Rainbow Ranche Collection

James Goldie Notebook, 1913-1933 Goldie, James 1933

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           17
Obviously, the cost per mile varies
inversely with the annual mileage,
owing to the high ratio that fixed
charges bear to the total cost.
Naturally, the tabulation contains
many assumptions which may not
necessarily be correct for all parts
of Canada or for all operators.  As
one instance, the price of gasoline :
varies considerably throughout the j
Dominion.   Thus, a recent publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics gives the average price of gas I
in various  Canadian cities as fol-1
lows:
Halifax, 18.4 cents; Montreal, 16.8 I
cents; Toronto, 17.3 cents; Winnipeg, |
19.8 cents; Regina, 23.8 cents; Cal- i:
gary. 20.9 cents; and Vancouver, 20.2 |
cents. Provincial taxes must, of |
course, be added to these figures.
A
adc
giv
the
ger
ant
thi
dep
COIT>
alw lesmen's  Automobiles
/ Cost, ,$1,000)
10:000
vai Annual Mileage
IiistYeatr      2nd Year ko
THE   FINANCIAL   POST
o
m
Wide Differences Shown
In Salesmen's Car Costs
Method of Obtaining Average Cost for Various Mileages Explained ■— Costs Vary Inversely With
Annual Mileage
Although Canadian companies
adopt many different methods of
giving their salesmen allowance for
their automobiles, one of the most
general methods is to fix the allowance at a certain, amount per mile,
this payment to include gas, oil,
depreciation, repairs, etc. Just what
constitutes a fair allowance has
always been a matter of doubt, however, different firms fixing widely
varying sums per mile.
In an effort to determine what
constitutes a fair automobile allowance, both to the company and to
the salesmen, Macdonald Brothers,
Inc., management engineers of Boston, recently conducted a study
vyhich purports to set average cost
of operation of light cars for various
annual mileages. The data were compiled from the experience of a
group of companies employing varying numbers of salesmen.
Big Spread Shown
Actual returns from the firms cooperating showed considerable
spread in allowance or cost per mile.
Returns    from    twelve    companies
showed the following costs or  allowances:
Company
• 1  .....
2  	
3  	
4 ....
5 .....
6  	
7  	
8   	
9   	
10   	
11   	
12  	
No. of
Cars
,.      2
..    13-
..    75
.2,000
,. 160
..    79
,.    19
,.    19
,.    90
..    79
,.    43
..    50
Average
Annual
Mileage
13,500
24,000
13,000
; 15,000
14,000
34,664
125,000
12,500
20,000
16,175
>26,096
15,000
Cents
per mile
7.00
6.00
5.75
4.75
4.60
4.37
4.19
4.07
4.00
3.91
3.66
3.50
Figures For Canada
"By introducing Canadian costs
for gas, oil, etc., The Financial Post has calculated the comparative costs in Canada for light cars
valued at $1,000 having annual mileages of 10,000 and 20,000 respectively. These figures are shown in the
table below for first and second year
of operation.
Calculations in the table are based
on the following assumptions:
1. Initial cost of the car is $1,000.
2. A diminishing 40 per cent annual depreciation has been used.
3. Registration and insurance have
been averaged at $45 a year.
4. Home garage has been allowed
at $5 a month.
5. Tires have been assumed to require replacement after 25,000 miles.
6. Gasoline has been assumed at
25 cents a gallon and it is believed
that the type of car considered will
consume one gallon of fuel per 20
miles. Oil has been assumed at
35 cents a quart and 100 -miles have
been assumed per quart.
7. Repairs have been assumed to
start at 15,000 miles and to increase
at the rate of $2 per thousand miles
thereafter.
8. Miscellaneous charges of $20
have been allowed at 5,000 miles,
increasing thereafter at the rate of
$1 per thousand miles.
; Obviously, the cost per mile varies
inversely with the annual mileage,
owing to the high ratio that fixed
charges bear to the total cost.
