12* A
Okinawa
Petropavlovsk
18164*
[1807.3]* A
Oki Retto.   Archipe
ago
off  west
coast of Honshu. One of the eight
Poland
provinces of the San-
ndo.
1803.5* A
1701.15"
[1823.8]* A
1834.16*
1837.16*
[184040]* A
1865.19* A
Saikaido.   The western-sea <
Nine provinces.
16724* A
1677.1* L, A
[1716.1]* A
Sakhalin Island. First visited by
Japanese about 1630. Explored by
them about end eighteenth century.
See under Ezo.
Sanindo. The mountain-back circuit. Eight provinces.
1837.56*
[1849.60]* A
1865.63* A
 INDEX
47
Satsuma.   One of the i
line provinces
Shinano.   One
of the eight prov-
Tango.   One of the
eight provinces
of the Saikaido.
inces of the Tozando.
of the San-indo.
1701.66*
1701.24*
1701.37*
1834.67*
1834.25*
1817.2 A
1837.67*
1835.2 A
1834.46*
[1849.71]* A
1837.25*
1837-38*
1865.74* A
[1849.29]* A
[1849.42]* A
Scandinavian Regions
1865.28* A
1865.45* A
1789.15*
Siberia
Tenmangu Shrine
1789.16*
1803.3* A
1861.16* A
1805.2* A
1861.17* A
Somei.   A part
ofEdo.
Tokaido.   The  east
crn-sea   circuit.
Scotland
1671.3* A
Fifteen provinces.
1861.33* A
South America
Tokaido   Highway.
One   of   the
1803.11* A
five main highways of Tokugawa
Settsu.   One of the fiv
ehome
prov-
[1856.10]*
Japan. It ran eastward along the
inces.
1861.38* A
coast from Osaka anc
Kyoto to Edo.
1701.5*
186142* A
1667.2* A
1748.1* L, A
Spain
1672.2
[1672.3]*
1834.6*
1789.23*
1836.2* A
1861.30* A
1690.3* L, A
1837.6*
[1849.10]* A
Spitzbergen
[1716.1]* A
1752.3* A
1865.8* A
178948*
[1810.8]* A
[18544]* A
Shkoku.   The smallest of th
Suruga.   One
of the fifteen prov-
main islands of Japan.
inces of the Tokaido.
Tokyo, see Edo.
Shima.   One of the
inces of the Tokaido.
fifteen
prov-
1701.1a-
1827.1
1834.13*
Tosa.   One of the s
the Nankaido.
x provinces of
1701.8*
1834-9*
I837-I3*
[1849-17]* A
1701.57*
1834.58*
1837.58*
[1849.62]* A
1865.65* A
1837-9*
[184913]* A
1865.15* A
1865.11* A
Suwo.   One of the eight
of the San-vodo.
provinces
Shimoda. Seaport in Izu peninsula.
Opened to American commerce
1854. Closed to foreign trade 1859
and Yokohama opened instead.
i8<;4n A
1855-1
1856 n A
1857 n A
Shimonoseki. Seaport southwestern
extremity of Honshu.
1701.19-
183*20*
1837-20*
[1849.24]* A
1865.23* A
Shimotsuke.   One   of   the   eight
provinces of the Tozando.
1701.50*
I83443*
i837.5i*
[1849.55]* A
1865.58* A
Swi
1837.27*
[1849.31]* A
1865.30* A
Taj»
1787-5* A
1834.47*
I837-39*
[1849.43]* A
186546* A
183445*
I837.37*
[184941]* A
1837."*
[184916]* A
1865.14* A
Tozando.   The    eastern-mountain
circuit. Eight provinces.
Tsushima.   Island in Korean Strait.
1666.16* A
1701.68*
1834-69*
1837-69*
[1849-73]* A
1865.77* A
Unitbd States
Utrecht
178947*
 48
INDEX
Wakasa.   One of
inces of the Hoku
1701.29*
1834.30*
1837.30*
[1849.34]* A
1865.33* A
the sev
1778.2*
1834-2*
1837-2*
[18496]* A
1865.4* A
Yamato. Oneofthefi\
Wakitsu
1790.3*
West Indies
1861.44* A
1701.2 *
I735-I* L»A
1834-3*
1837-3*
1848.27* A
[1849.7]* A
1865.5* A
Yamashiro.   One
of the fi
,ehome
Yodo Castle.   Jus
Yodo River
1843.4* A
Yokohama. Only a fishing village
in feudal period. Visited by Commodore Perry in 1854; opened to
foreign trade in 1859.
