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 0j
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"THAT OPEN-WORLD MAGAZINE FROM CiTR 101.9 FM"
tHoI, 37  j]Jo, oi  3w«e, 414
llocal + JFree
 oOOOOOO
The Cinematheque
February-March
TICKETS, BAND INFO, VIDEOS & MORE AT
[
UJU
Until February 17
Until March 4
February 16
March 5-26
March 6-11
March 13-19
March 20-24
Best of the Decade
Agnes Varda
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
UCLA Festival of Preservation Tour
VitalinaVarela
Come and See (Idi i smotri)
Anne at 13,000 ft
Film Still: Moonlight, "Best of the Decade"
1131 Howe Street, Vancouver
thecinematheque.ca
SATURDAY MARCH 14
FOX CABARET
TICKETS: TIMBREC0NCERTS.COM
RED CAT MAIN ST, RED CAT HASTINGS ST AND ZULU
254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
 TABLE of CONTENTS
FEB-MAR-2020
PHOTO OF TURUNESH BY ISAAC YOU W. ILLUSTRATIONS BY EVAN BRIEN.
COVER:
MAIN COURSE
09 • ART CRITICISM & OTHER SHORT STORIES
hanging  on the  dead  air  between the  silent   recipients
of  lore  letters
10 TURUNESH
Conjurer of worlds, master of arcane wisdom
12KYLA JAMIESON
"to conflate Kyla with the "I" of the poems is to get her
wrong again"
14 • EVAN MICHAEL SPROAT
Life flows through inanimate objects
20   DAFFODIL
Hovering cursors, paths that compete to offer themselves
APPETIZERS+BITES
04* ART REVIEW
EAT  YOUR  TAIL
05'OPEN LETTER
No   Fun   (Tent)   City
06 • EX-SOFTESS
The muddied chaos of a
lopsided city
15-"BELLY-
Guest    art    project    by
Bran Michael   Sproat
16 • CONTRIBUTOR ART PROJECT
By  Bryce  Aspinall
17•FEBRUARY 2020 CALENDAR
18 • MARCH 2020 CALENDAR
24'REAL LIVE ACTION
Music.Shindig 2020,Moments
26'UNDER REVIEW
Music"n'podcasts
29* CiTR PROGRAM GRID
30 • CiTR PROGRAM GUIDE
31* Top 50 Charts
ADVERTISE: Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca.
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To learn how
to get involved with Discorder
contact volunteer@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque
for $20 to LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute
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email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR,
a registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you
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Ill
• ••
To inform Discorder of an
upcoming album release,
art show or significant
happening, please email
all relevant details 4-6
weeks in advance to
Tasha Hefford,
Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
comments, complaints
and corrections via email.
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising
Coordinator: Tasha Hefford // Discorder Student Executive: Dan Miller // Editor-in-Chief: Tasha Hefford
// Sections Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch //Web Editor: Fatemeh Ghayedi // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo
Laredo // Social Media Coordinators: Alex De Boer, Dora Dubber // Administration Coordinator: Angela
Nguyen // Charts: Jasper Sloan Yip // Production Assistants: Enya Ho, James Spetifore, Sheri Turner //
Writers: Afrodykie Zoe, Milena Carrasco, Tate Kaufman, Liam Johnstone, Krystal Paraboo, Julie D. Mills,
Megan Milton, J Ockenden, Marianna Schultz, Sage Broomfield, Angela Villavicencio, Tatiana Yakovleva,
Jordan Naterer, Lucas Lund, Shreya Shah, Almas Khan, Dana Scharien, Borna Atrchian, Chris Yee, Ruby
Izatt, Amanda Thacker, Heather Baker // Photographers & Illustrators: Amy Brereton, Evan Brien, Perry
Chahal, Alistair Henning, Sunny Nestler, James Spetifore, Beau Todorova, Isaac You Proofreaders:
Milena Carrasco, Ricky Castanedo Laredo, Fatemeh Ghayedi, Tasha Hefford, Em Ludington, Jasper D.
Wrinch, Chris Yee.
©Discorder 2020 - 2021 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published bi-monthly by CiTR.
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiherh speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM.
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager©citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Editors'
Note
^TW- find a lot of comfort in things unkempt — to act like nothing less
H W than a bard in a world on fire. I like things that defy our rampant
f^~ overcorrection; markedly so in a world where best and worst
intentions are rhetorically displaced onto a machine god. It's amazing
just to have this sense of having lived. Of having done or seen or felt
anything at all. I wanted stories of purposeful maximalism — because
much of the reality of life is unapologetically gauche. Here, you will
see I've received work that reaches through my brief like even it
was not enough. Perhaps none of this can exist without reference to
what it isn't: It isn't steady eye-contact with Kyla Jameison's poetic
works, but the catching of discordant fragments. It's not a book
review, but a cephalopod bent to the shape of its subject. It's not just
Evan Sproat's formidable craft, but how he breathes candy-colored
warmth into arid forms. I want to dub this "Serious people getting
weird and weird people getting serious" and give you permission to
lean into your most embarrassing self. It's been a relentless year of
minimalist posturing, of Swedish death cleaning and Marie Kondo's
precious sparseness. We've done the face tuning, the reps and the
shelves best left empty. My hope for this issue — don't secretly
feel too cool. Herein lies excess! I had a plan for this and I lost it.
Hope you understand. Hope you feel the same way <3. C U in my
wildest dreams.
GL/HF
:-)   Tasha
SV)BSCR/££
$i$cot$fK
Send this form with some cold hard cash or a cheque to:
DISCORDER MAGAZINE, LL500- 6133 UNIVERSITY BLVD.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  V6T 121
 Discorder Magazine      feb/mar-2020
r*
EAT YCHJRTAIL
at Access Gallery
Art Review
words by
Krystal Paraboo
photos by
Sophie Janus
The latest exhibition at Access
Gallery, EAT YOUR TAIL, offers
bewildering multi-media works by
four local artists; Maya Gauvin, Chrome
Destroyer, Teresa Holly, and Evan Sproat.
The exhibition's title pays homage to the
ancient Egyptian ouroboros, a dragon or
serpent eating its own tail, symbolically
presenting a cyclical interpretation of
death and rebirth. Through a single
object both eternal sequences of life that
are impossible to co-exist are presented,
drawing equal criticism to both human
downfall and its contrasting renaissance.
The artists in EAT YOUR TAIL mimic
this iconography and present their
own paradoxical juxtapositions within
self-portraits.This in turn urges viewers
to partake in the process of confronting
meditations on both self-deprecation
and approbation, all through the lens
of ritual.
Gauvin and Destroyer begin by successfully creating a realm that ritualizes inter-
connectedness. The display of Gauvin's
ceramics on the floor, mounted on the wall
and hung from the ceiling, set the tone for
a sacred space — heavily reminiscent
of esotericisms and monuments such as
Stonehenge, both in display and medium.
The multi-coloured stained glass in "Salt
Range" confronts viewers with their
multi-dimensional reflection within
this single object. Chrome Destroyer
playfully displays the interconnections
between generational objects of significance — both historical and contemporary — enhancing the spiritual realm
of Gauvin's work. The beauty in Chrome
Destroyer's photographs is in their decon-
struction of certain eras, whilst criticizing
their chronological effects. Audiences
are forced to question the impact and
influence of these objects; to what extent
do they collectively play a role in shaping
and harming our identities?
A highlight of the exhibition was
Sprout's pink, hand-made, performative
sculptures. Juxtaposed with Holly's
scattered display of papier mache bodily
4
parts — indicative of a suppressed creature
attempting to either escape or return
to an unknown realm — both artists
suddenly have us wearing costumes that
elicit self-criticism through the unseemly
display of mythological anatomy. All
components of the metamorphosis are
fostered in these works — the grotesque
is simultaneously graced with the ethereal
in materials combined with soft shades
of pastel.
This exhibition challenges notions
of conceptualizing one's identity. The
experience becomes an expansive analysis
of the self, as opposed to a compartmentalized interpretation. Although I was the
sole viewer during my visit, I pondered
how my experience would have been
altered had I been with a handful of
viewers — whether the shared experience would have created another layer
of interconnectedness to be challenged
and accepted.
EAT YOUR TAIL
At Access Gallery
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EAT YOUR TAIL
At Access Gallery
 Discorder Magazine      feb/mar-2020
NO FUN (TENT) CITY.
words by Megan Milton.
About a month ago, I went on a drunken rant at a house party with a few of my Tenants
Union comrades. I loudly proclaimed that I am sick of watching my friends scramble to
find an affordable place to live every time a developer and our weasel mayor conspire to
build more $3,700 a month "affordable housing units" at their address. For the love of god,
I lamented, take any commercial building you want. I know something must be sacrificed to
provide overpriced housing for all the established Gen X-ers with their better-late-than-never
nuclear families. So let it be the bespoke furniture stores and the vegan butcher shops who
get the bulldozer. Frankly, I'll sleep peacefully knowing that nut pate is off the reclaimed
wood table. I found out shortly after my "mow down all the small businesses" posturing that
Little Mountain Gallery is up for redevelopment.
