Hawthorn Fly Fishing & Angling Collection

Salmon flies Kelson, Geo. M. (George M.) 1899

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T (KELSON.)
Tag: Silver twist.
Tail: A topping.
Body:   Spindle  shaped, of   alternate wasp-like coils
of yellow, scarlet, black and blue Berlin wool.
Throat: Gallina (plenty).
Wings:  Four, five or six toppings.
Horns: Blue Macaw.
THE   VARIEGATED   SUN   FLY.
" In days gone by, at a time when we all retired from the scene
of action and rested when the sun shone, I was forced to the cod;
elusion that there was something radically wrong in our line of
conduct. For many long years subsequently it was my delight to
study the dispositions of fish under such conditions, and I soon
satisfied myself that to call salmon capricious was merely a cover
for our own ignorance of their habits and tastes. Undoubtedly the
laws which govern the salmon in, his choice of the composition and
presentation of the flies he sees, are somewhat enveloped in mystery,
but the recurrence and operation of the respective conditions which
have at length induced us to adapt certain principles are so readily
detected, that to a great extent we have become familiar with their
ever-varying nature. This advance in knowledge is especially
marked in sunny weather. Perhaps my severest critic will not take
me to task for singing the praises of this particular pattern,
although it happens to be my own. In short, so long as King Sol is
not directly in the face of the fish, and assuming that this fly is not
dressed too large, the angler who perseveres with it ■will be as
frequently rewarded for his pains as he is when using any other, let
the conditions be what they may. No. 4 is the best all-round size for
the Variegated Sun Fly, which is by far the luckiest hit I ever made
jn connection with feather and hackle."
Geo. M. Kelson.    if
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(KELSON.)
Tag" .* Silver tinsel (oval, fine).
Tail: Red Macaw (hackle strips) enveloped in, two
strips of Summer duck.
Body: SHver tinsel.
Ribs : Silver Tinsel (oval)
Hackle : Three in number ; at the butt (No. i) Jay and
black herl; at the centre (No. 2) red Macaw,
butted with black herl; at the throat (No. 3)
black (dyed).
Wings : Copper-coloured Peacock herl.
Cheeks : Blue Chatterer.
Horns : Black Cockatoo's tail.
Head: Black herl.
THE   SILVER   SPECTRE.
"I know of no fly more useful in flaked water than the Silver
Spectre, It is not presented to the fish by any recognised or
named methods- of casting, but by paying out line and then 4 playing'
the fly somewhat quickly nearer to the catch than usual. Perhaps it
is a coincidence, and perhaps not, but I have never succeeded with
this pattern at any other time than that mentioned, and if the sun
shines so much the better for one's chance of success."
Geo. M. Kelson.    Supplement to " Land and  Water."
ffte   Si>faeft   i)pean.
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(HOLBROW.)
Tail: A topping.
Body: Black silk.
Ribs: Silver tinsel (oval),
Hackle: A natural black hackle from centre.
Wings:  Mallard.
Sides: Widgeon,
r.o ■ ft—"BfggSg—-* fr-
THE   BLACK   SPEAN.
'♦ This plain looking little pattern, which I believe was invented
by the late Mr. Holbrow, (Duke Street, St. James's) is said to be the
best general fly on the Spean. It must be quite thirty years that
my experience of it above Macumma pool, dates back. When
dressed on very small double hooks it will be found a useful fly on
the Lochy, especially on the lower beats where my own knowledge
of it is much more recent. The Black Spean has also done good
service for me on the Ness, where it is generally used on bright days
and jln clear water."
Geo. M. Kelson. pn  Q
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(KELSON.)
Tail: Silver twist and'light blue silk.
Tail: A topping, Ibis and Summer duck.
Butt: Black herl.
Body: One^fourth of yellow silk, followed by silver
tinsel (oval).
Ribs: Gold tinsel (oval).
Hackle: Large Irish grey, from oval tinsel.
Throat: Seal, three turns.
Wings: Alternate narrow strips of Swan dyed yellow
and black, married; Summer duck and a
topping.
Sides:  Jungle.
cr^s     RAY    MEAD.     *&/&
" This is one of my oldest patterns, and a great favorite among
fishermen for special use in spring, when snow water is flowing. I
have often found it a great advantage to use yellow celluloid in place
of yellow floss silk, for it never changes colour in the water. This
material was brought out some time since for ladies' dresses, but
owing to its inflammable nature did not meet with approval. I
consider the Irish Grey hackle and the Silver coch-a-bonddu the two
best for snow water when it gets perfectly clear, and on such
occasions I invariably use one or the other, let the fly be what it may."
Geo. M. Kelson.   matt*
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Cromarty.
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(HOLBROWJ
Tag: Silver twist and yellow silk,
Tail: Toucan.
Butt: Black herl.
Body: Black silk.
Ribs: Silver tinsel.