1859.5* A
1859.6 A
 Index of Map Makers
The names of Japanese individuals may appear either with the family name first or with the given
name first. Both methods are correct. We have chosen the former but a name may be encountered elsewhere in the reverse order and it is obvious that the reader should look for the second name in this index before concluding that the individual is not represented. With few exceptions, we have refrained
from listing the pen names frequendy adopted, especially by artists. In short, we give the names as they
appear in our maps.
The vocation of each individual is given as applied to our maps. Some of the artists were very versatile, but here again we have felt that we should not attempt to invade fields beyond our subject.
Where a name is associated with several entries in close succession, as in an adas or in the case of inset maps, only the first entry number appears in this index. Where no decimal follows the date it indicates the name is associated with a book or event, mentioned under that particular date. Where the number is preceded by the letters L, A in combination it indicates that both the original List and Supplement A should be consulted. An A, alone, denotes that the entry should be sought only in that Supplement. Where neither symbol appears it signifies the entry occurs in the List only.
If the reader will make due allowance for possible variations in the transliterations of Japanese names
and the other difficulties mentioned above, this index should at times be helpful in establishing the approximate dates of undated maps where they happen to name the publisher, author, reviser or other
craftsman responsible for the work.
Abe Akito of Edo. A, 1842.1; A,
[1848.26]
Akamatsu Kuhei, publisher, Osaka.
A, 18434; A, 18444
Akimaya Einen (= Bokusen). L, A,
1843.1; A, 1843.3
Akitaya Heitaro, publisher, Kyoto.
[1772.2]
Akitaya Taemon, publisher, Osaka.
A, 1851.1
Angelis, Jeronymo de, Jesuit missionary. A, 1621.1
Anzenmaru Saikichi, author. 1752.2
Aodo, copper-engraver. 1810.1
Asai Shoemon of Kyoto, publisher,
Osaka. 1783.1
Asakura Tetsugoro,  engraver.
1859.1
Asano Magobei, publisher, Osaka.
A, 18174
Asano Yahei of Naniwa, bookseller
and   publisher,   Osaka.    [ 1775-3] 5
i79i.2;A,i8ii.2
Bokusen, see Akimaya.
Bundaiken Uhei, publisher.  A,
Bunenkaku, publisher, Edo. A, i860
Bunkido, publishing house. 1859.2
Bunkindo, publishing house, Nagasaki. 1802.6; 1802.8; L, A, 1813.1;
A, 1821.2; 1850.1
Bunsodo Takehara Kobei, publisher, Kyoto. 1831.1
Balk
publisher,  Nagasaki.  A,
lu,   publisher,   Nagoya.
Chikujuken Nakamura Sanzo, publisher, Nagasaki. [1736.1]; [1741.1];
Chojiya Genjiro, publisher, Kyoto.
1843.2
Chojiya Heibei, publisher, Edo. A,
Cho Sekisui of Mito, see S
Chukei, see Ino Chukei.
Den Rinkoku. A, 1844.01
Egawa Sentaro, copper-engraver. A,
1850.8
Eijudo, publishing house of Nishimura Yohachi, Edo and Nagasaki.
[1802.11]; L, A, [1818.1]; 1848.3;
[1850.3]
1844.1
Ezuya Shohachi.
Fujimura Naoyuki, artist. A, 1844.:
Fujita Toemon. A, 1844.02
Fujiwara Tadehide   (=Nakagawi
Chuei), artist. 1784.1
Fujiya Chobei, publisher, Osaka.
1763.1; A, 1767.2
A, 1735-1
Chubei, engraver, Osaka.
Saburobei, publisher,
Kyoto. 1708
Furuya   Harumoto   (= Furuyano
Genrin), author. 1809.1; 1810
Gankyo Koudo, publisher, Osaka.
1801
Ganshodo, publishing house, Osaka.
1810
 INDEX
Ganzo  (= Ryosho Dojin), copyist.