My heart sank. It's true that nobody lives at LMG, but for improvisers and comedians, it is
home. I'm one of the hundred or so local amateur comics who frequent Vancouver's open mics.
What most of us are doing is only art on a technicality, but LMG is different. There, improvisers, stand-ups and everyone in-between have the freedom to get weird. A couple of months ago
a friend of mine chugged a 4L of milk and cried on stage for 6 minutes to roars of laughter.
The regulars pack the house every show because there's a huge market for LMG Comedy department's brand of organic, alt-comedy. I'm doubtful any of this could exist anywhere else. All
you have to do to understand how vital Little Mountain Gallery is to the comedy scene is scroll
through the Just For Laughs NorthWest indie show line up.
Bumpin" art spaces, gentrification, and demovictions are a vicious circle. Art and gentri-
fication seem to evolve together, a lot like how neanderthals slowly domesticated wolves that
ate their leftover mammoth carcasses. Artists look for a cheap space to work out of, and the
bespoke furniture stores and vegan butcher shops follow over time. Unfortunately, instead of
getting puppies out of this symbiotic relationship, the low-income senior who lives above
your art studio gets an eviction notice. Mount Pleasant has been going through this process
since the 1990s. True to form, LMG's building at 195 East 26th Avenue, opened in 1930 as an
automotive garage and became an arts venue in 2001. Now only 19 years later it's on the chopping
block. The rapid cannibalization of Mount Pleasant"s soul is a good indicator it is entering
late-stage cool-neighbourhoodism. This isn't happening because art is bad, or because neighbourhoods develop a unique culture. It's happening because housing is a commodity.
Many of LMG's regulars and performers live nearby and they are also being displaced to
build condos. In fact, Ross Dauk of "Jokes Please" has a great bit about his experience
with the housing crisis and it kills because we've all been there. Only the condo
builders are happy with this arrangement. Those Gen Xers with the better-late-than-never-
nuclear-families who've replaced the creatives and consumers are getting a rough deal too.
They have to watch the arts and culture which drew them to buy a home there get chiselled
away to make more condos. The snake eats its own tail. The snake in this analogy is Kennedy
Stewart. After all, he toasted his time in a rock band as proof he'd be an advocate of the
arts. I know this because I volunteered on his campaign.
Vancouver's city council promised us they would "make space for arts and culture" just
as they promised they would tackle the affordability crisis. Instead of doing anything
productive, on either front, they mandated developers to install a piece of public art
for every building over 10,000 Square feet. So now we have an infamous 4.8 million dollar
spinning bridge chandelier instead of the below-market rentals we desperately need. The
city promised to offer grants to help art spaces survive the affordability crisis then
slapped Red Gate with a $9,000 property tax increase. Stop buying into their bullshit and
lining up to lick Ian Gillepsie's boots. They only feign support for the arts as a way to
exonerate themselves of the damage they're doing to our communities.
As this council enters the second half of its mandate, pay close attention to what is
happening at City Hall. Pay attention and speak out. But you can't just write a play about
the fall of Vancouver. Artists more than anyone should know social commentary doesn't put
roofs over heads, you have to do something more. If you see a redevelopment announcement
show up near your black box theatre, you need to show up to support the affected tenants.
While Little Mountain Gallery's future is uncertain, what isn't is the vicious cycle of
gentrification in Vancouver. If housing is a commodity, you will always become a victim
of your own success, so get radical and maybe we can turn this whole "No Fun (tent) City"
thing around.
As I was powering through my final edit of this article, merely hours before the
deadline, I was served a "landlord use" eviction notice. So, if anyone needs a roommate
for April first my budget is 1000 plus utilities, pet-friendly please.
6
OPEN LETTER
NO FUN (TENT) CITY
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la
-W^ attling my way over False Creek on the
'■"»■ 007 bus, Ex-Softess's chiming guitars and
^"^ sprawling reverberations manifest — in
the twinkle of sunlight over the water and the
depths therein. Inherent within the band's newest
release, Hollow Ritual, is the muddied chaos of a
lopsided city. The band delves into free-jazz noise
excursions harkening back to L.A. Blues by The
Stooges (indeed, Don L'Orange, guitarist / vocalist
and I shared in a moment of mutual revelation
discussing the first time we heard the track). Unlike
L.A. Blues however, the songs on Hollow Ritual
quickly snap back into order. Chaos aligning at
once to drive the compositions forward.
Sometimes, what realigns the band is a specific
audio cue — a transition line on April Johnson's
bass or fill from Bill Batt's drums. Other times
the cue is visual or spatial, one member directing
the other two to return to form. This synchro-
nicity requires both discipline and chemistry, with
Ex-Softess always openly experimenting off one
another, while simultaneously working towards
the progression and build of a song.
Bill and Don have both toured extensively,
having formed many out-of-town connections
during the MySpace era, when musical networking
and discovery opportunities were at their peak.
April, meanwhile has spent time performing in
Cuba with her hardcore band WANT (We Are
Not Things) alongside now defunct Vancouver
band Black Pills. Solidarity Rock, an organization
with the mission of "bringing the Rock'n'roll
revolution to Cuba", organized the tour, during
which April and her bandmates had left their gear
behind, allowing locals access to equipment in a
nation with notoriously tough import laws.
Indeed, the band forms such a solid unit — with a
distinct form of experimentation — that it is hard
to believe it was formed out of Don and Bill's prior
project, Softess. April recounts how she came to
join the band, telling me that she had been to
numerous Softess shows, and was surprised when
Bill and Don reached out to her, not knowing
that they had heard her work as a bassist in
hardcore bands such as Career Opportunities.
Once onboard, the three realized that they had
a radically different approach and sound than
Softess had once had. They settled on renaming
themselves Ex-Softess, signalling a new stage
in the group's sonic evolution. All three
members of the band are visual artists,
and as such have total creative control
over all aspects of their releases. April
created the cover for Hollow Ritual, a
curtain lit against a void of speckled
black, the form behind it obscured.
Bill runs Thankless Records, the label
which Hollow Ritual was released
on, personally designing packaging
for the cassette release. Ex-Softess
is, in many ways, a quintessential
Vancouver band, each member having
found each-other through the city's vast
network of musicians and artists, coming
together to create a sound both claustro
phobic and expansive.
#"
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EX-SOFTESS
Music for lopsided city
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ART GRITIGISM &,
OTHERSHORTSTORIES
A High-Fantasy Review, words by Liam Johnstone, illustrations by Beau Todorov:
Editor's note:
This may be obvious now, but the first thing I need to tell you about Art Criticism and Other Short
Stories, the newest addition to Blank Cheque Press's impressive roster, is that it is not directly
art criticism. Instead, here there are stories that range from squeaky clean to filthy. Stories that
squelch, flutter and pop. AC&OSS is the collected works of Helen Reed's artist fan-fiction zine —
something I would think was some kind of bizarre witticism if it didn't work so well. The book
engages itself with subtly distorted sugar-pie displays of awe — cogent evidence of the fan-fie genre
— but also fanatical "too-close" readings (Jen Delos Reyes' Private Lives), odes (Hazel Meyers' ode
to Louise Bourgeois' ponytail) and science-fiction Bas Jan Ader (Sam Korman's BAS1975). These
are stories that pressure criticism without shying away from desire. They open themselves like an
ocean; to become more magnetic, more habitable, to accomodate the needs you didn't know you
had. Consuming every calorie of kink, and laying claim to a sense of indulgent art fantasy. And so
— hanging on the dead air between the silent recipients of these love letters and our voyeurism is
Liam Johnstone's response to the collection. Brought to us in the flavour of AC&OSS's clamorous
contributors, and of course, Helen's coveted eye for fun.
I AWOKE IN THE NIGHT, or at least I thought I had. My mind recalled a faint tapering of something
about a crystal dagger before the storm outside the hull overtook whatever else was\^oken.
And now I shall recall the events which preceded this dream. Which perhaps was no c
^TW- t was then several days later when
r I had landed in port. I never did
f^~ discover whose voice it was that
whispered to me, but I had found early
next morning on the ship which brought
me into town, a small dagger made
of luminescent crystal that seemed to
glow green in the moonlight. What its
properties were, or why it had come into
my possession, were but a mystery to me.
One which I desired greatly to unravel.
I became friendly with townsfolk and
the local guards quickly and began my
inquiries. I was instructed by one of my
new friends to meet with a merchant by
the edge of town. This merchant was
known to be an excellent appraiser of
esoteric artefacts. A relationship with this
merchant was considered paramount for
any dungeoneer, such as myself, and so I
made haste to their workshop.
