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 Nov-Dec
2020
"THAT POST NORMAL MAGAZINE FROM CiTR 101.9 FM"
SIJ0L37 jjJo.o? 3$$ue i4<y
JLocal + JFree
 AT HOME
NOV 18-22
♦CBCPODCASTS
1" VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER l^gDCAST FESTIVAL
by POX A
creative bc I ^rJKsg*
STORYHI
s?u
WOODWARD'S
 That POST NORMAL Magazine
from CiTR 101.9 FM
Nov-Dec 2020// Vol.37 // No.3 // Issue #4 J6
^ cover screenshot of Cyb3r Warehouse by James Spetifore
Editor's Note
•••••••••••••••
Disguise Self
Illusion
Level: 1
Range: Self
Duration: 1 hour
You make yourself - including your clothing, armor, weapons,
and other belongings on your person - look different until the
spell ends or until you use your action to dismiss it.
You can seem 1 foot shorter or taller and can appear thin, wide,
or in between. You can't change your body type, so you must
adopt a form that has the same basic arrangement of limbs.
Otherwise, the extent of the illusion is up to you.
An update: I suspect I have, and will continue to be, wrong
in my opinions on a variety of things into which I stumbled
with an insubordinate amount of passion and stubbornness.
I have been wrong, or untalented, or mostly delusional, but I
have never preferred expertise over experience. I hope it has made me a
slightly less shitty, slightly more kind person in the world. I do think there
is an increased societal preoccupation with expertise — we make all these
declarations about what we are good at and where we specify. Growing
up in the late '90s, this was best exemplified in that infamous "What's
your thing?" PSA which ran between cartoons. Beyond the pleasant tuba
kid, or Johnny cutting his sister in half — again — it made me anxious
and indignant. It still does. Not because I didn't have "a thing," but
rather because my "things" never felt like they fit the agenda. The PSA
focused on an extreme singularity — its message preferred expertise over
inspiring us to do things we liked, just for the sake of it. Just because it
felt good. Now, more than ever, I am not interested in setting parameters
for myself that remain fixed. The sense that each, or any, interest may
be lost to a measure of proficiency leaves a residue of perpetual loss (or
makes a perfect capitalist?) So let me try and articulate this; there is a
death to doing only what one is good at. Change is a means of insisting
upon something — which is often very good. It can also be very bad. But
I'm 100% not qualified to determine that.
ANOTHER UPDATE: Discorder is not a Magazine by, and for, experts.
It has taken me some time to feel I can make declarative statements about
"the direction" thus far, but I feel I need to clarify this at least. This is a
magazine less flashy than journals, zines, music rags, and art criticism.
It is better understood as a snapshot of Vancouver at a particular time,
and it wouldn't be any fun if it was regulated. If it was made exclusive
by having been written by, and for, the same people. What we have tried
to do in this issue is address that. You will notice each spread has been
designed independently, by designers both seasoned and new. Writers
from varying points of interest and experience have contributed on a
variety of topics they may not be directly affiliated with. Read first time
contributor Atira Naik's interview with Kitty Prozac — a compassionate
piece about practical intimacy. Or tuck into long-time writer Katherine
Gear Chambers' experience talking with, and about, artist Hazel Meyer.
I want this to feel like a magazine you can, and should, write for.
Discorder should feel experiential and accessible. Stories this month
circulate people doing shit because they just decided to. There is a
relationship between social power and privilege, and the ability to say
what counts as knowledge, and I think we have an opportunity here to
reform who gets to talk about what. Nobody actually needs a degree to
talk about art.
If this doesn't yet seem like an invitation to contact me, (editor@citr.
ca) or Jasper, (rla.discorder@citr.ca) or Ricky, (artcoordinator@citr.ca)
or Fatemeh (web.editor@ritr.ca) about contributing to Discorder, in
whatever capacity, with whatever experience, then let me make it clear:
we want your voice. Even if that makes you kinda nervous. Especially if
it makes you kinda nervous.
Between the bones of the earth and a very bad headache -
~I    ~(@_@)~   all  hail   ~(@_@)~
IRREGULARS
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^ doorstep for one year.   ;
^DISTRIBUTE
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"V, in your business, email ■
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\D   O   N   A  T   E
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^s relevant details 4-6
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You may also direct
comments, complaints  ,
and corrections via
email.
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico //
Advertising Coordinator: Tasha Hefford // Discorder Student Executive: Isaac You //
Editor-in-Chief: Tasha Hefford //Sections Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch //Web Editor: Fatemeh
Ghayedi // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo Laredo // Social Media Coordinators: Lauren
Park//Administration Coordinator: Elissa Soendjaja //Charts: Dora Dubber// Designers:
Olivia Cox, Deyvika Srinivasa, James Spetifore, Phoebe Telfar, Sheri Turner // Writers:
Milena Carrasco, Katherine Gear Chambers, Dora Dubber, Zainab Fatima, Tate Kaufman,
Almas K, Jamie Loh, Lucas Lund, Lisa Mayerhofer, Jordan Naterer, Maya Preshyon, Peter
Quelch, Frances Shroff, Phoebe Telfar // Photographers & Illustrators: August Bramhoff,
Amy Brereton, Katrina Gulane, Juliana Kaufmanis, Christina Kim, Natalie Hanna, Alistair
Henning, r. Hester, Jamie Loh, Maen Illustrates, Hayley Schmidt, Alex Smyth, Beau Todorova,
Phoebe Telfar, Isaac You Proofreaders: Ricky Castanedo Laredo, Clara Dubber, Fatemeh
Ghayedi, Tasha Hefford, Jasper D. Wrinch, Jasper Sloan Yip
15
16
29
31
TIN   LORICfl
how to wear a  soft armour
CLAIRE BAILEY'S SPOOL OVEN
Maximalist cake practice
KITTY  PROZAC
Cute but make it depression
CYB3R WAREHOUSE
WRSD to walk. Move your mouse to look around
CHINESE PROTEST RECIPIES
what food can teach us about racism
CULT  BABIES
this  is  not a  holiday
ALEXA  BLACK
the magick of the in-between
COMPANION PLANTING CLUB
Shred together, sow together
HAZEL MEYER
transformed by time, moved by legacy
REGULARS
NOVEMBER CALENDAR
Art Project by Katrina Gulane
DECEMBER CALENDAR
Art Project by Hayley Schmidt
UNDER  REVIEW
Lot's of music!   And a  podcast
CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
SUMMER AND FALL CHARTS
©Discorder 2020 - 2021 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All
rights reserved. Circulation 2,000. Discorder is published bi-monthly by CiTR, located on the lower
level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hanqaminarh speaking
Musqueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major
cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604)
822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen
and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
 Discorder Magazine
Nov-Dec   2020
WORDS
BY
MILENA
CARRASCO
PHOTO
BY
KIM
VILLAGANTE
ILUSTRATIONS
BY
CHRISTINA            KIM
LAYOUT            BY
JAMES
SPETIFORE
and
RICKY            CASTANEDO
LAREDO
Tin Lorica's debut chapbook, soft armour, makes you want to crawl into bed
with your twenty-something memories and stay a while. As Tin's literary debut,
their chapbook is a collage of landmarked moments and poems pinned from the
most formative moments of their life. Like moving to Vancouver from Calgary — or dating
white people.
Milena: This chapbook is your
literary, "in pages" debut. What are
you looking to discover within it?
Tin: I didn't plan to write a whole
manuscript, but I have always felt
that a poetry chapbook for me was
already in the works anyways — so I
am thankful that Mallory Tater from
Rahila's Ghost Press was stoked to
help me create my first one. I feel
like I'm kind of shy in terms of being
out there with my poetry — more so
than comedy — probably because
of the crude things I say on stage
sometimes. It's a side of me that I'm
not always readily available to express
to just anyone, hence the title of the
chapbook, soft armour.
Basically, a lot of the poems in the
chapbook are from a lot of experiences
that I went through in my early years
of moving to Vancouver. And the book
is kind of a landmark of moments in
my life. Like the first time I dated
a white person, or the moment I
realized I was (naively) wanting to date
another person of colour so I could
see something about myself, and how
I saw things so black and white back
then. It's me from the ages of like, 21
to 25. Living on my own for the first
time, coming into myself.
Do you feel like you've matured?
Totally. *laughs* I mean, I think I
could have gone to therapy more. But I
feel like I've matured a lot, for sure.
7n chapbook fashion,
soft armour is short
enough to be read
in one sitting, and takes
you through a sequence of
moments soft enough to
laugh at and heavy enough
to remember. There's a quiet
sense of acceptance that
anchors the conversation —
it is the kind of comfort you
collect on your walk around
the sun.
tt
Xttt Hacica
tt
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The first half of the poems are very silly
and kind of jokey. I don't get vulnerable
until halfway through. So yeah, even in
the way that I sequenced it, it kind of
has this armour already. I don't know...
I feel like you just get kind of closer and
closer into like, my emotional core, or
whatever. I mentioned my mom a lot
in it. Apparently that's a very Cancer
thing — because I'm a Cancer moon,
and a Cancer Mars. I don't know if
you're into astrology at all, but I'm also
not an expert.
Does astrology play as big a part in
the book as in your life?
Yeah. Well, I'm also an Aries sun, but I
have a lot of water in my chart. That's
where the soft part comes from. And
yeah, Cancer placements specifically
are supposed to have a kind of weird
karmic relationship to The Mother. It
doesn't necessarily mean [your literal]
mother, it's just kind of like, mothering
generally. Something like that. I went
through the manuscript recently, and 1
say the word "mother" like 10 times,
and I think I'm exaggerating a little bit,
but yeah. I also don't want my mom to
read it.
Did you go through writer's block?
Or artist's block?
I'm going through that now, for sure.
I just let it happen. I like to just pour
myself into something else. I picked
up a lot of hobbies during COVID.
I was like, Okay, I'm just not gonna
try to write anything. I'm not gonna
try to be funny. I'm just not going to
do anything creative. I'm just letting
myself [feel ok with] being creatively
blocked.
I know you said that you were taking
a break from making people laugh,
but a large part of what you usually
do is making people laugh, and I was
curious how this translates into the
book and into your poetry.
My friend, Jackie Hoffart, who runs
New Moon Comedy, [...] helped me
out a little bit with writing my bio, a
task I always dread. [In] one of them
she basically describes me as a poetic
comedian, and comedic poet. I just feel
like they kind of go really well with
each other. It would drive me crazy if
I was around someone who was just
trying to make people laugh all the
time. Because I definitely use it as a
defense mechanism. I definitely inject
humour in the poems.
You've said that the two practices
[poetry and standup] foil each other.
So, they enhance one another, but
there seems to be a difference in
vulnerability between the two —
at least for you. How do you work
with that?
I wrote and filmed my first sketch
very recently — it was really terrifying
because it was a solo sketch. And I
have to look at the camera and put on
this character and voice. I have never
acted in anything before and it was so,
so vulnerable — it took me like five
takes. I kept glaring at the camera.
It was like I was trying to familiarize
myself with it, like it was a stranger
I was struggling to befriend. I was
highly suspicious — like what if it
steals my soul? I'm pretty monotonous
when I deliver standup, so to put on
a character and act was definitely
another kind of vulnerability that I
haven't experienced as a performer.
Art has always been a way of exposing
your inner world to people, which I
am always learning to be okay with,
and not spiral after expressing myself.
I'll look at the chapbook one day ,
and like, flip through it and be really
embarrassed about something that I
wrote, that I decided to share with the
world. I just really have to let go and
be okay with that process. Yeah, that's
definitely one thing I learned, to let go,
and embarrass myself.
Tin and I laugh over
the "light roasting"
that we've experienced living in filipino and
latino households. It's true,
we roast and then toast
at family dinners, feeling
somewhat closer than
before. Culturally, astrolog-
ically, comically, poetically
and wonderfully funny.
When I was 10, I started to question
my dad's taste in music. He is an
earnest Beatles fan, and every Sunday
he would just blast the Beatles. One
day I asked him why he liked this
'hippie music' and my mom thought
it was the funniest thing. This inquis-
itiveness would later escalate to me
imitating the way he scratched his balls
while watching TV to my entire family.
Everyone loved it. In a way my mom
bolstered my comedy career, by giving
me the license to roast my father.
Earlier I was saying that I treated
humour as a kind of defense mechanism
— it's also a really great way to catch
people off guard, and lets them know
that me joking with them is me trying
to be intimate with them. It's a way to
bring people in.
Do you want people to read your
book all in one sitting? Or do you
think it matters where they start?
It's totally up to the reader, but I
know that sometimes when I read a
poetry collection and something really
clicks, I have to see the whole thing
through. I would be happy if some
weirdo out there decided they needed
more of my voice and read the whole
thing, but I wouldn't force anyone to
do so. It's always shocking to me that
people can relate to me. It's always
an honor. When people connect with
my poetry, when they come up to me
[after a reading] and tell me, "I really
resonated with that," I really, really,
appreciate it.