A, [1792]
Gengendo Ryokuzan, engraver in
copper. A, 1865
Gihei Matsuda (1786-1867). A,
[1836.3]
Gimando, author. A, 1842.3
Gountei Sadahide, see Sadahide.
GyofO Kaisei, see Tsurumine.
Gyogi (670-749), priest 1305.1;
Gyokuransai  Hashimoto   (= Gyo-
kusai), see Sadahide.
Hangiya Shichirobei, publisher,
Edo. L, A, 1690.1; L, A, 1690.3
Harimaya   Katsugoro,   publisher,
Edo. 1854.2; A, [1854.03]
Kyubei, publisher, Osaka.
; A, 1847.1
Hisi
k Moronobu (1618-1694),
H
5, publishing house. A,
1855-3
Hase Usho. A, 1848.27
Hassendo, publishing house. 1745.1
Hata Okumaru. 1798.1
Hatotani Kohei. 1789
Hatsutaro, castaway. A, 1844
Hayashi Jizaemon, publishar, Kyoto.
I745-I
Hayashi Joho. L, A, 1709.1
Hayashi Shihei of Sendai (1754-
1793), author. A, 1785; A, 1785.1;
A, [1792]; A, [1792.5]
Hayashi Tsugiemon of Kyoto, publisher, Nagasaki. 1671.1
Hayashi Yoshinaga "of the map office," publisher, Kyoto. A, [1668.1];
1680.1; 1683.1; A, 1686.2; A, 1686.3;
1688.01; 1689.2; 1691.1; 1691.3; A,
1696.2; 1699.1; A, 1723.1; A, 1741.2
Hida Tekitekiken Kosui, publisher,
Kyoto. A, 1842.4
Higuchi Yohei, engraver. A, 1844.2;
A, 1847.2
Hino Bunrindo Nagahisa, author.
1763.1
Hirai Kahei, engraver, Kyoto. A,
HlRANOYA Moi
t. 1849.3
t. L, A, 1
Hiyama Yoshichika, author. 1815
Hokkyo Gyokuzan, artist. A, 1847.2
Hokusai (1760-1849), celebrated artist. 1809.2; A, 1823; A, [1835.3]; A,
1839,1; 1840.1; [1840.2]
Hondaya Iemon, publisher, Osaka.
1735.1
Honya Riemon, publisher, Kyoto. A,
[1686.1]
Hozendo Maruya, publisher, Edo.
859.1
Hyoshiya Ichirobei, publisher, Edo.
,1676.1; 1678.2
[, publisher, Edo. 1785.6
KEDA TORITEI of Edo. 183I.I; A,
835.2; A, 1842.5
.k 1 Mrrsuo, pupil of Kobayashi,
Nagasaki. A, 1708.5
no ChOkei (= Ino Tadataka, 1745-
818) wealthy brewer, became celebrated as surveyor of the Japanese islands. 1800; [1804]; 1821
ue Shunyo, translator. A, 1861
YAMA   YOSHITOMO.   A,   1869
b of Kyoto. 16724
'A Shimbei, publisher, Osaka. A,
HntosHiGE   (1797-1858),  celebrated
artist. A, [18544]
a Toshiyuki, see Ryusen.
Shinshichi, wood engravei
:, publisher. A, 1844.02
i Manjiro, publisher,
zumiya Hanbei, publisher, Edo. A,
1810.8]; A, 1849.4
zumiya Jubbi, publisher, Osaka. A,
800.1
[zumoji Bunjiro, publisher, Kyoto.
787; 1848
'zumoji Manjiro, bookseller and
publisher, Edo. A, [1810.8]; 1846.2
zuya Zenbei, publisher, Enoshima.
1, publisher, Kyoto. A,
1677-1
JUNSAI FUJITA RYO. 1854.2
Jutokudo, publishing house, Edo.
1858.1
Chik
6. A, 1
Kahei, mounter of scrolls, Edo. A,
1671.2; A, 1671.3
Kaifuya Gonzaemon, publisher,
Edo. A, 1694.1; A, 1696.1
Kamekido, publishing house, Osaka.
