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   ThatCOMMUNAL Magazine
from CiTR 101.9 FM
Feb-March 202 J// Vol.38 // No. 1 // Issue #4 J7
cover illustration by Janee Auger
EDITOR'S NOTE
suppose it's an old point, the one I'm always learning, the complex
and ambivalent nature of productivity. Of feeling horrible about the
alien order of things — capital, creativity, chaos, capital — of also
reaping its rewards. Someone says, "earn more with your time!"
and someone responds, "that's just your scorpio moon talking," and
someone else writes, "productivity itself is a value neutral ideal. Stop
moralizing wage labour and constant activity, teach yourself to feel
comfortable with free time." As much as capitalism's humans generally
suspect: as long as there is time, there will always be Not Enough Of
It. At least, with what we like to do with it.
In this way, Discorder is like any other form of media journalism.
We celebrate a kind of making and doing that already aggravates our
caloric intake of this so-called "objective standard" for productivity.
But I also feel what we're doing as traditional media is different. Under
the unflattering fluorescent of instagram, it is a real crisis when other
people's stories concern you, but do not touch you. Which makes it the
kind of problem that page-turning is best suited to deal with. I know
print is a slow, sometimes languishing investment, but I strongly believe
in the healthfulness of this delivery system. If only because it won't fit
neatly into Silicon Valley's safety-blue empire. Print media is slow stuff
in a world of fast stuff, and that has to count for something.
Today, we 're constantly re-imagining how the workplace
can help everyone, from freelancers to Forttme 500s, be
more motivated, productive, and happy-because that's
how tomorrow works.
We Work, mission statement
"Discover Weekly"
Presumptuous Spotify Playlist
^WA i^pr hat I need to tell you now: I am tired. I am tired of
W^k W feeling tired, and being tired, and exclaiming tired things
r^H V like, "sorry I'm late-tired-slow", or, "fuck-writing-thinking-trying." My body has reason to be tired. More reason than I do.
It does not give a shit about finding meaning through productivity, or
wage, or keeping up with New Music And Art. This issue of Discorder,
by intent and also practice, came together through reclaiming rest in a
hamster-wheel. Through tactical collectivity. I can't help but notice the
inexplicable link between all this talk of collective accountability, and
allowing space for rest. We rest when we activate the collectives which
surround us. It's asking for help, or working alongside, rather than
moral self-sufficiency . In Jane Diopko's interview with Tash King, the
creator and editor of Bed Zine, we point directly at the sun. Through
Aly Laube's conversation with longtime contributor Megan Turner, one
is reminded of the collective responsibility in maintaining safe spaces.
Maya Preshyon's interview with Vancouver collective Crack Cloud
unveils the possibilities of collective making and learning — "during that
process of trying to communicate your thoughts to everyone else, you're
also communicating it to yourself." Lastly, read R. Hester's review of
Respire's Black Line — the heavy, orchestral post-everything bender
which makes a collective practice out of drawing hard lines and burning
beyond the cut. From that cut — that unexpected break — we yell.
So while you read through the stories of doing, of all the making
and producing, hold with you my small insertion that this doesn't all
happen in some high-proficiency vacuum. With every period of making
comes a longer inclination to rest, to collect and to revisit.
Forever urs <3
-T
ORANGES
04
06
08
10
12
19
22
24
BED  ZINE
Rest, safety, pain, and confinement
100 BLOCK ROCK
Singing above the silencing
ALY  LAUBE
"I'll  shut  up when  I'm dead"
CRACK CLOUD
The world of Crack Cloud
RESPIRE
Music written in flames
THE NEIGHBOUR'S PLATE
fl philistine's reckoning with food as art
CRISIS LIBRARY
Only what can be reproduced is real
NANDITA RATAN
Narrowed down to the matchbox
15
16
29
30
31
APPLES
FEBRUARY CALENDAR
artwork by BEAU T0D0R0VA
MARCH  CALENDAR
artwork by RACHEL LAU
ii M ftp p   RFVT FW
Music,  a book,   and a podcast
CiTR's PROGRAMMING GRID
CiTR's PROGRAMMING GUIDE
CiTR's JANUARY CHARTS
^ADVERTISE
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^and corrections via
.email.
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising
Coordinator: Tasha Hefford // Discorder Student Executive: Isaac You // Editor-in-Chief: Tasha
Hefford // Sections Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch //Outgoing Web Editor: Fatemeh Ghayedi // Incoming
Web Editor: Clara Dubber // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo Laredo // Social Media Coordinator:
Lauren Park // Assistant Editors: Clara Dubber, Afrodykie Zoe, Isaac You // Administration
Coordinator: Elissa Soenfjaja // Charts: Dora Dubber // Designers: Enya Ho, James Spetifore, Sheri
Turner, Jane Diopko, Oliver Gadoury, Olivia Cox, Ricky Castanedo Laredo //Writers: Jane Diokpo, Jon
Bond, Tasha Hefford, R. Hester, Nick Jensen, Kaylan Mah, Atira Naik, Maya Preshyon, Frances Shroff,
Finn Smith, Idaresit Thompson, Megan Turner, Faur Tuuenty, Valie, Jasper D. Wrinch // Photographers
& Illustrators: Janee Auger, Jane Diopko, Rob Eccles, Erin Flemming, Luke Johnson, Rachel Lau,
Alicia Lawrence, Chelly Maher, Daniela Rodriguez, Emma Potter, Beau Todorova, Proofreaders: Ricky
Castanedo Laredo, Ana Rose Carrico, Tasha Hefford, Afrodykie Zoe
©Discorder 2020 - 2021 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights
X^reserved. Circulation 1,000. Discorder is published bi-monthly by CiTR, located on the lower level of the
UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hanqaminarh speaking Musqueam peoples.
CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower
Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822
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1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
 BED ZINE
Chatting with artist Tash King on rest, safety, pain and confinement.
words by JANE DIOPKO illustrations by CHELLY MAHER additional images courtesy of BED ZINE layout by Jane Diopko
Many of us have found ourselves staying at home more
often than usual and have had limited contact with loved
ones. For these months of quarantine, we have all been
quite house bound. But there are many who are no stranger
to staying indoors, far before the pandemic enforced
this change. Individuals living with disabilities which
necessitate being housebound nave always found means
of chasing passions and sharing their talents, regardless.
A few months ago, artist Tash King created Bed Zine,, to
showcase the artistic and literary exploits of individuals
(such as herself) who have complicated relationships with
their beds (and homes) as places of "rest and safety, while
also as places of pain and confinement". King expressed
that disabled folks are not simply marginalized, but also
often misunderstood. She strives to create an awareness of
disabled ways of living, that "disabled people experience
joy and desire and all the things that non-disabled people
do. If we lived in a world that accepted disabled people
and ways of living, then...[disabled people] wouldn't
have to spend all our time advocating for our rights, for
accessibility, for representation."
Therefore, Bed Zine acts
as a symbol of true grit
and innovation. It brings
to light the complexities
of being housebound, as
it is something some disabled folks have
always reckoned with — pandemic or not.
The magazine sources submissions from
individuals facing limiting disabilities,
and according to King, "Bed Zine will
make a lot of people feel understood and
validated in their personal experiences.
I also think it will help educate non-disabled people about some of the everyday
things that disabled people experience.
It'll also just be a great collection of art."
Over email, I talked to King about the
very beginnings of Bed Zine, her personal
resilience, and the creativity in everyday
living with a disability.
Jane Diokpo: Tell me more about your
personal background. I read you have
a housebound disability that has been
ongoing for the last 2 years, so it must
have been a big moment for you. I'd love
to know more about your trajectory?
Tash King: It's a lot to tell! I grew
up healthy and able bodied, but in
my early twenties I caught a virus
that activated my illness — Myalgic
Encephalomyelitis, which is a terribly
under-researched, under-funded and
over-pathologized chronic illness that
affects people in a variety of ways.
It feels like living with a permanent
case of severe mono. If it's mild it can
feel like a minor flu, if it's moderate,
like mine, it can leave you unable to
work or do much but rest, and if it's
severe you can become bed bound
and unable to do almost anything.
Years of seeing doctors with misinformation led me to push myself even
harder, effectively ignoring my illness,
which culminated in me working full
time at the Cinematheque. It was an
incredible job, but it caused my health
to decline so severely that in the fall of
2018 I was forced to stop working and
have been at home resting ever since.
What has changed in those two
years is my awareness of my illness.
My discovery of an amazing online
community of disabled artists and
activists, and my slow transition into
a life of acceptance and advocacy
regarding my illness. My experience as
an educator and writer have perfectly
primed me for my position as someone
who can raise awareness about my
experience [...] My sociology degree
and my skills as a writer give me great
tools for thinking critically about
what it means to be chronically ill in a
neoliberal capitalist context.
How would you describe your
positionality now, discovering more
what it's like to live with, rather than
against, M.E.?
We live in a society that moralizes
wage labour and constant activity,
and most people feel uncomfortable
with extensive free time. When I
suddenly had endless days ahead of
me, I struggled feeling useful and
finding structure and meaning in my
days. I am constantly trying to strike
a balance between listening to my
body and resting as much as I need to,
while also doing things like reading
and socializing that are critical
to my happiness. M.E. is a brutal
illness because any activity I do —
showering, cooking, seeing a friend —
is immediately followed by a physical
crash. If we imagine every action we
do as one dollar, then I have maybe
2-4 dollars I can spend a day, and
if I go over my energy budget then I
go severely into the red and can't do
anything for a while. It's obviously
really hard, and I've struggled
adjusting, but illness has also taught
me some really radical and valuable
lessons about time, solitude, and
communication that I may never have
learned otherwise.
Can you tell me a little more about Bed
Zine and how it came to be?
I've wanted to create a publication
of disabled people's experiences,
expressed and represented through
art and writing, for a while. A few
months ago I found myself thinking
about this really simple contradiction
that disabled people face: our beds
are a place of rest and safety, while
also a place of pain and confinement.
I figured that lots of people have
similarly complicated relationships
to their beds, and threw the idea into
the world. The zine is so exciting
because it is an opportunity for
people to see some of these thoughts
and feelings represented through
photography, collage, painting, and
writing. I think people will both
relate to it and be educated by it,
which is really wonderful.
You mentioned you've gotten to know a
really supportive and loving community
in this work. In what way have they
helped; either for you personally or for
Bed Zine?
"When I stopped working and was
coming to terms with my new life as a
chronically ill person, I was desperate
to connect with others in similar
"fed %W
 ISOS  doiBH-da'i      snisBgBMtsbtooaiQ
I Spend All Day Here by Emmett Shoemaker courtesy of Bed Zine
situations but struggled to find them.
Over the last few years I have found a
really amazing community of people
to relate to, support, and learn from,
and it's been really special seeing that
care and support reflected back at me
as people have shared and spread info
about Bed Zine around social media.
I've had people offer their help, folks
offer donations to help me cover the
costs of producing the zine, friends
offer support and resources — it's
been really amazing.
I came across your review of Rebekah
Taussig's Sitting Pretty: The View from
My Ordinary Resilient Disabled Body.
In it, you spoke of how her insight
on internalized ableism and exclusive
feminism spoke to you. As a BIPOC,
I also face somewhat similar issues
with internalized racism and exclusive
feminism. Could you elaborate further
on the nuances of ableism and exclusive
feminism and what it means to you/
how it may have affected you?
"We live in a world that is built by
and for non-disabled people. Both
literally and figuratively. Ableism is
the assumption that disability is a
problem to be fixed [...] Disability
is a normal part of life, and disabled
people experience joy and desire
and all the things that non-disabled
people do. If we lived in a world
that accepted disabled people and
how we exist in the world, then we
wouldn't have to spend all our time
advocating for our rights, for accessibility, for representation.
I see feminism and intersectional
politics constantly neglecting to
include disability in discussions of
oppression. While racism, fatphobia,
sexism, transphobia, and many
other important issues are getting
more visibility and being included
in more conversations, disability is
often forgotten. There may be a few
more disabled characters in film and
television, but they are rarely played
by disabled people. Ableist language
like "lame" and "crippled" are still
used without a second thought.
Event organizers rarely think about
making sure their spaces are accessible to wheelchairs, or that they
are scent-free, or that they have
ASL interpreters, or that they have
seating areas for people like me that
can't stand for very long. During my
sociology degree we studied so many
aspects of oppression, but disability
and ableism was never mentioned.
What makes you resilient, or gives you
personally the courage and inspiration
to make the work you do?
"When I think about how lonely and
alone I felt early on in my illness
experience, I get really revved up
because I don't want anyone to ever
feel that way. I thought that illness
meant that my life was over. But the
presence of an amazing disabled
community has uplifted me, changed
my life, and given me purpose and
motivation. I want to help create
a world where disability is always
considered. Just a normal part of
life. If the world becomes accessible
then disabled people will be given the
opportunity to simply live — and that
is a right we unconditionally deserve.
Beds signify rest and repair to me
beyond all else. To me, a bed is not
only where I sleep but where I go when
I'm unwell/sad/looking for comfort. It
doesn't always give that back. What
does "rest" mean to you, and how has
it been a part of your creative process?