Hackle: Black from second turn.
Throat: Gallina dyed blue.
Wings: Two tippets (back to back) veiled with light
Bustard, Mallard, and a topping.
Sides: Swan dyed yellow and blue.
Head: Black wool,
#CROMARTY.#
"Taking the combination of this old standard (as dressed by Holbrow,
Duke Street, St. James',) most anglers to whom it is as yet unknown
will agree that little, if any, fault can be found with it. I do not know
the pattern from personal experience beyond having used it on the
Conan, where it is held in high esteem. Cromarty also has admirers
on the Helmsdale. But if I may venture to express an opinion upon
the fly as illustrated, I would much prefer Jay at the throat instead of
Gallina dyed blue, a feather which, in my opinion, should be reserved
for very large patterns."
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(A. D. BERRINGTON.)
Tag: Silver twist and scarlet silk.
Tail: Ibis and point of Jungle.
Body : Two turns of scarlet Seal's fur, followed by dark
orange Seal's fur.
Ribs': Silver tinsel (oval).
Throat: A dark coch-a-bonddu.
Wings I Two strips of dark mottled Turkey over under-
wing of light mottled Turkey.
Horns: Blue Macaw.
BERRINGTON'8    FAVORITE.
'Any fly on the river Usk bearing the name of Her Majesty's Chief
Inspector of Fisheries is ample introduction even to the passing
stranger. Mr. Berrington has made a name for himself from the
supreme interest he takes in fish and fishing, and indeed in all details
connected with our salmon rivers generally. But it was for the Usk
in particular that this fly was invented, and for many long years it has
held its own against all modern designs, whether standards or nondescripts. I am afraid to say how many salmon I have myself captured
with the fly, or indeed how many I have dressed for friends fishing
between Brecon and Newbridge. A really good coch-a-bonddu hackle
is not easy to get—especially one with black points. When I run
short I invariably dip a second class feather in Bismarck brown so
as to give it just a tinge."
Geo. M. Kelson.   ga&3§
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(Q, KELSON.)
Tdsgv Silver twist and pink silk.
Tail: A topping.
Butt: Blue Chatterer, as hackle.
Body:   In two equal sections—(i)  silver tinsel (oval)
butted with Golden Bird of Paradise; (2) black
silk ribbed with silver lace.
Hackle: Black Heron, from centre of black silk.
Wings: Grey Mallard, Golden Pheasant tail, Swan dyed
blue and yellow, with two strips of cinnamon
Turkey and a topping.
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&BF*   IKE    DEAN. ;sSss
"This fly has a long history behind it. At the time when
' Chatterers' first came into use, my father quickly discovered the
value of the feathers at the lower part of their backs when employed
as hackles. Several nondescripts of his which I use to this day are
decorated with this beautiful blue feather used as described. I can
just remember ' Ike Dean* in its infancy when its shorter costume of
Toucan did wonders, but—assuming a feminine metaphor is
applicable—it went into long dress directly the Golden Bird of
Paradise became • known. At that time, owing to the memorable
success of Isaac Dean—a servant of my father's—on the Lochy with
this pattern, it took the name now given to it, though, as a matter
of fact, the fly was christened * Ich Dien,' " I am hardly ever without
it go where I a
Geo. M. Kelson Ski- trxjl    <§>k
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Jus of the feathers at the lower part of tkeir backs when employed
i hack!es. Several nondescripts of r.is v/hich I use to this day are .
jcofated with tbit- beaui fnl blue feather used as d-serlbed. . I can !
st remember, ' Ike Dean ' in its infancy when its shorter costume of
bucan did wonders, but—assuming a feminine metaphor is
^>iicable—it went into long dress directly the Golden Bird of
sradise became - known. At that time, owing to the memorable
tceess of Isaac-Dean—*sOrtaiftof && fathers—on the Locay with
dli pattern, it took the tame aow «iveo to ^tiMMa^^ as a matter
f tfcet, Hie /!> was christened' -''■■.' ',1'ain hardly ever without
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Tag : Silver twist and yellow silk,
Tail: A topping, Ibis and Summer duck,
Butt: Black- herl.
Body: In two equal sections. No. i of yellow silk
ribbed with narrow (oval) silver tinsel, and
butted with Golden Bird of Paradise above and,
below, and black herl; No. 2 blue silk ribbed as
before alongside broad silver tinsel (flat).
Hackle : Black Heron from centre of blue silk.
Throat: Gallina.
Wings : Amherst Pheasant (strips) and three toppings.
Horns: Black Cockatoo (tail).
THE    HIGHLAND    GEM.
" Is a gem indeed, at least I have invariably found it so in Spring,
when the weather is mild, the day clear and the fish settled in the
pools. It is essentially a north country fly, though 1 could give a good
account of it on the Shannon, Wye, &c. Mr. George Home, Hereford,
has a large stock of ' Amherst' and an application to him for a leading
tail feather is rarely refused."
