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Newspaper clipping titled "How About a Summer Touch of Whitewash" [unknown] Author [date unknown]

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 HOW ABOUT A  SUMMER
TOUCH  OF  WHITEWASH?
In the summer the farmers' fancy may
rightly turn to thoughts of whitewash,
for, after the long winter, the barns,
creamery and home fences look much
in need of being brightened up. Even
dwellers in the city or suburbs will
find that an outbuilding would be none
the worse for a spring touch-up. And
there is nothing after all better or so
inexpensive as whitewash.
Persons are often deterred from using whitewash through the fear that a
shower of rain might ruin it, but the
Dominion Experimental Farms have
evolved a waterproof whitewash for
outdoor work which will prevent a
newly whitewashed barn from looking
a picture of desolation after a down-
poor. It is made up in the following
proportions; slake- 62 pounds of quicklime in 12 gallons of hot water, and add
two pounds of salt and one pound of
sulphate of zinc dissolved in two gallons of water. To this, add two gallons of skim-milk. An ounce of alum,
though not essential, improves the
wash. Salt should be omitted if the
whitewash is required for metal surfaces which rust.
For farm buildings, a disinfectant
whitewash may be desired. Here is
a recipe recommended by the Dominion Experimental Station at Scott, Saskatchewan. First, 50 pounds of lime
are dissolved in eight gallons of boiling
water. To this is added six gallons of
hot water which has ten pounds of salt
KELOWNA STEAM
LAUNDRY LIMITED
Phone   123
MENS   FLANNEL   TROUSERS
LADIES'    FLANNEL    COATS
GET YOUR PURE
MILK AND CREAM
— from —
TUTT'S DAIRY
Phone 550-R
and one pound of alum dissolved in it.
A can of lye is added to every 25 gallons of the mixture. A pound of cement to every three gallons is gradually
added and thoroughly stirred. The object of using the alum is to prevent
the lime from rubbing off. Cement
makes a more creamy mixture, so that
it is easier to apply and more surface
is covered. Lye is added for disinfecting purposes, but a quart of creosol
disinfectant to every eight gallons
would serve the same purpose. Lye is
preferred when the colour is to be kept
white.

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