Rest is a complicated thing for me.
It's something I am forced to do all
the time to survive, and it's something
I can resent. But, it's also taught me a
lot about slowing down, listening to
my body, and looking forward. Rest
is inextricably tied to my creative
process, because I have to rest a lot to
do anything, so it's both a punishment
and reward stemming from me doing
anything creative and fun.
I think Bed Zine will make a lot of
people feel understood and validated
in their personal experiences [...]
and I also think it will help educate
non-disabled people about some of
the everyday things that disabled
people experience. It'll also just be a
great collection of art.
The first issue o/Bed Zine will be available
in Spring 2021. Tor updates, check out
Task's instagram @dept_of_speculation
and for inquiries about the zine you can
email Bed Zine at bedthezine@gmail.com
Rest by Ashley Bravin courtesy of Bed Zinei
*«** rmtff
 Discorder Magazine      Feb-March  2021
ftMit
BLOCK
ROCK
To Sing Over the Silencing
Words by KAYLAN MAH
Illustrations by LUKE JOHNSON
Layout by OLIVER GADOURY
^Rjj ne Downtown Eastside
0^K often receives a bad
\^r rap from fellow
Vancouverites. But do we ever
take time to learn its stories,
to hear from those who occupy
the space?
100 Block Rock is a compilation
of music by artists from
Vancouver's Downtown Eastside.
The album's Bandcamp describes
the community as "constantly
on the verge of extinction from
a drug war, colonial genocide,
gentrification and the lack of
political will to create substantial
change." Yet despite this trauma,
it is a vibrant, caring, and
tight-knit community. This is
the story of resilience told in
100 Block Rock.
Music literally gives people a voice, but
it is up to the artist whether the sound
that emerges is passionate or lifeless. 100
Block Rock is full of life — I have never
heard an album with such breadth and
depth. You go from a track called "The
Sickness" featuring Terry Robinson's
raspy voice and laugh over the mellow
accompaniment of hand drums and
electric guitar, to "Nostalgia," a tune
that sounds like something that would
play during a movie montage of the sweet
scenes in a family's life.
Tracks on the album span from folk, to
punk, to pop — there is something in it
for everyone. The album showcases the
diversity of culture within the Downtown
Eastside, and in a world that increasingly celebrates difference, the Downtown
Eastside deserves to come into the limelight
for this contribution to music.
100 Block Rock's uniqueness transcends
its sound and multi-genre nature. The
album goes one step further and gives us
something to care about.
Despite the poverty and oppression they
face, those in the Downtown Eastside
have created a sound that refuses to be
muffled. The very fact that these songs
have emerged from the space demonstrates a resilience that we cannot ignore.
f
'had the privilege of speaking with
Eris Nyx, one of the producers
on the record. She has lived and
worked in the Downtown Eastside since
she was 19, and gave me a powerful
inside perspective on what music means
to the neighbourhood.
There are always people playing music in
the Downtown Eastside, and 100 Block
Rock is all about capturing the sound
of the neighbourhood. Eris says, "Your
community conditions the kind of music
you're gonna make, and you make music
representative of your community and
your personhood." The record is meant
to represent the Downtown Eastside in
the purest way possible; to tell the story
of those who live in it, create in it, breathe
life to it.
Eris also points out, "I've never met a
person who didn't listen to any music,"
and this is so true. Music is accessible.
It allows us to let down our walls and
preconceived biases to truly hear what
the musician wants to say.
Our various perceptions of the Downtown
Eastside have been conditioned by the
media and other intermediaries, not by
those who live there and experience it. This
album gives us an unsullied representation
of the values in the Downtown Eastside.
I believe this album asks us questions, and
calls us towards action. But the first step, as
with any piece of music, is to listen.
Umetmta
he Downtown Eastside has historically been a group whose voices are
silenced. The album's Bandcamp
page describes the neighbourhood
"an area that every politician, property
owner, social worker, and police officer
has an opinion on, yet, rarely do you
hear the voices that come from within."
"Working against this, 100 Block Rock
serves as a platform to showcase artists
who might not otherwise have a voice.
Musicians in the Downtown Eastside
don't always have the funds to release their
music, so 100 Block Rock was a project
that bridged this financial gap. To fund
the album, producers obtained a Creative
BC Grant, partnered with the City of
Vancouver, and received support from the
Coalition of Peers Dismantling the Drug
War. In doing so, they provided a way for
musicians to present their stories through
high-quality recordings.
100 Block Rock is also about the preservation of culture. According to Eris, the
Downtown Eastside is at a juncture where
the City of Vancouver, and their public
policy department, have predicted East
Hastings will become "the most walkable
street on earth" in the coming years. "At
the end of the day [...] they mean they're
gonna push all this poverty back under the
rug instead of actually dealing with it [...]
In doing that, they're decimating culture."
Whatever happens to the neighbourhood,
the vision is that 100 Block Rock will serve
as a monument to the Downtown Eastside,
a way of remembering it as it was.
9%e9#i*f*t£
feels like a warm hug, and it makes you
want to hear his story. Richter croons,
"May you be the spinner of the story I
The teller and the tale," encouraging us to
speak up, to refuse to be passive.
This is exactly what the artists do so well
on this record. Rather than accepting a
status of victim to big business and city
policy, they have put their words into
song and shared them with the world.
What else does this album try to tell us?
These are a few ways that it speaks to me.
7tteff&ff&to
?eea£§ii«e tfte
talent wuilhm
titetDawnUwm
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t&H*evttiie
tteigltlMwiIiUQd.
*
w
ith his first words, "So glad
,you're alive I So good that
you're here," Mike Richter's
"All the Best" starts off the album by
demonstrating a posture of openness.
Despite the trauma the neighbourhood
has faced, he welcomes us into their music.
The acoustic instruments create a vibe that
The Miseducation of River,"
Tesla Rainbowdancer tells us the
story of a nine year old boy in
a style that seems like a mix between
spoken word and rap, to the backdrop
of a repeating motif played on an electric
guitar. The song's narrator tells his father,
"If you want the best for me let me follow
my heart I Let me play when it calls me
let my life be my art."
The boy's boldness in these words is
striking. For someone's life to be their
art means to be unashamed, to do what
one thinks is right despite the opinions
of others. The artists on this album share
their art with the world in a bold act that
ought to command our respect.
bettfr
as
"iw #foc& Jfocfc
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Rainbowdancer continues on, "Because
life is too short to not chase your passions
I Ignore your desires and your dreams
will go crashing I Trust that my spirit's
not meant to die I My spirit knows what's
up and it wants to thrive."
These artists show us that they can thrive
when they pursue their passions. As Eris
says, we can view this record as feedback
from a neighbourhood that, despite being
crushed, refuses to crumble. Instead, it
emits a light of resiliency through its
music, as a testament to what people are
capable of when they have the resources.
fume a ftfffitfele
imttei&ttmd tiie
lteigltlMutltaud
bettet.
f^Btk hen I asked her about
^^KJM^Micommon misconceptions
^F^F^ of the Downtown Eastside,
Eris spoke against the perception of the
neighbourhood as some stronghold of
criminality and violence. "If you go down
there and you meet people, it's probably
one of the safest, most caring neighbourhoods in the city[...] Maybe it's too rough
around the edges for people [...] [but]
historically, and to this day, it has been a
bastion and safe place for a lot of people."
It's hard to move around the city
with the COVID-19 restrictions, but
this album can be a first step in learning
more about the neighbourhood. It helps
us to understand the Downtown Eastside
because through their music, the artists
share ordinary life experiences that can
help us relate with those who live there.
Elvis Nelson comes at us with a spunky
tune in "That Girl." An electric guitar
solo kicks in after the intro, accompanied by his declaration of "Baby, baby,
baby, baby!" The song follows a simple
narrative. He sings of love at first sight,
of how he'd "like to get to know her
better." By presenting us with unfiltered
utterances of angst and eagerness, Nelson
shows listeners that love is a common
experience shared across communities
and cultures.
The next song on the album introduces us to a vastly contrasting emotion.
Instead of skirting around expressions of
pain, Erica and Grant's recording of "Go
Rest High on That Mountain" reflects
an openness and vulnerability about loss.
^
Everything about this folk performance
from the two Indigenous artists is real
and raw. I hear it in the lyrics, "Oh,
how we cried the day you left us I We
gathered round your grave to grieve."
In the soulfulness as Erica's voice strives
towards the highest notes and holds them.
In the solid persistence of her hand drum
and tambourine; in the determined strums
of the acoustic guitar.
Yet I don't just hear pain, I also hear hope.
Erica sings "Son, your work on earth is
done." She tells him to rest, and to "Go
to heaven a-shoutin' I hove for the Tather
and the Son." Even in the face of death,
the artists have found the strength to sing,
play, and share their stories of persistence
in the face of heartbreak.
7tteff&ff&
facaft&fftet
foeeammg
htuuluedm
fteigftliaftiftaaff
wt a IxoKtfctU
feuef.
f S^ 'Chronic zeroes right in on
^systemic issues in "Fentanyl
^P^F Poisoning" as he proclaims that
Vancouver's fentanyl crisis is a genocide.
The cinematic nature of the track with its
driving beat, strings, and synth lend an
extra weight to his words.
Drugs are the centre of this song, and
L'Chronic uses his music to address the
stigma that users face.Tthe number of
Fentanyl-related deaths has increased
throughout the COVID-19 pandemic,
and he reminds us that, "It's not OD'ing,
it's fentanyl poisoning." The song is
an accusation of the system, as he says
"They say they'll save you, but they
won't," and refuses to leave anything up
to interpretation.
Yet I don't hear this song, or anything
on this record, as a call for pity. These
stories of courage refute any assumption
that these artists are crying out for help
from within the bowels of a broken
place. Rather, I believe this record is a
call to action.
L'Chronic tells listeners that there is
something to be done. "We need to take
care of each other I A lot of people use
for pain I Because the system is driving
them insane."
What does it mean to be a victim to the
system? This question cannot be answered
within this piece, but it can be the beginning
of a conversation about the history and
future of the Downtown Eastside.
^ifl^ris says she hopes that, "Maybe
3^   if people hear this and like what
^fc^ they're hearing, they'd consider
getting more involved in preservation of
the neighbourhood on a political level."
This neighbourhood is a part of our city,
and it may soon be demolished. But we
can do something about it.
Azul Salvaje's "Running Free" is the final
inspiration I will draw on. He encourages
us to "Just keep on keepin' on / Doin' the
best you can do."
We can each do our best to preserve the
space of the Downtown Eastside. Eris
says that the best way to get involved is
to go to the people and ask what they
need help with. Organizations such as
VANDU, CCAP and CPDDW are always
looking for volunteers.
Each of us has been given a voice,
and another way we can act is to go to
demonstrations, or directly to City Hall,
to speak against the destruction of the
neighbourhood.
Salvaje sings, "The golden calves
worshipped by society I They sing no siren
songs to me." What would it mean to be
unencumbered by desires for power and
possessions? As 2021 is still fresh, let's
decide on the things that really matter: to
ourselves, and to society as a whole.
fHm #foc& Jfocfc
tt
 Discorder Magazine      Feb-March  2021
LAUBE
words hy Nlegan Turner
illustrations hy Jane Diokpo
photos hy Daniela Rodriguez
layout hy Enya Mo
Recent movements, namely #MeToo, have brought more attention to
the industries which operate under the cishet white patriarchy —
including the music and nightlife industry. While many have pledged
their allegiance in words, Cushy Entertainment is providing a
framework for change in the Vancouver music scene. Cushy's
mandate is to "provide a platform for emerging and established artists
and musicians with an emphasis on supporting diversity in the
entertainment industry." Operated by Aly Laube and Mati Cormier,
Cushy serves to create a safe space for audience members as well as
platform underrepresented artists. I spoke to Aly Laube about the
underground scene in Vancouver and how Cushy is creating change.
Aly's Twitter bio proclaims, "I'll be quiet
when I'm dead!" — and nothing could
better serve as a testament to her
character. The work that she puts out as
a journalist, event producer, musician and
radio host champions marginalised voices
and unabashedly questions the forces that
seek to uphold the status quo. Read her
inquiry of the delay for police-kill
inquests in The Tyee from this December,
Aly holds herself to a high standard. And
it's contagious, not working towards
making a difference certainly feels like a
useless existence. Creating space for folx
that who might not otherwise have it, Aly
tells me, is an important part of her work.
Having been called 'loud' and 'bossy' in the
past she now realises the power of speaking
up, and shouting louder than the forces
working against you. Aly's work is
dedicated to providing representation and
her intense persona drives this in an
engaging and motivating way.
Through her punk band, Primp, Aly was
met with the reality of the Vancouver
music scene as a mixed-race femme
performer. At the time, and still today, she
was one of few in a white-guy dominated
scene.This no doubt influenced Cushy's
explicit commitment to representing
marginalised and underrepresented
musicians. "When we started, it was all
'so-and-so's girlfriend is starting a band,'"
Aly tells me. She noticed patterns
emerging, like bookings which clearly just
needed a woman somewhere on the bill.