Gbo. M. Kelson. I   1:1
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©ffte   Sfaeft  anl  SJofc}.
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(O'FEE.)
Tag : Silver twist and gold floss.
Tail: A topping and Indian Crow.
Butt: Black herl.
Body: In two equal sections:—No. i. Gold tinsel
ribbed with silver tinsel (oval) having Indian
Crow above and below, and butted with black
herl. No. 2. Black silk ribbed with silver
tinsel and a golden hackle from second turn.
Throat: A claret hackle and Jay.
Wings: Dark Turkey having white points, Bustard, red
Macaw, light mottled Turkey, Mallard, Swan
dyed red and blue and two toppings.
Sides: Jungle.
Horns: Blue Macaw.
Cheeks: Chatterer.
Head: Black wTool.
THE    BLACK    AND    GOLD.
" Of the Black and Gold from my own personal exploits I know very
little ; but the fly has a remarkable reputation and is, in my opinion,
one of Daniel, O'Fee's best introductions. I have, however, seen it
pay well on the Earn, Lochy,and Tweed, though perhaps the majority
of its followers are to be found on the borders of Irish waters."
Geo. M. Kelson.  AND    GOLD. N
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(KELSON.)
Ta% : Silver twist and pink silk.
Tail: A topping, Peacock wing and, Summer duck.
Butt: Black herl.
Body : Quill dyed yellow with four turns of red-orange
Seal's fur at throat.
Ribs: Silver  tinsel   (oval, narrow),   and  silver   tinsel
(flat, broad) alongside.
Hackle: A   silver   coch-a-bonddu  from  second  turn;
hen Pheasant hackle dyed yellow from  Seal's
fur.
Throat: Widgeon.
Wings: Two  tippets   (back to back),  two  extending
Jungle (one on each side), Swan dyed  yellow
and red-orange and two toppings.
Sides: Jungle.
Horns: Blue Macaw.
Head: Black herl.
MORAY    DOONE.
I Quill dyed in any shade is to me preferable to floss silk. It
is sold by Courtney at Killarney. The sort I usually dye for
myself is taken from the tail feathers of the Peacock. It is cut
into narrow strips and put on the hook with ease even by a
comparative novice at fly tying. 'Moray Doone' has hooked and
killed many a fish for me and my friends on the Spey, and is well
known as being a good spring pattern on most rivers. If the
water is very clear I dispense with the hen Pheasant and use
either Gallina or Teal, but in discoloured water the hackle is hard
to beat."
Geo. M. Kelson.  sant had
jjNgrf % *tup Shade ftto me preferable to floss silk. t\
ouriney •* Killarney. The sort I usually dye ft*
:en from the tail feathers of the Peacock. It is cuj
Strips and put on the hook with ease even by a
novice at fly tying. ' Moray Doone' has hooked an,c
a fish for. me and my friends on the Spey, and is well
eiftg a good spring pattern on most rivers. If the
?y J9$9af I dispense with the hen Pheasant and us<
a m'twA, bet in discoloured water the hackle is han DC
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(KELSON.)
Tag : Silver twist and yellow silk.
Tail: Ibis strands of Summer duck and blue-Macaw
(powdered).
Butt: Black herl.
Body : Silver tinsel (oval, fine) with four turns of violet
Seal's fur at throat.
Ribs: Gold tinsel (oval).
Hackle : A silver cock-a-bonddu from butt.
Throat: A hen Pheasant dyed yellow. \
Wings: Jungle back to back, Widgeon, Swan dyed
yellow, Golden Pheasant tail, Scarlet Ibis,
Grey Mallard, and a topping.
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THE    PURPLE    EMPEROR.
" This is a very old standard. For coloured water it is dressed with
a hen pheasant hackle; for clear water with an Irish grey and galljna
throat. It is essentially a spring and late autumn fly. I was fortunate
in getting f the fish of the season ' (Spey) on two or three occasions
with it. The hen Pheasant hackle is an especial favourite of mine on
any river where ■ Eagles' are fashionable. Of course it is never used
undyed. The feather is taken from the thigh of the bird, and, so far
as my experience extends is best dyed in Citronine (Woolley, Sons, &
Co., Manchester), 24 grains to 10 ounces of water, and then wash in
transparent glycerine soap. I have taken more spring fish with
this fly than with any other I ever invented."        Geo. M. Kelsok,    ^LX^KS?* (KELSON.)
Tag: Silver twist (plenty).
Tail: A topping and Summer duck.
Butt: Black herl.
Body: One third light blue silk, ribbed with silver
twist; butted with fibres of the blue
Enamelled Thrush above and below, and
black herl; followed by claret silk having a
dark claret hackle along it, and ribbed with-
silver tinsel (oval).
Throat: Jay.
