Hawthorn Fly Fishing & Angling Collection

The Fly maker's hand-book; representing upwards of fifty of the most useful artificial flies for trout… [unknown] 1886

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Full Text

 FLY MAKER'S
HAND-BOOK.
W* THE LIBRARY
The University of
British Columbia
Harry Hawthorn Foundation
for the
Inculcation & Propagation
of the Principles & Ethics
of Fly-Fishing THE
FLY   MAKER'S
HAND-BOOK.  THE
FLY MAKEK'S HAND-BOOK
LLLTJSTBATED   WITH
COLOURED   PLATES,
KEPBESENTING
UPWARDS OF FIFTY OF THE MOST-USEFUL
ARTIFICIAL   FLIES
TROUT AND GRAYLING FISHING.
BY AN ANGLER.
ENTERED AT STATIONERS' HALL.
LIVERPOOL:
THE LIVERPOOL PRINTING AND STATIONERY COMPANY, LIMITED.  PREFACE.
The writer of the following pages has endeavoured
to give, in a clear and concise form, all that is necessary
to assist the young Fly-Fisher in the art of making,
and choice of artificial flies, which is one of the most
pleasing and important branches of the art. To impart
useful information on this subject is, therefore, the
main object of the present work.
He has derived what information he possesses on
the subject of which it treats, chiefly, from his own
experience, corroborated by the communications and
opinions of many of the greatest sportsmen of the
present day. He feels, therefore, justified in placing
it, with modest confidence, before the beginner.
He has given a useful collection of flies for every
month in the Season, and a coloured illustration of
each fly; together with a necessary description of their
habits and time of appearance, which will be found of
infinite value to young sportsmen.
J PBEFACE.
In conclusion, let me ask your kind indulgence for
any shortcomings in this, one of the earliest, if not
oldest, productions of the kind.
The Kirby Hooks described are now entirely
discarded by Fly Makers, and are used chiefly for
Bait fishing. The fancy at present date is chiefly for
Eyed Sneck Bend, and nearly as important comes the
various " Sproats," " Pennels," " Stewarts," and others,
each and all embracing some particular improvement,
suggested in the practical use of same, by their inventors,
who are well known in the angling world.
There are many controversies on the point' of
perfection, and I would, with becoming reserve, leave
that to the judgment of our readers, though after a
fair and impartial trial of each, our experience has
. jbeen, for very fine Midge and Hackle Flies, to use
only (^Ilc'cok**^ very finest wire Sneck Bends; they
are a sure hold if taken. We give our next favourite,
the u Limericks," precedence for strength and neatness
when used for a Winged Fly; they swim better, and
the Fly, if I may use the term, balances better in
- water, and looks, and fishes better than most hooks.
In our New Price List for this Season we have given
sizes and shapes of various Hooks sold by us, any kinds
not mentioned we shall be glad to procure if desired. CONTENTS.
—^
Materials for Fly-making	
     1
Dyes for Feathers and Gut	
     5
Directions for making Hackle Flies    	
     6
Directions for making Winged Flies	
     8
Size and Choice of Flies	
 10
Blue Dun or Hare's Ear	
 20
Great Dark Dun or Drone        ...      ...      ...
...       20
The Dotterel	
 21
Brown Spider
 22
Water Cricket
 22
March Dun
       ...  22
March Brovm
 23
Great Bed Spinner
 23
Bed Spinner    ...
 21
Claret Spinner
 21
Small Brovm   ...
 25
Woodcock Hackle
 25
Golden Midge Dun
 26
Peacock Fly
       ...  26
Water-hen Hackle
 27
Gravel Fly
 27
Cowdung Fly ...
-   ..."   28
Sand Fly
 28
Yellow Dim
       ...  29
Granam Fly    ...
 29
Hawthorn Fly
 30
Stone Fly
 30
Iron Blue Dun
 31 f
Black Gnat     	
Little May Dun
Downhill Fly	
Alder Fly       	
Yellow Sally    	
Fern Fly 	
Brown Dun     	
Bed Winged Fly
Sky Blue Dun
Marlow Buzz  ...      ...
Gold Eyed Gauze Wing
The Coachman
Bed Ant ...
Black Ant       	
July Dun        	
Pale Dun        	
Wren Tail      	
August Dun
Cinnamon Fly
Blue Bottle     	
Willow Fly     	
Whirling Blue Dun  ...
Little Pale Blue Dun
White Moth    	
Brown Moth    	
Black Palmer ...
Bed Palmer     	
The Doctor     	
Chantrey Fly	
Ed?nondson,s Welsh Fly
'Gi'een Drake   	
Brown. Drake	
31
31
32
32
33
34
34
35
35
36
36
36
37
37
38
38
39
39
40
40
41
41
42
42
42
43
43
43
-44
44
45 THE FLY MAKER'S HAND-BOOK.
Materials for Fly-Making.    Dyes for Feathers and Chit,
Directions for making Hackle and Winged Flies.