The merchant towered at least three
hands taller than myself, whom I have
always considered to be above average
in height. They wore little, save for
a sabretache which I discovered later
contained only a series of large constricting
bands made of clothlike material. From
top to bottom the merchant was covered
in long and lush coils of hair. It was
difficult to discern whether their form
purely was that of silkened curl with no
physical form beneath, or if instead the
hair that protruded from their top was
simply allowed to grow whimsically out
of control so as to nearly dust the floors
as they moved.
I recall now standing in the merchant's
workshop for quite some time and
considering simultaneously the absurdity
of consulting a sentient oversized lock of
hair and their infallible perception as they
narrated histories I knew to be
true of all the objects I had on
my person. As the moments
ticked by, I was drawn further
into the minutiae and the
sentiment of the merchant's
words, until several words
stood out from the rest.
"The dagger is not for you to
know, but it will question you."
I had spent many days
pondering the merchant's
words and caressing the fine
edge of the crystal dagger I had
tasked myself with safekeeping.
The dagger seemed to whisper
and echo questions, present
challenges, and produce
imagery within my mind. The
ideas were fresh, confusing, and
yet familiar. I often wondered if I should
put it out of my mind and cast the dagger
into the abyss. Some time passed, most
of which I filled through conversation
with local townsfolk about the crystal
dagger and the ideas that had come to me
involving its purpose. Some conversations
were more fruitful than others.
There was an older dungeoneer who was
down on his luck. I spent much of our
time together fighting the urge to roll my
eyes at the stories of his past lover and
the journeys they were on. He was all
but washed up in this moment, but I was
later able to appreciate what his story
really meant.
There was an enchantress who said she
would channel the inner voice of the
dagger for me and, though I suspected it
was all staged, I allowed it.
There was an adventurer who instructed
me to hold a wooden board with the
words "Listen" carved into one side
while they examined the dagger. One
individual I recall quite fondly. They
drew several graphs and iterations of
how they think the dagger had come
to be. There were many others, most of
which were as memorable as the last.
Though I cannot say for certain if any of
them truly had the answers I was seeking.
(^^^" uring the coldest stretch of winter
^U I visited a mage in their high tower
^▼^ not far from where I slept most
nights. Perhaps one with arcane wisdom
could tap into the dagger's secrets.
The tower was as tall as the sky, though
the spiralling stairs that led up to the mage's
library somehow seemed only a flight or
two. I curled and turned my fist and was
caught off guard as my gentle knocking
produced a resounding boom that echoed
through the stairwell behind me.
My encounter with the mage was warm
as they opened the door and brought me
inside their study. The mage's quarters
were beautifully lined with shelves of
books and scrolls of which I had only
heard the names of and never thought I
would ever myself read. They spoke to
me of the fallacy of seeking knowledge
in an object, but instead spoke of how
knowledge comes from one's willingness
to apply that which is unknown to learn.
Their words guided and directed my
hands towards the crystal dagger which
I don't recall placing upon on a pedestal
before us — glowing in the moonlight the
dagger seemed almost to bleed whispers
of its secrets as moonbeams caught dust
motes hanging above its emerald glow.
Then the tower disappeared. The oaken
floorboards beneath me vanished as if
a blink had wiped their essence from
existence. For a moment I hung there, as
if grasped tightly by the darkness of the
night sky. In those moments I remembered all those whom I had met in this
strange town recently and recalled that
each left me with more questions, more
curiosity perhaps, than I had before
encountering them. I reached out to take
the crystal dagger which was suspended
in front of me and as I grasped it I
immediately began my descent back to
Earth and smiled.
tt
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ft
 Discorder Magazine      feb/mar-2020
WORDS BY AFRODYKIE ZOE
ILLUSTRATIONS BY EVAN BRIEN
PHOTOGRAPHY BY ISAAC YOU
World building means
you have a sense of
a bigger universe. Of
something more epic, things
that haunt the edges of your
story. Turunesh is more than
a singer/songwriter. She is a
storyteller, a conjurer, a poetess,
truly a world builder.
t's in tracks like 'Midnight' —
a jazzy, sensual ballad that was
t
** inspired by Ella Fitzgerald's
Moonlight in Vermont' — which depicts
the beautiful way people can be seen by
the light of the moon, or how a lover sees
their other at night. To the more recent,
'Asili Spirits', an Afrocentric calling of
our ancestors to this realm. Turunesh uses
her chill vocals to weave and entice you
into the beautiful and mystical worlds she
creates — blending together the sounds of
the familiar and the traditional. Forming,
folding, gently asking you to lie still long
enough to lap up the melodious sound
waves, and watch the creative creatures
which take shape in the beautifully lit,
lyrical way, that is Turunesh.
Turunesh, currently a fourth-year undergraduate student at UBC, had inklings
of being called to music as early as the
first grade. She recalls a moment during
her class' International Day celebrations,
during which a childhood friend was
chosen to perform over her. While she
remained jubilant for her friend at the
time, it was then she realised the importance of music and performance in her life.
Turunesh has been writing original songs
since she was 16 years old — releasing
singles and two self-titled EPs. Despite
these achievements, the experimental
Neo Afro-soul musician considered this a
hobby. "I don't want to call it [that] but
I treated it as such," she admits. "I've
always known I loved music and that
it is special to me, but I didn't always
know I was going to be a musician," she
continues thoughtfully, "in fact, I was
set on being an entrepreneur... it's what
my mum and my dad do. I always had it
in my mind, 'I'm going to be a business
woman, I want to be rich.'
It wasn't until the summer of 2018, when
she spent a month abroad in London, that
her mind was finally set. "I spent a month
crashing, doing gigs, meeting musicians.
It was a really, really fun time." she
gushes, "that was the summer I decided I
wanted to do music full time. That's when
I knew this was something I wanted to do
for a living. That this was my calling. This
is what I was sent here to do."
Turunesh returned home to Tanzania
for the remainder of the summer,
focused and inspired. "I was so
inspired by London, I went back home
[and] I said 'mum, dad, I'm working
on an album. Don't ask me to work on
no internship — this is my internship'
they respected it; I appreciated it. I was
so amped up to work on a project, you
know? I wrote so many songs [and] I had
recorded about 11 or 12. [Then] I came
back to UBC and I think I got the mixed
and mastered tracks in October *pause*
I didn't like them *laughs*. It's not like
I didn't like the mixing, or mastering,
or even the production. The producer
I was working with was incredible
[but] the songs just weren't there."
One can only imagine the grueling
heartache of having to potentially redo
months of dedicated work. However,
for Turunesh that's all part of the joy
of creating. She admits that part of the
excitement of her work is having her art
surprise her. The rebuilding, reshifting,
readjusting — it's all necessary. "I had
just spent a whole month dedicated
to[the] industry and being in London. I
had never worked that hard for anything
else. I had never gone to another city and
looked for a corporate internship, you
know? I don't go out of my way to make
potential business networks; but I spent
that energy on music. It felt good."
In 6 months, and with the help of fellow
artist/producer Tim Lyre, Turunesh wrote
songs and recorded 10 tracks for her
May 2019 release of Coastal Cider. "I
thought I was all alone in my own little
world, working on this album, but I
m
**
yuzunt$$
tt
 0S0S-T6in\d9l      snisBgBM tsbtooaiQ
had Tim Lyre constantly talking about
music, about different styles, about this
part, about that part. I felt there was
this other world I was working with as
well [because] in terms of how I make
music work for me, I just disappear into
my own world and it happens, y'know?
I made that album in Vancouver but I
wasn't really in Vancouver when I wrote
it. I was somewhere else completely
and, like, this is just where I was when I
go away."
w
e are in her dimly-lit and
cozy living room, where we
had spent the majority of the
interview. She shows me her wall where
about two dozen small paintings hang.
Between twinkly LEDs and candles, there
is just the right amount of warm light. She
shares with me that during her Coastal
Cider album listening party she had asked
guests to paint what they were feeling
when they were listening to her music.
Images depicted were of palm trees with
their leaves far reaching off canvas,
of African drums but no drummers,
sunsets (or sunrises), oceans and beaches.
There were landscapes and silhouettes of
African bodies. Gold brush strokes which
bled into blood oranges and faded into
pinks. The wall of art was spectacular.
An entire window into worlds built by
people who were bearing witness to an
artist, who, in her own kind way, has
been building quite the world of her own.
"The difference between an EP and an
album is not necessarily how long the
project is, but how large a picture you're
painting." Turunesh explains, "I think
that is the difference for me. I feel as
though if I am to make an EP, I would
be trying to express something that is
small. It can be intense and maybe big to
someone else, but I'm considering it small
project. It can still be 30 songs, but in my
mind it's a small project and I'm calling it
an EP. An idea. A point. That's how I see
an EP. Whereas an album is a big project.
My album is, what? 10 songs? And 2 of
those are interludes? * laughs* I was trying
to create something that was immense.
