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Newspaper clipping titled "Half Okanagan Fruit Lots are 7.5 Acres or Less" and "Fumigation for Oriental… [unknown] [date unknown]

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 APRIL -  1957
PAGE 11
Half Okanagan Fruit Lots
Are 7.5 Acres or Less
One of the factors which
seems to be coming under some
dispute and a lot of discussion is
that of the size of farming operations in. British Columbia.
Right now, the royal commission investigating the fruit industry is hearing several arguments on the subject and no
doubt some space will be devoted by Dean MacPhee to this
subject when he hands down his
final report on the fruit industry.
The B.C. - Department of Agriculture horticultural branch compiled figures on acreages and the
percentage of small orchards in
the Okanagan .Valley and mainline-' areas,  finding  that --out   of
3,521  growers  from Lytton -and
Chase down to Oliver and Osoyoos and including Keremeos and
Cawston, 1791, or 50.8 percent,
had orchard holdings of not
more than 7.5 acres each.
In the one acre to 2.5 acre
group, there are 684 growers or
19.4 percent. From 2.5 to 5 acres
there are 741, or 21 percent.
From 5 to 7.5 acres, there are
366 growers, or 10.4 percent.
In that grouping up to 7.5
acres, Summerland leads the
parade with 272 growers, ~out of
a total of 442, or 61.5 percent.
Next comes Oliver - Osoyoos,
with 255. or 45 percent. Penticton is next with 219 out of 345.
or 63.4 percent and Vernon is
in fourth spot with 203 growers
out of 362, or 56 percent.
There are only two orchards
with more than 300-acres in the
entire Okanagan, one being in
Vernon and the other in the
Kelowna area..
No orchard properties fall* in
the 200 to 300 acre, class, but
there are two in the 150 to 200
acre grouping, one at Vernon
and the second at Okanagan
Falls.   .
Half of the 10 growers who
are in the 100 to 150 group are
in Kelowna area, there are 13
who have orchards between 75
and 100 acres in extent and 21
in the 50 to 75 acres scale.
In the 40 to 50 acres, there
are 18 and in the- 30 to 40, there
are 50 growers, or 1.4 percent 'of
the total number of growers in
the arear- Again, half of these
are in. Vernon and Kelowna.
The complete table, showing
figures up to the 20 to 30 acre
class follows;
Grower Acreages Based on Orciisrci Survey of 195S
Over Over Over Over Over Over . Total
District            .1-2.5-   %   "2.5-5.0 % 5.0-7:5 % 7.5-10.0% 10-15 % 15-20" % 20-30 % Growers
Lytton-Chase     ...         27    30.0         21 23.3 11 12.2 14 15.6 12 13.4 3 3.3 90
Salmon   Arm-Sorrento        41    27,3         51 34.0 18 12.0 13 8.7 13 8.7 4 2.6 6 4.0 150
Armstrong          12    60.0           5 25.0 1 5.0 20
Vernon        106    29.2          67 18.5 30 8.3 50 13.8 47 12.8 27 7,4 20 5.5 363
Oyama            8      7.1          24 21.2 15 13.3 30 26.5 19 16.8 6 5.3 7 6.2 113
OK. Centre .& Winfiel.d .-     26    13.6         36 18.8 16 8.4 67 35.1 21 11.0 12 6.3 6 3.2 191
Kelowna          65    11.2         99 17.0 50 8.6 95 16.3 111 19.1 75 12.9 51 8.8 582
Westbank          19    12.1         30 19.1 13 8.4 28 17.8 46 29.3 5 3.2 8 5.1 157
Peachland               16    17.4          29 31.5 13 14.0 16 17.4 8 8.7 3 3.3 6 6.6 92
Summerland           113    25.6       103 23.3 56 12.7 84 19.0 50- 11.3 18 4.1 12 2.7 442
l\!aramata    ,...           6      5.3         28 24.8 20 17.7 30 26.6 19 16.8 4 3.5 4 3.5 113
Penticton            109    31.5          78 22.6 32      9.3 67 19.4 29 8.4 13 3.8 13 3.8 345
Kaieden & OK Falls .         22    25.0         29 33.1 6 6.8 8 9.1 7 8.0 3 3.4 4 4.5 88
Oliver-Osoyoos          92    16.2       101 17.8 62 10.9 164 28.9 105 18.5 17 3.0 18 3.2 567
Keremeos-Cawston  ...         22    10.6         40 19.2 24 11.5 56 26.8 39 18.8 12 5.8 6 2.9 208