The art of artificial fly-fishing certainly has the
pre-eminence over the various other methods that are
used to take fish. It not only requires a great deal of
ingenuity and attention, but the pleasure which the
angler derives from collecting and arranging the various
materials necessary for the formation of his ingenious
devices, is infinitely greater than can be conceived by
an indifferent observer. The angler is not confined to
any particular part of the water in fly-fishing, but
roves amongst the most wild and beautiful scenery of
nature, enjoying the harmonious warblings of the
numerous songsters of the grove.
Every angler should be able to make his own flies,
for if he cannot, he will not experienoe the same pleasure
that he would by taking fish with those of his own
making. The young angler should on all his excursions
have a few materials with him, for he cannot tell what
fly he may find the fish taking, or the misfortunes he
may meet with.    Having made these few introductory
B
1
J 10 THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.
remarks, I shall now proceed to give a description of
the different materials requisite for imitating the
natural flies.
A pair of tweezers (see fig. 1, p. 1) is of great
assistance for lapping on the body and hackle of a fly,
and a pair of fine pointed scissors (see fig. 2, p. 1) are
absolutely necessary. I have given a drawing (see
fig. 3, p. 1) of a small hand-vice which will be found
very useful for holding small hooks while dressing.
The angler should also be provided with a small
quantity of shoemakers' wax, or a little black pitch,
and if in case these should prove too brittle, they can
easily be softened, by adding a little grease. Gold and
silver tinsel, both flat and round, will be required ; and
fine strong silk of various colours for tying the flies.
This article is got from the silk worm that dies
before it comes to maturity. There are many different
kinds of gut; the Spanish is mostly used, for it is the
strongest, and is, besides, very clear. The Italian gut
is clear, round, and a little longer than the Spanish, but
not so strong. The gut from Turkey and China is of
a brown colour, and nearly three feet in length, but it
is seldom used, except for bait or sea fishing.
FUKS,  WOOLS,  ETC.
The most useful furs for the bodies of flies, are the
squirrels, water rats, moles, rabbits, hare's ears, and PU  THE  FLY MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK. 11
the fur from the hare's neck. Wool and mohair of all
colours are requisite, many shades of mohair may be
had from the web ends of broad cloth. Floss silk, too,
of various colours is indispensible.
Are manufactured of many different forms, but those
generally used for flies are the Limerick (fig. 12, p. 2),
the sneck bend (fig. 13, p. 2), the round bend
(fig. 14, p. 2).
THE   LIMERICK
Are the best shaped hooks for winged flies; the shank
being slightly bent, and made taper towards the head,
which adds greatly to the neatness of the fly. The
sizes run from No. 16 the smallest, to No. 1 the largest
size.*
THE   SNECK   BEND.
The point of this hook is rather long, and bent a
little on one side of the shank. It answers better for
hackle flies than winged flies. The sizes run from
No. 1 the smallest, to No. 10, the largest size.
*The sizes of hooks vary very much with the different
makers; the sizes that are given throughout this Book, are
these sold by AllCOCk'e     -- 12        THE FLY MAKER'S HAND-BOOK.
THE ROUND BEND.
This hook, although once a favourite, is seldom used
now, except in Scotland, where it is still preferred by
many of the old fishermen. The sizes run from No. 1
the smallest, to No. 16 the largest size.
THE   KIRBY    BEND.
It is reported that the German Prince Rupert, in
the reign of our Charles I., communicated to Charles
Kirby a method of tempering hooks, which remained
from that time a secret with Kirby's descendants. This
hook is rather thick in the wire, and seldom used,
except for moth flies, or flies with rough bodies, and bait
fishing.    The numbers run the same as the round bend.
The most useful feathers for trout flies, are from
the wings of the woodcock, snipe, partridge, landrail,
dotterel, water-hen, jay, starling, and the thrush;
likewise the feathers from the back and neck of the
partridge and woodcock.- Peacock's and ostrich's herls,
also the mottled feathers of the teal and wild drake.
Pheasant's, partridge's, and turkey's tail feathers, and
hackles from the neck of the do^mestic cock or hen.
-The best colours are different shades of duns and reds,,
also black and white hackles, the white are useful for
dyeing such colours as cannot be had natural. The
following receipts will be found very useful for dyeing;— THE FLY MAKER'S HAND-BOOK*        13
TO DYE FEATHERS FOR THE GREEN DRAKE.
First boil the feathers in alum and water, to extract
the grease; then boil them in an infusion of fustic to
procure a yellow, and subdue the brightness by adding
a small piece of copperas to the infusion.
TO DYE FEATHERS A BRIGHT YELLOW.
Boil the feathers first in alum and water, and then
in an infusion of saffron.
TO DYE FEATHERS BED AND CLARET.
Boil the feathers in an infusion of logwood, until
they are the shade you want for red. They can then
be easily changed to claret by being put into a warm
solution of potash.