Wings: Tippet fibres (plenty) veiled with Mallard -;
and a topping.
Sides: Jungle extra size, and a short strip of large
Summer duck.
Cheeks: Enamelled Thrush (extra size).
gn&    ELSIE,    a^ii
"Elsie is a special standard and has been in use on most rivers
for several years. Many a time have I seen it.do well in either
bouldery streams or hedgehog pools. The chief merits of the fly
lie in the fact of its possessing Sides of Jungle and Summer Du^k of
unusual'size. In fact I had no very large Jungle by me when making
this one up or I should have used much larger but not necessarily
longer feathers. For personal use I often vary the pattern, but
always adhere to the same characteristic qualities."
Geo. M. Kelson. Hi  z
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(HI.  REGAN.:
Tag: Gold twist and dark yellow silk.
Tail: A topping and light Bustard.
Body : Golden yellow Seal's fur.
Ribs: Gold tinsel (oval).
Throat: A light Bustard hackle.
Wings: Light   and   dark   Bustard   (strips)   and   t\v(
toppings.
Horns: Blue Macaw.
THE    GOLDEN    CANARY.
"Captain Dunne—if I may venture on raising the veil of
incognito, the inventor of this fly. assumes—has introduced into
general use many flies which have become widely known not
only in Ireland, but also in Wales; but this is the ' pick of tbe
bunch,' according to my ideas. I mention Wales because the
pattern is highly respected on the Usk and Wye. Scotland must
not be omitted in the list, for on one occasion I had capital sport
with the Golden Canary on the Don. One wants to be possessed
of more than one specimen, because Bustard unprotected, has a
nasty knack of breaking off unless the feather is taken as soon as
it is full grown. The 'sanding' business to which Bustards
accustom themselves almost without ceasing, soon injures the
fibres of these somewhat soft but valued plumes."
Geo. M. Kelson. !;  i I
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(BASIL   FIELD.
Tag:  Silver twist.
Tail:    A   topping   and   a   dark   topping   from   the
Impeyan Pheasant.
Butt: Black herl.
Body:  Silver tinsel.
Ribs:  Gold lace (fine),
Throat:   Red Toucan  (undertail)  and. Gallina  dyed
blue.
Wings:  Two strips of Tippet, two strips of Golden
Pheasant tail, Teal, Mallard^ and a topping.
Cheeks: Chatterer.
Ilrad:  Black herl.
THE    SILVER    TEST.
" This is one of Mr. Field's best inventions. For many yeai*s
it has been held as one of tne leading flies on the Test. I have,
however, constantly seen it used with success on several Northern
rivers, where the pattern is equally well known and relied upon?" Like
most of this class of silver bodied flies, the Silver Test is reserved
for bright days and bright water, excepting, of course, those rivers in
which the fish have learnt from constant usage to take bright flies
on dull days."
Geo. M. Kelson.  } the patters is equally well know
class Of silver bodied flics, the  Supplement to " Land and Water.'
Cfye Ducfyess.
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ITURNBUUL.i
Tag: Silver twist and light yellow silk.
Tail: Two toppings, Indian Crow and Blue Chatterer,
Butt: Peacock herl,
Body : Black silk.
Ribs : Silver lace and silver tinsel.
Hackle : Black from second turn.
Throat: Jay.
Wings : Six toppings.
Sides : Summer duck.
Cheeks : Indian Crow and Chatterer,
Horns : Red and Blue Macaw and light green Parrot.
Head: Black herl,
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*S&-   THE     DUCHESS.   ^BSs
" Among the most valuable standards for bright weather and water,
Mr. Turnbull's Duchess takes high rank. Its value consists in the
extra brilliancy of the dressing when compared with any ordinary
Sun Fly. I have sometimes succeeded with it when others of this
type have failed. The illustration will give anglers a good idea of
the inventor's mode of dressing, for he sent the fly to me himself, and
I did not feel it necessary to'make one specially for the artist."
Geo. M. Kelson. m\ HESS. H
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Tag:  Gold twist (plenty).
Tail: Ibis, two strips,
Butt: No. i hackle, a coch-a-bonddu, slightly tinged
in Bismarck brown ; cheeked with Jungle.
Body: Twelve alternate coils of yellow and black
chenille. No. 2 hackle in centre, No. 3 at
head, cheeked as before.
THE    JUNGLE    HORNET.
"This Grub is an improvement on'Ajax'—one of the oldest
of the " Scorpion' tribe—and it may be easily varied for different
rivers. The tail, for instance, may be composed of yellow Macaw
with or without Summer duck. The body instead of yellow may
have either blue or red chenille; and then it is called the yellow
Jungle Hornet or the Blue. I have found it useful in all kinds of
water, and especiall^so when the stream is slightly discoloured. It
may be remembered that in '82 on the Bryn Stream, a few miles
above Usk, I took, in one day, a fish of 31 or 32-lb. in weight, and
another of 26-lb. But its services are not limited to any one river or
indeed to any one district."