Aly speaks "I want to make people feel
like they are valuable and they are heard.
And not like they are just a token to pass
around. And to pay them! I believe that
artists really need to get paid, especially
underrepresented artists. You can't say we
want to do an all-Black line up but we're
not going to pay you, that is outrageously
offensive to me, but people do it all the
time."
Her experiences as an artist and
audience member have made
Aly perfectly placed to produce
an event. Investing in Vancouver's nightlife
culture via Cushy allows Aly to build a
community that she wants to be a part of.
While other promoters in the city mildly
commit to safe spaces via an Instagram
post, or a mention in the Facebook event,
Cushy boldy presents what nightlife could
look like by enforcing solid and reliable
practices to protect its patrons. Including
incentives to "be mindful of how you are
impacting the accessibility of the space" a
hard outline of harmful behavior which is
prohibited, and to "Believe in and stand in
solidarity with those who come forward
with reports of violence perpetrated
against or around them." Cushy's ethos
focuses on safety — people deserve to
party in a space free from abuse and
erasure. Somewhere that you will be
listened to, your identity will be respected,
your personal space will be protected and
you can feel secure in your own self
expression. The dance floor is a place of
release and escape for many, but can often
be the site of abuse and trauma. The
presence of alcohol and drugs in nightlife
acts as a smoke screen for abuse, and has
sustained a culture of victim blaming —
dark rooms, designed to aggrandize
hedonistic behaviours, do not
acknowledge the silencing that is perpetuated through the narrative that everyone
is there to 'have a good time.'
Dancefloors across the world are
committing to safer spaces and it's easy
to want to believe them but, as Cushy
demonstrates, building a safe space in
nightlife is not as simple as stating that
you believe in it. At a Cushy event, one
person's good time cannot encroach on
another person's safety — as Aly tells me,
"safety is a precursor to fun." Aly works
hard to create a space where everyone can
enjoy themselves without worrying about
the usual bullshit we have come to expect
on a night out. Audience safety is a
priority at Cushy events; as per the
guidelines   once   more,    "being   too
«%l$ UttU"
 ISOS  doiBH-da'i      snisBgBMtsbtooaiQ
intoxicated to monitor your behaviour
and your impact on others" and "being
disrespectful of other attendees' right to
participate and have an enjoyable time"
is explicitly not tolerated. This sounds
obvious - of course that's what people
want. Of course people deserve to be safe
while they are having fun - but is by no
means the standard. Even if the reduction
of harmful behavior is being talked about,
it is not being effectively implemented in
the local scene. Vancouver has much self-
improving to do and Cushy is setting a
fine example.
The audience demographic at a
Cushy event is diverse, but Aly
has noted the benefits for young
women and gender diverse people in
particular. Cushy's events are generally all
ages — and it's deliberate. Aly prioritises
the need to provide safe access for young
people who might otherwise be sneaking
into Celebrities, or attending underground shows with questionable artists
and leery attendees. Teenagers are going
to go out and get drunk — as we all did
— and it's reassuring to know there is a
community working to protect them, not
to take advantage.
Aly acknowledges the toxicity of a
culture in which you don't expect
accountability," and feels empowered to
be able to change that at Cushy: "I'm the
boss! [..] you break the rules, you're
kicked out, you're banned [...] it sounds
harsh, but no one else is doing this." In
fact, it doesn't sound harsh — it sounds
totally reasonable. Aly says their policies
might not make Cushy the most populous
dance floor in the city, but it tells its
patrons who are not made to feel safe or
welcome elsewhere, that they matter. This
is for them.
The #MeToo movement originally
sought to bring resources,
support, and pathways to
healing where none existed before, and
Cushy entertainment absorbs and
promotes this ethos when dealing with
allegations of abuse. Aly understands the
intricacies of abuse through lived
experience — not being listened to, or
believed, is a common issue among
victims. When an allegation of abuse is
made by a Cushy community member,
space is held for that person to tell their
story. Aly commits a lot of time to this
interpersonal work, so as to ensure both
sides are heard before making a decision
on the best course of action to keep the
community safe. It's exhausting, and the
outcomes may not always please
everyone, but it's not about making
everyone happy — it's about making
everyone safe.
This includes banning known abusers from
shows. This demands accountability and
gives victims power. Aly herself works the
door at Cushy events and runs a tight ship
in terms of enforcing their Safer Space Policy.
Aly lays out a simple strategy to engage in
shifting the culture — "don't support
abusive bands. Don't support abusive
people. Don't support toxic behaviours."
Aly also talks about "challenging clout" and
the value of shifting social capital. As
audience members we are obliged to speak
up and hold ourselves accountable for the
artists and promoters we choose to support,
otherwise we risk perpetuating a cycle of
abuse in an industry made to work for bad
people. In refusing to acknowledge our
individual power as a member of the
audience, we risk losing valuable community
members to harmful cycles of abuse.
When the audience holds themselves
accountable, in terms of the artists and
promoters they support, eventually the
big guys have to listen. We buy the tickets
to the shows, and large event organisers
will be forced to adapt their policies to
meet customer demand.The culture at
Cushy is a goal to strive toward, and
should set the bar for our expectations.
Change is fostered when we act as
individuals, but for the well being of all.
Where to find
and Support:
I Cushy is a non-profit operated for
the benefit of the community it
serves. Please consider donating
to ensure they are able to come
back with a bang post-pandemic.
Cushy:
cushyentertainment.com
@cushyentertainment
CiTR: Wednesdays @ 5pm Cushy
| Radio presented by Aly Laube
Primp: primp.bandcamp.com
m$ tmutf
 Discorder Magazine      Feb-March  2021
Th* iXioi*Id Oi* Crack Cloud
"The p>fefo»a*.iue of Craek Cloud \* to create
*tOfie* that allOW the «b$«fU«f to eome to
their own eonelu$ion$ and naue them feel like
it*# their own eureka moment — not our***
■antly outwitting preconceived notions fixed to thei
collective, Crack Cloud gives birth to an incredible, ray
and beautifully imperfect form of expression. Forging universes i
seemingly infinite depth, the many minds of the group put thei
heads and hearts together to produce extraordinary multimedi
storytelling. The expansive, sometimes sinister, always cathartic trv
Pain Olympics demonstrates how Crack Cloud uses collectivity t
produce boundless work. The group's congruent intention of bot
expressing and healing through their art has an unmistakable at
of candor. In past interviews, the band was uniquely fascinatin
for their candid story of punk music as therapy for addictiot
That story has been told inside-out as they toured Europe, an
frankly, there is a lot to say in addition to that narrative, such a
how they function creatively, as a collective. As endless as thei
outsider intrigue is, talking with members Zach and Mohamma
proved how much more there is to the story. Although they wet
only 2 voices out of the Crack Cloud mass, they had so much t(
add to the story. Carefully articulated by Zach, and passionatel
spouted by Mohammad, the duo filled each other's gaps, humbl
giving insight into this ridiculously cool, wildly capable collectivt
:auseyou 're an amalgamation of so many members — and mediun
let's start simple: what is Crack Cloud?
: It's just a kind of a platform, for us to get together, to conceptualize and come up with grand ideas. It's the brainchild of Zach
a little bit.
: I think it began that way, but at this point certainly it's really just
a platform for everyone to get together and translate ideas [...] with
the motivation of trying to relate to people on a scale that extends
outside of our own community.
It goes without saying, you are a very large collective. How man
people actually make-up Crack Cloud? What do you each add to tl
group?
: It's not really a quantifiable number. I think that just kinda loses
sight of what makes it a collective in nature. It's the manifestation
of a lot of different hands and people helping out. Some songs
incorporate 8 or 7 people, and some who aren't even in the main
touring lineup, so I think it's just about keeping that freedom and
openness.
: It's surreal to think that Crack Cloud kind of formed 5 years
ago — a lot changes over time. People have different motivations
and this project can become more demanding, or less demanding.
It really just comes down to how compatible it is with whoever is
around — and whether or not they're up for the challenge.
: I think we catch people in really passionate moments of their
lives, and they exude and put all that passion into something and
can feel kind of a nice release. I like how malleable it is. That's
the whole concept with this collective — and sometimes people
lose sight through quantifying it.
tt
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tt
 ISOS  doisH-da'i      snisBgBMtsbtooaiQ
healing'
'as it more organic
or intentional?
: I think it was absolutely an organic thing. Just having a house
accessible for anyone to stroll in, or pick up an instrument, or
pursue an idea visually, with the understanding that we were trying
to facilitate a safe space. Zero judgement.
: This is what I was gonna strike on — what was fundamental for me
was this sense of discipline which we all carry, and that was very
helpful in creating loyalty and bonds, and really trusting in the
idea. That we're going to make advances, and changes, and grow
— because that was what we were always seeking with community
and art, but never really had a language for it. Now we're really
using these opportunities to make the best of what we've worked
so hard for, which is like a large community of artists. At the end
of the day, it's the sum of everybody's effort and it really can't be
everything it is without all those pieces.
Because you are such a big and fluid group without a distinct leading,
it's more of a collective effort, how do you go about writing music?
I think people show leadership in different ways, but I'd be
denying it if I didn't say Zach is the pulsating heart of Crack
Cloud, [...] he keeps that beat going. It helps us stay creative with
each other.
would describe it as just an atmosphere that we maintain here at
le house and the other spaces that we work out of. A lot of just
shooting the shit, but these conversations turn into ideas that we
try to interpret musically. Right now, we're really trying to focus on
storytelling, and there's a way to transcribe stories and narratives
into music — I would say that you build it like lego. You create
the foundation, and add melody etc. but I wouldn't reduce Crack
Cloud's music to just that function. It's a many-headed beast, and
[our approach] is always changing.
nces or are you usually on th
: I think the creative differences have to happen — but it's not really
differences. It's more a process of like, let's talk, and go down the
path to how you got there.
: During that process of trying to communicate your thoughts to
everyone else, you're also communicating it to yourself, and I think
that's the benefit of working within a collective. It really gets to
be a stream of consciousness and an exchange of ideas. We'll be
riffing in the kitchen, or in the field, or wherever, and it really helps
us understand ourselves, our intentions, and each other. There are
never really any creative differences — it's more just pushing each
other to try and explain ourselves better, and to try and get to the
bottom of it.
: Our differences are not always a confrontation. It may be
disengaging for a couple of days, and then reigniting and feeling it
again later. We don't want to be "No" people, we don't want to be
like "that's a bad idea, what are you talking about", that's like the
worst thing you can do for anybody creatively.
: After Pain Olympics, we feel we have a bit more faith in terms of
just going with our gut, and not second-guessing it.
people to take something j
o be?
Cloud, what would
think that the actions of the art that we make, hopefully, will
speak louder than anything we could say today.
: That's exactly it. It's less about the messaging and for me,
more about a certain prerogative. The prerogative is just creating
stories that allow the observer to be able to come to their own
conclusions, and have them feel like it's their own eureka or their
own moment, not our moment.
: I think that's kind of the blessing of the collective. It's that
hopefully, you get through to all of the corners.
You mentioned that you think Crack Cloud will become more
uninhibited and ambitious in the future, so what do you think the
possibilities for Crack Cloud are? Or are you just leaving it up to what
naturally happens?
: Nothings off the table. We usually say things like that because
we don't want people to think we're just a band. But nothing's off
the table as far as Crack Cloud goes.
You oan *tr tarn Or aok Cloud'* latent r tlta*t oik
all *trtamift» *truiot*y and bt *urt to ktt* an
est out for their u»eomin» *ro*tot thi* **rift»»
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 Discorder Magazine      Feb-March  2021
A conversation with Respire
<X>G<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>^^
burning structure serves as the frame in the image
I am looking at. Though it is ambiguous if this
burning frame was erected for the purposes of
the photo, or if it is some found ruin off a highway, it recalls
landscapes that people who have travelled through the country
know well. The six people in the photo, standing beneath the
burning arch, are the current core members of Respire, the
self-proclaimed "Post-everything" Toronto-based collective
which has set out to defy the boundaries of bandhood, and
the claustrophobic confines of what most of us understand as
"heavy music." The photo is part of the press package that was
sent out to me prior to my conversation with Rohan Lilauwala,
vocalist, guitarist, and founding member of Respire, who acted
as the band's mouthpiece for this conversation.
fter a brief introduction
discussing their humble
beginnings, Lilauwala
summarizes the project's conception;
"The much briefer pitch is: We were all
playing music, sort of together, sort of
in different groups, and we decided to
come together to create something more
ambitious than we were doing at the time
in any of our projects. Not just musically
ambitious, but conceptually ambitious."
He explains that prior to Respire, many
of the members knew each other through
playing in other bands and booking
shows together, or by simply existing in
the Toronto punk scene. This combined
desire to create something beyond the
reach of their past projects would propel
the band to write 20!6's Gravity &
Grace, 20!8's Denoument, and their
latest offering, Black Line, which was
released in December 2020 by Church
Road Records.