Red hackles may be turned brown by being
immersed in boiling copperas and water.
Dun hackles may be turned olive dun by boiling
them in an infusion of onion coatings.
BLUE   STAIN FOR  SILKWORM   GUT.
To a weak infusion of logwood, add a small piece of
copperas; let it stand till nearly cold, and then immerge
the gut for a few seconds, and when sufficiently stained
rinse it well with cold water. 14 THE   FLY  MAKER'S HAND-BOOK.
BROWN  STAIN  FOR  SILKWORM  GUT.
To a strong infusion of coffee, add a small piece of
alum; and this will impart a fine brown colour to the
gut. Gut may also be stained with strong infusions of
tea, oak bark, and onion coatings. In staining gut,
care should be taken not to allow the infusion to be
more than lukewarm, as hot stains will tinge it too
dark and injure its strength.
DIRECTIONS  FOR  MAKING  A HACKLE  FLY.
I should recommend the beginner to commence, first,
with simple hackle flies, for instance, the marlow buzz.
Lay out your tweezers, scissors, tying silk, wax, gut,
hook, a red hackle suitable for the size of your hook,
and a peacock's herl. Next examine your gut by taking
hold of one end of it with your teeth, and drawing it
down between your fingers; this operation will both
try its strength and straighten it. You should now
prepare the hackle, by stripping off the soft downy
fibres which grow nearest the root, and turn back a
sufficient portion for the legs (see figs. 4 and 5 p. 1),
which may be done by drawing it between your finger
and thumb. Every thing being,thus in readiness, you
commence by waxing a piece of tying silk, and lapping
the end of it three or four times round the bare shank
of the hook. The hook should be held between the
finger and thumb of the left hand, and the fine end of THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK. 1$
the gut should be placed on the back of it (see fig. 6,
p. 1), and the waxed silk tightly lapped round both till
near the bend (see fig. 7, p. 1), now fasten the fine end
of the peacock's herl on the hook, by a few turns of the
silk (see fig, 8, p. 1), and cut off the waste point of the
herl; turn the silk down the hook towards the head,
and take hold of the end of the herl with the tweezers,
and lap it round the hook until near the end (see fig. 9
p. 1); let the tweezers hang down, and secure the herl
by a few turns of tying silk, and then cut off what
remains of the herl; next fasten on the end of the
hackle by a few turns of silk (see fig. 10, p. 1), cut off
the waste point, and take hold of the root end of the
hackle with the tweezers, lap it round the end of the
hook, taking care not to lap one turn over another,
and not to go beyond the end of the hook; the bright
side of the leather should always be kept towards the
h,ead of the fly. Now let the tweezers hang down, and
fasten the end by a few turns of the silk; cut off the
loose end of the feather, lap the silk a few more times
round the head of the fly, and fasten the tying silk on
the head of the fly with the invisible knot.
To make the invisible knot lap a few turns of the
tying silk on the gut, as in the figure, then lay the end 16 THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.
of the silk on the head of the fly, and unlap the silk
of the gut on the head of the fly; now draw the end
tight, and this will completely secure it.
In making and finishing your flies, be particular to
keep the tying silk well waxed; and if the hook is
small it is as well to bite about a tenth of an inch of
the gut, in order to flatten it, so that it may be less
liable to slip after being tied on to the hook.
DIRECTIONS   FOR  MAKING  A  WINGED  FLY,
Having arranged the requisite materials, you proceed
to tie the hook on the gut; after which, fasten the end
of a piece of tinsel at the tail of the fly, by a few turns
of the silk, and next fasten on the body (see fig. 16, p.
2), if it is a floss silk body you fasten the end on the
same as a peacock's herl; but if it is a fur or wool body,
it must be twisted on the tying silk. Now lap the body
on with the tweezers, and fasten it, but taking care to
leave sufficient of the end of the hook bare for the legs
and wings of the fly; next lap the tinsel down the
body with the tweezers, fasten and cut off the end';- (see
fig. 17, p. 2). Fasten on the hackle next (see fig. 18,
p, 2), lap it on with the tweezers, fasten and cut off the
waste end. The wings must be stripped from the feather by an even pull, care being taken not to separate
the fibres (see figs. 21, 22, and 23, p. 2), now place the
wings on the back of the hook, keeping the bright side
of the feather uppermost; hold the wings on the head
li Limerick Sneck
PL 2  THE  FLY MAKER S  HAND-BOOK.
17
of the fly with your finger and thumb nails, and lap a
few turns of silk tightly round, next divide the wings
into two equal parts with the point of the scissors, and
put one turn of silk between them ; cut off the stumps
of the feather, and finish as in the hackle fly. SIZE AND CHOICE OF FLIES.
Before I commence to give the description of the
trout flies, it is necessary to state that, although the
greater proportion of those represented in the plates
are common to all rivers, yet the time of their appearance will vary in different counties according to the
temperature of climate. The appearance of the May
fly on our southern rivers, is generally about the middle
of May, whereas, on 4>ur northern rivers they seldom
appear before the first week in June.