Naturally, the tabulation contains
many assumptions which may not
necessarily be correct for all parts
of Canada or for all operators. As
one instance, the price of gasoline
varies considerably throughout the
Dominion. Thus, a recent publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics gives the average price of gas
in various Canadian cities as follows:
Halifax, 18.4 cents; Montreal, 16.8
cents; Toronto, 17.3 cents; Winnipeg,
19.8 cents; Regina, 23.8 cents; Calgary, 20.9 cents; and Vancouver, 20.2
cents. Provincial taxes must, of
I course, be added to these figures.
Mileage   Costs   of   Salesmen's  Automobiles
(Assumed New Cost,  $1,000)
10,000
Annual Mileage
1st Year
$
Depreciation    '.    400
Registration   and  insurance         45
Home  garage      60
Tires     . 	
Gasoline     126
Oil      36
Repairs     ,    |  ..
Misc., chains, anti-freeze      25
Total	
Cents  per mile   	
6.92
20,000
age
Annual Mileage
rid Year
1st Year     2nd Year
$
$                    $
240
400                  240
45
45                     45
60
60                     60
60
126
252                   252
36
72                     72
10
10                     50
10
35                     20
527
874                   789
5.27
4.37                  3.95
The   Price   of   Security
Wall Street Journal
John R. Hall, writing in the September issue of "World Convention
Dates," says that in his researches
into the workings of more than a
thousand employee benefit plans he
has found that pure benevolence
tends to decrease efficiency.
If Mr. Hall's findings are right,!
as security grows man's initiative
and efficiency will die away.   Mr.  ■ ' /
r
Average Cost of 800 Cars
From detailed cost records re-,
ported on about 800 automobilesj
operated in various parts of the~
United States, figures were prepared _
taking all factors into consideration,'
showing the average cost of auto-"
mobile operation over all types of j
surfacing to be in cents per mile:
Light fours 6.02
Medium fours — 6.42
Heavy fours   7.20
Light sixes 7.38
Medium sixes  8.40
Heavy sixes 9.45
UcxicraxairCeATire, tnert, tornanoA-^rm*-
Total cents per mile 6.43
3PA\  mm
CLAIMS LOWEST
PACKING CHARGES
Charge of 33 Cents Per Box Due
To Good Equipment And
Storage Facilities
PENTICTON, B. C, May 2.—The an- ;
nual general meeting of the Penticton j
Co-operative  Growers  took  place   on
Thursday afternoon last at the Odd-
| fellows'  Hall.   Two vacancies  on  the
! directorate were voted upon, C. Holden
I taking the place of F. H. Keane, who
; had  resigned,   while   W.   Baskin  was
j re-elected on the expiration of his two
j year term.   E. J. Chambers, President
j of the Associated Growers, was present.
The local Co-operative claims their
last year's packing charge of 33 cents
per box to be the lowest in the Valley,
i and probably the lowest in history of '
; the fruit  business in  B. C.   This low
j cost of handling is greatly attributed
j to the up-to-date equipment and cold
storage facilities.
The apple packing charge of 33 cents
is made  up  as  follows:   Box,  paper,
nails, labels, etc., 20.50; packing super-
; vision, .30c;  receiving into warehouse,
I .55c; dumping onto grader, .35c; sort-
: ing, 1.75c; checking, .20c; lidding, .40c;
trucking, .25c; laboring, .10c; carload -
1 ing,   1.10c;   packers'  wages,  4c;   light,
I power,   fuel,   car-bracing,   etc.,   1.50c;
taxes,   insurance,   rents,   depreciation
and interest, etc., 2c; making a total of
33 cents per box.