Geo. M. Kelson. ill ! abered that'ia '82 on the Bryn Stre
Usk( I took, in one day, a fish of 51 or .33-11 o
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Trtgv Silver twist, aod quill dyed yellow.
Tail: A   topping,   two    strands   of   Peacock   (sword
feather) and of Bustard and Ibis.
Butt: Black herl.
Body: Quill dyed yellow, leaving space at the throat
for four turns of orange Seal's fur.
RJbs : Silver tinsel (oval).
Hackle: A grey Eagle, from centre.
Throat: Gallina (spotted feather).
Wings : Two tippets (back to back) veiled by-extending Jungle, a strip of Ibis and of Bustard,
and two toppings.
Sides : Jungle to centre of former pair.
Note.—Dyed quill in all shades sold by W. Courtney,
Tackle Maker, Killarney.
Geo. M. Kelson.
QUILLED   EAGLE.
1 This is a very old pattern of my own, and one well known in the
North. As a matter of fact I nor my own immediate friends hardly
ever use any other sort of Eagle but this. Of necessity the dressing
is often varied, both in the colour of body and colour of hackle. Apart
from that, I occasionally use the hen Pheasant hackle in place of an
Eagle's. When the water is low and clear I prefer the hen Pheasant, C
dye it what colour one may, from the fact that, being finer and shorter
in fibre it kills better than the coarser feather which is hard to beat
in discoloured water."
Geo M. Kelson.     j    Supplement to "Land and Water.'1
i^e   ©unt.
N£X2j$K2K
(MURDOCH.)
Tag : Silver twist and light blue silk.
Tail: A topping and Teal.
Body: Yellow, orange, red-claret  Seal's fur in  equal
sections.
Ribs: Silver lace, and silver tinsel (flat).
Hackle: Black Heron from claret fvfr.
Throat: Teal.
Wings:  Two strips of  cinnamon Turkey with black
bars and white tips.
Sides: Jungle, short and drooping over throat hackle.
<^B^   THE     D U N T.
" The ready and practical pen of Mr. W. Murdoch, to whom the
angling public is also indebted for this admirable Deeside pattern, has
been familar to one and all of us for many long years. Of all of the
fly inventions by this gentleman I willingly endorse the general opinion
that the Dunt takes precedence. I have myself been lucky with
it on other waters than the Dee, notably on the Spey, where, however,
I shorten the wings a trifle so as to meet the exigencies of local
characteristics. To those who do not dress their patterns, Garden &
Brown of Aberdeen may be strongly recommended for this_style of
fly. Their work is true and neat, and their gut loops of the best
material."
Geo. M. Kelson.    Q?e Claret Bromrt.
bJP (KELSON.)
Tail: A few fibres of yellow Macaw.
Body: Three turns of orange Pig's wool, followed by
claret-brown Pig's wool.
Ribs: Silver tinsel.
Hackle: Grey Heron from centre.
Throat: Gallina.
Wings: Two strips of plain cinnamon Turkey and a
topping.
Horns: Red Macaw,
THE   CLARET-BROWN.
" The original name of this fly was the Brown and Claret,
but I rechristened it many years ago, and probably few, if any, would
know the pattern by its proper title. I have the greatest faith in it
when the water is a dark peaty' colour. On the Spey, the local
dressers vary the dressing in a slight degree and do not put on a
topping, but in my opinion, even there, I believe in the topping,
especially at those times when the pools have been fished before me
without it. Sometimes I add jungle for ' sides,' but in maiden catches
neither addition is of much consequence. Early; in the sixties my
father had singular success with the fly on the Tweed, and hardly
changed it for several days. I am never without the fly wherever
I go."
Geo. M. Kelson. ^3*   mn
Supplement to " and Land Water "
0?e Zttcmbarin Drake.
^X^X&KSK*
Tag: Gold twist and yellow twist.  •
Tail: A topping and tippet strands.
Butt: Black Herl.
Body: In two sections : —No. i. Yellow Seal's fur ribbed
with gold tinsel and with a small yellow hackle
from second turn ; having, two strips of Mandarin Drake (white tipped) to form one body-set
of wings, arid butted with black herl. No. 2.
dark blue Seal's fur ribbed with broad gold
tinsel and with a light blue hackle from second
turn.
Throat: Jay.
Wings : Two strips (a trifle longer than the others) of
Mandarin Drake (white tipped).
Head: Black herl.
THE    MANDARIN    DRAKE.