This ambition manifested itself early
on in a desire to incorporate instruments not usually found at the forefront
of post-hardcore albums. The original
Respire makeup featured Emmett
O'Reilly on trumpet, which melded
well with the band's sombre dirges. As
the years went by, Emmett had to retire
from being as active within the band, and
trumpet came to be replaced with violin
in the hands of Eslin McKay. For Respire
though, no one is ever really gone. Their
approach to managing the band as a
true collective, rather than the romanticized "give all, give everything" attitude
— ubiquitous in genres like punk and
hardcore — pays off in a number of ways.
For one, it allows them to remain flexible
in terms of membership. Though Emmett
has not been a regular member of the
band since Gravity & Grace, he has made
an appearance on every Respire album to
date — and is always welcome to participate in the band's live shows. Respire
refers to this as their "open door policy
for the extended family," a model that
has gained some traction in recent years,
but remains largely underutilized by their
contemporaries.
This familial approach serves the project's
ambitious goals, which could be easily
stifled by the band's own technical limitations. "The reason we're able to draw out
all of these influences and do the things we
do, is because of our collective approach
to songwriting [...] We don't want to be
limited by the skills and talents of the
people who have the time to be in the
core membership of the band." Lilauwala
continues, "We're always considering how
to incorporate the talents, skills, and ideas
of other people in our musical process."
The extended family goes on to include
even reoccurring audio engineers, which
affords the band the flexibility to record
their massive albums, with consideration
for their budget, and every members'
availability. Though Respire can be
slow-moving, their pace makes sense to
me. It takes a particular kind of patience
and attentiveness to create the kind of
layered music they set out to write —
especially for a band that has adhered to
DIY ethics for the majority of its existence.
Corralling band members for practices,
studio sessions, videos, photoshoots, gets
harder as their numbers grow or fluctuate,
and harder still as the reality of being a
musician often means that resources —
like time and money — are also devoted
to personal responsibilities. Lilauwala
doesn't kid himself, and even jokes that
"[Respire is] a negative bill payer — in
that it has bills." But even in the face of
this reality, the band's model allows them
to create at a steady pace and thrive.
"Jfasjttc*"
 ISOS  rioTeM-dsl      snisBgBMtsbtooaiQ
z
hough the band's ethos is evident throughout
their discography, it is definitely in it's most
polished and refined form in Black Line. Having
learned lessons from their
past recording experiences,
Respire made intentional
decisions in effort to create
music that surpassed their
previous efforts. Choices
such as; recording drums
in a separate DIY studio as
opposed to live-off the floor
with the other instruments,
scoring out all of the
guitar and bass tracks
to avoid unintentional
dissonance (also to
give the other instrumentalists an idea
>f what to write
around), and
alloting a month
for simply listening, demoing the bones of the songs.
Once these were set on tape, the band booked some
time at Array Music in Toronto — a studio space
geared towards avant-garde music-making. "There
were just so many toys," Lilauwala chirps with vivid
excitement, "there was a grand piano, a gong, a
vibraphone, all these instruments that we'd never have
access to otherwise." This short stint at Array provided
the band with the ability to experiment with otherwise
unusual instruments, even choosing to replace some of
rock's classic tools altogether at points. Though Respire
definitely took cues from Canadian post-rock legends
Godspeed You! Black Emperor, among others, the
resulting music is far more aggressive — scaffolded by
the band's love of emo and hardcore. Unlike many of
their genre contemporaries, the added instrumentation
and experiments sound as they intended — considered
and necessary.
The theme of fire is central to Black Line, the title itself
a reference to a fire management term used to describe
a treeline that is control-burned to contain the spread of
wildfire. "The theme of fire as something that can cleanse
and purify, but also destroy, really appealed to all of
us," explairM^lauwala, "We^ieed to destroy some of
e ugliness in our society and the things that are eating
away at us, whether it's bigotry, fascism, climate denial
[...] These are the things we need to destroy as a society
to heal, move forward and survive." Simultaneously a
warning and a call to arms, Black Line observes the
wo
orld in a dire place, and the plight of the music is
drastic but arguably necessary. Though Respire was
writing the album prior to the events of 2020, Lilauwala
sees the album's relevance in today's political climatl
and is r^ shocked thaT^Be subjects they began to write
about three years ago ha^e come to a h^^krecently.
"The events of 2020 didn't come out of left-fieroJby any
means. They are a culmination of a number of trends
that have been going on for many years," he observes.
Moreover, he notes how being Canadian has always
served as an excuse for people to disengage from politics.
Even now, the imaginary line created by the southern
border with the USA is enough for Canadians to believe
that bigotry and far-right ideology have not set root in
Canada. "We have RCMP standing around while settler
fishermen set fire to Mi'kmaq fisheries. We have pipelines
being pushed through unceded Indigenous territories by
oil companies with the aid of the federal government.
Black, Indigenous, and brown people being incarcerated
at disproportionate rates [...] We have the same undercurrents as the US." Maybe with a degree of responsibility then, Respire turned their eye outward on Black
Line — writing about the ills of the world, rather than
the sicknesses of the self. Lilauwala concludes, "the best
time to set the stage for healing in 2020 was before 2020,
but the best time to do it now is now. Our message still
stands. It's still relevant."
s I observe the photo of the
six members surrounded by
Words by R. Hester
Illustrations by Janee Auger
Photos courtesy of Respire
by Dave Pike
Layout by Phoebe Telfar
the element to the album as more than
a simple thematic. I see artists wielding
fire, harnessing it, and using it as a tool
for creation rather than a weapon of
destruction. The band's attention to
detail, their collective intent, and their
meticulous approach to songcraft draw
Lessons were learned
from past skirmishes. ; '
Members support each
other, bring their own   ,
skills  and  resilience,
working   together   to
harness the versatility of
their music which — much like
fire — is as hostile, unrelenting,
and destructive as it is beautiful and
warm, brimming with magical life. As for
"^^
containing the power of wildfire. Black
Line is intense, but rarely escapes the
band's control. Instruments, like brush
thirsty for embers, are set ablaze and
removed to make room for new growth.
ally turned it to ash, and
age ot a family against
a limitless blue sky, unbound.
"Jfcsjttc*"
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SV3BSCR/a£*
Jf/V0 7W/S FO/?Af IW7W SOAfE COLD HARD CASH OR A CHEQUE TO:
DISCORDER MAGAZINE, LL500- 6133 UNIVERSITY BLVD. VANCOUVER, B.C. V6T 1Z1
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 WORDS BY JON BOND
ILLUSTRATIONS BY ALICIA LAWRENCE
PHOTOS   COURTESY   OF      UNIT   17
BYCEMRANEZUYGUNER
LAYOUT BY OLIVIA COX
THE NEIGHBOUR'S PLATE
There's a lot to miss about
the way we used to eat.
The way we used to be
served or given food. There are a
few aspects that I miss dearly,
despite the general over-it vibe I
had towards restaurants before the
pandemic. When something gets
taken away it's easy to slip into
nostalgia and pretend I wasn't
above it all only a year ago. But I
do miss sitting on a patio, or at a
window, and having that brief
moment of connection when
someone walks by and stares
hungrily at your dish. Or when
someone leans over from a nearby
seat and asks what you ordered.
As I sat on the floor at Unit 17,
during The Neighbour's Plate
exhibition, this happened. Sort of.
During that crisp day on West 4th
Avenue, people still passed and
looked in, but mostly they were
taken aback or immensely curious,
wondering what I was doing
eating soup in a room that was
categorically not a restaurant.
The Neighbour's Plate, a group exhibition
by Derya Akay, Amna Elnour, and Dana
Qaddah, is in one room, with a big
window that looks out on the street. There's
a table close to the ground surrounded by
cushions, a small pass carved through one
wall, and adornments on each wall and
basically every other available space by
the artists. Did I mention there's food?
There's also food, which allowed me to
indulge my other small favourite thing
about eating something new: asking
someone else to choose my meal because I
am unfamiliar with what is on offer. Oh,
what small pleasures! I spent my time in the
space either seated or pacing the walls (at
all times nibbling on some delightful small
surprise). And besides the food, there's
also a whole collection to explore. The
items that make up the exhibition are
displayed about the room and require — or
allow — one to get close to inspect them.
Things like:
SPENT PISTACHIO AND
SUNFLOWER SHELLS
PILED HIGH ON
PLATES.
LABELS FROM BRANDS
OR INGREDIENTS
UNRECOGNIZABLE
TO ME.
A BAG OF PEPPERCORNS
OR JUNIPER BERRIES
CI STUPIDLY DIDN'T
ASK FOR
CLARIFICATION)
ON A SHELF ABOVE A
PHOTOGRAPH OF
ENTRAILS SIMMERING
IN A HUGE METAL POT.
Before I go much further, I have to admit
that I'm a complete philistine. I know how
to look at art (and honestly, maybe I
don't even do that very well), but that's
about it. I know how to appreciate the
food laid out in front of me. But I can't say
that I can firmly interpret anything about
The Neighbour's Plate other than my own
reaction. It struck me as equal parts
collection/exhibition/presentation. While
there was art there, the show seemed to
take joy in sharing more than anything,
which made me feel a few things.
  ISOS  rioTeM-dsl      snisBgBMtsbtooaiQ
Firstly, I felt welcomed. I know,
right? Upon reflection, I think
that's pretty easy to take for
granted. The exhibit conveyed this
welcoming atmosphere — the feeling of
being brought into a space and fed. For
lack of a better term, it felt familial, which
is something, for all their ambitions, most
restaurants can't achieve. It felt closer to
someone's home than a meal out. And
that doesn't just come from the space, but
it also comes up from the plates and
smacks you on the tongue or in the nose
or both. The first bite I had was of a
candied kumquat. I don't think I've ever
had a kumquat, though it seems possible I
might have. Rather than recalling the
flavour from the fruit itself, this bite
actually tasted like the echo of some
candy I used to eat as a kid, and for the
life of me I can't remember what it was.
Regardless, it was here, in its natural form,
simple and delicious. What followed were
simple plates that stoked that familial
feeling all the more. Pickled beets and
rosemary shortbread. And what could be
more familial than lentil soup and bread?
Secondly, there's this other
feeling that I wonder if anyone
can really relate to (I'd certainly
feel seen if someone read this and was like
oh shit, I do that). I'm the type of person
who heads to Famous Foods for some
single obscure ingredient, and then ends up
slowly walking the aisles and taking note of
other obscure ingredients. I flip through my
cookbooks and make journeys to distant
corners of faraway stores to find small jars
of that one specific thing. The Neighbour's
Plate managed to stoke that in me as well.
Along one wall ran a shelf with foodstuffs,
photos, packages, and labels, all of which
merited a closer look. A small bag of seeds
turned out to be tobacco. A tall box for a
bottle of liquor was Arak — a cloudy, anise-
flavoured drink very high in alcohol, which
in turn led me to a Buzzfeed video of a
bunch of Australians trying it for the first
time and quite enjoying it, which shouldn't
have come as a surprise to anyone.
All of the googling and the note-taking
made me feel like a philistine all over
again. But this time, it was about
something I thought I had a good grasp
on: food. Being a white boy from the
middle-of-nowhere BC, I grew up with so
few worlds colliding with mine (unless you
count the mystery kumquat-resembling
candy). I studied and learned and
practiced and tried to understand the
world of food, and it resulted in me being
Very Smart about it all. But really, I want
nothing more than to be knocked on my
ass by something new, to encounter
something I don't know much about. Some
aspect of a meal shared, be it a table on
the ground, or a candied piece of fruit I've
never had. The exhaustion of knowledge
or experience can be this huge bummer of
a burden where nothing surprises you or
makes you curious ever again.
To me, The Neighbour's Plate is a
collection as much as it is an exhibit. And
to someone from a different walk of life,
all that comprises the collection may seem
like the typical detritus of a regular meal.
A lot of what caught my eye as familiar
only did so because I had a partner who
was born in Iran. However, had I been the
person I was five years prior, I may have
been at a complete loss. I may have
googled more, or studied more, or tried to
understand — but I'd be missing crucial
pieces of the experience. There is delight
in that certain form of ignorance.
Ignorance is an icky word in a lot of ways,
unless there is some external force, like an
art show, that pushes me towards a
greater understanding of a topic I was
smugly convinced I knew a lot about.
tt
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tt
 CRI
SIS
AJRY
Discorder Magazine      Feb-March  2021
WORDS by TASHA HEFFORD
ILLUSTRATIONS by ROB ECCLES
LAYOUT by OLIVER GADOURY
verything is observed
in a specious present,
but nothing, not even
the observations themselves,
can ever be in the specious
present. Things cannot be
directly perceived, the thinking
goes, but must be reconstructed
by the brain. I am fascinated
by the process of memory and
reconstruction — how all things
accrue detail in repetition, how
things are marked by recall.
Among the practices which
illustrate sufficiently how
re-inserting, re-membering,
re-peating, re-stating, re-circulating and re-working is an
art of possibility rather than
limitation, there is CRISIS
LIBRARY, the publishing
initiative of graphic artist Robin
Netherton, which hunts for the
end of this long tail — and
rearranges its parts for free.
he enduring inspiration for
CRISIS LIBRARY comes by
way of the anarchist practice of
the "infoshop" —resource spaces wherein
information, texts and art were shared to
aid in the distribution of information.