The young angler will soon discover that the selection
of his fly requires more judgement and experience than
any other branch of the art. Although the imitation
of nature in regard to colour, is the principal object to
be observed, yet great attention must be paid to the size
of the fly; it being advisable to enlarge or diminish it
according to the state of the water. In general they
should be made about the same size as the natural fly,
but when the rivers are very clear or low they should
be made smaller; the flies for deep and dark running
rivers, require to be made larger than the natural fly;
and flies for morning or evening fishing should be larger
and fuller in the body.    On the lakes and streams in THE  FLY MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK. 19
the mountainous parts of Britain, the spring and autumnal flies are by far the most killing. The fishermen in
these parts generally use small hackle flies, made with
very little feather, and spare in the body. The flies
for the Welsh lakes in fine, weather, should be the same
size as the natural fly, but in windy weather, when the
best lake fishing may be had, the fly should be a little
larger. Scotch lake flies are large, and not made from
any particular natural fly; they generally take their
name from the feather that is used in forming the wings*
The only guide that can be given for their use is:—on
windy days, fish with dark and rough bodied flies, and
in fine weather, fish with light and gaudy flies.
When a fly is said to be in season, it will not be -
found upon the water every day, the state of the weather
has great influence in this respect. The land flies, as
the hawthorn, cow dung, &c, will be found on the
water chiefly on windy days. The beetle, as the marlow
buzz, &c, principally on hot days. The duns and water
spiders, on cloudy days. The water flies, as the
granam, &c, on mild days with gleams of sunshine.
The drawings of the flies in the plates are the same
size as the natural flies; and I have given in the
following descriptions, the number and shape of the
hook, so that the amateur will have no difficulty in
regulating the size of his fly. DESCRIPTION   OF   FLIES.
No. 1, BLUE DUN, OR HARE'S EAR.
This is an excellent trout fly; it generally makes its
appearance early in March, and kills well all summer.
It is in appearance one of the most delicate insects
which frequent the water, and it is, therefore, extraordinary that it is to be found in the greatest quantities
on cold windy days.
Body.    The dark fur from the hare's ear, mixed with
a little yellow mohair, and left rather full
towards the head, to represent the legs,
and ribbed with yellow tying silk.
Tail.    Two fibres of a dun cock's hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of a throstle's wing.
Hook.    No. 12, Limerick.
No. 2, GREAT DARK DUN OR DRONE.
This fly kills best in fine weather, during the months
of March and April. It is a very dull fly, and on cold
days may be found in an almost torpid state on the PL3
_i^fe)
■am
m  THE  FLY MAKER S  HAND-BOOK.
21
Body, Black ostrich herl, ribbed with silver twist.
It is sometimes made with brown, yellow
and black mohair body, as there is a great
variety of colour in the family.
Legs.    A dun hen's hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of the jay's wing.
Hook,    No. 5, Kirby bend.
No. 3, THE DOTTEREL
This is a very destructive little fly, for all. shallow
streams, and may be used all the season. It is a great
favourite with the Cumberland fishermen. I do not
know of any natural fly that this imitates; but the fine
texture of the feather, and the rich golden tint on the
edge, gives it a lightness and delicacy that ensures it a
good killer.
Body.    The brown fur from the hare's face.
Legs. A feather from the dotterel's wing. This is
rather a difficult bird to get, and the only
substitute is a feather from the inside of
the starling's wing.
Hook. This should be regulated to the size of the
feather; No. 3 and 4 Sneck bend are mostly
used. 22 THE  FLY MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.
No. 4, BROWN SPIDER.
This fly kills well in small streams, and may be used
until the end of July, when the water is low.
Body.    Dusky olive mohair, ribbed with gold twist
or bright yellow tying silk.
Legs.    A small mottled feather from the back of a
partridge.
Hook.    No. 4, Sneck bend
No. 5, WATER CRICKET.
This insect comes on the water very early, generally
about the end of February, and may be used on all
sorts of days until the end of May.
Body.    Orange floss silk, ribbed down with black
silk.
Legs.    A small black hackle.
Hook.    No. 15, Limerick.
No. 6, MARCH DUN.
This is an excellent fly on the northern rivers for
March and April.    It ^ill answer best in dull weather.
Body.    The fur of a mole, tipped with gold tinsel.
Tail.    Two fibres of a dun copk's hackle.
Legs.    A dun hen's hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of a starling's wing.
Hook.    No. 11, Limerick. THE  FLY MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.    ' 23
No. 7, MARCH BROWN.
Generally about tne middle of March this fly makes
its appearance, and continues in season until the end of
May. This fly may be used with great success in warm
gloomy days, from eleven in the morning until two
o'clock in the afternoon, when these flies appear in
thousands on the water.
Body.    Brown fur from the hare's face, ribbed with
yellow tying silk.
Tail.    Two fibres of  a mottled  brown  mallard's
feather.