" The only feather that rivals the two beautiful specimens found on
the back of the Mandarin Drake is that taken from the_ lower back
feathers of the Nankeen Heron. There is no cinnamon wing to equal
this Heron, and I am glad to record the fact for the benefit of Deeside
anglers because I estimate its value above that of the extinct Gled-
wing—extinct, that is to say, in that neighbourhood. The buff-backed
Heron differs from the Nankeen. The feathers are not so deep in tone,
yet still valuable, and in my experience far superior to Egyptian
Goose or Turkey of this species. So far as this fly is concerned I do
not think it can be beaten on the Earn where ! white tips' are in the
height of fashion."
Geo. M. Kelson.  jPtctfoj,
DRAKE,
He
yot still valuable, and m :
3oose or Turkey of ibis spe
iiot think it can be beaten«
tieight of fashion."
white tips  Ufte  dfaref ©\f/a&f>.
^QXfK^ "    (MAULOOH.)
Tag : Silver twist and yellow silk.
Tail: A topping, Widgeon and Ibis.
Body: Equal parts of yellow and claret Seal's fur.
Ribs: Silver   tinsel (oval, fine) over yellow half, and
Silver tinsel over claret.
Hackle : A claret hackle, along claret Seal's fur,
Throat: Gallina.
Wings : Two strips of cinnamon Turkey.
THE    CLARET    WASP.
" This variety of the Wasp tribe is just as popular in places—
the Usk, Earn, Dee, &a, as the • Blue.' On the Earn, my experiences tell me that when the pattern is dressed with Mandarin
Drake wings, it is quite equal to if not better than, any of the
local flies. But perhaps for that river the Benchill (another of
Malloch's, illustrated in a former series) is the best general fly
for that river."
Geo. M. Kelson.  ^■YV
it is qu
But perhi
better than, any of
the Benchill (another
is the best general a
Q
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2 Supplement to "Land and Water''
mm
Mar   feocjge.
(LAMONT.)
Tag:  Silver tinsel (oval).
Tail: A topping, and points of jungle (back to back).
Butt: Black herl.
Body:   In three equal sections, No. i and No.  3 of
siver tinsel, centre of black silk.
Throat: Gallina.
Win^
Sides:
Horns
Head:
I Underwing of married strips of Swan dyed
yellow, fed and blue ; strips of Peacock wing,
Summer duck, Grey Mallard, dark mottled
Turkey, Golden Pheasant tail apd a topping
Jungle.
• Blue Macaw.
Black wool.
- ^a^« t^a^EF—-
MAR     LODGE.
I § J
"John Lamont hit on a grand idea at the time when he invented
this pattern and forwarded a specimen to Garden of Aberdeen to
introduce it to his Deeside customers. On many other rivers—
notably the Tweed and Lochy—at those times when a thorough
change is desirable this fly fills the gap and does its duty well. In
1893, Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Fife was most successful
with the pattern, which in my opinion, is destined to become even
more popular than it is at the present time."
Geo. M; Kelson.  I  'fte   l9o>e>at   @J£y.
^-^X ± X9"*
(LOVAT.)
Tag: Silver twist.
Tail: Point of the red breast of Golden Pheasant.
Body:  Two turns  of yellow   Berlin   wool,   followed
by blue Berlin wool.
Ribs: Silver tinsel (broad).
Hackle:  Black, from yellow fur.
Wings:  Bronze Peacock's herl.
Head: Yellow mohair, picked out,
THE    LOVAT    FLY.
I
" Although the late Lord Lovat invented this pattern for the
Beauly, it has often proved to be a good killer on other rivers,
particularly early in the season when the water is affected by
melting snow. It is not, however, on all rivers that Peacock herl
wings can be used with advantage, but I am never without the fly
on the Lochy or Usk, etc. Where long hackles are prevalent I
often use a black Heron in place of the natural black cock's hackle."
Geo. M. Kelson.  © 0
i neves without
a< kle's are prey*
I black cock's ha Z
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5©>r. ©oi^afcJAoQ.
^X^XtKi^
(malloch.)
Tag: Silver twist and yellow silk.
Tail: A topping, a few strands of tippet and points of
Toucan.
Butt: Black herl.
Body : (After Jock Scott type). First section, blue silk,
ribbed with silver tinsel (fine, oval) and butted
with blue Chatterer fibres above and below, with
black herl; second section, dark claret silk,
ribbed with silver lace and silver tinsel, and a
claret hackle along it.
Throat: Orange hackle and Widgeon.
Wings : Two extended Jungle, slightly tinged in Bismarck brown; Golden Pheasant tail, light and
dark Bustard, Swan dyed red and yellow, and a
topping.
Sides : Jungle (not dyed).
Horns: Blue Macaw.
Dr.   DONALDSON.