They often included photocopy machines
for people to use and produce their own
booklets, "this particular iteration was
originally meant to function more as a
library" Robin tells me, "where people
would "borrow" the texts through a
printer but due to COVID it has been
moved online." The present collection
follows this crucial inversion — a series of
CRISIS EDITIONS are produced specifically for online distribution. They can be
read and downloaded through a digital
library, or reprinted by request. Among
the "books", mined for their emotive
yelp of exposure and uncovering of institutional intention (in effect, a "crisis")
floats the vaguely Jean Baudrillard-esque
quote "only what can be reproduced is
real" — a lure to read and an ethos of the
process. Among that which is reproduced
back into reality, is Mike Davis's 1992
The Ecology of Tear - Beyond BLADE
RUNNER: Urban Control and Lucy
Forsyth's SOFTECHNICA — a 1991
text which declares "new technological
systems" to be reflections of those who
design them, and the conditions under
which they are devised. Not a far yelp from
Facebook's partisan "fact-checking", or,
say, the big business of data exploitation.
tt
mm» nmmrf
 ISOS  rioTeM-dsl      snisBgBMtsbtooaiQ
In a year that has made minutes of
our senses, it's easy/unavoidable
to revisit books, movies, texts
which mirror our current state like a
haunted xerox machine. In her 1999
book, Compassion Fatigue: How the
Media Sell Disease, Famine, War and
Death, Susan D. Moeller cites 1994
as an "unusually apocalyptic year",
which, depending on your constitution,
is laughable — how it only gets worse
— or horrifying. How long, and how
uncanny it seems that we've been in this
shadowy and flighty apocalyptic state.
To that end, Robin's CRISIS LIBRARY
is a titular linchpin, and a nod to this
odd cultural impasse. It's the way in
which reproduction and recirculation
of archival material change though the
CRISIS LIBRARY, and through simply
re-inserting them into culture, which is
generative. It's the way the reader engages
with the library through the marked
lens of 2021. "I believe the audience
plays a big role in the reproduction
and preservation of these works. The
material being preserved in the CRISIS
LIBRARY is ultimately knowledge,
and that knowledge only really gets
reproduced when the materials are
read," Robin explains, "Ultimately the
goal of CRISIS EDITIONS and the
CRISIS LIBRARY is to recirculate these
materials since I believe they still do
hold some relevant knowledge value.
Their preservation happens through the
reproduction and dissemination. If this
was purely an archival practice, I would
just spend my time filling harddrives
with pdfs and every other piece of media
I can think of."
What is important to mention
about the CRISIS LIBRARY
is that it is beautiful. At
least, by my simple logic of beauty.
Pouring through digital archives, reading
lists and links is something I am drawn
to in theory, but find kind of unbearable
at length. I think circulation is important,
but I have more interest in intervention.
Intervention on archival materials — like
the work of early punk zines, collage
and xerox art — has stronger bones,
and a better appetite for subversion.
It's the ethos of building, trading, and
sharing without being flattened by
objectivity. What is beautiful about the
CRISIS LIBRARY is first, that it is frank.
There are curatorial and aesthetic interventions present — and that visibility
is what makes the library resonant.
My experience of CRISIS LIBRARY'S
aesthetic and artworks lead me to this
place of purposeful havoc. I take with
me pieces of those composite parts as
I download books. The chalky acid
graphics, the small markers of brutalist
web-design, haunting structural forms
and "infoshop" art. "Working with these
archival materials I try to create a sense of
temporal disconnect through the choice
of texts and aesthetic/design elements,"
Robin explains, "These texts now exist
both in the present, though their current
form in the library, but also in the past,
in their original forms. Sometimes I think
about CRISIS EDITIONS as an exercise in
temporal disruption through objects and
aesthetics." But the spectrality here is not
a mere question of atmospherics. What
defines this "hauntological" confluence
more than anything else is how it gently
steps into a larger cultural crisis: the
failure of the future.
More broadly, and more
troublingly, the CRISIS
LIBRARY gestures to what I
can only see as a fragile, kind of viscous,
kind of powerful, and incredibly fraught
idea of "normal life." The failure of
the future, more broadly, is the loss of
social imagination and intervention.
It's when things are reproduced and
redistributed with the acceptance of a
situation in which culture should continue
without really changing. That there
couldn't possibly be an alternative to the
established colonial, capitalist institution,
that redistribution should happen without
making an imprint. Every reiteration
can be a moment of intervention — and
in a time of endless links and lists, of
instagram "resource drops" and the
apparitional inversion of the "infoshop"
via digital platforms, it feels crucial to use
this opportunity to intervene.
he texts available in the CRISIS
LIBRARY span 10 years of
similarly sticky dissent —
the timelessness of the texts feeling
less a history lesson than a diagnosis.
The library confronts this impasse by
intervening on the process of redistribution, and also repetition. It adds
context by color and texture, and it's
platform provides the space to revisit
work in a way that makes sense.
I don't always believe the view through
my rickety body — that my sense of
culture, from here inside culture, is
clear. It is easier to get lost in the past
now that every moment is recorded and
presented in a flattened timeline view. But
I do believe in our ability to make small
incisions, to be part of the process of
copy making, and to dig holes in it, and
I think I believe in the crisis of not interfering with it all.
«mm$ nmmrf
 Discorder Magazine      Feb-March  2021
HflHDITfl RflTflH
Exploring India; history through the
Ions of matchbox labels
ok
b
Handita Ratan had an air
of self-assurance about her.
This was the first thing I
noticed as we began our zoom call.
One got the sense that everything
she does is with purpose. A thought-
fulness, it seems, only artists have as
they pick and mix colours on their
palettes to paint their canvases.
We exchanged our stories
- she grew up in India,
and went to Srishti
School of Art, Design
and Technology for design
although if you ask her what
her specific major was, she will
burst out laughing, since apparently no one in Srishti knew the
answer to that. She then came
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
in Vancouver, where she graduated in
May of 2020, right in the middle of the
pandemic. I related to this, as I grew
up in India and I am in Vancouver now
for my education.
For her master's thesis, Nandita
investigated India's shifting visual
culture through the lens of matchbox
labels. She deconstructed and created
her own labels to experiment with
visual language and its relationship to
contemporary narratives in India and
socio-political change. I was fascinated
and asked her where she got the idea.
"Well," she began, "I'm a very visual
person, and I pull from the physical
spaces around me. So when I was
in India, it didn't feel necessary to
represent my culture in my work. It
was only after coming to Vancouver,
really, that I felt the need to ask, 'How
can I pull from the things I genuinely
cherish?' The chaos I knew, the sense
of community I was accustomed to."
"Essentially, I studied all things old,
took stock of where they're at in the
present, and hypothesised how they
could be in
the future.
It started out
with me studying
nostalgia items: film
posters, typography, any printed
material, really. Then I narrowed
down to the matchbox. For a lot of
these things, the progression was really
linear. I clearly saw the distinction
between traditional movie posters and
digitally-made ones. You could get the
exact date to categorize them. But with
matchboxes, I couldn't make sense of
it. They were so innocuous. But so
important. We can't get by without
them in India."
I fervently agreed. I remembered as
a child scouring the entire house for
one, needed for performing a prayer,
and my mother disdainfully rejecting
the lighter our neighbour offered us.
I thought about India's history, and
an inevitable question formed: can
these matchboxes accurately capture
that history? Do they show the lulls
and larger moments, or are they more
transitionary?
Nandita paused.
"I think I found some pretty clear
distinctions based on how the printing
looked, so I personally don't think
it was transitionary. We went from
some pretty colonial-looking images,
to this weird era between the 50s and
the 90s, that just felt very quintes-
sentially Indian? In a very born-and-
brought-up way. And then there was
this explosion of pop culture references, to kitsch images that made no
sense! The matchbox would say the
word 'tiger' but have a completely
different image. It didn't seem like they
had a meaning at all."
"In terms of transitions, some
images were pretty specific, like
it would have an actress's face on
it, or a freedom fighter's. But, in
general I think the practicalities of
production, and catering to a market,
would disallow a real-time factory or
production house to make something
that completely realistically alluded
to a specific time in history. Because
there are repercussions, you know, to
how an image looks.'
Nandita has reckoned with that in
her practice. "I put my art out in a
very safe way, and only a specific type
of person gets to see it. So I'm allowed
to use my voice in whichever direction
I choose. So I chose to make one about
[Demonetisation in India], because I
remember how angry it made me."
Nandita was quick to acknowledge
her privilege - of being a brown girl able
to pursue exactly what she wanted, of
being a higher caste in a country where
casteism led to massacres, and of being
given a beautiful, colourful voice to
use without repercussions.
thought about the pandemic we
are in right now. Speaking of lulls,
*s»ttdif» a»* »«*
 ISOS  rioTJsM-ds'S      QiiisBgBMisbiooeia
EDITORIAL ILLUSTRATIONS BY: THTIHHH YfiKOVLEVfi
WORDS BY: RTIRfi HflIK
EDITED BY: CLARA DUBBER, ISAAC YOU, AFRODYKIE ZOE
ARTHORK COURTESY OF: HfiHDITfi RfiTfiN
******
PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF: HfiHDITfi RflTfiH
LfiYOUT BY: SHERI TURHER
t     •    t     •
•     •    •    •
•
[
HfiHDITfi RflTfiH
]
"I kind of feel like, more than anything, art -
whether it's a painting going to a gallery or
somebody's kid sister's drawing gives you the
space to internalise things happening during
the lulls."
ok
perhaps the most relevant is this
one. So what happens when they are
extended, or altered? How would art
represent that?
"I kind of feel like, more than anything,
art - whether it's a painting going to
a gallery or somebody's kid sister's
drawing - gives you the space to internalize things happening during the lulls.
For people who are constantly having
open conversations about these lulls,
these larger political instances, art is a
spectacular way of keeping momentum.
"In the past, access to visuals certainly
wasn't as quick as it is now, with social
media. So most of these lulls become
an opportunity to take up space, or
push our arguments forward. It's easy
for something like the US elections to
overshadow something as important
as BLM." Social media is helpful in
maintaining awareness of important
things that could be overshadowed. "A
lot of people say, 'Oh God, but we're
in the middle of a pandemic, why're
you protesting?' But that's especially
why you should be protesting. That's
essentially the use of what could have
been a lull, in making it something so
big, and so impactful."
Nandita clearly had strong views on
politics, having made pieces inspired
by events in India as well. I asked her
whether she thought her art had ever
been successful in affecting someone's
view of politics.
"I definitely have had trolls, and
I don't know how actively I could
change their view. Over time though,
just the fact that there's a conversation
happening is good, I think. There's
only so long someone can be in denial
for. And sometimes, people do have
rational responses, and at that point, I
think it's very important that whoever
put that work out responds to them."
Hs I absorb this, I go through
her website. Her art is very
illustrative, with bursts of
colours making her pieces feel light-
hearted. I ask her whether this is a
choice — she nods, 'Definitely a choice.
I'm still trying to figure out my style,
you know. A lot of my friends know
what works for them, what they like
doing. But for me, I realized I can't
stick to doing a single thing. In my
undergrad, I started with ink, and that
was so easy, so simple [...] working
with colour right now, it's an active
push to really focus on something I
want to get right."
I noticed that a lot of her pieces
featured a dark-skinned girl with jet
black hair and bangs, and it made me
wonder whether she made herself the
subject of her pieces often.
"Not on purpose. But I think that's
just for lack of realistic models around
us. A lot of times, if you barged into
an artist's studio, you would see them
making weird faces in the mirror." She
laughs. "My face is the first point of
reference I have. But, I thought it was
important that I show South Asian
skin representation as well, and so it
evolved into a conscious decision."
I stared at this sketch of a girl who
looks like me, unsuspectingly carrying
her groceries back home. The pastel
colour scheme somehow romanticised
the way I remembered India. Sometimes
it is hard to appreciate my country. It is
constantly fraught with tensions, riots,
and people crying murder over things
that, to the ordinary eye, do not seem
to matter. But Nandita has a gift - she
manages to capture the colours and
vibrancy of India, and pick and choose
poignant themes that make you feel
nostalgic and hopeful simultaneously.
Yes, art can be political; but even in
that, art is emotion - emotion about the
shows you watch, the books you read,
the places you visit, and of course, the
decisions that affect your country.
/'\
"NnnMn %ntentf
 • *
• »
ollowing several years of garnering attention •
'  across Canada with intermittent single •
releases and a slew of higher profile festival^
performances, Vancouver's Sam Lynch released her debut full-length' <
i «album, Little Disappearance, on October 9th.
Though it is far from a lengthy release — seven songs clocking in just •
under thirty minutes — Lynch's crisp songwriting and lush, sometimes >'
overly ornate arrangements make Little Disappearance feel like a fully
realized and well-crafted folk album. With that in mind, the album does
suffer from a lack of adventurousness at times, slipping into those '
occasional cliches and conventions that comes with most indie folk
projects.