1802.9
Kameya Seibei. A, 1709.2
Kanamaru HikogorS. 1788.1
>n, publisher,
Kyoto. A, 1851
Katsushika Hokusa
eHokus
Kawachiya Genbei, publisher,
Kyoto. [17724]
Kawachiya Gisuke, publisher,
Osaka. A, 1824.3; A, 1836.2
Kawachiya Kibei, publisher, Osaka.
A, 1776.1; A, 1836.2; 1837
Kawai Yukan Morikiyo, artist,
Osaka. A, 1735.2
Kawano Dosei, publisher. 1664.1
Keisai, see Kuwagata.
Kikkoen Kanehiro. A, 17854
Kikuya Chobei. A, 1754.1
Kikuya     Shichirobei,     publisher,
Kyoto. A, 17674; 1787.1; A, [1823.8]
Kimura Juyodo, publishing house,
Kyoto. L, A, 1748.1
Kinkado   Suharaya  Sasuke,  publisher, Edo. A, 1855
Kinrindo, publishing firm operated
by Owariya Seishichi, Edo. A, 1869
Kitajima Choshiro, publisher, Edo.
1815
Kitajima Junshiro, publisher, Edo.
1836.1
KlTANO YUKITA. A, 1844.3
Kobayashi Hethachi, engraver,
Osaka. 1796.1
Kobayashi Kentbi (1601-1684). A,
[1646.2]; L, A, 1708.5
KOGETSUDO. A, I754.I
 INDEX
Koide Chojuro. A, 1844.3
Kokan, see Shiba Kokan.
Komakichi, engraver. A, [1855.4]
Kono Michkiyo, publisher, Osaka.
1657.1
Kuchiki RyOkyo, see Saiundo.
Kudo Tohel 1854.1
Kunihiko Shiba. 1775.2
Kurata Togaku, artist A, 1855
Kurihara   Shincho,   author.   A,
[1848.26]
Kuwagata    Shoshin    (1761-1824)
(=Keisai =Kitano Masayoshi), artist.
A, [1810.8]
Kyokukodo Murataya, publisher.
I854.3
Maekawa Rokuzaemon, publisher,
Edo. A, 1787.5
Mamiya Rinzo (1781-1845), pupil of
Ino Chukei in surveying. 1800
Matsu. 1834
Matsukawa Hanzan of Osaka.
1865.1
Matsuura Takeshiro, surveyor and
cartographer. A, 1850.10; A, 18594;
A, 1860.01
Mimura Genseki. 1672.2; A,
[1716.1]
Minamoto RyOkyo, author. 1787
Mrro Sekisui, see Sekisui.
MmuHASHi Kinkaku, author. A,
1783.1; A, 1783.3
Mitsukuri Genpo, author. A, 1851
MlYAWAKI Takatsugu. A, 1799-1
Moriharu, publisher, Edo. A,
[18554]
Morimoto Tasuke, publisher, Osaka.
A, 1805
Murakami Ihei, publisher, Osaka.
A, 17352; 1742-1; I749-I
Murakami Wagao of Edo. [1837.72]
Murataya Kotaro, publisher, Kofu.
A, 1842.3
Musan, publisher, Kyoto. A, 1654.1
Nagakubo Genju of Mito, see
Sekisui.
Nagakubo Sekisui, see Sekisui.
Nagata Chobei, publisher, Kyoto.
Nagayama Kan. 1848.2
Naito Hiromae, author. A, 1840.3
Nakagawa Toshiro, publisher,
Kyoto. A, 1799.1
Nakahama Manjiro, castaway. A,
1854
Nakamura    Ichiemon,    publisher,
Edo. A, 1674.1
Nakamura Kanjisai of Izumi, author. 1735.1
Nakamura Sozaburo. 1752.1
Nakamura Yurakusai, artist 1831.1
Nakano Kozaemon, publisher. A,
1666.1
Nakata Koreyoshi. 1830.1
Nakatani Kozan, author. A, 1736.3
Nansensho   Somabito    (= Soman-
do). L, A, [1818.1]
Narui Hyoemon, author. A, 1776.1
NichiyoHayami. 1856
Nishida Katsubei, publisher, Kyoto.
A, [1716.1]
Nishikawa Kyurinsai of Nagasaki,
Nishimura, see Eijudo.
Noda Tomoyoshi of Nanki, author.