"Too much commendation can hardly be awarded to the inventor
for this singularly beautiful specimen of artificial entomology. I have
myself frequently dressed it for friends and have had good accounts
of its attractive qualities from almost all quarters. Many years ago I
personally added " Dr. Donaldson" to our list of Standards, and no
committee of experts—if ever one be formed—will be at all likely to
call me to task for the liberty. The last time I fished the Tweed the
fly was in constant use and seemed to be as much appreciated by the
fish as the local fishermen. It is as well to mention that the Jungle
feathers in the wings are just tinged in Bismarck brown (Woolley,
Sons & Co., Manchester). Malloch's dressing is too well known to
need praise by me, but anglers wanting the fly will do well to apply to
him for it." Geo. M. Kelson. £y: xse and seemed to be as much appi
herraen.   It is as well to mention t
iester).   Malloch's dressing is too.
>ut anglers wanting the fly will do \ ^a
mm
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(Ufie   (sfaret   SarAoh;
^X|X^
(HOLBROW.)
Tag : Gold twist and dark yellow silk.
Tail: A topping.
Butt: Black herl.
Body : Claret silk.
Ribs : Gold tinsel.
Hackle : A claret hackle from second turn.
Throat: A medium blue hackle.
Wings: Golden Pheasant tail, Swan dyed yellow,
scarlet, and blue, Gallina, Widgeon, Mallard,
and a topping.
Horns : Blue Macaw.
Cheeks: Chatterer.
Head: Black wool.
THE    CLARET    PARSON.
11 hardly know of any claret-bodied fly among the standards that
has not several admirers, but perhaps not many can compare favourably with Holbrow's introduction. A blue hackle at the throat over
claret is, to me, the perfection of harmony, and although I have never
tried the Claret Parson, the composition itself is sufficient recommendation to the followers of this style of fly who would do well not
to overlook the pattern in future. All the clarets are fashionable, and
chiefly so in Ireland, but I hear good accounts from a reliable source
of this one on other waters, notably the river Dee."
Geo. M. Kelson.  -  —^"^riiTiiiiiiiiiiiBWi o
Q
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SUPPLEMENT   TO   ULAND   ANp   WATER,'
©Ifte &Paefc ©og.
^QXfX^ (G.   KELSONJ
Tag : Silver twist and canary silk.
Tail: A topping and Ibis.
Butt: Black herl.
Body : Black silk.
Ribs: Yellow silk and silver tinsel (oval) on each side
of it.
Hackle : Black Heron from third yellow rib.
Wings: Two red-orange hackles (back to back) enveloped by two Jungle; unbarred Summer duck,
light Bustard, Amherst Pheasant, Swan dyed
scarlet and yellow and two toppings.
-f^
THE    BLACK    DOG.
"This old standard was introduced by my father about half
a century ago. I give the original dressing believing it to be
superior to any of the variations to which the fly has in several
places been subjected. I hardly know a river in Scotland or in
Wales where it fails. On the Wye I have been singularly
successful with the pattern, and I need not remind Spey fishermen
of its value in their neighbourhood. It is, however, well to state
that in certain places—notably in Ireland, where long hackles are
not in fashion—a natural black hackle often answers the purpose
equally well. But the Amherst Pheasant in the wing was added
several years after the fly was invented."
Geo. M. Kelson.  BBjBHIiHHH8jgHKI ■■»*» Cfte (golb &tqcfr.
^ox^yisy
Body:   Orange Berlin wool three turns, followed by
black wool.
Ribs:   From different   starting  points, of gold tinsel
(narrow), gold   twist   and   silver   twist, not
wound   as   usual   hut   in   the   reverse   way
(towards -head) and placed an equal distance
apart.
A red Spey cock, from end of body, wound
from the root of feather instead of from the
point of  it, and crossing over the ribs  the
whole way.
Teal, two turns.
Two  short  strips  of  Mallard  with  brown
mottled points and grey mottled roots.
Hackle:
Throat
Wings:
&£^..0$0»«2S?«>
THE   GOLD   RIACH.
" The least known of one of the best standards is the Gold Riach.
It is essentially a Spey pattern; and, taking the river from end to end,
it accounts for more fish than any other standard in its own individual
neighbourhood. Except now and again of an evening, however, the
fly is not much in evidence during the summer months. The local
hackles used in this fly are becoming scarce, so I particularly wish to
record my best thanks to Miss Grant of Rothes, (the home of the
Riach,) who in the first instance, kindly presented me with a beautiful
coloured illustration of the original pattern as now described above."
Geo. M. Kelson.  gammmmmmm o
DC
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H Supplement tq  "Land ANp   Water,''
Che Ccmblesttck Vflakev.
(HOLBROW.)
Tag : Silver tinsel (oval, fine).
Tail: Ibis and Summer duck.
Body: Three   layers of black silk followed by black
Seal's fur.
Ribs: Silyer tinsel.
Hackle: A dark fiery brown from Seal's fur.
Wings: Double Jungle and two toppings.
Head: Black wool.
THE   CANDLESTICK    MAKER.
" Here we have one of the oldest standards, which has made a
reputation for itself in all parts of the kingdom. I am not quite sure
of the name given as the inventor with the description; but suffice it
to say that in Scotland and Wales the fly is still popular and effective.