The   Co-op.  orders   an  average   of
500,000 boxes per year from the local
I sawmill, gives work to about 175 citi-
fzens during the height of the season
and  uses  one-fifth  of the  electricity
used in the municipality.  Cold storage j
has room for 110,000 boxes of apples J
and pears while common storage capacity  is   160,000   boxes.    Belt   conveyor
j equipment totals 1,400 feet and gravity
800 feet.  The total floor space at present   is 135,000   square feet   or about
3 1/10 acres.    F
The Lawn Will Respond To
Soil Feeing
MAINTAINING a beautiful lawn
requires planting and careful
consideration each spring.
During   the   first   year   mowing
should not  be done  until the  sets
J   are  uniformly  spread  so  that  the
runners have taken root.   The first
I   cutting should not be too close, but
|   after that clip to one inch above
<   the ground so that it will not grow
into a loose turf.   The advisability
of   mowing early   is important   in
keeping weeds from going to seed.
For the second year as soon as
the grass begins to show signs of
life, scatter uniformly over the lawn
a coat of barnyard manure, at least
<a   good wagon   load to   each 2,000
iqmare feet.
^.fertilizers may be used
' jnore
the growth of the grass so tremendously that it crowds out weeds such
as dandelions.   Amonium  sulphate,
which   gives nitrogen   to the   soil,
may be  used  at  the  rate  of  one
pound   to 250   or 300   square feet.
This should be mixed with dirt and
applied   evenly over   the  lawn   in
early spring.   Do not use it while
the  dew  is  still   on   the   grass  as
there is a tendency for it to burn.
Another inorganic fertilizer which
should be applied at least once is
superphosphate, which gives phosphorus to the soil. It should be applied at the rate of one pound per
150 to 200 square feet of ground.
Inorganic fertilizers containing nitrogen are excellent in starting the
grass but they disappear so quickly
that their value is not as lasting as
that of the organic fertilizers such
jig clnckefksheep and cattle manure.        J 1 J Ay
MANY preparations to be put on
the trees to keep off rabbits
have been tried, but most of these
are not sufficiently durable to last
the winter. The most promising one _
that is known is the following:
Take one quart of linseed oil
(either boiled or raw) and heat it
to 470° F. outdoors where no fires
will be started by accident, because
the oil may foam over. Use a container five times as large as the vol-
9 ume of oil. Use a thermometer to
determine temperature. When 470°
is reached set the container away
from the fire and immediately add
flowers of sulphur while the oil is
very hot. Add the sulphur a tea-
spoonful at a time and stir the oil
thoroughly after each teaspoonful.
Add three ounces of the sulphur to
each quart of oil. After the sulphur
has all been added the liquid should
be black and thick. Avoid getting
it on the clothing because of the
smell, which is persistent. It can
be washed off the hands with soap
and water or dissolved by gasoline. -
This thick sulfonated oil is about _
the right consistency to paint on
tree trunks. Paint the trunk liberally  to  about two feet  above  the
J snow line. The trunks should be
dry when the oil is applied. This
should stay on all winter, but a
second painting towards spring may
be desirable.  / w
1933
Picking Cra
in some cas
the South s
trees only
side crabs.
Veness
Chas.  Hall
Taktfl&ka
-Muraki
Kanizaki
Abe
R#   Campbell
F.  Clements
S.Houston
W.Willey
-Frtesra
Kograma
Chas,White
B,   Cooney
bs
es  picking only
ide.  ani  in some
taking off the out~*~
'td^frlz.'       <******''*if
of Piclcing per hour,
ZMZ    Orch.   Box 2.04
1.7
1.9
1.35
1.9
...&+05
1.75
1.43
1.5
1.52
1.64
2.0
1.76
1.75
Ml*ACLf+*+ F+7L
1.73
-iteivt Wt.432  orch.box 20645  lbs,
average 46.6  2
103 box  to  bin of bulk
150 cub.ft.  holds   5000  lbs.