1729-1
Obatake Bunjiemon, publisher,
Nagasaki. (See also entries under his
trade   name   Toshimaya.)   1764.1;
Ochikochi Doin. L, A, 1671.2;
A, 1671.3; L, A, 1690.1; [1690.2];
L, A, 1690.3
Ogawa Tazaemon of Kyoto, engraver. 1796.1
Okada Gyokuzan. A, 1844.2
Okada Jishoken. [1695.1]
Okada Shuntosai, author. A, 18424
Okadaya Kahichi, publisher, Edo.
1846.2
Okamoto ChikusO of Washu. 1865.1
Omiya Sataro, publisher, Kyoto. A,
1842.5
Onodera Ken, author. A, 1855.6;
A, 1855.10
Onogi Ichibei of Osaka, publisher,
Osaka. L, A, 1783.1; A, 1783.3
Onseiken. 1697.3
Ooka Shunko. A, 1847.2
Otsuki Shigetada of Sendai, scholar.
A, 1803;A, [1807]
Owariya Seishichi, see Kinrindo.
Rakuge Hyakuga, author. 1778.2
RiNKADo, publishing house, Nagasaki. 1866.1
Ryusen (= Ishikawa Toshiyuki),
artist and cartographer, Edo. L, A,
1687.1; 1687.2; 1688; L, A, 1688.1;
1689.1; L, A, 1691.2; 1697.1; 1697.2;
1702.1; A, 1703.1; L, A, 1708.4; A,
1714.1; 1715.1
Sadahide, famous artist. A, [18554] !
A, [1857.1]; 1859.1; A, 1859.5; A,
1859.6
Sagamiya Tahei, publisher, Edo.
L, A, 1687.1; L, A, 1688.1; 1689.1;
L, A, 1691.2; 1697.1; A, 1703.1
Saito Jinzaemon. A, 1817.2
Saiundo (= Kuchiki Ryukyo). 1789
Sakai Junzo, editor. A, 1844
Sanoya Ichigoro, publisher, Edo. A,
[1810.8]
Sasaki Seiri. A, 1848.27
Sato Seiyo, publisher, Edo. A, 1861.1
Sato Shiroemon, publisher, Edo.
1693.1; 1697.3
Sato Sukekore, author. 1824
Schnell, Ed., Englishman. 1858.1;
.1862.2
Seibundo, publishing house, Osaka.
1779.1-
Seirin Orihashi, artist A, 1820.1
Seitaien, draftsman, Osaka. A,
[1835.1]
Sekigyokuho Shujin, author. A,
184847
Sekkui of Mito, cartographer. 1775.1;
[i775-3];   I779-I5   1785-6;   17857;
1791a; 1796.1; A, 1805; 1811.1; A,
 52
INDEX
roo, engraving firm. L, A,
1844.2; A, 1847.1
Sekiten Kan, publisher, Osaka. A,
1863.1
Sendai Tamamushi, author. A,
1854.03
Sen-in. A, [1835-1]
1, publisher, Edo. A,
Seta Masanari, Osaka. A, 1735.2
Shiba Kokan (1738-1818), artist and
engraver in copper. 1788; 1790; 1792;
17924; 1793; 1796; 1805.1
Shibugawa Seimon, publisher.
1778.3
Shimokabe ShOsui of Kyoto, artist.
1778.2
Shineido, publishing house, Yokohama. A, 1859.5
Shioya Heisuke, publisher, Osaka.
A, 1776.1
Shirai TsOki of Utsunomiya, author.
A, 1850.8
Shitomi KangyO, draftsman. A,
Shoudo-shujin, publisher, Suruga.
1827.1
Shukasai Sakai Yoshinori. 1837.71
Shumparo, publisher, Edo. 1805.1
Shuseido, publishing house, Edo. A,
1843-1
Soejima Seishin of Hirosaki. A,
1842.1
Somando, see Nansensho.
Sozando Nishimura Soshichl, publisher, Edo. L, A, [1818.1]
Sudo Gonbei, publisher, Edo. A,
1714.1
Sugita Kinsuke, engraver. 1859.1
Sugita Tsutomu of Wakasa. A, 1803
Suhara Mohei, publisher, Edo.