Legs.    A feather from the back of a partridge.
Wings.    From a feather of the wing  of  a  hen-
pheasant.
Hook.    No. 6, Kirby bend.
No. 8. GREAT RED SPINNER,
This fly is the March brown that has changed its
mottled coat; in its second state it is seldom seen in
such quantities as in the first, generally coming on the
water in the evening after the March brown has gone
off. It may be used for both rivers and lakes until the
end of July.
Body. Reddish brown mohair, ribbed with gold twist.
Tail.    Two fibres of a red cock's hackle. 24 THE  FLY MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.
Legs.    A red cock's hackle.   .
Wings,    From a feather of the jay's wing
Hook.    No. 8, Limerick.
No. 9, RED SPINNER.
This is the second state of the blue dun, which undergoes this change when about a week old. There are
many varieties of this fly, and they chiefly appear on
the water in the evening; it is in season until the end
of July.
Body.    Reddish brown floss silk, ribbed with fine
gold twist.
Tail.    Two fibres of a red cock's hackle.
Legs.    A red cock's hackle.
Wings,   From  a mottled feather of  the mallard4,
slightly stained with onion coatings.
Hook.    No. 12, Limerick.
No. 10, CLARET SPINNER.
. This is one of the varieties of the red spinner, and
will be found a good killer on most rivers in the
evening; the other varieties are chiefly different shades
of brown, red and claret. Pl4
12
13
U*
15
16  THE  FLY MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK, 25
Body.    Claret colour floss silk, ribbed with fine gold
twist.
Tail.    Two fibres of a claret hackle.
Legs.    A claret hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of the starling's wing
Hook.    No. 11, Limerick.
No. 11, SMALL BROWN.
This fly will be found on the water about the middle
of April, and continues plentiful on most rivers until
the end of June.
Body.    The grey fur of the hare's ear.
Legs.    A small grey or dun hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of the inside of the woodcock's wing*
Hook.    No. 3, Sneck bend.
No. 12, WOODCOCK HACKLE.
This is an excellent fly for April and May, and will
kill in almost any river. It is used by the old sportsmen in Cumberland all the season.
Body.    Olive and brown mohair mixed.
Legs.    From the inside of a woodcock's wing.
Hook.    No. 3, Sneck bend. 2Q THE  FLY  MAKER'S   HAND-BOOK.
No. 13, GOLDEN MIDGE DUN.
This delicate fly comes on the water about the
beginning of April, and good sport may be had in
warm weather with it until the end of June, and again
in September. ..J.sfc*
Body.    Olive floss silk, ribbed with fine gold twist
or bright yellow tying silk.
Legs.    A dun hackle.
Wings.    From the feather of a starling's wing.
Hook.    No. 12, Limerick.
No. 14, PEACOCK FLY.
This little insect is like a small earwig, it generally
makes its appearance about the beginning of April, and
is abundant all the summer months. It answers best
when there is a slight breeze, for they get blown from
the banks, and as their wings are very weak they are
unable to rise from the surface of the water.
-   Body.    A brown peacock's herl.
Legs.    A dark purple hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of a lark's wing.
Hook.    No. 14, Limerick. THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK. 27
No. 15, WATER-HEN HACKLE.
This is an excellent trout fly, particularly when the
rivers are clearing after a flood. It is a standard fly,
and may be used all the season.
Body.    Black mohair, ribbed with silver twist.
Legs.    A feather from the inside of the water-hen's
. wing.
Hook.    No. 4, Sneck bend.
No. 16, GRAVEL FLY.
This fly appears on the water about the middle of
April, and is an excellent fly for the remaining part of
the month. It should only be used on warm days, as
it is a delicate fly and cannot endure cold.
Body. Lead coloured silk, it is best to use lead
coloured tying silk to tie the hook on with,
and let the lapping form the body.      -iv%
Legs.    A black cock's hackle.
Wings. From a feather of the inside of the woodcock's wing.
Hook.    No. 13, Limerick. 28 THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.
No. 17, COW DUNG FLY.
This fly appears about the end of March, and is
very plentiful all the summer months. Although this
is not an aquatic insect, it is nevertheless a favourite
of the trout; and when high winds have blown these
flies upon the water, the angler may calculate upon
having good sport.
Body. For the male, yellow mixed with a little
brown mohair, and olive mohair for the
female.
Legs.    A ginger coloured hackle.
Wings.    From the feather of the landrail's wing,
Hook.    No. 11, Limerick.
No. 18, SAND FLY.
Good sport may be had with this fly in April and
May, when there are not many of any particular flies
on the water, Si-^8
Body,    Yellow fur from the hare's neck.
Legs.    A light ginger hajckle.
Wings.    From a feather of the landrail's wing.
Hook.   No. 11, Limerick. PIS  THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK. 29
No. 19, YELLOW DUN.