Coastal Cider was world building for me,
that's why I call it an album."
w^- oft brass instruments play
I soothing, improvised jazzy runs in
^^~ the background from a Bluetooth
speaker. As our time wraps up, I ask for
final thoughts. Her comfortable, bubbly
vibe pipes up thoughtfully, "Live music
when the entire audience is black is an
entirely different experience. I would say
it's better. It hits us differently, and we
respond to it differently too. That energy,
that vibe, is missing here. But people are
trying to create it. Sometimes I have to
find inspiration away from myself, and
there are not many places I can go. But, I
will keep following the music."
It's hard not to be inspired by that.
tt
Xttctttttsfj
t*
 Discorder Magazine      feb/mar-2020
q^ keep being wrong about Kyla Jamieson.
hI I first saw her at a reading, where I was
<+ struck by her fierceness. Her poetry
was biting and explicit, read in a deadpan,
sardonic voice. One piece concluded with
the lines "...I guess I like / projecting onto
you / maybe it's the closest / I'll get to
coming / on someone's face / like a dude".
-W^ ater, in her manuscript I find a
poem called "Outspoken Woman
r Circa 2016" which declares:
"I have the worst / reputation in this
room". At that first reading, I noticed her
sharp cheekbones and straight, serious
eyebrows. She seemed strident and
glamorous and perhaps rather vengeful,
using dark humour and sharp, jerky line
breaks to snap at misogyny and ableism.
But that's only a small fragment of Kyla
Jamieson. When I meet her in person,
months after the reading, she is friendly
and generous and giggles unexpectedly
often. For someone who seems so intimidating, she's remarkably good at vulnerability. Her Instagram is studded with
effortlessly aesthetic modelling shots but
between them are text posts in which she
talks candidly about living with disability.
"I wish healing / was a social activity"
she writes in one post. In another, she
laments the way that, for people living
with chronic illness, "friendship can be
elusive, and unpredictable, and scarce."
Jamieson has post-concussion syndrome
[PCS], something she writes about in
the chapbook Kind of Animal and her
forthcoming collection Body Count.
While writing poetry almost always
entails shining a light on intimate and
private aspects of one's life, choosing to
publicly discuss one's disability can have
more drastic consequences. As Jamieson
explains, "a lot of people with PCS
have to be silent about their experience
because of litigation reasons or because
they won't get hired otherwise... There
have been times when I've scrubbed my
social media because I do have concerns
about how that will affect my ability to
survive". Ultimately, she argues that it is
the responsibility of those with privilege
to take the risk of speaking up on behalf
of those who are more marginalised. "I
always think about how much I'm willing
jstjla JaroUsatt
tt
 0S0S-T6in\d9l      snisBgBM tsbtooaiQ
.Kyla
Jamieson
WORDS BY
J. OCKENDEN
ILLUSTRATIONS BY
SUNNY NESTLER
PHOTOSBY
PERRY CHAHAL
to risk for my voice to be a truthful one."
At one point during the interview, she
trails off mid-answer and asks me to
repeat the question. "This happens,"
she explains. "It's a post-concussion
thing." Immediately I want to say that
I understand, that everyone loses their
train of thought sometimes, that it's no
problem, but of course, that misses the
point. Post-concussion syndrome doesn't
happen to everyone, and I can't understand, and it is a problem.
The 2019 chapbook Kind Of Animal
mostly focuses PCS, but Body Count
count covers a wide range of themes.
There is a glimpse of a failed love story
(from "I'm getting to be / so vulnerable
/ with you" to "...Maybe / I stopped
loving you / or maybe my love / is out
of the office") and, towards the end of
the collection, the emergence of a new,
hopeful one. There's also a story of
healing, not just from the literal trauma
of concussion, but from the wounds
inflicted by misogyny, from sneering
literary critiques to sexual assault.
Some poets seem to enjoy hiding the
meaning of their verse beneath layers
of abstraction and lyricism in a kind of
poetic dance of the seven veils, but that
is not Jamieson's style. Her poems are
sometimes fragmented, jumping from
image to image, starting new thoughts
mid-line, but she writes with a determined clarity. In Future Body Self Portrait
she observes "...they're nearly / the same
thing, alive I & in pain. I'm speaking /
plainly but it's poetry." In fact, the whole
collection reads like poetry made out
of plain speaking. I ask if she is afraid
of being misunderstood — "I'm not so
much afraid of being misunderstood,"
she muses, "I'm more motivated to be
understood... I do really want people to
get it, and I want it to be accessible and
I'm OK with that too."
"V- n discussions of poetry, the word
"accessible" is usually a rather
sneering synonym for 'simplistic'.
Many scholars have debated the notion
of accessibility in poetry, but rarely in
the context of ableism. We don't usually
imagine a poem being accessible in the
way that a building or a bathroom can be
accessible, but for Jamieson, it's the same
thing. "We can talk about accessibility
through technology, through a screen
reader, through audio or whatever, but
some people, whether or not they realise
it, make their language inaccessible for
people and not just people who "aren't
as smart as them". She emphasises
the last words with heavy air quotes.
"Intellectualism, and intellectual elitism,
can go so unchallenged in the literary
world... that's something that I have an
issue with."
Perhaps it was this commitment to clarity
over intellectualism that earned Jamieson
a reputation for being outspoken as a
student. She recalls being "perceived as
being too feminist, or too outspoken
or "a man-hater"", the reputation she
celebrates in Outspoken Woman Circa
2016. In poems like that one or Review
("The critics will say / This isn't poetry /
It's audacity"), you sense that the poet is
preparing herself for a hostile reception.
The tone is strident, a little defensive. But
then you come to a piece like Body Count
and the tone changes again, suddenly
confessional and full of vulnerability:
"today I went in the shower & shaved
for so long my calluses fell off / I don't
like what this might be seen as saying
about my politics like maybe I'm secretly
as misogynistic as that man who's in love
with his sex doll as well as his sex doll
side piece / but it made me feel so clean".
Body Count is mostly written in the
first person, and much of it seems to be
autobiographical, complete with references to modelling and concussion and
the names of real people. However,
to conflate Kyla with the "I" of the
poems is to get her wrong again, as she
gently points out: "I don't think that
it's possible to encapsulate the entirety
of a person in language or even in one
person's idea of themselves." I leave our
interview wondering what to say about
Kyla Jamieson, but of course, she is right.
It's impossible to pin a person down in
words, at best you catch a few fragments.
So all I can say is try it for yourselves:
look for Kyla Jamieson in Body Count
forthcoming with Nightwood Editions,
spring 2020.
tt
jstjla Jattmsatt
t*
 Discorder Magazine      feb/mar-2020
EVAN MICHAELSPROAT
words by Julie D. Mills
images courtesy of Evan Michael Sproat
JI remember when I first encountered Evan Michael Sproat's
HI work circa 2016. Being a transplanted prairie chicken
(^ myself, I thought it had made such a beautiful and queer
parody of what it meant to be from the prairies. At this time
he was showing work from his Tender Ego series during his
undergraduate at Emily Carr.
The subjects being portrayed
in his sets and photos were
soft pony-boys puppeteering
(sometimes domineering) hand-crafted
stuffed animals and slinging large,
carefully smoothed wooden guns. These
images were at once soft and rigid in
their contrasting material and content.
Through staged photographs and installations, Evan combined craft, bits of
queer iconography and trope-y objects —
such as 'truck nuts' — that made playful
and pointed reference to prairie identities.
For Evan, his family's involvement in
gendered crafts and trades have hugely
informed his way of making. Many of
the men in his family are practicing wood
workers and the women seamstresses or
knitters. Being surrounded by this kind of
craftsmanship at a young age, he not only
took interest in the processes but also
drew from their aesthetics. Evan describes
the fabrication aspect of his process as
being "meditative and time intensive,"
an aspect that is pivotal to the outcome
of the work. It is during these repetitive
hand motions and gestures that he has
time to contemplate the impulse behind
the work, which is often a personal one.
When discussing this, Evan reasoned
that his art is one way of making sense of
himself, his identity, and his relationship
to others. When it comes to sharing
learned experiences, toys seem like a
natural subject given their capacity to be
used as educational tools. Through the
history of toys as gendered and politically charged objects, Evan finds that
there is much to critique and manipulate, but also to appropriate. When it
comes to world-building and concept
driven sculptural work, playful nature of
the material he uses invites viewers into
a plushy, make-believe world in order
to then introduce deeper conversations
surrounding vulnerability, deception
and intimacy.
y^f^ urrently on view at Access
fll~ Gallery, Evan is part of a group
^C/ exhibition titled Eat Your Tail
curated by Chelsea Yuill. The exhibition
includes a staged photo in which he is
pictured wearing a forward facing yarn
pony-tail wig, and is posed in a somewhat
centaur-like stance. This is his depiction of
the Trojan Horse, "a deceitful character
that perhaps does more harm than he may
realize." The work is titled "Anagnorisis
he says!" which refers to the moment in a
theatrical tragedy wherein the true nature
of a character is revealed.
The choice to use the image of an animal
such as a horse as the subject for a plush
toy or costume has many levels of entry.