><l L933
Picking Wealthy for 10 hrs
on Aug.10th ';- Picking for
size./to get 700 boxes.
orch. Box
Veness 55
Hall 52
Campbell50
ijfred. 39
Houston 40
Willey 39
Freisen 36
White 55
Buckley 32
Takaki* 54
Mura&i 53
Kenezak 54
Abe 54
Muraki 63
Average cost 3.6 /per Orch box.
< w
Crab
1935 ffiiif^ "^
Picking Aug.16,17,19 th.
OUOO    8
worn
9-qq. 1
22 pickers in all
g   510 hours picking      969 orch. boxes
Average 1.90 box per hr.  or 950 lbs.day
800 orch.box net weight 40,335 lbs.
average net weight 50 2/5 lbs.per box
—wage 18^per Hr. average ~£$$ orch.box
Pickers average
Kunz 2.29
Aizawa      2.24
Abe f.
"~27±&
R.Freisen2.24
— Dark   2.04
Cross   1.62
.  Willy   1.95    ©
©
&
Rattlesnakes
Editor The Vernon News, Sir:
The following excerpts from a letter
written to me, in reply to some queries,
by Dr. Thomas Barbous, Director of
the Museum of Comparative Zoology,
Harvard, may be of interest as coming
from one who is acknowledged to be
the leading herpetologist on this continent.
"They (rattlesnakes) certainly do not
mate for life. The number of rattles
are no index to age. They are constantly being knocked off. One rattle
is gained with each shedding. They
usually shed about three times a year.
"The snake-bite confers no immunity against the poisoning of the same
or any other species of snake. I. do not
see how the rattle can serve as a means
of communication for we know that
the rattlesnake cannot hear it.
"We know little of their sense of
smell. I doubt if they would follow a
dead snake a mile even if it were dragged on the ground.
"Bull snakes eat rodents, not other
rattlers: at least all the species of
which I have any knowledge. I have
never heard of their frequenting marmots' burrows.
venomous serum is definitely and" con-r
stantly used in all the great hospitals j
muuui   UI    UV)    piUllipVouj^"^>   Uiiucr-'
helps aM, Indeed, in borderline cases
may effect a cure. Death, as you know,
S caused by that amount of venom
which^ is beyond the capacity of the
n^son bitten to neutralize. Each kilo-
Sam of man can neutralize so many
mm&ram? of venom. If the amount
Sited is less/than the number of |
I mure poison is Ihdicated ne dies, unless
(a) the surplus and lethal dose may be
very small and repjoveable by suction
or (b) larger so that it must be neutralized by serum.
"The Vernon subspecies Is Crotalus
confluentus oreganus (Holbrbok)."
Submitted by Augustine C. Mackie.
June 4, 1934.
Aj  »
*»
"If a person is bitten and steeps the
affected part in milk it would do him
no more good than steeping it in water
or cider.
"The S. African pocket outfits are of
absolutely no use whatever. Permanganate of potash (not soda bicarbonate) Which is supplied in the outfits is
now known to be of no use. The anti-
venomous serum is definitely and constantly used in all the great hospitals
muum 01 uy piumpv cuppingA**«eu
helps and,: indeed, in bordefftw cases
may effect a cure. Death, as you know,
is caused by Jlat amount of venom
which is beyond the capacity of the
person bitten to neutralize. Each kilogram of man can neutralize so many
milligrams of venom. If the amount j
indicated is less/than the number of 1
more poison is indicated he dies, unless
(a) the surplus and lethal dose may be
very small and removeable':by liuction
or (b) larger so that it must be neutralized by serum.
"The Vernon subspecies is Crotalus
confluentus oreganus (Holbrook)."
Submitted by Augustine C. Mackie.
June 4, 1934.
5il  »
Sill
ONOI
m
&
and    by    intelligent    medical    men I
throughout the country with excellent
results.    Straight   suction,   either   by
mouth  or by prompt  cupping,  often!
helps and, indeed, in borderline cases j
may effect a cure. Death, as you know,
is caused by that amount of venom
which is beyond the capacity of the
person bitten to neutralize. Each kilogram of man can neutralize so many
milligrams of venom.   If the amount I
indicated is less/than the number of |
more poison is indicated he dies, unless
(a) the surplus and lethal dose may be
very small and repaoVeable":by "suction
or (b) larger so that it must be neutralized by serum.