This fly is found on most rivers about the end of
April, and continues in season until the beginning of
June. The best time for fishing with it is from ten
o'clock in the morning until three in the afternoon.
Body.    Pale yellow mohair ribbed with yellow silk.
Tail.    Two fibres of a dun cock's hackle.
Legs.    A light yellow dun hackle.
Wings,    From a feather of a starling's wing.
Hook.   No. 11, Limerick.
No. 20, GRANAM FLY.
This fly is on the water about the first week in April,
and continues but for a few days; the female has a
bunch of green eggs at its tail, which it drops on the
water while skimming on the surface. The trout takes
this fly greedily at first, but they soon become so glutted
with them that it is almost useless fishing, except in the
mornings and evenings, when they are not on the water.
Body.    Dark brown floss silk, tipped with green
silk at the tail.
Legs.   A dun hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of the partridge's wing
Hook.   No. 12, Limerick. 30 THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.
No. 21, HAWTHORN FLY.
This is a good killer on most rivers, and may be
used from the end of April to the end of May. It is a
land fly, and should be used on windy or cloudy days.
Body.    A black ostrich herl.
Legs.    A black cock's hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of the starling's wing.
Hook.    No. 11, Limerick.
No. 22, STONE FLY.
This fly is bred from an insect called the water
creeper, found under stone near the edge of shallow
streams. The usual time of its appearance is the first
week in April, and it may be used until the end of
May; it kills best in windy weather, in the rapid
parts of streams, and it is an excellent lake fly.
Body. The dark fur from the hair's ear mixed
with yellow mohair, and ribbed with
yellow tying silk.
Tail.    Two fibres of a speckled partridge's feather.
Legs.    A dark dun hackle,     f^'if-
Wings.    From a feather of the pheasant's wing.
Hook.   No. 7, Limerick.
I THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK. 31
No. 23, IRON BLUE DUN.
This fly is rarely to be seen in mild weather, but
during the months of May and June; they frequent
the water in considerable numbers on cold windy days.
Body.    Blue fur from the mole.
• Legs.    A blue dun hen's hackle.
Hook.    No. 14 Limerick.
No. 24, BLACK GNAT.
This little fly appears early in May, and may be used
in the evenings all summer; it is a very good killer in
fine weather when the water is low.
Body.    A black ostrich herl.
Wings.    From a feather of the lark's wing.
Hook.    No. 3 Sneck bend.
No. 25, LITTLE MAY DUN.
This spinner is very like the green drake in form and
colour, but on a much smaller scale. This fly comes
on the water early in May, and is the precursor of the
green drake.
Body.    Yellow fur from the hare's face ribbed with
yellow silk.
Tail.    Two fibres of a dun hackle. 32 THE  FLY MAKER'S HAND-BOOK.
Legs.    A stained olive hackle.
Wings,    From the mottled feather of the wild drake
stained a light olive,
Hook,    No. 10, Limerick,
No. 26, DOWN HILL-FLY OR DOWNLOOKER,
This fly is in season throughout May and June, and
like all other land flies should only be used in windy
weather, for then they get blown on the water. It is
invariably found with its head pointing downwards on
the trunks of old trees, from which it derives the name
of downlooker.
Body.    Orange floss silk, ribbed with brown tying
silk.
Legs.    A black and red hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of the woodcock's wing.
Hook,    No. 11, Limerick.
No. 27, ALDER OR ORL FLY,
During the months of June and July this fly may be
seen fluttering along the surface of the water; and it
. wiU, be found an excellent killer1 for both rivers and
lakes after the green drake has gone.
Body.    Dark   mulberry-coloured   floss   silk,  or  a
copper-coloured peacock's herl. 27
P16
25
26
28
3(  THE FLY MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK. 3$
Legs.    A dark dun hackle.
Wtngs.    From a feather of a brown hen's wing.
Hook.    No. 8 Limerick.
No. 28, l^ELLOW SALLY.
This fly generally makes its appearance early in May,
and continues in season until the end of June. It
should be used in fine weather, for then it is busy
laying its eggs upon the water.
Body,   Pale fawn-coloured floss silk," ribbed with
brown tying silk.
Legs.    A pale olive hackle.
Wings.    From a white duck's feather or sea swallow,
stained a pale yellow.
Hook.    No. 11 Limerick.
No. 29, FERN FLY.
This beetle appears about the beginning of June, and
remains abundant until the end of July. There are
two kinds, one has red wing cases, and the other blue;
both are much admired by fish, and should be used on
hot days.
Body,    Dark orange floss silk.
Legs.    A red cock's hackle.
Wings. From a feather of the jay's wing, and for
the red winged one, use a feather of the partridge's tail.
Hook,    No. 10 Limerick. 34        THE FLY MAKER'S HAND-BOOK.
No. 30, BROWN DUN.
This little spinner generally appears on the water
about the beginning of June, and continues in season
for three or four weeks. It should be used on cold
days, when there are not many flies on the water.
Body.    Brown floss silk, ribbed with fine gold twist.