The chapbook covers a lot of things
like, diasporic anxiety, dating white
people anxiety, understanding my baby
queer self in relation to other queer
people anxiety, soft armour is definitely
a coming of age.
Xttt Hacica
tt
 r§P°o1
Oven
Discorder Magazine Nov-Dec   2020
Words By Zainab Fatima
PhotOS By Alistair Henning
Illustrations By A
Layout By Start Twibbip
F
rom quarantine season comes another
exciting adventure: @spool oven!
Greated by artist Glaire Geddes Bailey,
©spool oven is a project which invites people
to submit prompts — a book, a drawing, a
word — which Bailey will use to bake a cake.
@spool oven lives on instagram, where
Bailey bakes prompt-based cakes for anyone in
Vancouver. People are free to submit a prompt
if they live in the area, and can purchase the
cake — not a shabby distraction from Ms. Rona.
®ww
As someone who loves to
create fun and exciting
cakes, it makes sense that
Bailey has a deep love for sweet treats.
Ever since childhood, they've been the
friend who enjoys baking for everyone,
and @spool oven is the perfect outcome
of that, "The aspect of sharing is really
nice— especially birthday cakes; to me
it's a really nice way to express care for
a friend."
Being an artist also drew Bailey to the
baking scene because it's another opportunity to be creative, "You're literally
taking flour and sugar, which you would
never eat on its own, and transforming
it in the oven — which feels like a really
magical process in some way."
Connecting food to art was an intriguing
concept, and discovering many talented
people online — Sharona Franklin,
@spiral_theory_testkitchen, @dream-
caketestkitchen, @_hoe_cakes, @cakes-
4sport, provided amazing inspiration.
Bailey's cake decorating style is a
colourful addition to the "maximalist"
online baking community; an unorthodox
cake scene that celebrates imperfections.
"What distinguishes this community from
many other baking niches is how accessible it is: "Anyone can make a cake, and
there's so much joy in even seeing a cake
that is really messy and maybe didn't
turn out how the person expected— but
it's still an expression of care," explains
Bailey.
"Talking more about a queer aesthetic
of food, or queer cooking and baking, I
think it is connected to [...] taking baking
— which can be something that has a lot
of rules and constraints — and coming at
it from a slant."
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f*'S\
^
■
^
You're literally
taking flour and
suqar, which you would
never eat on its own, and
transforming it in the oven
I which feels like a really
magical process in
some way. a
1
. A\\
Not only is Bailey creative in their
approach, and approaching
baking outside of its constraints
— they also have quite an eye for flavour
combinations. Consider the "skipping
stone cake", inspired by the prompt "the
moment when a skipping stone is sitting
on top of the water, extended", which
amounted to a cardamom-rose swirl
sponge, with a gingerbread cake middle,
pear jelly filling, topped with ginger
buttercream, dried ginger, echium petals,
lychee syrup and fruit.
Coming up with flavour combinations
for cakes depends on several things, Bailey
explains, sometimes the requests come
directly from the people sending prompts.
However, the
ill often use specific
colours as opportunities to introduce
unique flavours into their work — like
the time they combined cinnamon, black
sesame seeds, and cocoa, to achieve a dark
blue glaze for a bundt cake.
-^^- ailey first began creating colourful
^■"w and unorthodox cakes last year,
^r^ when they collaborated with a
friend to curate UBC's Hatch Gallery's
exhibit 100's Day. The show consisted
of participants bringing in collections of
100 items, and for the closing reception,
Bailey baked a hundred ingredient cake.
"When matching a prompt to it's delicious
cake form, Bailey explains, "My attempt
is to devote a lot of sensory attention and
care towards the nromnt and then convert
#
KTV
that to a cake somehow. A lot of it's just
intuitive," From a few sketches, and
input from friends, any prompt— even a
feeling— can become a heavenly treat.
Out of all the cakes Bailey has made
so far, their favorite is one of @spool	
oven's earlier creations: the prompts
for the cake were two selfies of Bailey's
friend. Not only was the flavour combination really unique — tahini sesame
cake with lime curd, homemade marsh-
mallows and malted milk buttercream —
but the prompt itself is also why Bailey
loves this piece.
"With some of the prompts, you can
already imagine how it would become
cake, but my favourite ones are the ones
where it's completely separate. It's not
about what the cake will look like at the
end at all, and there's a lot more possibilities within that."
As for the future oi@spool oven,
Bailey hopes to create more
cakes and continue inspiring
people. Although it wasn't intended to
become part of their art practice, the
community Bailey has created is really
special, "I hope it gives people freedom to
experiment with food in their own way,"
says Bailey, "and if anyone in Vancouver
wants a cake, they should DM me!"
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 Discorder Magazine Nov-Dec   2020
KITTV PROZAC
TRANS POWER PUNK, MEETS
MUSICALLY-INCLINED CAT,
ON ANTIDEPRESSANTS.
i;    .
1
Words b   Atira Naik
Photos by August Bramhof f
Illustrations by Beau Todorova
Layout by Sheri Turner
a thy Schultes is a 21-year-old trans
musician in Vancouver, livingon the
homelands of the xwmaOkwayam
(Musqueam), <- Sal'ilwata? (Tsleil-
atuth), and Skwxwu7mesh (Squamish)
nations. A queer bike mechanic, political
human-rights activist, self-described
anarchist, and pro electric-guitar shredder,
she makes pop punk music centred around
trans power and self-identity. I met with
her to discuss her (atest release as Kitty
Prozac — Pandemos Vol. 1, a powerful EP with
unapologetic lyrics and a deep relatability.
I found in my conversation with Cathy, that
intimacy is a huge component other work,
and I couldn 't help but respond to the lyrics
myself. Below you will find fragments of
Kitty's fluid lyricism, and the ways I've
found to connect her thoughts to my own.
tt
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As with most interactions in the
pandemic, we open onto the
setting of a zoom call — me in my
room, and Cathy at her jam space at the
Red Gate. She clearly looks comfortable,
sitting cross-legged in front of a drum
set. We make small talk for a while,
and then I jump into my first burning
question, "So, what's the inspiration
behind Pandemos Vol. 1, and your stage
name, Kitty Prozac?"
Cathy nods knowingly, likely used to this
question, and explains, "Well, there's not
much behind Pandemos —it just means
pandemic demos although I guess it also
evokes the word "pandemonium". I've had
an album in the pipeline for a while now,
and progress on that has been kind of slow.
So, I just wanted to put something out.
That's why I phone-recorded these songs
and put them up on my bandcamp. Kitty
Prozac was something I was treating as a
music project, distinct from myself, from
the start. I wanted to name it something
cool, something that properly captured
what I was going for."
"And what you're going for is...?"
"I think what I'm going for is pop punk.
Like, really intense and upbeat pop punk
tunes but also super intense emotions. So
once my friend and I were hanging out,
talking about this, and she basically had
an epiphany, 'Oh! Kitty Prozac' used to
have a cat who was prescribed Prozac
because he had anxiety. That's a thing
— cats being prescribed antidepressants.
I take Prozac as well, so that's me. And
then Kitty was because - well, I want to
portray an image that's playful, and fun.
And my partner Jill calls me Kitty as well,
so there's that."
"So — playful and cute, but make it
depression."
"You know until you don't know and
then they're gone / Well I figured
some day I'll stop getting thrown
away / I just didn't think it would take
so long" (Vacation Song)
I thought I knew. Bloody hell. I
knew I knew. Didn't I? Obviously
not, if I was discarded like those
folded paper games we used to
make. Wasn't there a 'forever' in
that stupid acronym?
been pretty rocky, really, and I
think music played a huge role in
keeping me afloat."
Cathy agrees, 'Yeah, for sure. In fact I
think that tension pretty much defines
my music. I initially wanted Kitty
Prozac to be a band — but it was
usually only me, and people started
associating me with [the name]. It just
sort of grew to be a persona. Kitty
became this person who feels things
really deeply and I think that's kind of
conveyed through my music, how loud
and head-banging it is. Kitty can never
be lying-on-her-bed sad - she's weeping,
screaming, breaking things. Theatrical,
almost. It's a theatrical sad.'
"So, what's your origin story? Like, what
inspired you to really start putting your
music out there?"
"That's a pretty cool story, actually.
"When I had just come out, my friends
and I were obsessed with this band. They
wrote such good music — it was so very
loudly, and proudly, gay. It really was our
jam. Later it was revealed that a member
of the band was involved in sexual allegations, and obviously, the fan base just
dropped. And I just — I remember feeling
so betrayed, and so alone. Like I had no
one to look up to anymore. That was
when I realized how desperately people
like me needed validation, needed representation, that's when I decided that I was
going to be that person. I was going to
make the music that people could relate
to, and be inspired by."
"And you know, I was always making
music - I just grew up in a family that
was constantly listening to music. But I
think I truly started putting in effort into
my music in 12th grade, when I came out
as trans. It's kind of like — my whole life
began again when I came out, and I just
had so much catching up and adjusting
to do. So that's when music became what
I leaned on. These past two years have
The road to justice is long / And the road to
peace is too / And it asks of me to unlearn all
/ The fucked up things I thought I knew
(A Little More Myself)
My grandmother once told me I would need
to be better if I wanted to marry into a 'nice'
family. The next two years I worked on being
better, and the next three I worked on running
as far from 'nice' as I possibly could.
I
can't help but notice how honest Cathy
is. I ask her, "Is this a conscious effort?
To be so honest, and to make your
lyrics confessional, almost?" she replies,
"I think I did make a conscious effort to
be honest. But at the same time, it was
also an important exercise in just letting
my emotions out. As a teenager, I just
had these really big feelings that I needed
to get out in some way. That meant me
— necessarily — writing about these very
personal experiences to lessen the load
and hopefully help other folks with similar
experiences feel less alone. [...] I'm writing
to express myself as a trans woman with
mental health issues — so I'm going to
write about experiences pertaining to
that." She pauses again, "And, something
that's super surprising, but super gratifying,
is that people relate so deeply to these
songs. I write about very personal and
specific experiences, but after a live show
people will still come up to me to tell me
my song made them cry. It's an amazing
experience, and really one of the biggest
inspirations for me to continue."
It's in primary colours / It's so vibrant
it won't leave me alone / And it keeps
changing but I think it means home
(Primary Colours)
I spent the first 19 years of my life in the dark. If I don't
have a nice family, what do I have? I saw the swirls of
blues and reds and yellows in my dreams and drawings.
I knew then what I needed to do - if not home, at least a
path that leads there.
ask Cathy if there were any mental
roadblocks that needed to be overcome
in order to release such radically
honest music, to which Cathy
replies, "The answer is definitely."
She continues to explain — "I had
to work through my anxiety a lot,
which makes sense, because I'm
Kitty Prozac. Perfectionism, and
that fear of what people were going
to think of me when I actually
put music out. It's funny, because
the initial music I released was
already very personal and honest. But it
was just as hard to put out the next few
songs — which is why there was such a
gap between them. Just because you do
something hard once, doesn't mean it
becomes easy the next time round, you
know? Easier, maybe. But not by a lot. I
think it was just...not believing that my
music was worth sharing, really. And it's
taken people reassuring me, a lot, for me
to continue to put my music [out there]."
"Actually, there's a few people I'd like to
credit for encouraging me in a big way:
Kelly McCloud, from Tinkin' Pete, who
booked me for my first live show, and
Miles Black, from Pale Red, who got me a
CiTR interview and funding for my record
from the Pat Placzek Legacy Fund. It's what
CiTR is using to fund a bunch of artist's
first releases through their label Fanta
Records. I call them my two gay scene
dads," she laughs lightly, "because they've
really been in my corner. Seriously, it's
totally been because of the encouragement
and support of other people that I'm even
here, still, making music."
tt
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 Discorder Magazine Nov-Dec   2020
^^W^^™*' ^^ti^^^^P*  ^S^hBs*   ^Wlfl^Sf  ^^wP™-'      ^W
iiKS^   l*^\Mig>   lH|%       Afytjpf    ■y^JJJiiy jfj^BK/'
WORDS BY
DORA   DUBBER
PHOTOS   BY:  isi;i«lbiai^ii8i»ai      LAYOUT   BY
ILLUSTRATION
B Y :
JAMES
AMY   BERETON
SPETIFORE
In the late 90s and early 2000s, the
internet's novelty and burgeoning
accessibility essentially made it a
total free-for-all. There was a lot of earnest
excitement for what the internet could be,
though now we have a pretty standard
idea of what an online experience is.