TOTALS  .       684    19.4       741 21.0 366 10.4 722 20.5 527 15.0 204 5.8 161 4.6 3521 PAGE 12
APRIL -  1957
Biggest in Canada
Fumigation for Oriental
Fruit Moth Takes in Two
Canneries/Large Orchard
The biggest fumigation operation in the history of Canadian
agriculture was undertaken in
the southern Okanagan in the
latter part of March. It represented combined effort on the
part of the Canada and B.C. Departments of Agriculture to stO£
a potential infestation of Oriental Fruit Moth in its tracks and
thus maintain the Okanagan as
#ne of the few remaining fruit
production areas in North America which is free of this
scourge. It is estimated that the
total cost of the operation, which
included fumigation of nearly 9
acres of orchard and a considerable amount of spraying and
fumigation at other points, will
run into some $55,000. However,
if the fruit moth became established in the Okanagan it had
been conservatively estimated
that the annual cost of additional
sprays, plus fruit losses, would
run to $200,000.
This all started last September
when, owing to a short fruit crop,
some peaches were imported
from Washington for processing
i n Okanagan canneries. All
peaches imported must be fumigated before crossing the border
to kill the insects if they should
be present. However, the fumigation failed for some reason and
when they began to process this
fruit, live worms were noted by
some cannery workers. The affected fruit was discarded and
the larvae were taken to appropriate officials for identification.
Since the area is free of the Oriental Fruit Moth, it took some
time to make positive identification of these worms. By this
time the fruit had been processed and the refuse disposed of.
Some from one cannery at Osoyoos had gone on the town
dump, while at the Summerland
cannery it had been spread on
an adjoining orchard as humus.
The only fortunate thing was
the time of year. Adult moths
from these worms would not emerge until spring. Indeed, the
time of the first peach blossom
is considered normal for their
emergence and this gave the scientists time to study the situation and to plan for the destruction of the insect if this was
possible. Their first job was to
trace all locations where this infected fruit had touched and
hence where fruit moth larvae
might have gone to form their
cocoons. This having been done,
consultation with entomologists
in both Canada and the United
States suggested the best procedure would be to fumigate all
such areas before any adult
moths emerged to lay eggs and
increase their kind.
This was a large order—to
fumigate these canneries they
had to be completely covered
and sealed to hold in the concentration of Methyl Bromide
gas necessary to assure killing
of the fruit moth. Then the affected orchard had to be cut and
burned,   leaving   12-inch   stumps
THREE MEN WHO ARE TAKING a leading
part In the attempt to prevent the spread of
the Oriental Fruit Moth m British Columbia's
tree fruit orchards are pictured here just turning on the fumigation equipment and gas from
the cylinders is pouring into the plant of York
Farms Ltd. at Osoyoos. From left'to right they
art
Ore
L?
on    which    sheets    of    material
could be spread and the fumigation   process   carried   out   over
this area as well.
BIG JOB
No Canadian pest control operator was equipped to do the job
and the- successful bidder came
from Ontario, California. The
company, operated by Harper
Brothers, brought with them well
over two acres of* plastic impregnated nylon tarpaulins which
they used for the job. Most of
this was in sheets 43 by 50 feet,
SEVEN TONS
To fumigate
neries at Su^
Osoyoos, mor
pounds of
was used,
merciai CheT
plied the
Country Li
from the C
month.
though c-
as 7
/^

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