Tail.    Three fibres of a red cock's hackle.
Legs.    A red cock's hackle.
Wings.    Tip of the brownest feather from a par-
hb-'     tridge's tail.
Hook.    No. 12, Limerick.
No. 31, RED WINGED FLY.
This is an excellent fly in dark cloudy weather, on
the northern rivers and lakes, for the months of May,
June, and July.
Body.    Black mohair, ribbed with silver twist.
Legs.    A black and red hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of a partridge's tail.
Hook.    No. 11, Limerick. THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK. 35
No. 32, SKY BLUE DUN.
This little fly comes on the water early in May, arid
remains on about four or five weeks. It is taken
freely by grayling when the water is fine.
Body.    Pale fawn coloured floss silk.
Tail.    Three fibres of an olive dun hackle.
Legs.    A dun hackle stained a pale yellow.
Wings.    From a feather of a sea swallow.
Hook.   No. 14, Limerick.
No. 33, MARLOW BUZZ.
This beetle is extremely abundant in certain districts, during the months of June and July. It is a
favourite fly on most rivers, and should be used in hot
weather. In Cumberland they call it the brachan
clock, and in Wales the cock-a-bonddu.
Body.    Black ostrich, or peacock's herl.
Legs.    A black and red hackle.
Hook.   No. 5, Sneck bend. 36 THE   FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.
No. 34, GOLD EYED GAUZE WING.
This is rather a scarce fly, and seldom found on the
northern rivers of Britain. It generally makes its
appearance early in July, and is on the water about
three weeks.
Body.    Very pale green floss silk.
Legs.    A very pale blue dun hackle.
Hook.    No. 5, Sneck bend.
No. 35, THE COACHMAN.
This is an excellent fly for most rivers and lakes,
and may be used from the end of July until the end of
September. In rivers it kills best on fine evenings, in
the rapid parts of the stream.
Body.    A  copper-coloured  peacock's  herl,   tipped
with gold tinsel at the tail.
Legs.    A red cock's hackle.
Wings.    From a white duck's feather.
Hook.    No. 10, Limerick.
No. 36, RED ANT.
This fly appears in warm gloomy weather, from the
middle of, June, until the end of August. It should be
used from eleven o'clock in the forenoon until six in
the evening ; and it will be found an excellent lake fly,
when there is a slight breeze. P17
3F
X
39
38
37
40 j THE  FLY MAKER S  HAND-BOOK. 37
Body.    A copper-coloured peacock's herl.
Legs.    A red cock's hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of a starling's wing.
Hook.    No. 11, Limerick.
No. 37, BLACK ANT.
This resembles the preceding in size and form, and
appears about the same time.
Body.    A black ostrich herl, ribbed with a peacock's
herl.
Legs.    A black cock's hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of a starling's wing.
Hook.    No. 11, Limerick.
No. 38, JULY DUN.
This delicate little water fly comes on about the
middle of July, and will be found an excellent fly in
the evenings, both for trout and grayling, until the end
of September.
Body. Mole's fur mixed with a little yellow mohair.
Tail. Three fibres of a dun hackle.
Legs. A dun hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of the throstle's wing.
Hook. No. 14, Limerick. 38 THE  FLY MAKER S  HAND-BOOK.
No. 39, PALE DUN.
This fly will kill extremely well on a calm summer's
evening, and it is in season from the middle of July
until the beginning of September.
Body.    Yellow fur from the martin.
Legs.    A very pale dun hackle, slightly stained with
onion coatings.
Hook.    No. 15, Limerick.
No. 40, WREN TAIL.
This little insect in fine weather will be found a very
good killer, particularly when the water is low. There
are several varieties of these insects, but the pale
brown, the greenish blue, and the dark brown are the
most common. They generally appear on the water
anout the end of July, and are plentiful until the end
of September.
Body.    Fawn-coloured mohair, ribbed with  black
silk.
Legs.    A feather from the wren's tail, or from the
partridge's breast.
Hook.    No. 14, Limerick. THE   FLY MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.
39
No. 41, AUGUST DUN.
This fly is in season from the beginning of August
to the middle of September;   it is an excellent fly for
most rivers and lakes, and quite as important for this
month as the March brown is for March.
Body.
Brown floss silk, ribbed with yellow tying
silk.
Tail.
Two fibres of a dark dun hackle.
Legs.
A red hackle stained brown.
Wings.
From a brown hen's wing.
Hook.
No. 10, Limerick.
No. 42, CINNAMON FLY.
This fly appears about the beginning of August, and
may be used until the end of September.    In windy
weather and during heavy showers good sport may be "
had with this fly.
Body.
Fawn-coloured floss silk.
Legs.
A ginger hackle.
Wings
From a feather of the landrail.
Hook.
No. 9, Limerick. 40 THE FLY MAKER'S HAND-BOOK.
No. 43, BLUE BOTTLE.