The album starts with "Not My Body," by far the strongest of the lot.
A perfect blend of introspective and honest songwriting, with a sonic
palette that constantly shifts into an ever-more satisfying shape. After a <
drone-laden intro and verse, the song climaxes into a fuzzy and pulsating
mountain of rich and deep synths and strings, with Lynch's soft voice
cascading across the electric surface. The punch that this moment brings is • *\
unfortunately unmatched on the rest of the project, except for possibly the
transition between "Garden" and "Garden II," at the centre of the album.
"Garden" trails off into a steady and crumbling decay, before those
same notes arise with a new vigour in "Garden II," to mix with Lynch's
garbled and altered voice and form a storm of sound that seems to be
lurching out of the speakers at you — "On the edge of it all /1 scream to
hear / A little part of me stays / A little disappears." The torrent slips away
suddenly, as Lynch guides the listener onward, renewed from the rush.
The rest of the album, albeit very well written and immaculately
produced, doesn't have quite the spark for me. Maybe it comes from
hearing most of the tracks before as singles, the first of which was ' J
released way back in the summer of 2019; or maybe I'm already saturated
with enough thoughtfully orchestrated and contemplative indie-folk
music; or maybe I should just stop looking for reasons not to enjoy this
album, because it is an undeniably well crafted piece of music, regardless
of what some lowly reviewer might have to say. —Frances Shroff
•• •
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• • • •
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•••
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• •••♦
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• •♦ \
- • • •
• • ••
• • •
To submit music, podcasts, books, or film for review consideration to
Discorder Magazine, please email:
Jasper D. Wrinch, Section Editor
ur.discorder@citr.ca.
Send physical items of any kind to Discorder Under Review at
CITR101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, v6t1z1
::•••■
•♦....♦
• • • ~. • •
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26
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• • I • • • •
• • •
f- alade's debut EP Blindfolder is a moody,. '
I introspective collection that explores* '
r relationship power dynamics. Malade and
- her accompanying instrumental effortlessly shift tone from smooth to
• «    harsh, from plaintive to powerful. The transitions pull each song along in «
• "ways that feel complex and natural. Camille puts her synesthesia to good
• use in this colourful R&B EP that evidences her artistic efforts.
:
>• •
m
• 4
"Second Half" — Swinging instrumental accompany Malade as she
explores a breakup, telling herself she's "second half, second best, second
to nothing, second in the eyes of a god." Malade reclaims independence
in the song's discordant chorus, telling the subject "not to try to deserve
[her]." "Second Half" grows out into a beautiful crescendo of saxophone
and leaves us with the impression she's moved on.
"Blindfolded" — She explores the male gaze, telling the listener they've
left her "without a voice, without a choice." She condemns how men •
treat women in romantic relationships, exploring the ways women do
unreciprocated emotional and physical work. The track is very Amy •
Winehouse-y in tone and subject matter. The verse's instrumentals
are wonderfully snappy, then transition with Malade's vocals into the
expansive, flowing chorus. The guitar comes out hard as Malade reclaims *
her place and power.
"Commission" — The instrumentals give space to the song, letting •
Malade express her longing melancholy. There's the perfect amount of   '
accompaniment, haunting the listener. I read this as telling of a woman's
abusive relationship, ruminating on what drew her and her partner #
;
•  4
•   •
_
f:..
»«
together. Malade's chorus tells the listener "There's a light / I can't »
refuse / When it shines /1 feel the bruises fade / To a pale shade of grey." '
I love the piano outro with its accompanying guitar — it literally makes ►
me sigh (in a good way).
"SUV's" — Even my least favorite song on the EP is still good, with
its catchy melodic phrase and cool interplay between the different
instruments. I personally think there's too much violin in the song at <
places like the chorus, which has multiple layers of it. The melody is really ,
catchy, and the drums fit really nicely in drawing the song along, but I'm
not convinced of the song's progression or story. Maybe it's because I
• can't relate to parents who "pay bills they never ask for / Driving their
SUV's like a taskforce." Loneliness and feeling detached from the people
we love is universal, though.
"Roadkill" — Listening to this song at the end of 2020, it's tempting to
read "Roadkill" as a product of the COVID-19 quarantine, but the EP was
done being recorded in February. The chorus is now extremely relatable:
"These days the truth is that I don't feel much / Give me a party or a school
'%' < crush / A shot in the dark." But maybe instead, it's once again speaking
J     < from the perspective of the depressed victim of abuse, overpowered by
£• i   the "headlights," or desires, of their partner.
?#       Blindfolder is great. My one qualm with the EP is that there are moments
• of too much busyness. While I love the emotional complexity of the EP,
• • * some of my favorite parts are when Camille is given more space, and
I wish there was a teensy bit more of that. I think the violin is one part
that could've been used more judicially. But I mean, take my comments
with a grain of salt - I like The Blow. Over all, the EP is filled to the brim
with thought provoking lyrics, firm structures, catchy melodic lines, and
the aforementioned emotional and lyrical complexity I love to see. I look
• » « forward to whatever Malade blesses our ears with next. —Nick Jensen
■ • •
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UNDER REVIEW
■ • • ♦
Feb-March 2021
 ►       4
•   «
2020
• ■ •
Ian Noon's Colour Story, the lo-fi pop project
of Keenan Mittag-Degala, and sometimes*
David Parry, is the perfect album to use as * \ * *
'a soundtrack in your next indie film project.
Mittag-Degala, when writing about the album's release, said it best:
"These songs are windows into moments that, for [them], sparked feelings
of hope, love, and safety; amongst much else. [Their] wish is that you may '
sit at their sills, peer into them, step through even, and experience these ,
feelings for yourself." And the album does just that!
People who have listened to Elan Noon for a while will be happy to
know their sound hasn't changed much since their release of Have a •
Spirit Filled in 2017. Light percussion, some fantastic guitar playing and •
reverbed vocals are definite positives on Colour Story and David Parry
interesting topics such as wasting your life, accepting the inevitability (
of death and whether one's done all they were meant to do during their ►
lifetime. Some might say it's quite a large topic, or even too much to bring •
up in the closing song, but I think that thematic breadth has opened up a
mi       brilliant door for Georgia Lee Johnson to explore in her next release. —Valie (
has done a great job blending the sounds and songs together. The
instrumental sounds of the album are best portrayed in "Coggygria," the ■ »J^*
i * i
instrumental intermission of the album, which really showcases the guitar
work and the sprinkling of audio effects scattered throughout this piece.
While the production is lovely, I personally found the lyrics to be the main
attraction. Mittag-Degala has done an amazing job of crafting together the
lyrics of this album. Each song is written beautifully, with the exception
of "Lavender" which is less than a minute long and is simply about the
narrator's love for lavender!
Some of my personal favourite lyrics from this album are: "You look at
me / Like some forgotten / Dream you had last night," "Every time you try
to / Go out for a swim / Do you always have to cry / When you lie awake
at night / And the moonlight shines / Up against your skin," and "But
how can I be everything / At once for you my darling? / When I've got
trouble simply being me."
The opening lines of "Honeyrose" describe the album's mood perfectly,
saying "You wear colour glasses / When you walk around the world" and
even the album cover agrees! Listening to Colour Story, which has quite
a romantic collection of songs, is like wandering around with rose-tinted
glasses — everything is rosy, wistful and sentimental. —Valie
• • •
•
• ■
y
(§eorota£ee Johnson
• •
Lady Love
(sElf-releaseb)
December
EP
• •
alse Hope is the second 2020 release from* *
i the alternative, DIY, experimental, ambient
and lo-fi rapper, Nivram (AKASublime).
The record starts with an upbeat lo-fi dance •
track that contains noisy delayed snares, evolving beats around 120 BPM,
arpeggiated synth melodies, glitched samples, and trap hi-hats. This track
almost makes you feel like you are back at a party again — not socially
distanced, with no pandemic, no more masks, and forgetting all your
novel virus related worries ever existed. You can almost feel the memory
of sweaty bodies packed in close in a small room that's been converted
" to a dance floor. But-you're just in your room alone with headphones on.
► J, Brevity seems to be the artistic focus of this record - with most tracks
*!• » less than 2 minutes in length - the artist streamlines their thoughts,
* emotional affect, and sonic world as quickly as possible. This artistic
precision is especially highlighted on the last couple of tracks.
The last two tracks contain beats produced by RIP FI0W and also the
first lyrical statements from Nivram on the record. On the song, "Vanity,"
the most profound line seems to ring like a dance floor confessional, as the
steady tempo falls apart, slows down, and opens up around the words, "You
never really cared for me" and a sonic swelling and cascading of the line, "I
said what I said" followed by, "If you don't like it leave / Fuck" highlighting
an emotional strain on some unmentioned relationship falling apart.
"Stanley," the final track before the reprise of "Vanity," echoes
feelings of loneliness, anger directed towards racial profiling in Toronto,
sleeplessness and a want to find peace and rest in a succinct stream of *
consciousness flow that is less than one minute in length.
Nivram's False Hope is a skillful and quick display that starts with a
hope and ends with lyrical pain and loneliness that is left for the listener to •
sit with unresolved. —Faur Tuuenty
• _ •
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•: *
?«
••• •
•:•
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JF
Georgia Lee Johnson, you can already telli
• that you're in for a very relaxing and calm experience.
Georgia Lee Johnson, a local Vancouver artist was named one of the , f •
, "Ten best new acts in Vancouver to keep an eye and an ear on" by the •
t Georgia Straight in 2018 and has definitely lived up to that title. Her latest »
release, an EP titled Lady Love, is quite similar to previous releases by
Johnson, although the songs on this EP do seem to be slightly more quiet,
soft and restrained than those on her last release, 2019's Languages.
Despite the songs on Lady Love all having a similar sound, each one
brings a slightly different theme, topic or musical element to the table.
"First Man" is a wonderful song sonically, the perfect amount of acoustic
instrumental mixed with some sweet sounding vocal layering. The song
does drag on a little towards the end, but the visual imagery of the lyrics
definitely make up for it, as Lee Johnson portrays picturesque scenes
with her words: The contour of cedar's twisted limbs," "When the heron
flies at dusk," and "The wind lifts her like a song" — how beautiful is that!
Unfortunately, while I am usually a big fan of vocal layering and
harmonization, I did find it slightly overused on this EP. In addition, the
production elements sometimes felt out of sync, but in a way that added
to the homemade vibe of the release.
" "Endsong" lyrically wraps up the EP perfectly. It brings forward some
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Urban Native Youth
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►- ince the summer of 2017, Cole Nowicki, Vancouver
I based writer and curator, hosted fine., an interdis
ciplinary evening of storytelling and otherwise at* ]
the Lido every month, up until February of 2020, when, 4
fine, pivoted to the online sphere for two iterations. After
years of the compelling and recurring events that had
'become a staple for Vancouver's literary, comedy, music and art scenes
the months without fine. — the better part of 2020 — felt like a piece of
'the city had gone missing.
Fortunately for us, Nowicki spent that time away from the Lido to •
assemble a diverse selection of work from fine, alumni, and put it all
together into a fine, collection, vol. 1. This small book (published by «
Nowicki's own imprint, fine, press) contains an array of work from 35 •
artists in a joyful resurrection of the beloved variety show.
The contents of the collection, while accounting for only a fraction 1'
of those who performed at fine, over the years, are a wonderful
representation of the range of genres, mediums, and styles. From
Beni Xiao's candidly hilarious and despondent piece entitled "Keanu  '
Reeves' Fake Plastic Dong: A Fanfiction;" to Jessica Johns' quiet and
earnest meditations on meditation with "Headspace (For Shaun "Bean"
Robinson, again);" to Tariq Hussain's prosaic untangling of cultural f
identity, fast food and pop music in "Emotional Rescue;" to Dallas Hunt's
quick, potent and cutting list of "Thoughts, Indoors, During Canada Day 4
and COVID-19" — a fine, collection is as eclectic as it is hard to put down.   '
And to represent both the musical and visual aspects of fine, (each
event featured a musical act to close the night, as well as an incredible •
poster designed by a new artist each month), the centre of the book >
contains four artistic representations of four songs by some of fine.'s *
musical alumni. Aaron Read's illustrative take on Devours' bombastic *
"Taxidermy: the Musical" is especially lovely.
fthcjabtb
eginning during the #BLM protests and
the COVID-19 pandemic, The Jaded^'
is a podcast that brings Black people
together to discuss pertinent issues within Black" <
_ communities. Hosted by UBC student Moussa •
^Niang, and accompanied by various guests, The Jaded examines their, '
I* " ^thoughts about the diverse experiences of Black folks in a wide range* '
t    • of topics from colourism and police brutality to cultural appropriation.
4        Moussa often begins the show with personal experiences with the topic
• 4    and then opens the floor for his guests to provide their insights. Sharing 4
,•  *  4jntra-communal knowledge and asking big questions concerning topics,
{    ' <such as identity and mental health, The Jaded has also become a space
"    ,"to contend with Blackness.