"The Vernon subspecies is Crotalus
confluentus oreganus (Holbrook)."
Submitted by Augustine C. Mackie.
June 4, 1934.
.-/Ml         °
Success/ul Control Of
Couch Grass By Use
Of Sodium ChloraU
[Editor's Note: When the result® of the first experiments in the use
of Sodium Chlorate for the extermination of couch grass as conducted
by District Agriculturist H. E. Waby, Salmon Arm, were published in
"Country Life in B.C.," a widespread interest developed and subsequently
frequent inquiries were received as to the methods of using this chemical.
These inquiries have continued and Mr. Waby kindly has furnished
later information regarding the matter. It is suggested to farmers who
are troubled with couch grass that they clip out the appended article
and keep it for handy reference].
By H. E. Waby,
District Agriculturist, Salmon Arm, B.C.
OWING to the number of inquiries
that are still being received asking
for further information as to the method of application and results from
the use of Sodium Chlorate chemical
weed killer, we are of the opinion that
your readers may benefit by again having published, in the pages of "Country Life in B. C", particulars of methods used and summary of results to
date.
Plots treated in the fall of 1935 are
growing good crops and are clear of
couch grass. These plots were seeded
in the spring of 1936 to grain and all
grew good crops and all had practically
a one hundred percent kill of couch
grass.
In the fall of 1936, additional plots
were treated, commencing October 1
and as late as December 24.
Plots treated early show practically
100 percent kill, but later treated plots
show a percentage of weak growths of
grass, perhaps owing to the prolonged
spell of freezing weather in January,
1937, lasting about six weeks and which
naturally stopped the action of the
chemical.
NO TOXIC INJURY ON
GOOD  SOIL
A NUMBER of crops were grown including corn, potatoes, mangolds,
carrots, alfalfa and grain, and in every
instance when grown on land in a
good state of fertility, no ill effects so
far are found. Poorer soils, however,
showed slight toxic injury.
Several orchard tests were made and
to date no apparent injury is noticed
on fruit trees. Orchard plots were
treated as high as 220 pounds per acre.
The rate of application advised is
180 pounds per acre for ordinary practice, of Sodium Chlorate,   Almost all
plots have been treated with a dry application mixing dry sand with the
Chlorate to make ease of spreading,
but care must be taken to get an even
distribution and the proper amount of
chlorate applied.
When used in liquid form the amount
of water does not matter, the amount
of chlorate as advised to the measured
acre, is all that need be considered.
A barrel sprinkler for a liquid application has been devised and will be used
this fall on several plots; this sprinkler is inexpensive and simple and particulars of same will be available from
the Soil and Crops Branch, Victoria.
SUMMARY
SODIUM Chlorate may be spread by
hand mixed with twice the quantity
of dry sand, spreading both ways so as
to avoid missing any part, or in small
patches a sprinkler or watering can
may be used, as sodium chlorate is
readily soluble.
Applications should be made early,
as soon as fall rains start.
All live stock should be kept off treated plots as although not considered
poisonous cattle will lick sodium chlorate on treated land and this is rather
an expensive way of providing salt.
All treated plots should be cultivated and stirred well the following spring
and fairly late crops are best as this
will allow for more cultivation, thus
assisting in killing any weak roots of
couch that may have survived.
Rate of seeding for ordinary application is 180 pounds per acre and
land should be measured and chlorate
weighed, for best results; less than
the above amount will result in a poorer kill, and when more than the advised quantity of chlorate is used the
succeeding crop shows the toxic effect.
If a standing crop of couch is on
the ground it is better to cut and re-
/
move from the land to be treated thus
giving the chemical an opportunity to
follow down the stubble roots. Remember it is the roots we are aiming
to kill and not the growing grass.