For one thing, animals are not automatically gendered, a universality that Evan
appreciates. Secondly, most animals
come with a very specific set of preexisting references that lend well to the
artist's conceptual intentions. His current
series of work pulls from folklore and the
Shakespearean trope of "the tragic hero."
Though he has no specific background
in dance or theatre, Evan spent a great
deal of time in his childhood playing
dress-up and make-believe — experiences
that have obviously lent themselves to his
practice today.
While most of his work continues to
include elements of performance — be it
in staged photos wherein his body is the
subject, a live enactment of a wearable
work or simply the gestural movement
that goes into making a piece — Evan
still considers himself a sculptor first and
foremost. Aside from depicting personal
experiences, having control over the
outcome of an image is important to
his process.
~m^ e tends to prefer the performative
*W W nature of staged photos over live
^\ events, as photographs automatically suggest a moment of manipulation and set, whereas live performance
requires spontaneity and chance — two
things that are in fact relatively counter to
his process. In terms of the choice to use
his own body and sexuality as subjects, he
states that it isn't his intention to go about
making politically queer artwork. He is,
however, queer and therefore his body is
political and his artwork will inevitably
contain queer subjectivity. Additionally,
there is inherent bodily experience built
into the wearable sculptures he makes,
and as Evan suggests, "Just being able
to envision how a material might feel is
often the most direct way to communicate
that principle."
From cinderblock shoes to a fuzzy
gag-like piece (which completes a moth
character's raiment), the materials chosen
tend to contrast significantly in weight
and touch, resulting in apparent tactility.
Often he uses his own body as a medium
of pain or endurance — which effectively
lends to the portrayal of discomfort as
the intended pathos of the work.
Approachability and audience is
something to constantly evaluate, given
the different venues of exhibition in
which Evan's work takes part. Some of
the pieces included in EAT YOUR TAIL
were previously worn in the "Bazaar"
category at last year's Kiki Vogue Ball. He
sees the Vogue Ball as a venue of display
that offers not only a fun challenge, but
a safe space for experimentation. Within
the runway context, he must conceive of
a wearable sculpture that will stand out
within the outlandish "Bazaar" category
yet provide the functionality necessary
for his own safety. When I asked him
how the work might change when it's
displayed statically in the gallery rather
than performed live, he simply stated that
the works are also sculptures, therefore
they are made with the dual intention
of being able to stand alone in a gallery
space. He also hopes the audience can
make use of his absence as an opportunity to envision themselves in the work.
It is through this, and the use of playful
imagery, that Evan's work invites accessibility, fostering moments of empathy
and learning.
tt
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elections
^ams
Want to make
a difference at UBC?
Get involved with student government! The AMS Elections are accepting
nominations from Friday, January 10th at 9am to Friday, February 14th
at 12pm. Find your forms at ams.ubc.ca/elections or outside the AMS
office on the 3rd floor of the Nest.
Contact elections@ams.ubc.ca for questions or more information.
ams
elections
ams
— EST. 1915 —
 Discorder Magazine      feb/mar-2020
hey glided in the cafe on a unicycle.
Jf- A sense of opportunism mixed with
a heavy, wistful wonder struck me
throughout our conversation. Daffodil is
a non-binary, game developing artist who
moonlights as an activist for climate and
animal justice in Vancouver.
Their work is translated throughout a variety
of mediums; whether it be programming
through a screen, digitizing art or painting a
canvas on paper and on their skin, daffodil
finds vehicles for artistic expression not only
in their appearance, but the way they move
around — on their unicycle.
M: How did you
discover unicycling?
d: So, the first time I encountered unicycles, I was in high
school and there was this
costume contest for Halloween
where someone had dressed
up as Major Bedhead from the
Canadian television show The
Big Comfy Couch. So yeah,
someone dressed up as the
mail delivering clown Major
Bedhead and rode on stage on
a unicycle. And I thought it was
so cool and was like, "I wanna
try that sometime..". I asked
for a unicycle for my birthday
and ended up getting one. And
that was like 12 years ago-ish.
Why extreme street unicycling?
It's a way of creatively
expressing myself through
movement, for myself. Because
I have an appreciation for
dance and performance art,
and all that kind of stuff, but
also personal development. I
also have this thing — skateboarders probably know what
I'm talking about — like street
goggles, I guess? Now that I've
built up a set of skills I can
use in different configurations
of public space, I start seeing
the potential ways of engaging
with it no matter where I go.
Regardless of whether or not
I'm consciously looking for it.
Like I'll see a ledge and be like,
"oh, I bet I could jump off of
that in a particular way," or
see some piece of a structure
connected to a fountain or
something, and try to figure out
how to move over or through
it. To cap it off — unicycling
specifically because skateboarding is hard. You probably
think unicycling is hard, but
I've been doing it for so long
now that it feels safer, and I feel
like I have more tools to express
myself than with other extreme
sports I've tried. It started as
a desire to do cool stuff with
an arbitrary extension of my
body's mode of transportation,
but then it became impulsive.
Do you consider yourself an art
activist?
You say "art activist" but to
some extent I feel like art is
inseparable from life. There's
not a point where I decide
"I'm doing art now." Art is the
residue of being, in a way. We
be in the world, and we leave
some stuff behind, through
the way that we be, and that's
where the art is, I guess.
And in terms of the way I exist
in the world, I've been engaging
with climate activism and
animal justice in Vancouver for
a few years now, particularly
with Extinction Rebellion. I
always try to bring my unicycle
when I go to those events to keep
it kind of playful, jovial and
festive. So that we can foster a
sense of positivity through the
frustration, intention and anger
tt
faium
tt
 0S0S-T6in\d9l      snisBgBM tsbtooaiQ
words by Milena Carrasco
illustration by Amy Brereton
Photography by Isaac You
Stills courtesy of daffodil
that we're wielding to combat
these systemic issues. And
through that, stepping up when
I can — when I know that I'm
safe. I was arrested in, I think
it was... October? During a
climate protest on the Burrard
bridge, and yeah, it seems to me
that, [...] in Canada at least[...],
we have so much less to lose
putting ourselves in the way of
the systems of oppression.
Art can be a reaction, or a means
of existence. The change that
daffodil illustrates, codes and
composes through their work
closes the gaps and spaces we seek
to fill. With noise that speaks to us
in languages that are fluid.
I make a lot of different music.
I'm inspired by vaporwave
and plunderphonics, kind of
darker stuff. A lot of the time
I'm taking samples of other
tracks and cutting them up and
rearranging them, modulating
their pitch to turn them into
constituent aural building
blocks. They turn out to be
these dark, looming, strange
atmospheres.
Do you feel more attuned with
darkness?
I tend to immerse myself in more
music and media that evokes
the emotions we often don't
want to confront in society.
My favourite movies and
albums of all time are ones that
make me feel sad, or heavy, or
evoke some sort of emotional
response beyond pleasant,
smooth riding. And that makes
it way into my music and even
into some of my games and
other art I create. It's what
comes out. It's what needs to
be said, and we live in a dark
time. It's constantly weighing
on me. In a way, putting that
into my music, and in my other
work, helps me deal with these
emotions that we're so afraid
of taking over so we repress
them instead of engaging.
Their game, STREET UNI X
tackles stereotypical extreme
sport video game tropes while
still staying true to the essence of
the culture. A certain authenticity
that is built in resistance, and the
adrenaline of the sport.
My game is an extreme sports
game. Historically, these games
have had this edgy culture that
tends towards not representing
women, for example, very
fairly. There's these extreme
sports games — that I love
the game mechanics and the
level design — but some of the
characters are absurd scantily
clad women. Some of the goals
in the game are not great representations of people, other than
the skateboarders.
To some extent in my games,
and with STREET UNI X, I'm
trying to subvert the tropes of
machismo and bro culture that
come along with extreme sports
attitude. I'm trying to demarry
them so we can all be extreme,
and we can all do cool stunts
tt
ftaHo&H
t*
 Discorder Magazine      feb/mar-2020
(skffi) (a*
oFsiayiji * sorta-a s^ * aa
with attitude, ya know? And
through that I'm trying to get
more diverse character representation. Like, there are going
to be men and women and
non-binary people as playable
characters in the game.
Play is crafted through tricks
that make diagonal connections
towards communities which
aren't as visible in the streets that
Vancouver seeks to pave, daffodil
finds a happy home within game
developing because of the freedom
it gives them, and the player to
experience.
How is video-game developing
different from other forms of
art-making?
"The unique aspect of video
games is that every player's
experience is different and
changed from another players —
or even different from their own
previous experience. It's always
changing. Always in flux."
In terms of art making, I feel
like video games are great
because you can be working on
one aspect that kind of encompasses one form of media,
like maybe visual art through
texturing virtual spaces, or
3-D modelling virtual objects.