1701.1; 1708.4
Suharaya, publisher, Edo. 1823
Suharaya Ichibei, publisher, Edo.
A, 1783.3; L, A, 1785; 1785.6
Suharaya Ihachi, publisher, Edo.
1848.2
Suharaya Mohei, publisher, Edo. A,
1750.1; 1788.1; 1811.1; 1817.1;
1837.70; 1837.71; 1846.1; A, 1848.27
Suzuki Kien. 1852.1
Suzuki Sakei, explorer. A, i860
Tachibana Morikuni, author. A,
1800
Tachibana Shigeyo, author. 1809.2
Tagawa Shindo, author. A, 1855
Takada Shinsho of Izu. A, 1842.1
Takagi Kozo, publisher. 1852.3
Takagi Masatsune. A, 1776.1
Takahashi Kageyasu. 1810.1
Takashiba  Hidbzo. L, A,  1849.1
A, [1849.5]
Takashima Shunsho, artist. A,
1843.4
Takatani, publisher, Edo. 1850.2;
:i Teisai, copper-engraver.
A, 1850.8; 1852.3
Takehara Kobei, publisher, Kyoto.
A, 1831.2; A, 1843.4
Takei Ranzan. 1846.2
Tansai Shofu, artist. A, 1863.2
Tenkodo. A, 1863.2
Terajima Ryoan, publisher. 1712
Tojo Shinko, author. A, 1842.1
Tokaiin ka Sonto, priest, 1828.1
Tomatsu Masanori. A, 1869
Tomoshima Shokyoku of Osaka. A,
[1840.5]
Toryo Suido Ho, publisher. 1852.2
Toshimaya (= trade name of Oba-
take Bunjiemon), publisher, Nagasaki. [1772.1]; 1780.1; 1780.2;
1783.2; 1796.2; 1821.1
iTaw
st 1756.1
TSURUMINE    HlKOICHIRO    (1788-
1851), author. A, [1823.8]
TSURUMINE SHIGENOBU   (1788-1859)
(= Gyofu Kaisei), author. A, 1855
Tsutaya Kichizo, publisher, Edo.
Uemura Ugen, author. A, 1787.5
Umbmura Saburobei, publisher,
Kyoto. A, 1783.3
Umemura Yahaku, publisher,
Kyoto. A, [1700.1]
Umemura Yemon, publisher, Kyoto.
1708
Untonsai, publisher, Sendai. 1824.1
Utagawa Sadahide, see Sadahide.
Wakabayashi Kihei, publisher, Edo.
1848.2
Yamada Wasuke of Osaka. A, 1836.2
Yamamoto Kahei. A, 1754.1
Yamamura Shoei of Tsuchiura,
translator. A, 1803
Yamashiroya Sahei, publisher, Edo.
A, 1830.1.1; [1837.72]; A, 1843.3; A
1854.03; 1855.1
Yamashita Shigemasa of Kashu, a
thor. 1742.1; 1749.1; A, 1824.3 n.
Yamazaki Yoshinari. 1850.2
a Kihei, publisher. 1778.3
Yano Chobei, publisher, Kyoto.
Sadatoshi, editor. A, 1799.1
Mubataya Kotaro. L, A,
Yorozuya Heishiro, publisher, Edo.
1856
Yorozuya Seibei, publisher, Edo.
1715-1; A 1752-3
Yoshida Bunji, author. A, 1854
Yoshida Goroemon. L, A, 1709.1
Yoshida Masaaki. A, 1844a
Yoshida Tarobei. A, 1666.1
Yoshinoya Nihei, publisher, Edo. A,
1830.1.1
Yumahashi, publisher, Osaka. 1802
Zuda Rokashi (= Priest Hotan,
1653-1738). 1710.1; 1710.2
   U.B.C. LIBRARY
A List of Japanese Maps of the Tokugawa Era, Supplement A, has been composed and printed in an edition of
one hundred copies by The Anthoensen Press, Portland,
Maine. The binding has been done by John W. Marchi,
Portland, Maine, and the collotype plates by the Meriden
Gravure Company, Meriden, Connecticut.
   J
 Z 60.27
V.I
LIBRARY
USE
ONLY
 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.specialp.1-0373615/manifest

Comment

Related Items