Cyb3r Warehouse — a virtually local
art space created by roommates Sam
Herle and Brodie Anderson-Pilon —
harnesses this nostalgia and eagerness to
create a dynamic world and exhibition
space perfectly designed for our current
lockdown reality.
Cyb3r Warehouse largely features
internet art, "art that's made in a way
that is very digital where it's a lot easier
to show it to people through the internet.
It's usually made on a computer and it's
less physical," Brodie explained. "It's
a chance to show gifs and stuff," Sam
added. "Things that usually you just
scroll past and disregard and maybe don't
consider art. Like if someone makes a 3D
sword for a video game and they're really
proud of it — it's usually not outside of
that. Here, they can put it in a room and
people can walk around and look at it."
"While the ultimate function of Cyb3r
"Warehouse is to be an exhibition space,
"It's definitely not a neutral space,"
Sam clarified. "We weren't trying to
make a white wall gallery. It's kind of
our own art project too." Unlike most
galleries, both physical and virtual, Cyb3r
"Warehouse's curators/creators' influence
is omnipresent. With part of the function
being its re-creation of disparate 2000s
digital aesthetics, attempting to curate a
space designed to feature its exhibitions
in a "subjective" environment would be
so obviously antithetical.
The "warehouse" is more of an expansive
and adaptive world — with 2D streets,
"NOW THERE'S NOT
REALLY THE OPTION
TO GO TO PHYSICAL
SPACES, ALL THESE
ONLINE SPACES
ARE GETTING MUCH
MORE POPU LAR
AGAIN. PEOPLE ARE
TRYING TO UTILIZE
THEM IN WHATEVER
WAY POSSIBLE -
LIKE TH ROWI NG
RAVES    ON    IMVU"
buildings, characters, and groves that you
can wander through. Any exhibitions are
housed in 3D buildings designed to match
the theme or feel of the art featured. Right
now, when you enter Cyb3r Warehouse,
you're dropped at the entrance of a crypt
inviting you to their current "Horror/
Occult" exhibit. A couple weeks ago,
you were dropped in the entrance of the
general exhibition space, greeted by an
angel in a full-body bunny costume and
a beefy feline security guard. The space
navigates like a video game — using the
cursor to orient your "character", and
the arrow keys to move around. The
space itself is a combination of 2D and
3D elements that you observe, but don't
necessarily interact with. Besides the areas
of the warehouse explicitly delegated to
featuring art, the world is an invitation to
explore Sam and Brodie's digital fantasy.
"I don't know if you've fallen into hell yet
— where you fall off the path and you fall
into hell and can't get out. We got lots of
email like, 'Oh I can't get out of hell.'"
Sam laughed. "We were like, 'That's kind
of the point,' just making it something
you wouldn't usually experience online
and making it kind of a game where you
can explore it and have fun exploring it
too." "Yeah," Brodie continued, "I think
we're both open to the idea of making it
as big and extensive as possible because
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there's a certain limitation to what we
can do in one space, [...] but I do like the
idea of just building on top of things and
it keeps getting bigger and bigger." Most
of the expansions Sam and Brodie are
working on right now are for commissions from physical art spaces or festivals
that are reevaluating what it means to
host an event during a pandemic —
including the current Doom Gloom Stuck
in Your Room (DGSYR) Report exhibit,
and Vancouver's upcoming local zine
festival, Unibrow Festival.
The look of the space draws
heavily from the maximalist,
busy, and kind of goofy
aesthetics of the early internet."I like the
older style of what the internet used to be
in the early 2000s, when GeoCities was
a thing where anyone would just make
a website and just fill it with basically
whatever they wanted. You had a lot
more freedom," Brodie explained. "I'm
just really into that whole framework
of older internet aesthetics, which aren't
really as big of a thing these days, where
you're taking risks making weird stuff
that's really chaotic. I wouldn't want
to make something that's like, 'Look at
how the internet used to look,' with a
"Windows 95 simulator, where it's like,
you just go on an old computer that's
hard to use. It's still new ideas, and a
new space, but just taking from that same
energy that used to be there." Cyb3r
"Warehouse's strength is in balancing the
skill of building a functional space with
that chaos.
Sam and Brodie's curatorial process
mirrors that of Cyb3r Warehouse's
aesthetic of structured disorder — you
just have to send them an email. "We
wanted it to be less of a process — People
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can just email us and we can give them
a more interesting platform to show
their stuff," Sam explained. The internet
is a famously dark place. Its complete
anonymity, and lack of accountability,
warns users against digging too deep into
any corner of the net to shield against
blatant ableism, racism, transphobia,
homophobia, and/or misogyny and,
all too often, these precautions aren't
enough. The opening criteria for any
submissions to Cyb3r Warehouse is
the total unacceptability of any hateful
messages. "We just want to be pretty
firm with that just because there are some
bad internet spaces," Sam explained. "I
feel like if you stumble across something
on the internet, you really wanna' know
what you're dealing with, and where
everybody stands on that."
Even before the pandemic, much of our
lives had already transferred to the online
— COVID has only exacerbated that.
"I had the idea for it before lockdown
started, but just in idea form. Just the
idea of an online exhibition space for art
that doesn't usually get shown in other
locations," Sam explained. "But when
lockdown happened we both realized
that it could be such a bigger opportunity." They continued, "I was inspired
by other virtual spaces people are making
and riding the wave of online things
because I think there's really been a resur-
Although the space may seem best
suited for the current times, Sam and
Brodie don't expect Cy3r Warehouse
to dissolve any time soon. "Even when
physical spaces open, especially with
internet art, it'll still be good to have a
space people can send their gifs and art
that's more conducive to online spaces,"
Sam anticipated. "There'll still be a
want for that because tons of people are
making digital art, especially people who
haven't before lockdown started." The
internet is a pretty infinite medium. With
Cyb3r Warehouse, Sam and Brodie are
re-imagining the online experience. Their
shameless celebration of the ostentatious
and gaudy digital aesthetic is refreshing
and nostalgic.
gence in that. Talking about the early
2000s again — I think there was a big
phase when Second Life and IMVU came
out, and people were like, 'Oh, this is
awesome' and later on moved away from
that. Now there's not really the option to
go to physical spaces, so all these online
spaces are getting much more popular
again. People are trying to utilize them in
whatever way possible — like throwing
raves on IMVU and through Twitch and
stuff. So we just wanted to follow that
and make a space that was fun. Not
more of an online art gallery, but more
of an online DIY space." The role of
online spaces is constantly transforming
as aesthetic trends and the limitations of
what's possible, both online and offline,
fluctuate. Cyb3r Warehouse is offering a
lot of possibilities as a world that exists
entirely on the internet. "Around the
beginning we were talking but doing
live shows and streams and stuff, with
multiple people in the space," Brodie
entertained. "I just don't know how to do
that. But as soon as we figure it out, I'm
down to do it."
ENTER CYB3R WAREHOUSE A
CYB3RWAREHOUSECOM
SUBMIT YOUR ART TO
CYB3RWAREHOUSE@OMAIL.COM
MORE INFO AT
CYB3RWAREHOUSECOM
*%#%$t Wntt$tm$tff
 CHINESE PROTEST
RECIPES
Discorder Magazine Nov-Dec   2020
words and photos by Jamie Loh illustrations
by Alex  Smyth  layout by Phoebe  Telfar
Born in Singapore, to a Cantonese mother and a
Hokkien father, meant that I grew up surrounded by
a medley of flavours, dialects, traditions and ways
of storytelling. From braving brutally bitter (yet nourishing)
herbal Cantonese soups as a child, to helping my grandma
make ba zhang (sticky rice dumplings) and popiah (a type of
fresh spring roll) whenever she visited, food has always been
the vessel through which I learned about my cultural identity. In
Singapore, there were no heirlooms, nor genealogy books, and
rarely did anyone know or speak of the past. After moving away
from home and family, and settling as a guest in 'Vancouver',
I have come to understand the importance of cooking Chinese
food and holding fast to recipes and traditions fading along
with the memories of my family's matriarchs. When it comes
to making Chinese food, all I had were meagre photos and
ANTI-RACIST A-C HOY
IT'S NOT
ENOUGH
TOB
CHINESE PROTECT RECIPES
that intuition chef Clarence Kwan
speaks of in his new zine entitled
Chinese Protest Recipes.
Chinese Protest Recipes (CPR)
has struck a chord with many
Chinese-Canadians,  and
newcomers like me. Throughout
the zine, Clarence Kwan (aka
@thegodofcookery) calls us to
respond to the pandemic, and
the BLM movement through
mobilizing the tools we have
— our love for Chinese food
and cooking — to resist white
supremacy in our relationship to
the food we choose to buy, eat and
make. In centering Black lives and
calling for collective action in the zine,
Kwan pairs reminders of police brutality
(thereby cheekily banning cops from cooking
his recipes), statements of solidarity among BIPOC and
MY
GRAMMA
. ITS MOT
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IGNORANT
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"WE   MUST   BE   ACTIVE   IN
OUR   FIGHT   FOR   ANTI-RACISM
THROUGH   FOOD."
personal anecdotes to each of the eight
recipes he has curated. Each dish stands
as a form of protest on its own. Among
the generous peppering of black and white
photos and understated yet beautiful
typography, the mosaic of stories and
recipes stand as stars of the show.
CPR is not only a call to protest
through cooking. It is also a love
letter to his strong ties to Chinese
restaurants and Chinatowns, in which
he urges us to keep supporting local
businesses reeling from the devastating
effects of the pandemic and in Vancouver's
case, gentrification. Kwan drives home
the idea that we must be active in our fight
for anti-racism through food. This starts
with reflecting on who we are, the way we
acquire food, and claiming our cultural
heritage by continuing to cook our food
deemed "exotic" and "weird" by white
culture, as well as keep up the work
that still needs to be done in dismantling
anti-Black sentiments within our families.
In centring food culture in the discussion
of racial oppression, Kwan not only urges
his readers to actively decolonize their
relationship with food, but also shows
how it could be a unifying process. In
the zine, he writes "THE MORE WE
EXPLORE AND SHINE A LIGHT ON
BIPOC FOOD THE CLOSER WE GET
TO A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF
ONE ANOTHER". He does his part
in shining light on Chinese food, and
shares the recipes with whoever is curious
enough to try. It is only through sharing
recipes with each other across communities, and coming together to prepare
a meal, can these discussions on food
happen.
OUUHAS CHOI IN
Prop; Cut scalllons kilo big pieces. Slice ginger.
Misrirnl* (hicfctn togs with Mil. Sugar, toy *nd
Shacxing wine ovemght.
Arrange scallions in a low
shallow dish to make a rack
for the chicken.
Place chicken legs on top of
scallions in one layer.
Scatter ginger and star anise
over chicken.
Place dish rmin a steaming
ruck in a wok with water,
cover and steam until chicken is cooked through,about
20 minutes.
Garnish with chopped seal
lions and serve with white
rice.
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I would not be  doing the
zine justice if I did not try a
few recipes myself. I invited a
friend to join me in this process
as she, being a first-generation
Chinese-Canandian, shares my
love of cooking Chinese food and
preserving our cultural heritage. It
was both our first times cooking
such an elaborate meal apart from
our families so we opted for familiar
 Discorder Magazine Nov-Dec   2020
disl
and
les that were no
. a-choy doused
t too ambitious — Shrimps in Lobster Sauce, F.T.P Fried Rice
in sesame oil and oyster sauce.
:ame with no measurements or handhold-y instructions,
descriptions inspired by traditions and oral history. We
to eyeball measurements and cook intuitively, tasting and
way. It made me realize the potential for cooking to be so
like an interpretive dance. It put a   focus on making food
i good to me, and moved it away from mindlessly following
sat down to feast on the fruits of our labour, the first bite
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WORDS
IY
TATE
KAUFMAN
ILLUSTRATIONS
IY
DULIANA
KAUFMANIS
PHOTO
COURTESY OF
CULT BABIES
LAYOUT
IY
DAMES
SPETIFORE
HOT A
ancouver/
a digital nomads
Babies. Hasan and Layla, the key creatives
behind the project, had spent well over
a year crafting their latest release, Not a
Holiday, when the carefully considered
concept behind the album became
hyper-relevant in a wholly unexpected
way. Having initially planned
a summer tour prior to the
release of the album, Hasan
of a healthier internet. Technology, and
its capacity to simultaneously connect and
distance — to create distinct communities
and turn them against each other - is a
constant theme. Over wistful woodwinds,
the spring-reverb doused vocals of "Eye
Was There" evoke simultaneous pressures
of ingrained spectatorship and desperation
for attention as Hasan sines, "Look at
his final descent is p
cmmine ot tne
"Not A Holiday
3ped, buried by its
choices,
I've been working on my immolation
It's not a holiday/ But you should
a party in my honor." Is this futility,
[
on an elongated lockdown
stay with Hasan's family in the
Caribbean. With the majority
of the album written and
recorded, they shifted course
and opted to release Not a
Holiday in the early days
of the lockdown. Layla and
Hasan joined me over video
call in early October, from
Tunisia, to discuss the strange
and unanticipated prescience
of their new project — as
well as the role their day jobs
played in its inception.
ot a Holiday  is
an unyielding and
DESTROY
WHITE
^IPREMAO
. tempestuous album, drawing
a droning, psychedelic palette to
create an ever
yearning i
sound. There's an underlying sense of
yearning and hope here — first audible
in opener "Buried Alive," a somewhat
fatalistic reminiscence on finding purpose.