But then, if I get kind of tired
of doing that, within the
same project I can redirect
myself into a different form
of media; Through music,
sound, animation, storytelling
or poetry even. This media —
this medium of video games
— is a kind of culmination
of all kinds of art making
throughout history into a
multimedia amorphous blob of
totalizing creativity. And
then, in terms of the players
experience, video games have
the unique component of a
real intimate engagement with
the work. Whereas most other
work we're passive listeners, or
viewers. Like, when you see the
painting, you don't put your
hands in the painting and move
the paint around — the painting
is as it is. It's like a snapshot of
a particular moment. Or a fixed
linear series of snapshots in the
form of cinema, or music. But
in games you're given a system
of expression that has a realm
of possibilities from the player's
perspective. Your experience
versus my experience of any
game will be totally different,
and we can talk about our
time playing them and have
completely different understandings of what we did, how
we did it, and why we did it.
We're like actors within the
game world, in a way.
What are you most excited for
people to see about the game?
I'm excited for people to learn
about street unicycling and to
see that "Oh, unicycling isn't
just this silly thing for clowns
to juggle on." It's a serious,
kind of... pretty cool, extreme
sport with a whole spectrum
and vocabulary of expression
that they may not have been
aware of before. And through
the game I can give people
some feeling of what it's like
to do these tricks in real life,
maybe inspire some people to
unicycle. But also just inspire
people to play more of these
kinds of games because they're
super fun and I want more
of them.
daffodil's world is malleable; the
roots of their perennial growth
disrupts stagnant patterns of
culture that move at a horizontal
pace. Everything around them
morphs into an ever-changing
landscape, where concrete structures, fountains and parks become
a playground for potential. Where
wheelies and 360 uni-spins lead
the constant search for this essence
of play. That shape-shifting
feeling which defies gravitational
laws, hunts for quiet maneuvers
that embrace slanted paths and
leaves our cursors floating just a
little longer, before we click send.
You can download STREET UNI
X at daff.space/street-uni-x. As
well as their personal website
daff.space for music, youtube and
other work. You can also follow
them on twitter at @daffodildil
and @StreetUniX for updates on
the game.
•f
«
tottto&H
tt
 MM IMACTION !
izra Collective
DECEMBER 14 / FOX CABARET
TW- 'd not yet entered the Fox Cabaret, but I knew
r what I was about to be in for: some good jazz
(W* music. You could already hear a horn starting
to blare on the other side of the venue's heavy,
mirrored doors. The band had just kick-started
their first number without so much as a word to
the crowd, from what I could hear. Stepping inside,
I was suddenly thrust into the full force of Ezra
Collective's sound. It was triumphant.
After fifteen minutes of bouncing solos from one
instrumentalist to the next, always bringing it back
with the same choppy, latin-flavoured, trumpet-
blasting melody in between, I began to wonder if
we'd be introduced to the players at all. At last the
drummer finally slowed his relentless rhythms and
rolled the tune to a close. He then took the mic to
introduce himself as Femi Koleoso, as well as his
bandmates. On tenor saxophone, James Mollison
had been grooving away, while Ife Ogunjobi lit
up the stage across from him on trumpet. Bassist
TJ Koleoso, Femi's brother, held down the first
number with jazzy bass lines while the pianist, Joe
Armon-Jones, killed it on the keys.
"We want our music to be about joyfulness,
happiness, to make you dance like no one is
watching, but not from a place of ignorance..."
Femi continued. "We all know what's happening in
the world right now, we all know there's a lot to be
angry about, trust me... But sometimes the way of
dealing with that anger and that heartbreak is to
celebrate the good moments we get to have and
cling onto them tightly."
Over the course of the night, Ezra Collective played
hits like the popping latin "Sao Paulo," which Femi
explained as "inspired by the Brazilian people's
resilience through pain and destruction," the Jorja
Smith-powered "Reason in Disguise," and their
latest album's titular bop, "You Can't Steal My Joy."
They kept the set captivating and energetic, with
their self-described afrobeat jazz changing tempos
and time-signatures throughout — even mid-song. I
was continually impressed by the professionalism of
these incredible performers, who brought effortless
energy without lights, pyrotechnics or even vocals
to complicate an already enthralling show.
If I were to describe it in one word, it would be
effortless. Their talent seemed to come so naturally
that Femi could lay down twenty-straight minutes
of advanced, technical drumming before standing
up to take the mic and talk to the crowd, without
needing to catch his breath. They were effortless in
the way that James and Ife try to make each other
laugh from across the stage — mid-solo — effortless
in the way that makes you feel like a fly on the wall
in a band practice. But the band that doesn't need
to rehearse anymore because they've got their
setlist down pat, and now they're just having fun.
—Dana Scharien
Kingfisher Bluez 12th
j Annual Christmas Party
j w/ Peach Pit / Winona
j Forever / Sam Tudor /
j Sleepy Gonzales / Tim
j the Mute / Babe Corner
\ I Non La / Marlaena
Moore / Bridal Party
: / kylie v / Luvgoon /
j Kristin Witko / David
: Ivan Neil / Dacey
DECEMBER 21 / RICKSHAW THEATRE
•ft- ave you ever gone to a concert and had a
It great time, but just wished that there were
^\ thirteen more bands performing that night?
If that sounds relatable, then the Kingfisher
Bluez Christmas Party would have been perfect
for you! The twelfth iteration of this Vancouver
staple provided memorable performances from a
wide array of BC artists (along with some special
out-of-province guests) that justified its dizzying
six-hour runtime and mainlined the Christmas spirit
into our veins. This year's gathering continued the
record label's long tradition of donating 100% of the
profits to 1-800-Suicide and Crisis Centre BC, which
alone made it an event I'd recommend to anyone.
The demanding task of opening a 14-act Christmas
I concert fell on the shoulders of the young
J Vancouver band Dacey, whose groovy collection of
J tracks — including their breakout single "Sidewalks"
I — established the night's fun and carefree tone.
> They were followed by the upbeat tunes of Kristin
Witko, folksy singalongs of David Ivan Neil, and
the ethereal Luvgoon. By this point, the crowd had
slowly grown in size and the Rickshaw Theatre
was looking packed. You could really sense the
Christmas spirit crackling in the air as you waited 15
minutes for a glass of water — it was truly magical,
kylie v took the stage soon after. Their infectious
excitement — and unbelievably vocal fans —
stood out as one of the highlights of the night.
The next two acts were the bubbly Bridal Party
and Edmonton-based Marlaena Moore, whose
performance of "24 Hour Drugstore" carried a raw
energy that surprised me and set it apart from its
more muted studio version.
At some point in the night, the audience was graced
by the presence of the flat earther punk band Flat
Earth, who played a few songs from their EP Flat
Earth. Attempting to remember their set is like trying
to break out of a fugue state while experiencing
a fever dream, but I have vague memories of the
entire venue chanting "the earth is flat". Though they
weren't even billed to play, I will bravely say that
their performance was the most fun of the night.
Next to take the stage was local act Non La and
Kingfisher Bluez' very own Tim the Mute, who
gave us some much-needed melancholy after the
whole Flat Earth fiasco. At this point, we had been
entertained for over four hours straight and many
of us were wondering if we'd ever see our families
again, but the anticipation for the last few bands
of the night was greater than the fatigue that was
plaguing our bodies, so we persevered.
Surrey-based Sleepy Gonzales delivered a dreamy
set that served as a fitting prelude to Sam Tudor,
whose sombre and beautiful music comfortably
lulled the audience into forgetting that the line for
water had grown twofold. My frustration regarding
this was soon forgotten though, as Vancouver-
turned-Montreal band Winona Forever started
playing the cleanest set of the night. It was a shame
they were only limited to a few songs (I assume the
long walk from Montreal is to blame) but their strong
chemistry and mellow, yet dynamic, sound stood out
as one of the best parts of the show.
The final act of the night — beloved Vancouver
stars Peach Pit — appeared decked out in full Santa
Claus outfits and began playing some of their most
iconic songs, including "Tommy's Party," "Hot Knifer,"
and "Alrighty Aphrodite." Any concerns about the
length of the line for water were soon washed away
as the crowd began singing along with frontman
Neil Smith and having an all-around good time. The
group's nostalgia-infused tone was mesmerizing to
witness, and their encore performance of Chuck
Berry's "Johnny B. Goode" was the perfect way to
cap off the Christmas party. Not bad for a $25 ticket.
—Borna Atrchian
Hell Night with
Gorbman & Aaron w/
Ronald Dario / Brent
Constantine / Emily
Bilton / Andrea Jin /
Gavin Matts
DECEMBER 27 / LITTLE MOUNTAIN GALLERY
TW-f you've spent any amount of time around
P Vancouver's comedy circuit, you'll know Aaron
^"Read can be counted on for queasy laughs.
Take Hell Night, for instance — a high-concept
stand-up comedy night, interspersed with gross-out
gags straight out of the nightmares of a neurotic
(which, admittedly, describes much of Read's work
in general.)