U '       As the podcast is ultimately shaped to be a conversation between •
•
• »
In his "Wee Note From the Editor" that opens this volume, Nowicki
describes the live events as "an intimate, often unpredictable, and
occasionally raucous blending of mediums." And while we are all anxiously
awaiting its return, with chairs packed tightly together, occupied to their
capacity, all facing that little stage tucked into the corner of the Lido,
anticipating Cole's endearing introductions to a night of marvellous words
— until then, this collection will do just fine. —Jasper D Wrinch
•• •
:.4
the audience, the host and the guests, there are various moments of
•
:
• *■*
V
• <
»■ •
J-: «
■
»*
:
vulnerability throughout, such as an episode in which Moussa questions
the established boundaries that police Blackness in our communities.
, These instances further remind me of the genuine care involved in the
« podcast. Moreover, Moussa and his guests always push the conversation
further beyond the superficial, noting the nuances that surround topics.
For instance, in an episode about colourism, Moussa and the guests
propelled the discussion to move beyond the typical discourse of •
coloursim (i.e. dating), and they talk about the impacts of having darker
skin when it comes to incarceration and employability, and other systems
of oppression, such as featurism and fatphobia, that impact the politics of 4
desirability for Black people.
The multifaceted discussions do not only challenge the host and •
guests, but they also present challenges to the listener. In an episode
that I really enjoy, "Faith and Spirituality within Black Communities,"
Moussa and guests, Lillian and Keitu, talk about the ambiguities and
complexities of faith and spirituality within Black communities. They
provide knowledge about traditional ancestral worship and examine
the influence of Abrahamic religions on Indigenous beliefs while also ►
challenging one another and the listener. As a listener, I was pushed to
think more carefully about my views concerning ancestral veneration and •
rituals, ideas that I have toiled with but never truly gave my full attention.
The Jaded is a podcast rich in conversation, giving us the space to have  ,
critical discussions and I hope these conversations continue to happen. ,
—Idaresit Thompson
• • 4
• 4
:
4
• 4
»♦
:
• 4
 CiTR 101.9FM PROGRAM GUIDE
'Discorder  recommends  listening to  CiTR every day."  - Discorder
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CiTR  GHOST  MIX PACIFIC  PICON"
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8AM
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BREAKFAST  WITH
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10 AM
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AND PATH
CiTR GHOST MIX
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FILIPINO FRIDAYS    CiTR GHOST MIX
12 PM
1PM
PARTS UNKNOWN
2 PM
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CUSHY RADIO
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
FLOWER POWER HOUR
C-POP CONNECTION
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
CiTR GHOST MIX
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
LA BONNE HEURE w.
VALIE
ALL ACCESS PASS
THUNDERBIRD EYE
DIALECTIC
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
ABORIGINAL FRONT
DOOR SOCIETY
PODCAST
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
CUSHY RADIO
ASTROTALK
SPIT IN
YOUR EAR
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PHONE BILL
MANTRA
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5 PM
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CiTR    BLUE &
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EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
8 PM
9 PM
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THE JAZZ SHOW
FLEX YOUR HEAD
CiTR
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I    HIDE-AWAI
I COME FROM THE
MOUNTAIN
K-POP CAFE
NASHA VOLNA
FRIDAY NIGHT FEVER
CiTR GHOST MIX
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AFRICAN RHYTHMS
CRIMES & TREASONS
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NINTH WAVE
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11PM
12AM
1AM
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LATE
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STRANDED
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FHLOSTON
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LIVE FROM
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OVERNIGHT
CiTR GHOST MIX
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OF INSOMNIA
CiTR GHOST MIX
6 PM
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RTjvTi'tjMQ   I     I.EGHNO
TTOTA PROGRE 8PM
l will A ssi vo
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9 PM
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LATE
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DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
<-hey, this kind of cell means this show is hosted by students
They are also highlighted in this colour on the guide,
you can't miss it.
 BREAKFASTWITH
THE BROWNS
8AM-11AM, ECLECTIC
Yourfavourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
• breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmailcom
FILIPINO FRIDAYS
11AM-1PM, SPOKEN WORD
Filipino Fridays is a podcast for the
modern Filipinx millennial.
• programming@citr.ca
PARTS UNKNOWN
IPM-3PM, ROCK/POP/IN DIE
Host Chrissariffic takes you
on an indie pop journey
not unlike a marshmallow
sandwich: soft and sweet
and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and
held close to a fire.
• programming@citr.ca
CUSHY RADIO
4PM-5PM, ROCK/POP/IN DIE
Cushy Radio is a weekly
show hosted by Aly Laube,
the co-owner of Cushy
Entertainment. The purpose of Cushy is to uplift
and amplify the voices
of marginalized artists
through event production
and promotion — a mission
dear to Aly's heart as well
as her business partner's,
Mati Cormier. They're
both queerwomen who
grew up in the local music
scene, and together they
try to throw the most
inclusive, accessible, and
fun parties possible.
• programming@citr.ca
BLUE & GOLDCAST
6PM -7PM, SPOKEN WORD
The Blue and Goldcast is a monthly
podcast hosted by UBC President &
Vice-ChancellorSanta J. Ono.
• programming@citr.ca
• DELIBERATE NOISE
5PM-6PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
E>ve rocking out to live
...usic, but don't feel
like paying cover? Tune
in for the latest and
greatest punk, garage rock,
local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
• ninapaniniT234@gmaif.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television,
along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge
new tracks, and strange
goodies for soundtracks
to be. All in the name
of ironclad whimsy.
• programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker
takes listeners from the
past to the future of jazz.
With featured albums
and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
• programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time
music and its derivatives
with Arthurand the
lovely Andrea Berman.
• pacificpickin@yahoo.com
• INTERSECTIONS
Tune in monthly for conversations about gender, race
and social justice brought
to you by CiTR's Gender
Empowerment Collective!
• genderempowerment@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Sweet treats from the
pop underground.
Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts.
• duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
• FLOWER POWER HOUR
2PM-3PM, MUSIC
The Flower Power
Hour, hosted by Aaron
Schmidtke, is designed to
give a platform for artists
that are underrepresented,
underappreciated or even
underplayed. While the
primary focus of the Flower
Power Hour is to play quality music to ease listeners
into their afternoons, it
is also to educate them
on these artists played.
• programming@citr.ca
C-POP CONNECTION
3PM-4PM,C-POP/INTERNATIONAL
C-POP Connection brings
you some of the most
popularsongs in the
Chinese music industry!
The show also talks about
Chinese culture to connect
you to the Chinese society.
Tune in with your host DJ
Sab to get updated on the
hottest singles, album,
and news in C-POP!
• programming@citr.ca
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/POP
a show with music
about being uncool
• programming@citr.ca
.INTO THE WOODS
TUES 5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Lace up your hiking boots
and get ready to join Mel
Woods as she explores
music by female and
LGBTQ+artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree?
Nope, just another great
track you won't hear
anywhere else. We provide
the music mix, but don't
forget your own trail mix!
• programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and
hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from
around the world.
• programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
8PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop
& Trill $h*t. Hosted by
JamalSteeles, Homeboy
Jules, Relly Rels, Malik,
horsepowar& Issa.
• dj@crimesandtreasons.com
• crimesandtreasons.com
SEASONS OF LIFE
lOPM-llPM, TALK / MUSIC
Seasons of Life attempts to
understand the crossroads
between distinct phases
in our guests' lives and
the music that came with
them. Host Sean Roufosse
interviews a wide array of
guests with diverse stories
and musical influences
to help add context to
why people love/loved
the songs they do.
• programming@citr.ca
STRANDED:
CAN/AUS MUSIC SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds past and present,
from his Australian homeland. Journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
• programming@citr.ca
PLANET FHLOSTON
11PM-12AM, IMPROVISED MUSIC
A late night exploration
into the depths of
the unknown...
• programming@citr.ca
CANADALAND
7AM-8AM, NEWS/SPOKEN WORD
CANADALAND is a news
site and podcast network
funded by its audience.
Their primary focus is on
Canadian media, news,
current affairs, and politics.
• programming@citr.ca
SUBURBANJUNGLE
8AM-1C-AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information and insanity.
• dj@jackvelvet.net
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with musicforyour ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future. Genre need not apply.
• programming@citr.ca
. LA BONNE HEURE
WITH VALIE
1PM-2PM	
A new show on the air?!
From mellow and indie, to
more experimental, join
'La Bonne Heure' for a
little bit of it all- both in
English and en Francais!
With some interviews on
the horizon and many
good times too... soyez
surde nous rejoindre!
• programming@citr.ca
.ALL ACCESS PASS
ALTERNATING WED 2PM-3PM,
TALK/ACCESSIBILITY POLITICS/
DISABILITY	
We talk about equity,
inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse
abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every
second Wednesday from
3-4pm for interviews,
music, news, events, and
awesome dialogue.
• Twitter: @access_citr
• THUNDERBIRD EYE
3PM-4PM, SPORTS/SPOKEN WORD
• programming@citr.ca
• DIALECTIC
4PM-5PM, ROCK/POP/IN DIE
Defined as "The way in
which two different forces
or factors work together",
Dialectic brings the distinct
music tastes of hosts
Chase and Dan together.
Each episode showcases a
variety of indie rock and
beyond, bound together by
the week's unique theme.
• programming@citr.ca
.ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ARTS &
CULTURE	
The Arts Report on CiTR
brings you the latest and
upcoming in local arts in
Vancouver from a volunteer
run team that likes to get
weird! Based primarily in
Vancouver, BC, your show
hosts (Ashley and Jake)
are on the airwaves.
• arts@citr.ca
SAMSOUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM,
ROCK/POP/INDIE
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss herspins,
every Wednesday.
• programming@citr.ca
I COME FROM
THE MOUNTAIN
8PM-9PM, ECCLECTIC
The show that doesn't
happen on a physical
mountain, but it does
happen in the mountains
of your mind. Bittersweet.
• artcoordinator@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-IOPM, HIP HOP/ RfiB/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and
the snow capped rocky
mountains, A-Ro The Naut
explores the relationships
of classic and contemporary stylings through jazz,
funk and hip hop lenses.
• Facebook: Ninth WaveRadio
LATE NIGHT WITH
THE SAVAGES
11PM-1PM, INDIGENOUS MUSIC
Late Night With Savages
features indigenous
programming covering traditional and contemporary
artists, musical releases,
and current cultural affairs.
• programming@citr.ca
THURSMU
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
6AM-7AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces
you to topics through his
unique lens. From news,
to pop culture and sports,
Issa has the goods.
• programming@citr.ca
BREAKFASTWITH
THE BROWNS
7AM-IOAM, ECLECTIC
Yourfavourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
• breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmailcom
• ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
IOAM-IIAM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I
interview bands and
play new, international,
and local punk rock
music. Broadcasted by
Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
• rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com
• rocketfromrussiacitr@gmait.com
• @tima_tzar
• Facebook: RocketFromRussia
ABORIGINAL FRONT DOOR
SOCIETY PODCAST
11AM-12PM, SPOKEN WORD
The AFDS Podcast shares
stories of individuals who
have triumphed over a
life of addictions from
the Downtown Eastside.
If you would like to
participate please reach
out to us at reception@
abfrontdoor.org.
• reception@abfrontdoor.org
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/IN DIE
Sweet treats from the
pop underground.
Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts.
• duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
CUSHY RADIO
4PM-5PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Cushy Radio is a weekly
show hosted by Aly Laube,
the co-owner of Cushy
Entertainment. The purpose of Cushy is to uplift
and amplify the voices
of marginalized artists
through event production
and promotion — a mission
dear to Aly's heart as well
as her business partner's,
Mati Cormier. They're
both queer women who
grew up in the local music
scene, and together they
try to throw the most
inclusive, accessible, and
fun parties possible.
• programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM -3PM, TALK/SCIENCE
Space is an interesting
place. Marco slices up the
night sky with a new topic
every week. Death Starts,
Black Holes, Big Bang,
Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
• programming@citr.ca
.SPIT IN YOUR EAR
Brought to you by the
CiTR Music Collective!
• programming@citr.ca
• LISTENING PARTY
4PM-gPM, MUSIC
The best new music
curated by the CiTR
Music Department.
• jaspersloanyip@gmail.com
• FEELING SOUNDS
5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
All about indie music and
its many emotions. I'm always looking for local and
student artists to feature!
• programming.executive@citr.ca
K-POP CAFE
6PM-7PM, K-POP/ECCLECTIC/
NEWS
Jayden focuses on Korean
Culture, News, Music,
Movies, and TV Shows as
well as Korean Society
here in Vancouver through
Korean Food, Guests and
Korean Language Lessons.
• programming@citr.ca
PROF TALK
7PM-8PM, SPOKEN WORD
Prof Talk is a conversation- a
dialogue about life, literature,
science, philosophy and everything
in between.
• programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
8PM-9PM, RfiB/SOUL/JAZZ/
INTERNATIONAL
Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and
future. This includes jazz,
soul, hip-hop, Afro-Latin,
funk, and eclectic Brazilian
rhythms. There are also
interviews with local
and international artists.
Truly, a radio show with
international flavor.
• programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s)
every week performing in
the comfort of the CiTR
lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the
country and around the
world are nice enough
to drop by to say hi.
• programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s)
every week performing in
the comfort of the CiTR
lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the
country and around the
world are nice enough
to drop by to say hi.
• programming@citr.ca
CRACKDOWN
7AM-8AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
The drug war, covered
by drug users as war
correspondents. Crackdown
is a monthly podcast about
drugs, drug policy and the
drug war led by drug user
activists and supported
by research. CiTR is airing
all episodes weekly.
• @crackdownpod
QUEER FM
8AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
In case you missed them
on Tuesday, tune in to
Queer FM's rebraodcast
on Friday morning!.
• queerfmvancouver@gmail.com
• GLOBAL GET DOWN
ALTERNATING FRI 10AM-=11AM,
NEWS/TALK	
Produced by UBC's
International Relaations
Student Association,
Global Get Down explores
issues ranging from
cultural exchange to
taking non-conventional
approaches to approaching
international issues.
• programming@citr.ca
»MUSE-ISH
Using found sounds, new
music, and an eclectic vinyl
library join me, chronfused,
as I mish mash everything
that inspires me (and
anything you send in) into
new improvised tunes.
• programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
• daveradiopodcast@gmail.com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP /SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on
each other and leave mix
tapes and love letters in
each other's lockers xo
• Facebook: @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, EXPERIMENTAL /
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF RADIO
ART in a snack size format!
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
• Twitter: @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour
and a half of Manhattan
Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola
doot doo... doot doo!
■  nardwuar.com/rad/contact/
• PHONE BILL
5PM-6PM, ECCLECTIC	
Hey there you've reached
Phone Bill on CiTR 101.9FM.
So sorry we can't take
you're call right now,but
please tune on Fridays
at 5pm for the freshest
guest-curated playlists
from accross the country!
• programming@citr.ca
• FRIDAY NIGHT FEVER
6PM - 7:30PM, DISCQ/R.&B
Friday Night Fever - an
exploration into the disco
nation B-) Every alternating
Friday, join Sophie and
Max on a journey of disco,
funk, and RnB on CiTR
101.9. Night-time is just
around the corner, so get
ready to head out with
some groovy tunes.
• programming@citr.ca
CANADA POST ROCK
7:30PM-9PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Formerly on CKXU,
Canada Post Rock remains
committed to the best in
post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and
basically anything your
host Pbone can put the
word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
• programming@citr.ca
• Twitter: @pbone
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-IOPM, TALK/RADIO DRAMA
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through
the art of Radio Drama.
Story readings, poetry
recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host
Brian MacDonald. Have
an interest in performing?
Guest artists are always
welcome, contact us!
. Twitter: @Skatds_Hatl
SaTURMU
THE SATURDAYEDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31st year on CiTR,
The Saturday Edge is my
personal guide to world &
roots music, with African,
Latin and European music
in the first half, followed by
Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
• steveedge3@mac.com
. VIVAPORU: THE OINTMENT
FOR THE SOUL
"Similar to vicks-vapo-rub,
the magical ointment
that seems to cure it all,
we bring you cultural
medicine to nourish
your soul Latinx style".
• vivaporu.citr@gmail.com
ART HEALS
ALTERNATING SAT 12PM-1PM,
SPOKEN WORD
Art Heals highlights artists
and creative initiatives
where arts and mental
health meet. The aim is to
inspire, raise awareness,
reduce stigmas, and explore
diverse stories of healing.
• programming@citr.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, LOUD/METAL
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darkerside of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided
by Coleman, Serena,
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
• programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and
blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
• codeb\ue@pau\norton.ca
MANTRA
ALTERNATING SAT 5PM-6PM,
ELECTRONIC/MANTRA/NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the
many faces of sacred sound
- traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic
array of electronic and
acoustic beats, music,
chants and poetry from
the diverse peoples and
places of planet earth.
• mantraradioshow@gmaif.com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, TALK/RUSSIAN
Informative and entertaining program in Russian.
• nashavoIna@shaw.ca
• CITR NEWS: ON THE POINT
7PM-8PM, NEWS/SPOKEN WORD
News from around
Vancouver brought to you
by the News Collective
at CiTR 101.9 FM.
• programming@citr.ca
• GENERATION STRANGE
ALTERNATING SAT 7PM-8PM,
SPOKEN WORD/MUSIC
Welcome folkies to
Generation Strange a
lovely hour where people
showcase theirfavourite
ideas n moments thru
music history, stay tuned
for deep dives, artist
interviews and Ml bit of fun
conversational analysis.
• programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
Every show is full of
electro bleeps, retrowave,
computer generated,
synthetically manipulated
aural rhythms. If you like
everything from electro
/ techno / trance / Sbit
music/ and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
• programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no
concept of genre, style,
political boundaries or
even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our
focus on a series, The
Solid Time of Change, 661
Greatest Records of the
Prog. Rock Era -1965-79.
We're not afraid of noise.
• programming@citr.ca
sunuau
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
OF INSOMNIA
2AM-3AM, EXPERIMENTAL/
GENERATIVE
4 solid hours of fresh
generative music c/o the
Absolute Value of Noise and
its world famous Generator.
Ideal for enhancing your
dreams or, if sleep is not on
your agenda, your reveries.
• programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
8AM-10AM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUE-
GRASS
Pacific Pickin', originally
aired on Tuesday mornings,
brings you the best in
bluegrass plus its roots and
branches: old time, classic
country, rockabilly, western
swing and whatever
jumps off the shelves at
us. Most shows have an
artist feature and a gospel
set. Hear the historical
recordings and the latest
releases right here.
• pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SHOOKSHOOKTA
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
• programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time.
Playing the best in roots
rock reggae, Dub, Ska,
Dancehall with news
views & interviews.
• program ming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-
in-yer-boots country.
• program ming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL/LATIN
AMERICAN
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
• program ming@citr.ca
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, INTERNATIONAL/BHA-
JAN S/OAWWALIS/SUFI
Presenting several genres
of rich Indian music in
different languages, poetry
and guest interviews.
Dance, Folk, Qawwalis,
Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock& Pop. Also,
semi-classical and classical
Carnatic & Hindustani
music and old Bollywood
numbers from the 1950s
to 1990s and beyond.
• rhythmsindia8@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, ELECTRONIC/ DEEP
HOUSE
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house,
prog-house and techno +
DJ / Producer interviews
and guest mixes.
• program ming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, ELECTRONIC/TRANCE
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from
Vancouver, BC since 2001.
We favour Psytrance, Hard
Trance and Epic Trance,
but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, Hard Dance
and even some Breakbeat.
We also love a good
Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
•   djsmileymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer
discussion show is centered
around Vancouver White-
caps, MLS and the world of
football. Est. in 2013, the
show features roundtable
chat about the week's big
talking points, interviews
with the headline makers,
a humorous take on the
latest happenings and
even some soccer-related
music. If you're a fan
of the beautiful game,
this is a must-listen.
• program ming@citr.ca
lslau*°f
to$tToy$
• STUDENT PROGRAMMING
ECLECTIC
Marks any show that
is produced primarily
by students.
CITR GHOST MLX
ANYTHING/EVERYTHING
Late night, the on air
studio is empty. Spirits
move from our playlist
to your ear holes. We
hope they're kind, but we
make no guarantees.
RADIO ART GHOST MLX
SOUNDS / IDEAS / EXPERIMENTS
From the makers of 24
hours of Radio Art, Radio
Art Ghost mix gives you a
taste of the weird, wonderful, and challenging.
• SPECIAL PROGRAMMING
3PM-5PM, SOMETHING SPECIAL
A spot for podcasts and
special programming
from CiTR. Tune in for
Vancouver COVID-19
Update, Motherlands,
Speak My Language,
Queer Noize, and more.
Subscribe whereever
you get your podcasts.
• @CiTRRadio
• program ming@citr.ca
 tmmm
NUARY 2021
rtist   I  Album   I    Label
IT
Various artists*#+
100 Block Rock
Incidental Press        |
! ^
PRADO*#+
STRIP
TMWRK RECORDS              |
I ,
redress*+
audionography
Self-Released          |
! *
Odario*
Good Morning Hunter
Do Right Music         |
! »
Potatohead People *+
Mellow Fantasy
Bastard Jazz Records    |
I ,
Evan Shay*+
New Normal
Self-Released          |
! »
Hailey Blais*#+
Below the Salt
Tiny Kingdom Music     4
I .
Petal Supply*#+
Hey-EP
SONG Music            |
! »
shitlord fuckerman*+
brain donor
Self-Released          |
I «
Mi'ens*#+
Future Child
Kill Rock Stars         |
li
Nivram AKAsublime*+
False Hope
Self-Released          |
N
kumi motek*
pis1 ainp
Self-Released          |
1"
Red Herring*#+
Neon
Rapid Transformation    |
|u
Baby Blue + Ugent*#+
Senescence
Self-released          |
1   B
The Cyrillic Typewriter*+
Permanent Colours
JAZ Records           |
I"
Mattmac*+
20/20
Self-Released          |
1 0
ILAM*#
Nene
GSI Musique             |
|M
Bedwetters Anonymous*+
Framed
Self-Released          |
!«
Backxwash*#
God Has Nothing to Do With
This Leave Him Out of It
Grimalkin              |
1^
Miguel Maravilla*+
TYPHOON
Self-Released          |
It.
Nicholas Krgovich*+
PASADENA AFTERNOON
Tin Angel Records      4
h
Jody Glenham*#+
Melt
Self-released          |
h
Izzy Cenedese*#+
freshly squeezed (draft)
Self-Released          |
1*
Buildings and Food*#
Up Down Strange Charm
Self-released          |
la
The Weather Station**
Ignorance
Outside Music          |
1^
Aquakultre*
Legacy
Black Buffalo Records  |
l»
Jupiter Sprites*
Holographic
Self-Released          |
|»
Braids'*
Shadow Offering
Secret City Records     |
M
TheShilohs*+
Tender Regions
Light Organ Records    |
!»
Itchy Self*
Here's the Rub
Self-Released          |
la
Various artists*#+
Short Songs 2
Kingfisher Bluez        |
\n
Brutal Poodle*#+
Night Creeps
Kingfisher Bluez        |
h
The Golden Age of
Wrestling*+
Tombstone Piledriver
Self-Released          |
!«
Battlekat*+
By Any Means
Dip Hop Music          |
I»
Saltwater Hank*+
That's Not How Tommy
Played It, Vol. 1
Self-Released          |
|»
House Wind*+
Nighthoney: Melodoes for
Prepared Guitar, Vol. 2
Self released          |
l»
Freelove Fenner*#
The Punishment Zone
Self-Released          |
|»
Homofonik*
Smoke + Mirrors
Self-Released          |
l»
Yu Su*#+
Yellow River Blue
bie Records            |
l«
Norine Braun*#+
December Falls
Self-released          |
1   «
Quite Like This
Easy Pieces EP
Self-Released          |
1®
Khotin*
Finds You Well
Self-Released          |
1*
Bella White*
Just Like Leaving
Self-Released          |
1  «
Be Afraid*#+
Remember Fun
Hidden Bay Records     |
1 m
Nivram*+
Restless (demo)
Self-Released          |
!<«
Twin Flames*#
OMEN
Self-Released          |
|»
Adrianne Lenker#
songs
4AD                    |
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The Elwins*
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We Are Busy Bodies      |
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WAKE*
Devouring Ruin
Self-Released          |
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•• r i a:
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DEVIL MAY WEAR
198E21STAVE
* 10% off
EASTVAN GRAPHICS
304 INDUSTRIAL AVE
* logoff
LUCKY'S BOOKS
& COMICS
3972 MAIN ST
10% off books and comics
RED CAT RECORDS
4332 MAIN ST
* 10% off
RED CAT RECORDS
2447 E HASTINGS ST
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SAVE ON MEATS
43 W HASTINGS ST
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THE PINT PUBLIC HOUSE
455 ABBOTT ST
* 20% off food bill
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
3934 MAIN ST
A free DIY button with any
purchase over $5.
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AUDIOPILE RECORDS
* 10% off
SPARTACUS BOOKS
3378FINDLAYST
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STORMCROW TAVERN
1305 COMMERCIAL DR
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RUFUS GUITAR
& DRUM SHOP
1803 COMMERCIAL DR
* 10% off strings and
accessories
THE CINEMATHEQUE
1131 HOWE ST
* Ismail bag of popcorn
per person per evening
DEVIL MAY WEAR
1666 JOHNSON ST UNIT #110
* 10% off
FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
147 E PENDER ST
Free Cover to Midnight Mondays & Happy
Ending Fridays (before 10:30 pm)
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
& ART EMPORIUM
1238 DAVIE ST
* 10% off
VINYL RECORDS
321W HASTINGS ST
' 10% off new and used
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1968 W4TH AVE
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6138 STUDENT UNION BLVD, ROOM 36
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4440 W10TH AVE
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Members of CiTR and Discorder
get sweet deals with these sweetie
Just show 'em your membership!
For more information about our friem
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