There's the somewhat flippant, singsong
recital of "I can be your very own ghoul,"
which leads into triumphant swells of
guitar, ebbing and flowing throughout
the song. This initial glimmer of hope
and agency lays at the very core of the
what you've done/ You went outside all
on your own/ With no one there to see/
You might as well have stayed at home."
f hese criticisms are not distinct
of the internet age (see David
Foster Wallace's E Unibus
Pluram for parallel commentary nearly
three decades earlier), but the latter half
of the setlist shifts focus to an entirel
modern phenomenon: the dominanc
of disinformation. Both the whirlin
ambient hums of "Town Crier," and the
upon Hasan and Layla's experiences as
professional internet moderators. Though
neither has had the misfortune of auditing
video content, the recent lawsuit filed by
YouTube censors has brought to light the
personal torment undertaken by those
who dedicate their careers to the creation
serve to deliver t£
and insidious mistruths. these songs
are hard to breath through. Deep and
dark and entrancing — like the beautiful
fading image of a mermaid dragging you
down, down, down; eyes glittering in the
refracted moonlight.
D
yet fail to steer the course
of the future? Perhaps, but
the fight, though it is not a
holiday, will always be worth
fighting. Though Layla and
e,   and spend their
of Tunisia, it is not a holiday.
Though many of us have been
sent home from work indefinitely, have been confined
by leisure, and enraptured in
forum-bred paranoia — this is
not a holiday.
tt
gtttf #n%hs
tt
 ALEXA
WORDS BY LISA MAYERHOFER * PHOTO BY R HESTER * IM
As a primarily self-taught inter- disciplinary artist of
Indigenous and European descent (Nahuat, Mayan/
Spanish, Irish) Alexa Black is "a bridge, a person in
between". On a healing journey reconnecting with her ancestors,
she is currently creating a tarot deck made of tintype photographs
which refute the colonial gaze and invite mysticism, collaboration
and connection instead.
Mitztemoa noyollo.
Discorder Magazine Nov-Dec   2020
Alexa, I appreciate you talking to
me. Let us start at the beginning,
how did you get into art?
Art is a part of my first memories. My
mom has pictures of me as a
two-year-old painting the walls with
lipstick. As cute as that is, it was never
really supported. I have videos from
when I was five, having an art show in
the kitchen and I am explaining how
everything was going to be okay.
"Which is kind of funny, because I
remember everything being really tense
in my life growing up. I remember
always being ready to go, because my
mum and my biological father had a
very toxic relationship. He wasn't in
my life right from the beginning for
good reasons. I'll leave it at that.
All I wanted as a kid was to be seen
and heard for who I really was, which
was somebody trying to connect to
that divine source, where one felt safe.
I think we all have the potential to be
creators. For the most part, I believe
art is something that you need to have
a level of stillness for, where you slow
the fuck down and you move into a
certain place in your softness.
I can sense that you have a lot of
understanding for your family for
not enabling that space.
My grandmother and mother, both
Nahuat Pipil and partly Mayan
women, had fled from the civil war in
El Salvador and came over to Canada
in the 80s. Poverty was a big fear for
my family. They were afraid of art
leading me down that path. Mixed or
indigenous people migrating North as
refugees were considered immigrants,
despite pre-colonial migrations and
territories. Being indigenous was
associated with poor treatment, so in
order to survive, they never talked
about their indigeneity. Culture was
truly left behind in order to assimilate
for survival. So art, being such a strong
component of culture was definitely not
a priority for my family.
What did you start out doing
instead of art?
My paternal grandfather offered to
pay for a practical degree in nursing
so that I could be independent. Because
my mother always dreamed of helping
people as a nurse, I took the offer. It
was painful for me. It's hard for me to
have a regimented life with a schedule.
In order to cope with going against my
creative self, I used a lot of drugs.
During my degree process, it got quite
severe and I became dependent on
stimulants. They got me through
school, but the art went away. I was
so detached from my spirit that I
couldn't create.
JHow did you reconnect with it?
I got super sick. I don't want to put
this kind of pressure on my illness, but
maybe it became a trigger to remind
me of my purpose. Through it, I really
reconnected to my art practice again,
and I started learning about tintype
photography at 26.
Why this ancient practice of all
things?
There was a time in my early 20s where
I was very anti-technology, and I was
really angry at the system and what was
going on in the world. I needed
something like magick or that
had the essence of conjuring
and scrying. Something that
would bring me back into my
body and connect me to the
land. When I found tintype
photography I knew
instantly. You don't need
anything except the elements
and the chemistry, and you
can shoot on a rusty can if
you need to.
You are working on a
special project right now —
The creation of your own
set of tarot cards. You told
me you had dreamed of
them.
Yeah, I dreamed about it for ^^^^
sure. My adopted father is of
mixed Cree/European
descent. He and my mother were on a
big healing journey and introduced me
to their indigenous teachings and
spirituality at a young age. It felt like
it was old inside of me, as if it had been
with me for lifetimes. My parents
ended up going to AA meetings a lot,
where they were highly influenced by
some white christian folks and ended
up converting. But I stayed with my
traditional teachings and was adopted
into another family out in Merritt.
Ko'waintco Michele is my adopted
spiritual mother. She oversaw me for
a few years of vision fasting.
Is this a practice you can, or want,
to share your experience with?
I ended up fasting every spring for a
few years starting around age 23... I
would go for as long as two to four
M
days without food or water, or
however long it took me to have a
vision basically. It was during those
times when you would set your
intention for the rest of the year.
"Without water you're really in a
totally different universe. At first you
feel like you're burning from the inside
out, it hurts to pee, and you feel really
fucked up and a little scared, and then
things become crystal clear. The whole
point is that your body becomes weak
and your spirit becomes strong.
Through my visions, I gravitated
towards a tarot deck in my head that I
was going to create, because I really
couldn't stand the colonial construct of
a traditional deck, and I wanted to
create space for intersectionality to
account for human complexity. The
other part was how passionate I felt
about bringing magick down to earth
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for people. It's so special that you can
connect to this omnipotent, omniscient
consciousness by using a tool.
That sounds like everything you
needed was there already, you just
needed to connect to it.
It's there but it's just so bogged down
by these lower material vibrations
that we have to constantly disconnect
from. Art can move energy. I don't
really use words very much, as I'm
not a writer. I think it's because I
don't like my colonial languages,
Spanish and English. It kills me that
I don't have access to my languages,
I've only heard and understood them
a couple times in dreams. I heard that
someone who preserves their
language preserves their spirit.
There is another important
concept for you developed by
Gloria Anzaldua?
She is a queer, mestiza femme who
coined the term "Nepantla", in
Nahuatl, which means to share cultural
and spiritual knowledge from one
group of people to the next. It's about
building tolerance for contradiction,
and not rejecting any part of yourself,
but instead, understanding it as a new
consciousness. When I read her book
Borderlands/La Frontera: The New
Mestiza I just wept and held onto that
for dear life. I get emotional talking
about it.
"Nepantleras are threshold people;
they move within and among
multiple, often conflicting, worlds."
Being half white, and living in
so-called "Canada," I feel as though
my indigeneity is perpetually erased.
Because of my mix, my mom's
traditional territory spans
all the way from the Four
Corners down to El
Salvador. Unless you're
Nahuat, you don't know
that. People will call you
Hispanic, or Latina, and
for me that's a defeat to my
people to wear a colonial
label. A lot of my work is
moved by the anger I feel
towards the erasure of my
people. As a mixed race
person, the world tells you
you're not indigenous
enough, not white enough
— it's all enraging. My
identity is not up for debate
or colonial policing. I
represent the in-between
but choose to give voice to
what has been silenced. At
the same time it is very
important to me to
acknowledge my privilege that comes
from being hugely white passing.
The main thing for me was to
hear from my whole family
"You reclaiming your
indigeneity and you introducing yourself as a primarily
Nahuat woman allows us to
heal. Just keep doing what
you're doing."
Does all that play into your
tarot?
The deck is about creating a
home. The only place that
feels like home is here doing
this. I get asked "what's your
as well. There's rarely a time when I
don't have a two-hour conversation
with somebody before the shoot who
doesn't have a huge emotional
breakdown and that's beautiful. It
becomes therapeautic, and a labour of
love, and that is really why I am doing
this. I'm creating space for them to
move through in whatever way they
choose and we are translating it into
an ethereal piece of magick.
How do you turn that conversation
into a visual?
In most cases, I show you a couple of
images that I've made previously and
explain them. I might ask which one
you resonate with and if there is
anything that you would like to add
to the archetype. I don't know how
it happens, but so far, every time it
ends up being in alignment with what
the person is actually going through.
Just as if someone was doing a tarot
reading for you.
mix?" all the time. I can't
go
back to my mum's land
because I wasn't born there
and it's violent as fuck — so I
don't know if it's home or not,
colonialism has damaged it so
much. My ambiguity is a
pillar of my creativity. I'm
always in a contradiction and
eventually I learned that it is okay
and actually kind of special. It's been
uncomfortable and fucking lonely
but when I get to this place where I
create this work, it's when I can
connect and feel whole from the
contradiction the most. Does that
make sense?
Absolutely
And each of my models are in-between
too. They are mixed raced or mixed
genders or have multiple personalities,
they are in between a liminal state of
mind or physical health or in active
addiction. This art project is not about
objectifying or exploiting somebody's
lived experience whatsoever. It's about
me finding folks who want to heal,
and want to find a place of belonging
Photography also was, and
remains, a colonial tool. If we think
of countless so-called anthropological studies or nameless
portraits of First Nations people. I
love that you aim to turn this often
objectifying and dehumanizing
process on its head, and into a
conversation. You give your
subjects back their agency in a
healing and empowering process. I
wondered, is it also about
reclaiming and finding new ways to
create art, which lead away from
the colonial and patriarchal gaze
and acknowledge collaboration
instead of feeding into a myth of
'genius and object'?
That's a hundred percent it. That
person sitting in front of the camera
is a collaborator. I couldn't make any
of this without their lived experience
and their unique essence. Photography is an uncomfortable colonial
art form and I've addressed that with
almost all of my models. They are
compensated for their time
financially; they are always asked for
their comfort level and consent and
can withdraw it at any given point,
have total freedom as opposed
to being captured.
I want to make them feel beautiful. I
want to make them feel like everything
they've gone through, and all of the
discomfort in their worlds, all their
sensitivities, can just be there in one
moment. I hope they can come into a
space of self-love.
Could explain your interpretation
of the card Judgement to me?
It is the birth of a new consciousness
— somebody is definitely resurrected in
the image. This arcanum really speaks
to one of the hardest experiences
I've ever been through. It reminds
me of the madness I went through
when I was getting clean. I moved,
quit my job and lost all my friends
with a relationship of five years.
Everything I surrounded myself
with and identified with was lost
overnight. I ended up going back to
the Four Corners and I stayed in the
desert for months. I sat down with
the plants and what felt like
lifetimes of trauma. I remember this
constant feeling of a resurrection. I
didn't know who I was anymore
because I had wrapped my identity
around another person and my
addiction. I was 27 and it was the
rudest awakening. But when you
realize you're still surviving, and
you realize your power and
resilience, you open yourself up to
something greater. You have created
space for this divinity to come into
you. Where your greatest fear is,
your power also lies. Most of us are so
scared of our true selves. I didn't know
I could trust Alexa to create, and to go
live on her true path. I've always had a
fear of failing, as I associated it with
abandonment. But the true
abandonment is for me to leave myself
and to not let this spirit create.
f
*All images of the artwork are works
in progress and are subject to change
as Alexa continues to work on the
project.
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 I've been trying to grow kale seeds for the better part of two
months. They've been about four inches for about three
weeks now. Nestled in a tin can filled with some dodgy
dirt I had scooped from under my house, they perch inside my
kitchen windowsill, getting a small dose of indirect sunlight.
Their little curling leaves stretch towards the glass. Had I
thought that my love and attention would make up for their
lack of sun and space? Maybe. Did it work? Apparently not.
Perhaps I would have had more luck with a support circle like
the Companion Planting Club. A gardening group of unlikely
origins, they promote accessibility and inclusion in sharing of
knowledge. I recently had the pleasure of chatting to some
members through — ironic, given our organic subject — the
over-familiar zoom grid.