By a somewhat curious coincidence I have never used the fly except
on the Wye when I took the liberty of adding gallina to the throat,
and using yellow Macaw instead of Ibis for part of the tail."
Geo. M. Kelson. mWmfmmm CANDLESTICK    MAKER.
r that in Scotland and Wales the fly i
ewhat curious
ence I have never used th
liberty of adding gallina to
.d of Ibis for part of the tail UJ
in
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(Ufte  f^pugft (Syrou&e,
•^eXSKSX*     (CRU.KSHANKS
f VARIETY,
Tail: A few fibres of yellow Macaw's hackle,
Body : Black Berlin wool (short) and picked out,
Ribs: Silver tinsel.
Hackle: Grey Heron from third turn.
Throat: Black and white mottled Turkey.
Wings: Black and white mottled Turkey (strips).
THE    ROUGH    GROUSE.
M Of the several standard specimens of this fly I have selected the
one illustrated to-day as it is the best known and most popular one of
the set. It is a great favorite on the Spey and was introduced into use
many years ago by John Cruikshank of Aberlour. On a dark, drizzly
day none of the local flies are to be compared to this variety for its
singularly constant and attractive qualities. At such times I have
often heard Cruikshank say:—' Put on the ' Rough Grouse' and keep
it on till you've got him and his grandfather too.'"
Geo. M. Kelson.  kshank say :-
jot him and I  Bi
■a
Supplement to | Land and Water,"
@Jf}e.&Pue ©^a^p.
. X J
(MALLOCH.:
7#z7; A topping, Summer duck and Ibis.
Body : Equal divisions of yellow and blue Seal's fur.
Ribs I Silver tinsel (oval, fine) over yellow, and silver
tinsel (flat and larger) over blue.
Hackle I A blue hackle along blue fur,
Throat: Jay.
Wings: Two strips of cinnamon Turkey having white
points, and a topping.
Sides: Summer duck.
Head: Black wool.
THE    BLUE    WASP.
| Of all the Wasps give me the Blue, though many men prefer the
Claret. I remember it being dressed with Egyptian Goose, but finding a difficulty in obtaining sufficient materials, Malloch, for many
years, has used Turkey wings. It was with this fly that Sir Wm.
Eliott lost his memorable fish on the Earn in the seventies. The
weight of his monster was estimated by those who witnessed the fight
to be 60 lbs. At all events after ' a morning of it' the fish turned tail
down stream, ran out all the line and broke it as though it were but
mere cotton. The fly, however, is evidently a modern variety of one
which has been in use on the Tay beyond the memory of living man."
Geo, M. Kelson.  mam <
X
2
S
UJ
X
H Ufie ©^ifiL  Jri^ftman.
^SXfXS^                                 ,o-FEE.)
Tag: Silver twist and light orange silk.
Tail: A topping and a few tippet strands.
Body: Yellow, dark orange, and dark claret Seal's fur
in equal proportions.
Ribs : Silver tinsel (oval fine) and gold tinsel.
Hackle: A claret hackle from claret fur.
Throat: A blue hackle.-
Witigs: Golden Pheasant tail and tippet strands, Pin
tail, Bustard, black Cockatoo's tail, red Macaw,
Mallard and a topping.
Horns: Blue Maca\
C/irrks: Chatterer.
Head: Black wool.
THE   WILD   IRISHMAN.
" I have never fished with this fly and so cannot speak of it
from personal experience. On the authority, however, of my
frieng, Mr. W. Thomas, we may safely take it that Daniel O'Fee'.has
numerous applications for the fly, and that it has for years held
its ovtai among other standards in Ireland and elsewhere. As a
generjal pattern for use when the water clears after a flood, it
possesses all the usual qualities that would lead one to give the
fly a.good trial."
Geo. M. Kelson. PH I
SPNum
i&s&i  i&B&%mm       i j
IllBigfiiihaifflM
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CL Supplement to "Land and Water.'
Senpergcom; Set,
F^A^Jsgf* (KELSON.)
Tag : Silver twist and yellow Seal's fur.
Tail: Summer Duck, strands varying in length of Ibis ;
and Indian Crow.
Butt: Blacj
Body: Yellow,   crimson-magenta,   mouse,   and   plum-
claret Seal's fur.in equal divisions.
Ribs: Silver Twist.
Hackle: A  coch-a-bonddu slightly tinged in. Bismarck
brown, from second turn (full).
Wings : Double white Turkey, ginerg speckled Turkey,
Macaw, powdered-blue Macaw, Parrot and Teat .
all in double strands, two strips of rich brown
Turkey  above   having   black   bars   and   white
E N PE RGW M     PET.
" So much has been written of this favourite fly for th
former articles of mine that I need only remark that as   a
other two—the
sses  it true to    

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