A fixture at local indie comedy space Little
Mountain Gallery since last April, Hell Night features
Read along with his "friend" Gorbman (who may or
may not be the shape-shifting reptilian alter ego of
LMG collective member Christine Bortolin) as hosts.
While Read tries to keep his stand-up night on
track, Gorbman tries their best to upstage him with
a motley crew of creepy guests doing off-putting
things on stage, often involving copious amounts
of liquid and / or the infliction of moderately
humiliating acts on Read himself.
Though billed as a holiday special revolving
around the "festivities on Gorbman's planet Kunk,"
the December 27 episode of Hell Night quickly
i/ioitda avu JAaa
23
 branched out from that conceit. For one thing,
Hell Night has an inescapably Halloween-y vibe in
general, which opener Ronald Dario contributed to
by starting the show off with a stand-up set that
touched on distinctly spooky topics like conspiracy
theories and slasher movies.
If anything, the Hell Night holiday special had the
feel of a seasonal party with friends, if it was large
enough to fill a small theatre. Much of the night's
comedy came from the banter between Gorbman,
Aaron Read and each of the stand-up performers
that night — the dynamic between Brent Constantine
and Gorbman was especially funny to watch. With
Constantine's interactions with Gorbman moving
from expressions of disgust and exasperation to
mild flirtation over the course of his set.
But for all the witty repartee and cringe comedy on
display, there was also a distinct sense of pathos
in many of the performances at that night's Hell
Night — whether it was Gorbman describing their
guests' antics as the result of "having a bad year",
or Ronald Dario imagining himself as a "depressing
Freddy Krueger" making a series of increasingly
downbeat (and fatal) appearances in teens'
dreams. The night's performances were also frank
discussions of issues ranging from race, gender and
sexuality, to everyday life in one of the world's most
expensive cities. Chalk it up to comedy's upward
trend toward greater social awareness, or even the
diverse cast of the show itself, with Ronald Dario's
(whose long list of credits include producing the
all-Asian comedy show Yellow Fever) and Andrea
Jin's material reflecting their experiences as Asian-
Canadians — almost as much as their experiences
as weird young people — and Emily Bilton centring
her experience as a queer woman in her set. Gavin
Matts rounded out the token white dude quota
along with Brent Constantine, but they too were
keen observers of the everyday awkwardnesses of
life in Vancouver under late capitalism.
The appeal of Hell Night was also simply the
product of many of the night's performers
honing their craft well over the past decade.
Take the relentlessly defensive patter and racial
obliviousness of "White Woman with a Platform,"
one of Gorbman's other holiday special guests,
who was portrayed to staggering effect by another
long-time local comic, Bita Joudaki, who gnawed
her whitefaced character's feet to metaphorical
stumps. With star-studded performances like these,
there's little wonder that Hell Night is moving up: in
less than a year, it has gotten the attention not only
of local peers like the Unibrow Arts Fest (whose <
inaugural lineup this past August included a musical <
crossover episode of Hell Night featuring chip-punk j
artiste Shitlord Fuckerman) but also from the likes
of Just For Laughs (Hell Night's next episode will be
part of JFL NorthWest this February.) If that isn't the
making of another local fixture in a town perennially
bereft of such things — well, that would be a shame,
wouldn't it? —Chris Yee
The Ministry of Human
Resources / girlsnails
/ Dante's Paradise /
Obscenery
JANUARY 11 / THE MATADOR
While the Matador may look like an
inconspicuous home from the front, circle
around to the back entrance on any given
weekend evening and it becomes evident that this
is no ordinary house. As I walked past the inflatable
pool in the backyard and down the stairs into the
wood panelled basement, I saw a stage delineated
by a string of purple Christmas lights and crushed
beer cans already littering on the floor. Indeed, this
is not your dad's basement jam space.
Obscenery, a three piece from Victoria, kicked off
the night with a cover of Weezer's beloved "Undone
— The Sweater Song" while people filed in, finding a
place to sit among the collection of futons that lined
the walls or navigating the appropriate distance to
stand from the stage.
Next, Dante's Paradise played a collection of
songs familiar to many in the crowd, who provided
carefully timed "woos." When singer Justice Cote
exclaimed "I don't see enough hand clapping at
shows and I think we should do it more," the crowd
kindly obliged and stayed surprisingly on beat.
Half way through the set, people were downright
dancing and I watched anxiously as a few heads
nearly bumped the low ceiling.
By the time The Ministry of Human Resources
took the stage, the crowd was ready for what was
about to happen, while I was caught in the middle
of now tightly packed room — some strategic
crowd maneuvering got me close enough to see
the band. Half decked out in country-inspired attire,
they played high energy, Captain Beefheart-esque
instrumentals interjected with the occasional lyric
that sent the crowd into a frenzy. At times the floor
bounced with such force it felt possible that the
foundation might give way and drop us into the pits
of a wonderfully jazzy hell. Part of the intrigue of the
Matador is this sense of impending danger, drawing
DIY moths to a flame to dance, dance, dance. Still,
with the Matador being a house in a residential area
there was a tight schedule to keep, and The Ministry
of Human Resources utilized their final minute with
a ripping so-called "free jazz."
girlsnails brought the night to a close with a
mellow and sweet math rock set that saw the
lead guitarist switch guitars three times. Partway
through I noticed an ominous baby doll head on
the hi-hat that was somehow the perfect image to
summarize the night. I emerged from the basement
and stomped across the muddy backyard while
people chatted excitedly amongst themselves
before dissipating into the neighbourhood, and,
as the clock approached midnight, the Matador
returned to being just another house on the block.
—Ruby Izatt
Best Canadian Poetry
2019 Launch
JANUARY 16 / MASSY BOOKS
-^^■y the time I reached Massy Books for the
^■"w launch of Best Canadian Poetry 2019, all the
fW^ chairs had gone. That's understandable — it's «
a huge claim. The book brings together 50 different «
poems which, according to guest editor Rob Taylor, j
represent the best Canadian poetry of 2019.
Since all the chairs had gone, I crouched awkwardly
in the aisle between them, avoiding patches of
melting snow. A kindly man looked at me with
obvious concern and offered me his seat. I politely
declined. This was a good move, as he turned out
to be Dallas Hunt, one of the selected poets. There
were ten poets in attendance, hidden around the
room like plants in the audience. I started to suspect
everyone around me of being a secret poet.
The atmosphere was relaxed and celebratory
as Rob Taylor — who seemed happy and a little
punch-drunk from the ordeal of reading all the
eligible submissions and choosing his selection
— introduced the poets. I always find it more
interesting to hear lots of different poets read
side-by-side than it is to hear one poet read several
of their own poems. Above all, the event seemed to
highlight how different poets are, although we tend
to imagine them to be a particular class of person.
We started with Kevin Spenst, a flamboyantly
extroverted poet who thanked Rob's eyeballs,
before launching into his reading, speaking rather
too fast and breaking into pseudo-operatic singing
at various points in his poem. Dallas Hunt followed,
speaking first in Cree then in English to introduce
his darkly funny Cree Dictionary. Ellie Sawatsky
introduced her poem as though she was giving a
presentation in English class, analysing her own
use of metaphor. Sonnet L'Abbe was mesmerising
in her re-writing of Shakespeare's sonnet 127, a
howl of anger addressed to "the culture that has
surrounded me to the point it speaks through me."
Mallory Tater read next and fleetingly — forgoing
an introduction she read her slight, darting
poem straight into the microphone and sat
down again almost before I realised it was over.
Laura Matwichuk's voice was quiet, even with
the microphone and she confessed to getting
tongue-tied speaking about her own work. It spoke
for itself, a haunting reflection on fear, pregnancy
and volcanic eruptions. The fear of fire also ran
through Shaun Robinson's How Soon, How Likely,
How Severe. Tall and black-bearded, he spoke
confidently and a little self-effacingly about his
experiences fighting forest fires. Christopher Evans
followed — white-bearded and surprisingly young.
He joked about his fears associated with reading
in public (having to adjust the mic stand / farting)
before reading an incisive, troubling poem about
housing insecurity in Vancouver.
The last reader was Marion Quednau, and her
poem was perhaps the most memorable of the
evening. Her poem, read in a gentle, sympathetic
voice, described the experience of accidentally
seeing her father's penis, which she compared to
"bruised fruit / like something forgotten in a lunch
pail." Somehow, she took this unprepossessing
subject turned it into a poem full of warmth, dignity
and humour.
The editors were at pains to call the collection's title
into question, pointing out that taste is subjective,
and that, at most, this was a selection of some of
the very good poetry produced in Canada last year.
Based on the launch, it's clear that, quibbling aside,
there are some gems to be found in Best Canadian
Poetry 2019. —J Ockenden
b
Shindig 2020 Night 3
w/ The Neighbours /
Cain Price I KCAR / Be
Afraid
JANUARY 21 / RED GATE
-^%- odies, painted by the soft pink and blue of
^■"w scattered strobe lights, wandered, clustered,
fW^ swayed, ricocheted off and leaned against
one another as four local bands took turns occupying
the foot-high stage at Red Gate Arts Society.