PHOEBE: I suppose the first question I
have is, how did Companion Planting
Club start up?
NORMA: Well, everything started
during the lockdown. We all had
one thing in common — we are all
skateboarders. We're part of the
skateboard community. During
the pandemic, we weren't hanging
out anymore, and some of us were
gardening. For me, this was my
first year [gardening], and I just
had no clue what I was doing. So I
reached out to Sam. Then I reached
out to Judy, and we ended up with
this Instagram group doing seed
exchanges, or just asking questions
like, oh, you know, where should I
plant this type of seed? Or where do
you get your soil from? That kind of
thing.
SAM: The whole experience has been
so rewarding! We are bonding over
gardening rather than skateboarding.
I think it has been really inspiring.
It's another way for us to collaborate
and learn from each other.
JUDY: I mean, skateboarding's a
pretty individual art, if you will, and
gardening can be the same thing. A
lot of us do these things because we
get some sort of joy out of creating
for ourselves — but there's a bridge
that links everybody together with
those commonalities. It doesn't
matter how good of a skater you are,
right, it doesn't matter how good of
a gardener you are.
"What kind of similarities do you feel
there are between gardening and skating?
I think I can see every skateboarder like a plant —you progress
at different speeds. It's the same
when you skateboard. I feel like
you need to practice every day and
like, you know, give it some love,
or get support. If a plant is failing
sometimes you need your friend to
help you. You put in a stick to help
the plant grow straight. [It's the]
same for skateboarding. Sometimes
you need to learn how to drop in,
and you're not able to do it on your
own. So you're like, can you hold my
hand so I can try these tricks? Also,
skateboarding is so creative. There's
not just one way of skateboarding.
Everyone has their own style, their
own tricks, their own preferences.
And like, some people might be
doing gnarly, crazy stuff, but we
all share the same joy. I think for
gardening it is the same. Like, I might
just be growing the easy things, but
I get the same joy every time I see
something bloom, something flower.
It's the same joy that we get when we
land the trick, you know?
KALEA: Both scenes are pretty
DIY, like even just, if we were to
talk about creating a skate space
or designing a garden — there's so
many similarities there. You have so
much creative freedom in using the
environment to just have fun.
But now we're at a point where
we're like, okay, well, how can we
share this joy with our skateboarding
community, because I think everyone
should know how to grow food. It's
something that everyone should have
access to.
"What do you consider the Companion
Planting Club's main goal to be?
I think [CPC] bridges and connects
communities. You know, I garden
with my 85-year-old neighbour —
clearly my 85-year-old neighbour is
not skateboarding. She doesn't even
understand it.
You never know, she might pick it up!
I have an older neighbour, I don't know
how old he is, but I see him everyday,
roller skating down the street. I just have
such mad respect. So you never know.
It's true. Never underestimate. But
you know, I don't think gardening
has any borders or limits — any
person with flesh and a heartbeat can
do this.
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■H/f -j.
0
ne of Companion Planting Club's core values is to be accessible. Both gardening and skateboarding
are more than just activities — they equip those who engage with tools like perseverance,
consistency, patience, and determination. With a whirl of uncertainty and stress clouding our
minds, gardening can be a grounding breath of stability. As health and safety adjustments involve
a heavily digitized lifestyle for many, taking a quiet moment to water your plants and notice little garden
critters can provide mental relief. CPC aims to bring this peace and appreciation to more people.
I also think that gardening is met
with some anxiety, especially with
being in the city — Sam really blew
my mind, she's done a great job with
using what the city offers. Because I
live in a house, I have accessibility
— but she lives in an apartment that
doesn't even have a balcony. So,
she took a roundabout and transformed it into this incredible space.
People riding their bikes down 10th,
they're like, what? It stops people,
it's really inspiring. It's a very clear
example of showing urbanite people
that gardening can actually happen.
Right? Like it's usable space.
W-
Starting skateboarding or starting a
garden can be really overwhelming.
You might not know where to start,
and having access to a community
that understands and supports that
can go a really, really long way.
"We've seen this happen in skateboarding, and now we can see the
possibilities in gardening as well.
"We're representing a new age of
gardeners, in a way.
I love the way you put that — new age
of gardeners. Also, I really know what
you mean with feeling kind of intimidated until you know people. I had a
roommate over
the summer who
threw himself
into gardening.
I'd never had a
close friend who
just did that
before. He had
all these crazy
ideas about it.
I'm only trying my own planting experiments now because of him. So I appreciate the way you put it — how simply
talking about it encourages people, and
stops it from being such a scary, big thing.
That's really cool.
It's really motivating to grow within
this group.
I'm a mom of three kids, you know,
and I have a teenager who is 15, so
it's really cool to feel included. And
Kalea is like, could be my daughter,
which is awesome!
I wanted to mention one of
our members — Michelle from
Antisocial Skateboard Shop, because
she's one of my biggest inspirations.
Like, she literally brought soil to my
house, brought me my first seeds for
growing flowers. Michelle does a lot
for skateboarding, and now she's
doing a lot for gardening too. She
has a farm in Squamish and we all
go and buy flowers and food from
her every Thursday.
My nine year old daughter calls her
auntie Michelle — and sometimes
I'm like, isn't she everybody's auntie?
If you could give a sentence of advice to
people who want to start skating, or start
gardening, but for some reason haven't,
what would you say?
It's never too late. It's never too
late! I started skateboarding after I
turned 31.
Yeah. I started at 31 too. Once you
start, you're like, Whoa, I wish I
started earlier!
ooking ahead, CPC plans to launch beginner planting packs, with different
versions adapted to accommodate growers' space and sunlight availability. I
ask if the frosty weather will disrupt them, but am reassured that though the
cold might slow growth, winter is time for important processes like building
up soil and mulching down dry leaves. Apparently even throwing lentils into your
soil stew can add richness! Preparing beds for bulbs sets up lovely tulips and daffodils
ready for spring. On top of this, winter gives CPC more time to focus on organizing
and applying for grants. They are on the hunt for supporters, both for funding, and for
a spot to develop their own community garden with an integrated skate component.
If you'd like to connect, you can find them through @companionplanting club or at
www.companionplantingclub.com *
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(gorojmmott %Hmlh$ <£M
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 Discorder Magazine Nov-Dec   2020
WORDS BY
Katherine Gear Chambers
STUDIO & ARTIST PHOTOS BY
AlistairHenning
ARCHIVE PHOTOS COURTESY OF
Hazel Meyer
PHOTO OF WHAT IT MEANS TO GROW UP
POUR (AFTER REASON OVER PASSION)
COURTESYOF
Dennis Ha
LAYOUT BY
Deyvika Srinivasa
M
TIKiUS   ll§
AE>@UT
nt is a white room that invites you
in, and offers its various pieces to
you as though showing you a
secret. Milk crates, curtains and a faux-
marble puppet smile at you, encouraging
you to reflect on their function. While
the objects themselves have a far more
obvious function — pants, puppets,
quilts — they have been edited by
inheritance. Transformed by time,
moved by legacy and new inhabitants.
The show in question, The Weight of
Inheritance, exhibited at Western Front
from September to late October, is the
most recent manifestation of artist Hazel
Meyer's ongoing project of the same
name. uThe Weight of Inheritance is me
thinking through various kinds of
legacies, and queer inheritance," Meyer
explains, "using my long-time fondness
for Joyce Wieland as a starting point."
"I first saw [Wieland's] work when I was
a pre-teen," Meyer continues, "I saw her
piece, Reason Over Passion, and it totally
resonated with me [...] I had never seen
such a large work made with textiles
before. And the humour! It was funny! It
was unabashedly cute — there were
hearts everywhere, and puffy letters, and
while I couldn't make total sense of what
its meaning was at the time, I knew it was
trying to communicate something to me
— and using these motifs as a means
towards that goal."
In The Weight of Inheritance, Meyer uses
her relationship to Wieland's work as "a
compass, and a pathfinder to other
histories that aren't given as much
attention and care." "My intention wasn't
to make a show about Joyce Wieland,"
Meyer admits, "rather I wanted to see how
I could think about legacy, power, inheritance etc...with Wieland and her marble as
my starting point."
The connection between Wieland and
The Weight of Inheritance is not
arbitrary. In fact, the project was born
when Meyer was given slabs of marble
that once belonged to the artist. In 2017,
Meyer had done work based on Wieland's
Reason Over Passion which caught the
eye of Jane Rowland — a woman who
had moved into Wieland's former home.
Meyer and her partner Cait were given
the opportunity to visit and tour the
house. "On the second floor landing there
were all these pieces of marble leaned up
against the railing," Meyer explains. The
marble had belonged to Wieland, and
Rowland offered it all to Meyer on the
spot. So began The Weight of Inheritance.
f// hen Meyer moved away
▼ #      from   Toronto   —   two
w
years after first meeting
Rowland and a year following her
passing — it was without the marble.
She soon realized that it had become a
symbol of her friendship to Rowland.
"The kind of inheritance I was a part of
was actually way more meaningful,"
Meyer reflects. She adds, "I came to
realize — and I know this sounds absurd
— but that all marble is Joyce's marble.
Marble is older than any of us, it is of
the earth, it's shells that have been
pressed together trillions of years ago,
like who am I to own that?"
Meyer began exploring questions about
inheritance through performance.
Surrounded by various props based on
objects found in Rowland and Wieland's
home, Meyer told versions of the story,
"thinking about inheritance, class,
queerness [...] and what you pass on,
especially without a biological inheritance of having children, how we leave
things behind." In one iteration of the
performance Meyer picked up a heavy
piece of marble, and invited audience
members to come and hold it with her.
"It was a way of suggesting we don't do
these things alone," Meyer explains,
"how do we come together and take care
of people, thinking outside of a
biological kind of family. [...] How do
we hold people's pasts — if they want us
to." Meyer explains that in holding the
marble, the audience was helping her
hold its story.
From those first performances, the
project developed into a scripted, three-
person performance, featuring a puppet
made to look like a chunk of marble, the
Diana Ross song "It's My House," and a
Shakespearean sonnet, amongst other
things.
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The exhibition that currently sits at
"Western Front was initially meant to be a
series of performances developed and
presented over the course of the
exhibition, but the pandemic necessitated some flexibility and the performances became 2 person workshops
between Meyer and filmmaker Alysha
Seriani and writer s f ho. Even so, mobile
milk crates and a pair of pants do what
they can to conjure bodies in the space.
There are nods to Wieland
throughout the room - in
particular, a piece called Joyce
Wieland's Marble (2020 ) that looks like
a cluster of slabs of marble, and a large
quilt with the words "What It Means to
Grow Up Pour" in puffy letters, an
obvious reference to Wieland's 1968
piece Reason Over Passion.
Hazel remembers attending a workshop
on poverty activism in her early twenties,
in which participants were separated into
different class brackets based on how they
grew up. Participants were then asked to
share a word that was typically used to
describe people in their economic bracket.
Hazel remembers being alone in the
lowest bracket: "Of course I knew what
they were looking for, and I was like,
"I'm not giving you that, so I said,
'intelligent.'"WHAT IT MEANS TO
GROW UP POUR (after Reason Over
Passion), is an echo of this, as Meyer
reflects, "It's not monolithic in any way.
"With this work I used the word POUR
because I hope it might be misunderstood
as a misspelling of POOR, which I
thought might also make the person who
thought this think about their assumptions, or experiences with regards to
education and class."
Across from What It Means to
Grow Up Pour hangs a pair
of purple leather pants. On
the back of the pants, the words ABOUT
POWER are stitched in white leather.
"The pants could easily be found in a
BDSM scene, the object of someone's
kink and desire... So thinking about
power through desire, and various
relationships with power [...] a kind of
positive radical desire."
"This is an essay about power," reads the
first sentence of an article which hangs in
miniature on the gallery wall beside What
mm it
•10 ©ROW
UP FOUR
It Means to Grow Up Pour, aptly given
the title, (This is an essay) ABOUT
POWER, 2020. The text itself, Power,
Technology and the Phenomenology of
Conventions: On Being Allergic to
Onions, is by Susan Leigh Star, and has
traveled with Meyer for a while now. The
Weight of Inheritance poses the question
of "reengaging with structures and systems
to make them work for those of us with
less power than others."
"Thinking about my own privilege as a
white settler on these lands," Meyer
reflects, "and thinking back to that idea
of ownership (with regards to Joyce's
marble and objects that are of this earth),
I owe myself and the work, and really the
world I move through, to constantly be
thinking through how I benefit from
certain structures, and how I can redirect
that power, be an ally and stay true to
what my politics are. The work about
Wieland and her marble and Rowland
gives a certain idiosyncratic scaffold to
these ideas and moving through them. It
feels fertile and generative."