Fall applications have proved best
as we are of th® opinion that nature
works against the success of a spring
application as at that time the grass
is fighting to grow.
Sodium chlorate should be handled
with care and none spilled around.
Rubbers and old clothes should be
used when handling and all utensils
washed after using as it is a highly
inflammable material, under certain
conditions, and although no fire has
occurred in B. C. from its use, we are
trying to use that necessary ounce of
common sense required by all those
using a material to which there is the
slightest element of risk.    Paper Plates, Spoons, Cups
Salad Dishes, Serviettes and
Ice Cream Dishes ... to make
your Picnic a Success.
Ttros~ir
ii   ;qol
See Them At
W.  R.  TRENCH LTD.
Drugs & Stationery; *   ' I
/ o ? y. 73
/h'Jx^t iV^"-n As«*t(
[Q   73.
3UJ
V* A*'r*
/J>'7£.$
TedyAAAAdAAAsrM. i*JU~~
7h^y0 4*l*4l^-„    ^JJ0JJ>:z
Wt'llZC VUJk, FRIDAY, HOTTEST DAT IN 35 YEARS. *
Last Friday was the hottest day in
Kelowna of any during-the past 35 years
since the official weather records have
been taken in this city* A temperature (*
of 101 degrees was registered. The previous highest temperature was 100 degtfees
recorded by P.B.Willits on July 11th 1926
•^H^^JJgfc
«
y-y^fr   &
Q
^s                                                            Circular Ko. 52.
TO ALL GloWERS,
October 7th, 1932,
Undernoted please finl the current Season1s packing,
handling and selling charges, you will observe that there is a
considerable reduction in these in comparison with last Year, lower
shook and labor costs accounting for't.his. You will notice that
the buli^A^^^^^-Bj^Ajd-.r nn   thfl Union  s concerned amounts to $5,50
per ton, and this will be subject to rebate along with our other""
charges, but the a1.50 per ton charged by the Associated is fixed♦
Bulk charges will only apply on Crabapples, Duchess, and Wealthie s
as these varieties were handled over 90fo  in bulk and we will receive a straight bulk pool price from tho Associated wl thout amy
reference to grades or  size, and will account to our Growers in
tho same way, most of this tonnage having boon shipped orchard run,
culls out and ungraded *
later varieties such as Macintosh which aro graded,
siz d, and culled, like any other packed fruit and of which only
the large sizes wore shipped in bulk will bo accounted for as
packs similar to other years*
1932 Season - V.F.IT. Packing, Handling & Soiling
 Charges,/	
APPLBS, trapped
Medium & largo par box
Smalls
Ex. Smalls     Tf  "
Household      TT   T?
Boxed Unliddod  fT  »
Apples & Crabapples
Bulk, per ton a,a*
Poars
Crabs
Poaches
Prunes
Plums 4 Basket
Suitcases
11 Quart Baskets
packing Handling AssTtd
GA.rgo
Chargo
Cha rgo
.36^
6jjf      1
u
35yA
-~i5'f
7<9
.42
67   I
It
*W4
6d
7f
.zy
6p    t.
17
2,50-
3.00 /::
1.50
.3%'
57
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57
.    .197
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21 a
SZf
57
gotal
497
527
55f
407
519
7.00
477
33-g-£
O 3g-Q,
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my
28J7<9
33p ^D""L1XT|   UU'4    S'B    'JZ&Jl   US    \2rtiA. £13*1™ 1S[ ILLUU    >d Lj!^.
jcoj £tixq.imooo8 sq.soo jroq^x pins ipoqs
I ux osGift. lit UOT9.OTIP9.Z QiqBviepxsuo©
t/\ noiS 'seSvCetp SuTIies pus Bux Tpumi
iiij ssqgxcT peq.otixepufl
'OH   JCBITIOJXQ    

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