This is an excellent fly for some rivers throughout
the month of September. The best sport may be had
with this fly in windy weather, as these flies are very
weak this month, and the least wind drives them on
the water.
Body.   Blue floss silk.
Legs.    A black hackle lapped all down the body.
Wings.    From a feather of the starling's wing.
Hook.    No. 9, Limerick.
No. 44, WILLOW FLY.
This fly comes in season about the beginning of
September, and continues until the end of October. It
is a four-winged fly, and generally flutters upon the
surface of the water; it answers best in cold stormy
weather, being then the ^nost plentiful on the water.
Body.    Fur from the mole.
-    Legs.    A light dun cock's hackle, stained a light
copper-colour.
Hook.    No. 5 Sneck bend. PL8 f THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK. 41
No. 45, WHIRLING BLUE DUN.
This fly is on the water from the beginning of
September until the middle of October. The best sport
may be had with this fly in cold blustering weather,
from eleven o'clock in the forenoon till three in the
afternoon.
Body.    Brown fur from the squirrel.
Tall.    Two fibres of a dun hackle.
Legs.    A pale ginger hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of the starling's wing.
Hook.    No. 12, Limerick.
No. 46, LITTLE PALE BLUE DUN.
This fly is upon the water the same time as the
whirling blue dun, and continues on until the end of
October. The wrings of this fly stand upright on its
back when it is on the water, and good sport may be
had with it when the water is fine.
Body.    Fur from the water rat.
Legs.    A very pale blue dun hackle.
Wings.   .From a feather of the sea swallow. 42 THE  FLY MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.
No. 47, WHITE MOTH.
Very good sport may be had in some rivers with the
moth flies, late in the evening, during the summer
months; they ought to be dressed on rather strong gut,
as only the largest trout are taken by these flies.
Body.    A white ostrich herl.
Legs.    A white cock's hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of the wood owl.
Hook.    No. 7, Kirby bend.
No. 48, BROWN MOTH.
Body.    A Brown ostrich herl.
Legs.    A feather from the inside of the wood owl's
wing.
Wings.    From a feather of the wood owl.
Hook.    No. 8, Kirby bend.
No. 49, BLACK PALMER.
This is the caterpillar of the fox moth, and good
sport may be had with it on most rivers and lakes all
the season. There are many different kinds of hairy
caterpillars, but this and the following will be found
the most successful.
Body.    Black ostrich herls, ribbed with silver twist.
Legs.    Black cock's hackles.
Hook.    No. 4, Kirby bend. THE  FLY  MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK. 43
No. 50, RED PALMER.
This is the caterpillar of the tiger moth, and
abounds most in the spring of the year.
Body.    Peacock's herls, ribbed with gold twist.
Legs.    Red cock's hackles.
Hook.    No. 4% Kirby bend.
No. 51, THE DOCTOR.
This is an excellent fly for the Welsh lakes, in the
beginning and end of the season.
Body.    Dark brown mohair ribbed with silver twist.
Legs.    From the breast of a partridge.
Wings.    From a feather of a woodcock's wing.
Hook.   No. 8, Limerick.
No. 52, CHANTREY FLY.
This fly answers well on most of the Cumberland
and Westmoreland lakes, in the months of April,
May, and June; the best sport will be had with this
fly in cloudy weather.
Body.    A peacock's herl, ribbed with gold twist.
Legs.    A red cock's hackle.
.  Wings.    From a feather of a pheasant's wing.
Hook.   No. 8, Limerick. 44 THE  FLY MAKER'S  HAND-BOOK.
No. 53, EDMONDSON'S WELSH FLY.
This is an excellent lake fly, particularly for the
Welsh lakes, in the beginning and end of the season.
It will also be found a good killer on most of the
Welsh streams at the end of the season.
Body. Dirty yellow mohair, and tipped at the tail
with gold tinsel.
Legs.    A black and red hackle.
Wings.    From a feather of the woodcock's wing.
Hook.   No. 8, Limerick.
No. 54, GREEN DRAKE.
The time of this fly's appearance depends greatly
upon the state of the weather, but generally about the
first week in May. It will be found earlier upon
slow running streams than upon rapid.
Body. Pale straw coloured floss silk, ribbed with
brown tying silk, and tipped at the tail
with a few turns of a peacock's herl.
Tail.    Three fibres of a mottled wild drake's feather.
Legs.    A pale red cock's hackle.
Wings. A mottled wild drake's feather, stained
olive.
Hook.    No. 5, Limerick. PL 9  THE FLY  MAKER'S HAND-BOOK. 45
No. 55, BROWN DRAKE.
This is the green drake that has been on the water a
few days, and has undergone all its changes. In this
its last state it may be used until the end of June.
Body.    Brown floss silk ribbed with black tying silk.
Tail.    Three fibres of a brown mottled feather of
the wild drake.
Legs.    A dark red cock's hackle.
Wings.    From a brown mottled feather of the wild
drake.
Hook.    No. 5, Limerick.   

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