The Weight of Inheritance is indeed
generative - of ideas, of questions, of
conversation. It encourages us to think
about legacies, inheritance, and power.
"I like conjuring that word in this space
because it feels like my first sentence of
the exhibition." Meyer shares, "This is a
show about power — but it's about so
much more than power."
tt
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• • • • * •«   • ••• •. • •'.•:♦<
>  » »* •  > ♦. ♦ # •  •,• ♦ • °?•
^^^^^^^^^^H   77ie Myriad and the Maelstrom
■■■■■■■   (self-releaseb)
||   Ill   II  l||   Jl   II   April   25,   2020 ► ;.«
I r *tii^Ml ^Pr * '  » •
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*
> •
• ^
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> •
• •
■
•
"Order and chaos are separated by one thing •
and one thing only; the presence of repetition or
the lack thereof. Replication, duplication, copying, •
recurrence, call it what you like; it is absolutely necessary to the structure •
of human existence. Look at all the elements of our lives that are cyclical
by nature; we follow in the footsteps of our parents and peers, find routines
that work and stick to them, recreate ourselves through procreation, and •
so on. We are only able to reproduce what we already know, or as Mark
Twain eloquently put, 'no occurrence is sole and solitary, but is merely
a repetition of a thing which has happened before, and perhaps often.'
But exact repetition is only possible in theory, not in real life. Instead,
what seems to happen is that whenever something is repeated, the
newest iteration adjusts itself ever so slightly to best fit its environment,
so that over the course of many so-called replications we begin to see
overarching patterns of change and transformation. I believe that this
forms the essential pattern and structure of all the processes around us.
So then you may be saying to yourself: 'how can you still call it repetition
when it's not exactly the same from one step to the next? Doesn't that
go against the very definition of repetition?'... but see, repetition is only
a word. Moreover, it is a word with vague predicates but, like most other
such words, people nonetheless unconsciously think of it as having fixed
predicates. Take for example the famous sorites paradox; if a heap were
reduced by a single grain at a time, at what exact point would it cease to
be considered a heap? There is of course no answer, it simply illustrates
the limits of language's function to process, categorize, and classify the
<;
> • •
played is jolted, and slowed to a halt.
The album continues for eight more tracks, with lengths varying from
barely thirty seconds to spanning over seven minutes, each toying with
this interplay between analog and digital. Musical motifs circle back on
one another, defining and redefining themselves against each other
before faltering off, jumping in partway on another, or beginning again
entirely, seemingly unchanged. With all this jumbling of musical phrases
and ideas, the album can easily feel disorienting, even nauseating
— the piano swirls around so ceaselessly that one can't help but feel
unmoored. And if left isolated and un-supplemented, The Myriad and the
Maelstrom would not be the sort of record that would be easy to listen to
a second time. But with the guidance of the story, and Jacob's untethered
conceptual probes into the musical ideas surrounding his own fictional
compositions, Olynyk's compositions are transformed into a fascinating
foray into postminimal music. —Lucas Lund
(Bra Coaan
Bells in the Ruins
(Prism Congue Kecorbs)
July   10,   2020
• ■
• ••'._•...
•   -    ♦ •
• ■
• •
»•
• ♦
»• •
jV
• •   4
* «
:
matter we come in contact with. There are many things out there that fall * ».#      attempts to describe what some partner is feeling, rather than remaining ►
in between known human classifications, and that's where the fun begins.
Maybe repetition is a broader category than we thought, and I'm okay «
with that. I don't know about you folks, but I don't want to live in a world ■
where my only two options are to circulate endlessly in an unchanging *
loop or jump into the abyss of complete nihilism. Right at the very edge of '
repetition, that's where the narrow and tottering bridge lies."
n the short story accompanying Vancouver pianist and composer
f Sasha Olynyk's latest album, The Myriad and the Maelstrom, Jacob,*
• »
head of an unnamed Toronto university's music department, is     '► J#  ,  hammers you with her heavy vocals that sound like she's chanting down at
swept up in his conceptual probes into the nuances of contrapuntal « '!♦ < you from the top of some beautiful Vancouver alpine mountain.
a composition. Using the music of J.S. Bach as a point of departure, Jacob * " #-"       Ora unapoloj
•transcendently explores an alternative, more intuitive, meditative and»*
•all-consuming composition practice. Alternating back and forth between
'scenes of Jacob lecturing in a course of his creation, entitled "The»
•      4
i 'Metaphysics of Music," and him sitting at his desk, piano, or church
• organ, composing a new musical work — a reimagining or perhaps*
reflexive step beyond Bach's "Die Kunst der Fuge" — the short story,
examines the underlying theoretical structures upon which Westerni
.music has been built, and their ontological limits.
Musically, Olynyk's release illustrates, almost to a tee, the musical ideas
Jacob expounds in his lecture hall — repetition, deviation, decay. On
the first track, Olynyk's piano rumbles out of the initial silence, with faint
hisses and pops of digital manipulation showering over the cacophony.
Then, just as it builds to an apex, the deep jumble of notes cuts away
cleanly, leaving a beautiful piano figure, centring around a single note,
with underlying chords changing cyclically beneath. After just a few
♦  • •
•:•
ra Cogan's Bells in the Ruins, is packed with
chilling gothic vocals and tight production*
quality that crosses between the genres of •
shoegaze, post-punk and darkwave. While her previous releases have
> ibeen led by heavier psychedelic rhythms or tranquil folk guitar, Ora's«
wide vocal range dominates the mix throughout this album. There is also *
m a focus on meticulously composed synth lines, that build the foundation '
r for many of these new tracks.
Cogan's lyrical storytelling seems stronger than ever, as she draws
strong naturalistic allusions to describe a particular relationship
throughout the album. The track "Tell," is filled with dancing skies and
sweeping canyons, and pleasantly backed with elegant synth arpeggios
and balanced strings. The narrative is also incredibly refreshing, as she
••
»♦
■<
:
:
•  4
introspective. This shift in perspective is depicted in great detail in "Fixe,"
where Cogan describes a number of events her partner has undergone.
However, while exact events are described — fires behind a motel
and sitting down by the water — the intentions are still highly up for
interpretation.
Musically, my favorite track is "Kills," with its fast and precise post-punk
percussion that reminds me of Vancouver-based Crack Cloud. Ora skillfully
• builds up to each chorus by filling the rhythm with a bubbly bass synth, and
J    4 lacing the higher frequencies with radiant electric strumming. She then
i
»
i
» «
,
igetically drags you into her musical narratives with  <
allusive imagery and tender vocals, while her mixes feel like black magic;
arcane yet well-practiced spells cast upon the unprepared listener. '
i —Jordan Naterer
ust as Altamont and the murder of Sharon •
Tate spelled the end of the swinging,
free-loving '60s; the COVID-19 pandemic —
♦ 'along with our city's ongoing overdose crisis — has wiped out a large   <
•chunk of the remaining optimism in an urban landscape being slowly
 • •
♦ _        «•       •   •      •        •••«••••     •
within the heavy pressure of the Earth's crust, Crack Cloud has produced
•••
•••••
.an authentic gem worthy of recognition.
Continuing the unique blend of post punk and hip hop that has defined
« their sound, the album begins with "Post-Truth (Birth of a Nation)," a grand,
« five-minute opener featuring bright, choral voices, pulsing, seamless
« percussion and a vocal style as stark and raw as the streets Zach Choy
(Drums/Vocals) called home during his period of substance abuse. The
, song's chorus calls for a much-needed end to bi-partisan politics, and
« a start to real solutions to problems our out-dated institutions fail to
contain. "We need a vigilante who can wear both shoes / Break free from
the echo chamber / We all are post truth."
The record continues to shine with "The Next Fix," a powerful track
that shines a light on the inner turmoil addicts face as they struggle to
feed their habit ("Yes it's mine / It's the one thing / That keeps me alive /
But I'm better off dead / So please chop off my head / Fill my body with
lead /1 have too much regret"). The end of the song features a sound-bite
from an interview where a DTES resident describes the pain of chemical
withdrawals. With "Favour Your Fortune" sounding like a Daughters deep
cut and the guitar solo on "Tunnel Vision" being one for the ages, this is
truly a record that doesn't rest.
• • ♦
•t>:
:
:
••
9
♦'••• •
r" -
\U   <
»«
I consider this group to be one of, if not the most important band to ■ »• *
... .    .    .      , ;   , ..♦!*•
emerge from the Vancouver scene in the last few years. As far as cultural
, impact, innovation and vision go, they are second to none. Names like
Peach Pit will mean nothing to people in five years, Crack Cloud will stand
• the test of time. —Peter Quelch
£cHcn
• ♦
• •
» •
i •• «
Morning and Melancholia
(£ecretl}i Canabian)
July   31,   2020
' • • ■ ♦    •
» •    • • •
e Ren's Morning and Melancholia grapples',,
with raw grief. The short set of folk songs
allow Lauren Spear's voice to shine set* „
'    I    *
of*
against a backdrop of gentle guitar and drums. They have a mellow,
feeling, mixed with a sadness — perfectly encapsulated by the EP's title.
» Each song seems to be a continuation of a story from leaving a lover
• »
'in "Love Can't Be the Only Reason to Stay" to regretting losing contact *,> *,
' *with them for good in "How to Begin to Say Goodbye." Then trying to.
• • <
reason through the grief of their death in "If I Had Wings" and trying'
• to keep their memory alive in "The Day I Lose My Mind". Each song is*,
.impactful in its efficiency — despite them being short, each and every *
line is meaningful. —Almas K
•  •
• •
Zane Copparb
Of Self
(Bonfire Kecorbs)
August   28,
i •
• • •
• • • •
• •
»•
. •. •
2020   '
rom the first song onward, in the most heavy*,
yet calming way, the sound of Zane Coppard's,
Of Self fills you with the cloaking sensatio
• of drowning. And that's not exclusively due to the instrumentals, as th
album feels almost exactly like its name claims — it pulls you into th
•depths of introspection. Mikayla Koch stated it perfectly, expressing tha£ ,
, *"Zane draws attention back to what is most essential but overlooked in* '
> 'our outwardly focused society — the Self."
Yet the album goes beyond Coppard's own personal reflection of
himself and articulates that introspection in such a way that any listener
can interpret how it may fit flush with their own unique human experience.
The album almost sweeps over you when you hear it —it's wildy immersive
because it so unexpectedly tugs at emotions and sentiments in a deeply
personal way. A beautiful and incredibly intricate follow up to his previous
(equally aptly named) project Of Love, Of Self is an album for escaping,
< finding yourself and disappearing all at once.
With a Radiohead-esque ominousness (In Rainbows-era, at least), the
( first handful of tracks dive right into Coppard's typical eerily spectral
1   sound. In the second track, "Fake Reasons," with the drawn out reverb
tense almost cinematic strings as you hear the words "I don't want to
remember" — the song is a dreamscape that you feel entirely within.
Like an architect of incorporeal spaces through the sounds of each track,
Coppard builds worlds that you can only access by listening and closing
your eyes.
On "Strings Plucked," distorted keys are immediately present,
reminiscent of the sound of his last album. The mixing in this track,
courtesy of Coppard's brother's production company, Big Gift Sound,
is exceptional. Each incorporated element swimming amongst one
another, amalgamated yet unique. In terms of other collaborators, the
drum machine beat that picks up particularly just past half way through
the song is courtesy of Jasper Miller of Outback. "Strings Plucked" is
a chilling, gripping dystopian electronic three minutes. It's way on the
experimental side (a reminder of his other monikers, 1000 Petal Lotus and
downpour) while also maintaining a pop appeal.
Although the album has a dark tone, it also encompasses a really sweet
sadness. The middle stretch of the record feels nurturing and delicate,
almost in flux with the stark intensity of the neighbouring songs. They
all still peel away at the layers of this idea of selfhood, but the ebbs and
flows of intensity feel natural. The darkness and lightness of introspective
analysis fluctuate, taking turns to be processed by the listener.
Like standing at the edge of water, between the seafoam and the kelp;
on top of sea-smoothed stones that graduate to coarse granules of sand; »
the ocean wind whipping through your clothes and the chill hits your mid '
back — this record is a piercing yet comforting late October wind and the ,
heavy clouds dim out the universe. The placement makes you feel small
* " until you sink into it, and it makes you feel infinite. If you closed your eyes »
► I,   ,  in that very spot and took a deep breath you'd feel an unbridled calm. ►
► That's what it feels like, for me at least. But again, the album is a reflection  '
of each individual's self. Where would it transport you?
"Freedom" may just be the most special on the album. Coppard's father
appears posthumously on the track, playing all the keys. In an interview ■
with The Other Side Reviews, Coppard explained how his father's sudden
passing urged him toward contemplating what one's earthly existence   ,
was supposed to mean and be. For years working as a session drummer, •
the shift in his life and eventually his thinking led him to explore the '
i possibility of creating for himself. Thus, he created Of Self.
• Maybe it's because we're both from Vancouver Island and the sound of '
his music pulls at my own West Coast reminiscence; or maybe it's because
he takes inspiration from people like Thorn Yorke and aspires to work with
Frank Ocean, two other artists whose work I adore; or perhaps it has to do *
with the fact that his music is digging at the ideas of broader perspective, *
the way our actions affect those outside of ourselves and self-reflec- • (
tion — all I can say is that Zane Coppard is one the most confoundingly •
talented musicians I've been lucky enough to hear. When asked what his '
biggest hurdle has been musically, he replied "being comfortable in my
own skin." His unwavering integrity and humility shows within every song
and reminds you that each of our personal versions of "the self" share ,
congruences. In these times of often feeling tremendously alone, we are *
more akin than we may realize. All submerged in the depths Of Self. — *
Maya Preshyon
•:•
V
•• •
!• ♦
i
* %   >  more akin than we may realize. All submerged in the depths Of Self. — *
• • •
, *• • Maya Preshyon
'q  '► L
s$Vi.:::&V*a**j$vVX:
&• X* •'. #<
• t
August 2020
present
• • •"
s governments began mandating social
I  distance protocols, and entire industries*
rshuttered their windows and doors to
weather the storm of COVID-19, boredom ran
•
rampant among those swept up in isolation. For   ,
"some, this meant sitting tight, anxiously awaiting a return to normalcy, •
• *    pre-pandemic lives. Vancouver-based musician and producer Justice"
 • •
• • ♦
• •
•   •     • "
notably — was of the latter category.
•••
• • • ,
• ♦
• • «
■
Starting in mid August, McLellan began releasing his new interview-based podcast, satisfyingly titled The Department of Justice. Each
episode, of which there are now fourteen, is a conversation between
McLellan and a notable Vancouver artist. Because of his proximity to
the local music scene, the majority of his guests have thus far been
musicians, but he has a few episodes in which he talks with visual artists «
and actors as well.
Despite spending most of his professional career in the arts behind ■
the scenes, producing or mixing music, McLellan proves himself to be '
an adept interviewer throughout the podcast. While it would be a stretch
to label his style of interviewing as hard-hitting journalism, McLellan's
calm, casual and often vulnerable tone of conversation results in honesty
and reciprocity from his guests. In the third episode of the podcast,
McLellan and his guest, producer, musician and queer DIY-electro punk • »•
icon Jeff Cancade of Devours and The Golden Age of Wrestling chat like ,
the long-time friends they are — reminiscing about the awkwardness of *
early-2000s pop culture, discussing the segregation between the city's •
• LGBTQ community from much of the independent music scene and >
opening up about their own journey through dealing with shame and •
♦
■
•      4
body image.
As someone who has long been attentive to the independent arts
scenes in this city, The Department of Justice is an incredible glimpse
into the intimate lives and careers of many of the people within it. I
would imagine, however, that for someone who has less of a grasp on
the scene, McLellan's podcast could be somewhat opaque. Both he and
his guests talk so casually about their own creative lives that they often
leave out many of the details that would orient the uninitiated listener to
fully understand the independent arts landscape in which they reside.
But for those who are in the know, or perhaps those who are unafraid
to dive right into the deep end of
Vancouver's independent music
scenes, The Department of Justice is
an entertaining and informative look
at the people who keep Vancouver's
culture alive. —Frances Shroff
III
• ••
To submit music, podcasts, books, or film for review consideration to
Discorder Magazine, please email:
•    •    •
♦    •
Jasper D. Wrinch, Section Editor
ur.discorder@citr.ca.
• • •
• ♦    •
••••
•   •    •
. • • •
Send physical items of any kind to Discorder Under Review at
CITR101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, v6t1z1
6
Free and open to the public, the Vancouver Art Book Fair (VABF) is
an annual multi-day celebration of artists' publishing featuring over
one hundred local, national and international publishers, as well as
a diverse line-up of programs, performances and artists' projects.
Featured artists from across Canada and the globe produce
everything from books, magazines, zines and printed ephemera to
digital, performative or other experimental forms of publication.
VABF is a non-profit organization committed to the advancement,
appreciation and circulation of artists' publishing.
VABF Members are part of an engaged community that is
passionate about art publishing. In addition to annual perks,
Members contribute to the sustainability and growth of the
annual fair—keeping the event free, while also allowing us to
invite international artists and pay fair fees to presenters and
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for artists' publishing.
6
$25 MEMBERSHIP
• Access to year-round VABF programs
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• Membership Card designed by Cora Yiu
• Subscription discounts
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and full online access to Artforum's archives
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get your hands on the fall/winter "Death" issue!
°     ilovecreatives: 10% discount on products (ads,
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Q    VANCOUVERARTB®® KFAlR.COM
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10% discount on risograph poster printing
at Moniker Press
Screen printed VABF Tote
A selection of digitized publications from both local
and international artists and publishers
OO
 CiTR 101.9FM PROGRAM GUIDE
'Discorder  recommends  listening to  CiTR every day."  - Discorder
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BREAKFASTWITH
THE BROWNS
8AM-11AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
■ breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmaH.com
RADIO ART GHOST MIX
CITR's 24 Hours of Radio
Art in a snack-sized format.
Dark Ambient. Drone.
Field Recordings. Noise.
Sound Art. Orsomething.
• programming@citr,ca
PARTS UNKNOWN
IPM-3PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Host Chrissariffic takes you
on an indie pop journey
not unlike a marshmallow
sandwich: soft and sweet
and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and
held close to a fire.
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SPEAK MYLANGUAGE
3PM-4PM, DOCUMENTARY
Five multilingual radio
documentaries highlighting
the experiences of
Chinese elders facing
barriers to access in the
BC healthcare system.
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CUSHY RADIO
4PM-5PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Cushy Radio is a weekly
show hosted by Aly Laube,
the co-owner of Cushy
Entertainment. The purpose of Cushy is to uplift
and amplify the voices
of marginalized artists
through event production
and promotion — a mission
dear to Aly's heart as well
as her business partner's,
Mati Cormier. They're
both queerwomen who
grew up in the local music
scene, and together they
try to throw the most
inclusive, accessible, and
fun parties possible.
• programming@citr,ca
• DELIBERATE NOISE
5PM-6PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Love rocking out to live
music, but don't feel
like paying cover? Tune
in for the latest and
greatest punk, garage rock,
local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
• ninapanini1234@gmail.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television,
along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge
new tracks, and strange
goodies for soundtracks
to be. All in the name
of ironclad whimsy.
• programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On airsince 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker
takes listeners from the
past to the future of jazz.
With featured albums
and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
• programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time
music and its derivatives
with Arthur and the
lovely Andrea Berman.
• pacificpickin@yahoo.com
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1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Sweet treats from the
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Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts.
• duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
• FLOWER POWER HOUR
2PM-3PM, MUSIC	
The Flower Power
Hour, hosted by Aaron
Schmidtke, is designed to
give a platform for artists
that are underrepresented,
underappreciated or even
underplayed. While the
primary focus of the Flower
Power Hour is to play quality music to ease listeners
into their afternoons, it
is also to educate them
on these artists played.
• programming@citr.ca
C-POP CONNECTION
3 PM-4 PM,C-POP/INTERNATIONAL
C-POP Connection brings
you some of the most
popularsongs in the
Chinese music industry!
The show also talks about
Chinese culture to connect
you to the Chinese society.
Tune in with your host DJ
Sab to get updated on the
hottest singles, album,
and news in C-POP!
• program ming@citr.ca
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/POP
a show with music
about being uncool
• program ming@citr.ca
• INTO THE WOODS
TUES SPM-6PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Lace up your hiking boots
and get ready to join Mel
Woods as she explores
music by female and
LGBTQ+artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree?
Nope, just another great
track you wont hear
anywhere else. We provide
the music mix, but don't
forget your own trail mix!
• program ming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and
hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from
around the world.
• program ming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
8PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop
& Trill $h*t. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Homeboy
Jules, Relly Rels, Malik,
horsepowar & Issa.
• dj@crimesandtreasons.com
• crimesandtreasons.com
FINE.
lOPM-llPM, TALK/THEATRE
A previously recorded
evening of storytelling
and otherwise.
Each show features a real
nice mix of Canada's best
emerging and established
writers, comedians, musicians, artists and more.
It's fun, yeah. It's
a fine time.
Hosted by Cole Nowicki,
recorded by Matt Krysko.
• Twitter.n @afmeshow
STRANDED:
CAN/AUS MUSIC SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/IN DIE
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds past and present,
from his Australian homeland. Journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
• program ming@citr.ca
CANADALAND
7AM-8AM, NEWS/SPOKEN WORD
CANADALAND is a news
site and podcast network
funded by its audience.
Their primary focus is on
Canadian media, news,
current affairs, and politics.
• program ming@citr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information and insanity.
• dj@jackvelvet.net
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future. Genre need not apply.
• program ming@citr.ca
• LA BONNE HEURE
WITH VA LIE
1PM-2PM	
A new show on the air?!
From mellow and indie, to
more experimental, join
La Bonne Heure' for a
little bit of it all- both in
English and en Francais!
With some interviews on
the horizon and many
good times too... soyez
sur de nous rejoindre!
• program ming@citr.ca
• ALL ACCESS PASS
ALTERNATING WED 2PM-3PM,
TALK/ACCESSIBILITY POLITICS/
DISABILITY	
We talk about equity,
inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse
abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every
second Wednesday from
3-4pm for interviews,
music, news, events, and
awesome dialogue.
• Twitter: @access_citr
• SHORT STORY SCORE
A biweekly radio show
drawing connections
between the narratives and
themes of my favourite
short stories and music!
Listen as I attempt to
fit a soundtrack to a
particularauthor or
anthology each episode.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
• THUNDERBIRD EYE
3PM-4PM, SPORTS/SPOKEN WORD
• program mi ng@citr.ca
• DIALECTIC
4PM-5PM, ROCK/POP/IN DIE
Defined as "The way in
which two different forces
or factors work together",
Dialectic brings the distinct
music tastes of hosts
Chase and Dan together.
Each episode showcases a
variety of indie rock and
beyond, bound together by
the week's unique theme.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
• ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ARTS &
CULTURE	
The Arts Report on CiTR
brings you the latest and
upcoming in local arts in
Vancouver from a volunteer
run team that likes to get
weird! Based primarily in
Vancouver, BC, your show
hosts (Ashley and Jake)
are on the airwaves.
• arts@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
ALTERNATING WED 6:PM-8PM,
ECLECTIC/LIVE INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing
Energy with LIVE Music
and laughter! A variety
show, featuring LIVE music,
industry guests and insight.
The material presented
is therapeutic relief from
our difficult world. We
encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
•   vancouvermedicineshow@gmail.com
SAMSOUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM,
ROCK/POP/INDIE
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss herspins,
every Wednesday.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
I COME FROM
THE MOUNTAIN
8PM-9PM, ECCLECTIC
The show that doesn't
happen on a physical
mountain, but it does
happen in the mountains
of your mind. Bittersweet.
• artcoordinator@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-10PM, HIP HOP/ RSB/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and
the snow capped rocky
mountains, A-Ro The Naut
explores the relationships
of classic and contemporary stylings through jazz,
funk and hip hop lenses.
• Facebook: NinthWaveRadio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
10PM-11PM, TALK
Listen to yourfavorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD
LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird
Locker Room gives you a
backroom perspective on
varsity athletes, coaches
and staff here at UBC.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
TUURSMjJ
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
6AM-7AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces
you to topics through his
unique lens. From news,
to pop culture and sports,
Issa has the goods.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
BREAKFASTWITH
THE BROWNS
7AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
■ breakfast wi ththebrowns@hotmaH.com
• ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
IOAM-IIAM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I
interview bands and
play new, international,
and local punk rock
music. Broadcasted by
Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
• rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com
• rocketfromrussiacitr@gmait.com
• @tima_tzar
* Facebook: Rocket From Russia
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/IN DIE
Sweet treats from the
pop underground.
Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts.
• duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
CUSHY RADIO
4PM-5PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Cushy Radio is a weekly
show hosted by Aly Laube,
the co-owner of Cushy
Entertainment. The purpose of Cushy is to uplift
and amplify the voices
of marginalized artists
through event production
and promotion — a mission
dear to Aly's heart as well
as her business partner's,
Mati Cormier. They're
both queer women who
grew up in the local music
scene, and together they
try to throw the most
inclusive, accessible, and
fun parties possible.
• programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, TALK/SCIENCE
Space is an interesting
place. Marco slices up the
night sky with a new topic
every week. Death Starts,
Black Holes, Big Bang,
Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
• programming@citr.ca
• UNCEDED AIRWAVES
3PM-4PM, TALK/INDIGENOUS
STORIES/MUSIC	
Unceded Airwaves is
produced by CiTR's
Indigenous Collective.
We centre Indigenous
voices with narratives
that empower Indigenous
people and their stories.
We recognize that media
has often been used as
a tool to subordinate or
appropriate Indigenous
voices and we are
committed to subverting
these dynamics. The team
is comprised of both Indigenous and non-Indigenous
people who are passionate
about story-telling,
alternative media and
Indigenous affairs.
• Twitter: @uncededairwaves
• LISTENING PARTY
4PM-5PM, MUSIC
The best new music
curated by the CiTR
Music Department.
• jaspersloanyip@gmail.com
• FEELING SOUNDS
5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
All about indie music and
its many emotions. I'm always looking for local and
student artists to feature!
• programming.executive@citr.ca
K-POP CAFE
6PM-7PM, K-POP/ECCLECTIC/
NEWS
Jayden focuses on Korean
Culture, News, Music,
Movies, and TV Shows as
well as Korean Society
here in Vancouver through
Korean Food, Guests and
Korean Language Lessons.
• programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
8PM-9PM, RSB/SOUL/JAZZ/
INTERNATIONAL
Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and
future. This includes jazz,
soul, hip-hop, Afro-Latin,
funk, and eclectic Brazilian
rhythms. There are also
interviews with local
and international artists.
Truly, a radio show with
international flavor.
• programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s)
every week performing in
the comfort of the CiTR
lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the
country and around the
world are nice enough
to drop by to say hi.
• programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/IN DIE
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s)
every week performing in
the comfort of the CiTR
lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the
country and around the
world are nice enough
to drop by to say hi.
• programming@citr.ca
TRIMJJJ
CRACKDOWN
7AM-8AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
The drug war, covered
by drug users as war
correspondents. Crackdown
is a monthly podcast about
drugs, drug policy and the
drug war led by drug user
activists and supported
by research. CiTR is airing
all episodes weekly.
• @crackdownpod
QUEER FM
8AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
In case you missed them
on Tuesday, tune in to
Queer FM's rebraodcast
on Friday morning!.
• queerfmvancouver@gmaiI.com
• CITR NEWS: ON THE POINT
IOAM - 11AM, NEWS/LOCAL
• programming@citr.ca
• MUSE-ISH
Using found sounds, new
music, and an eclectic vinyl
library join me, chronfused,
as I mish mash everything
that inspires me (and
anything you send in) into
new improvised tunes.
• programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
• daveradiopodcast@gmail.com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP / SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on
each other and leave mix
tapes and love letters in
each other's lockers xo
• Facebook: @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
CITR'S 24 HOURS OF RADIO
ART in a snack size format!
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
• Twitter: @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour
and a half of Manhattan
Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola
doot doo... doot doo!
■ nardwuar.com/rad/contact/
• PHONE BILL
5PM-6PM, ECCLECTIC    	
Hey there you've reached
Phone Bill on CiTR 101.9FM.
So sorry we can't take
you're call right now,but
please tune on Fridays
at 5pm for the freshest
guest-curated playlists
from accross the country!
• programming@citr.ca
• FRIDAY NIGHT FEVER
6PM - 7:30PM, DISCO/R&B
Friday Night Fever- an
exploration into the disco
nation B-) Every alternating
Friday, join Sophie and
Max on a journey of disco,
funk, and RnB on CiTR
101.9. Night-time is just
around the corner, so get
ready to head out with
some groovy tunes.
• programming@citr.ca
CANADA POST ROCK
7:30PM-9PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Formerly on CKXU,
Canada Post Rock remains
committed to the best in
post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and
basically anything your
host Pbone can put the
word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
• programming@citr.ca
• Twitter: @pbone
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, TALK/RADIO DRAMA
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through
the art of Radio Drama.
Story readings, poetry
recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host
Brian MacDonald. Have
an interest in performing?
Guest artists are always
welcome, contact us!
. Twitter: @Skatds_Hatl
S-aTURMU
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30AM-6AM, electronic/
AMBIENT
The Late Night Show
features music from the
underground Jungle and
Drum and Bass scene,
Industrial, Noise,
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
• citrlatenightshow@gmail.com
THE SATURDAYEDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31st year on CiTR,
The Saturday Edge is my
personal guide to world &
roots music, with African,
Latin and European music
in the first half, followed by
Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
• steveedge3@mac.com
• VIVAPORU: THE OINTMENT
FORTHESOUL
ALTERNATING SAT 12PM-1PM,
INTERNATIONAL/LATINX
"Similar to vicks-vapo-rub,
the magical ointment
that seems to cure it all,
we bring you cultural
medicine to nourish
your soul Latinx style".
• vivaporu.citr@gmaiI.com
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, LOUD/METAL
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darkerside of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided
by Coleman, Serena,
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
• programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and
blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
• codeb!ue@pau!norton.ca
MANTRA
ALTERNATING SAT5PM-6PM,
ELECTRONIC/MANTRA/NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the
many faces of sacred sound
- traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic
array of electronic and
acoustic beats, music,
chants and poetry from
the diverse peoples and
places of planet earth.
• mantraradioshow@gmail.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, TALK/RUSSIAN
Informative and entertaining program in Russian.
• nashavolna@shaw.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, ELECTRONIC/RETRO/
TECHNO
Every show is full of
electro bleeps, retrowave,
computer generated,
synthetically manipulated
aural rhythms. If you like
everything from electro
/ techno / trance / 8bit
music / and retro '80s
this is the showforyou!
• Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no
concept of genre, style,
political boundaries or
even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our
focus on a series, The
Solid Time of Change, 661
Greatest Records of the
Prog. Rock Era -1965-79.
We're not afraid of noise.
• Contact: programming@citr.ca
sutmag
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
OF INSOMNIA
2AM-3AM, EXPERIMENTAL/
GENERATIVE
4 solid hours of fresh
generative music c/o the
Absolute Value of Noise and
its world famous Generator.
Ideal for enhancing your
dreams or, if sleep is not on
your agenda, your reveries.
• programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
8AM-10AM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUE-
GRASS
Pacific Pickin', originally
aired on Tuesday mornings,
brings you the best in
bluegrass plus its roots and
branches: old time, classic
country, rockabilly, western
swing and whatever
jumps off the shelves at
us. Most shows have an
artist feature and a gospel
set. Hear the historical
recordings and the latest
releases right here.
• pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM, INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
• programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time.
Playing the best in roots
rock reggae, Dub, Ska,
Dancehall with news
views & interviews.
• programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-
in-yer-boots country.
• programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL/LATIN
AMERICAN
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
• programming@citr.ca
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, INTERNATIONAL/BHA-
JAN S/OAWWALIS/S UFI
Presenting several genres
of rich Indian music in
different languages, poetry
and guest interviews.
Dance, Folk, Qawwalis,
Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also,
semi-classical and classical
Carnatic& Hindustani
music and old Bollywood
numbers from the 1950s
to 1990s and beyond.
• rhythmsindia8@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, ELECTRONIC/DEEP
HOUSE
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house,
prog-house and techno +
DJ / Producer interviews
and guest mixes.
• programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, ELECTRONIC/TRANCE
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from
Vancouver, BC since 2001.
We favour Psytrance, Hard
Trance and Epic Trance,
but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, Hard Dance
and even some Breakbeat.
We also love a good
Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
•   djsmileymiiVe@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer
discussion show is centered
around Vancouver White-
caps, MLS and the world of
football. Est. in 2013, the
show features roundtable
chat about the week's big
talking points, interviews
with the headline makers,
a humorous take on the
latest happenings and
even some soccer-re la ted
music. If you're a fan
of the beautiful game,
this is a must-listen.
• programming@citr.ca
Islam* °f
tost Toys
• STUDENT PROGRAMMING
ECLECTIC	
Marks any show that
is produced primarily
by students.
CITR GHOST MIX
ANYTHING/EVERYTHING
Late night, the on air
studio is empty. Spirits
move from our playlist
to your ear holes. We
hope they're kind, but we
make no guarantees.
RADIO ART GHOST MIX
SOUNDS / IDEAS / EXPERIMENTS
From the makers of 24
hours of Radio Art, Radio
Art Ghost mix gives you a
taste of the weird, wonderful, and challenging.
• SPECIAL PROGRAMMING
3PM-5PM, SOMETHING SPECIAL
A spot for podcasts and
special programming
from CiTR. Tune in for
Vancouver COVID-19
Update, Motherlands,
Speak My Language,
Queer Noize, and more.
Subscribe whereever
you get your podcasts.
• @CiTRRadio
• programming@citr.ca
 mmm
C'dnddidTL Irdip. f-ylfc
*\   TUe. Legend of
t tAv*i\ab\e. Now
www/.bentfoadft;
bea role model
friend advocate
burger expert
mentor
Our volunteer
mentors help
youth recognize
their many
strengths and
work towards
their goals.
To Learn how you can become a mentor, visit:
unya.bc.ca/mentorship
Urban Native Youth
Association
 November 2020
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Fellini 100
01
Fellini 100
02
Fellini 100                      03
New Cinema
04
DIM Cinema
05
Fellini 100
06
Chan Centre
07
6:30 pm
6:30 pm
6:30 pm
6:30 pm
6:30 pm
6:15 pm
Connects
La Dolce Vita
La Dolce Vita
La Dolce Vita
Belonging
DIM Cinema
8:30 pm
Symbiopsychota
plasm: Take One
New Cinema
ki-
I Vitelloni
8:45 pm
La Strada
4:30 pm
Ridge
7:00 pm
Sy m biopsychotaxi -
8:30 pm
Ridge
plasm: Take One
Belonging
DIM Cinema
08
New Cinema
09
New Restoration            "|0
Fellini 100
11
Fellini 100
12
25th Anniversary
13
Fellini 100
14
4:00 pm
6:30 pm
6:00 pm
2:00 pm
6:15 pm
Restoration
3:15 pm
Symbiopsychota
xi-
Belonging
Damnation
La Dolce Vita
La Strada
6:15 pm
La Strada
plasm: Take One
Fellini 100
DIM Cinema
6:00 pm
8:45 pm
La Haine
New Restoration
New Restoration
8:30 pm
I Vitelloni
8:40 pm
La Strada
II Bidone
New Restoration
6:00 pm
6:00 pm
Symbiopsychotaxi-
8:30 pm
I Vitelloni
8:40 pm
Damnation
Damnation
plasm: Take One
Damnation
25th Anniversary
New Cinema
Restoration
8:40 pm
8:45 pm
Belonging
La Haine
Contemporary
15
Contemporary
16
25th Anniversary
18
Fellini 100
19
Fellini 100
20
Fellini 100
21
Iranian Cinema
Iranian Cinema
Restoration
6:00 pm
6:15 pm
4:00 pm
3:30 pm
6:30 pm
^^^^i     ^^..
6:15 pm
II Bidone
La Strada
II Bidone
The Warden
The Warden
La Haine
Fellini 100
|*-M      >    i
25th Anniversary
8:45 pm
7:00 pm
6:00 pm
I Vitelloni
25th Anniversary
r#*>\
Contemporary
Restoration
SVz
BYs
Restoration
8:45 pm
Iranian Cinema
8:40 pm
8:45 pm
La Haine
8:30 pm
La Haine
fcr/J^K^
The Warden
II Bidone
Fellini 100
22
Fellini 100
23
Fellini 100
25
Fellini 100
26
Harvard's Sensory
27
Fellini 100
28
3:00 pm
7:00 pm
7:00 pm
7:00 pm
Ethnography Lab
6:15 pm
3:45 pm
La Dolce Vita
Juliet of the Spirits
IHEE^Hi^E
Juliet of the Spirits
8J4
BY2
Sweetgrass
7:00 pm
7:00 pm
8V2
8:40 pm
Juliet of the Spirits
H .   1™ j ..
Leviathan
December
Harvard's Sensory
Ethnography Lab
4:30 pm
Sweetgrass
7:00 pm
Leviathan
29
Harvard's Sensory
Ethnography Lab
6:00 pm
Manakamana
8:45 pm
Sweetgrass
30        Fellini 100 01
7:00 pm
Juliet of the Spirits
Harvard's Sensory
Ethnography Lab
6:30 pm
Leviathan
8:40 pm
Manakamana
02
Harvard's Sensory
Ethnography Lab
6:15 pm
Sweetgrass
8:40 pm
Manakamana
03
Virtual Screening options, including tickets
for the European Union Film Festival can be
found online at thecinematheque.ca
Images from top to bottom:
La Dolce Vita, 1960; La Haine {Hate), 1995; 8'/z {Otto e mezzo), 1963; The Painted Bird, 2019

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