The third night of the four qualifying rounds for
CiTR's annual battle-of-the-bands event, known
as Shindig, saw bubbles blown, knowledge of
bird penises exchanged for vodka sodas, and
the modest coming-together of a community
REAL LIVE ACTION
February-March, 2020
 of carhartt-wearing, mustache-bearing friends,
musicians, and Main Street-goers of the night.
The Neighbors jump started the evening with the
kind of angsty garage rock that masked the parental
door-bangs which frequented my bedroom during
the peak of my adolescence. The semicircle of
no-man's-land stretching out from the stage was
no sooner established than it was penetrated
by bodies which propelled from the crowd into
the heat of guitar solos —successfully shredded
— and anxieties of the meaning(lessness) of life
with(out) love successively belted. Sometimes
leaning towards playful pop rock comparable to The
Beach Boys, sometimes towards the no-one-under-
stands-me punk rock of Blink 182 — the virtuosic
fumbling of guitar strings and drumsticks of the
inaugural set left few bodies immobile.
Feet anchored themselves to the floor and eyes
to the stage as Cain Price stepped up next; feet
anchored perhaps in awe of the gold geometric
earrings revealing themselves from behind the
hair of the frontperson, perhaps for the enchanting
violin, fingerpicking, and vocal harmonies that
followed. Rendered speechless after the first half
of their set — turning to lock-eyes and gape at the
friend beside me in an attempt to communicate
my emotions — my mouth tried to remember how
to speak at the same time as my hands tried to
remember how to come together in applause. The
two songs concluding the performance revealed an
alternative psych-rock side to the band that was
just plain cool.
KCAR followed with an ode to the proto-punk
age of The Velvet Underground and Iggy Pop. The
voices of the singers blended together in song and
half-screams throughout the entirety of the set,
effectually punk rock and angsty as hell.
Be Afraid closed the event with a return to garage
rock for the punk-hearted. I couldn't help but think
I'd never seen a less intimidating group of people
as they announced their name, and that they were ;
the coolest "uncool" band I'd ever seen. The set
which followed consisted of some seriously crazy
drumming, and a bouncing between near-inaudible
monotone voices that I can only describe as the
vibe-child of Always and The Moldy Peaches.
Songs ended abruptly, expressions remained fairly
blank, and I felt as though Scott Pilgrim was going
to manifest himself on stage at any moment to
battle for Ramona — and certainly would have won.
—Amanda Thacker
What is (a) Punk? New
Acquisitions Screening
JANUARY 23 / VIVO MEDIA ARTS CENTRE
~^~± eading up to the screening, I found myself
mulling over this very question: what is punk?
^^"To me, punk was discovering The Ramones
or The Clash and blasting music in my bedroom
ignoring the knocks on the door from my parents
telling me to turn down the volume. The word has
taken on a variety of meanings over time, from use
as a derogatory insult to describing a movement
in rock music. As time passes, punk (both the
adjective and noun) has continued to redefine
itself. VIVO's screening sought to explore what it
meant to be (a) punk in today's landscape, and it
was clear that submissions tackled this question
from unique angles.
To start off the screening was Garbage
Conglomerate & Trash Talk: Eva from Jen O'Connor.
At the heart of this piece was the attempt to open
up the conversation around waste in our community,
and specifically whether or not sustainable practices
are accessible to everyone. Encouraging a dialogue
that interacted with the performance space was an
approach that was well executed.
The Day Job from Christian Nicolay embraced
counterculture in a subtle way, by hiding art in
clocks, breakers, ceiling tiles, and artwork from
other artists. This silent rebellion left me wondering
long after the screening was over whether or not
anyone has ever found his pieces.
Sydney Southam's Stoner, a dream-like piece shot
on a small toy camera, was a portrait of a man
smoking pot and discussing issues he has to deal
with daily. Most striking about this piece was the
dialogue — the subjects discussed daily anxieties
and the internet which was presented in robotic
speech-to-text voices.
Pool Party Pilot Episode from Hardeep Pandhal felt
like a bit of a science fiction fever dream, with vibrant
colours and imagery set in a post-apocalyptic world
where female bodies reproduce non-sexually. To
complement the visual stimulation was a soothing
sing-song narrative beat, riddled with rhymes.
True Community from Tracey Vath highlighted the
work that goes into keeping DIY spaces (in this
case, Toast Collective) alive. Seeing Vath prepare
for another show and grapple with the burden of
responsibility and feeling unsupported, I thought
of all the times I have seen others struggle to keep
a club, space, or collective afloat.
Roberto Santaguida's Miraslava was beautifully
shot and embodied feelings of nostalgia, from
reflecting on an unmade work to grappling with
living life in your twenties. "I think I'll move to
Toronto," says the narrator, half-jokingly, as he
reflects on feeling disillusioned by his surroundings.
This line feels all too familiar.
To close the evening was In Search of Martin
Klein from Joseph Wilcox. Peppered with satire
throughout, this piece highlighted our obsession
with trying to solve a puzzle but getting lost in the
details along the way. Starting out curious with a
hint of rationality and slowly devolving into that of
conspiracy, Wilcox asked us where to draw the line.
The evening began with a quote: "Living on the
edge, working on the edge, dealing with everyone
else who is on the edge — so that people who
live on the edge can survive." By the time I left my
seat in the multipurpose space at VIVO Media Arts
Centre, I wasn't sure that I had a specific answer
to what (a) punk means today. However, I realized
that this was because it is continually redefined in
different contexts, and that challenging the norm
from any perspective, like all these works were
able to do, makes space for those on the edge.
—Heather Baker
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine
and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to:
Jasper D. Wrinch, Section Editor
rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences. Feel
free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
rrom
^ 90.1 FM
LIVE MUSIC
+ OTHERWORDLY
CONVERSATIONS
with your favourite independent
Canadian Artists
WATCH, LISTEN, ENGAGE at
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25
 %nkt Wvitto
i
Albums
llatlian Slmbcit
Field Recordings, Vol. 1
(self-rclcaseb)
September 27, 2019
Niiilmn Slmbert
l-'k'ld Uccordings - Vol. i
Jt
athan Shubert's Field Recordings,
Vol. 1 catches and savours ordinary
sounds. This attention to the imperfect
and mundane is fundamental in the
piano-centric landscape of Shubert's work,
including his other 2019 album, named When You Take Off Your Shoes.
However, in Field Recordings, Vol. 1, Shubert moves away from the piano
and into the spaces and noises of a trip overseas while maintaining the
memory-like intimacy of his music. Each track is named for the place it's
recorded, like "Park Bench in Hornstull (59.318°, 18.026°)," or "Stream
Outside Frankfurt (50.186°, 8.691°)." The record begins on an Icelandair
plane in Vancouver, and leads the listener through Sweden, England,
Germany and the Netherlands.
Most of the tracks are less than two minutes, some recorded thousands
of kilometres apart and others with only a few steps between them. But
the record never feels disjointed as it travels quickly between countries,
with transitions often melting into each other. Time is a prominent theme;
each track feels like a moment drawn out longer than it was born to be.
Almost half of the recordings are of in-between places like train stations,
ferries or planes; the rest in a spot where you would take pause, like in a
park or by a stream.
Certain sounds inevitably recur throughout the record: muffled
conversations in numerous languages, dragging footsteps and the
beeps and bells that direct pedestrians. "Birds in Victoria Park (51.539°,
-0.038°)," the record's longest track, is strikingly nostalgic without being
sentimental, featuring varied yet persistent birdsong and the occasional
far off whirring of something that doesn't feel like it matters. A sense of
loneliness pervades most of the album, but in "Leicester Station (51.538°,
0.045°)" and "Oxford Circus (51.515°, 0.141°)" the seamless tracks' sounds
of echoey rails and surging commuters make the feeling especially
apparent.
These recorded moments possess the kind of quiet beauty of a house
or tree that you walk past every day and never noticed until now.
Shubert's album never eavesdrops or even celebrates. There's no
initiative or agenda. Instead it basks in the chaos of the space around
it. But these tracks are not ambient noise meant to desensitize the
listener. They're something to be still with, an opportunity for meditation
unprompted by crafted lyrics or melodies. Use them to create your own
place, somewhere that you're meant to be. —Marianna Schultz
netifjialuah
nipiy
(Arts & Crafts)
ctober   24,   2019
am on a train travelling between Alberta
and British Columbia. The distance
between  the  Rocky  Mountains  is
measured by the drumbeats of the debut
album by nehiyawak. The band's name
means Cree people — they hail from amiskwacTwaskahikan, or what is
now known as Edmonton. Their ancestors are my ancestors. The album
is called nipiy, which means water. Water is culturally interconnected
to all life as well as to language, ceremony, and women. Marek Tyler,
the band's drummer, says: "Water has the quality of being in two places
at once."
The album itself exists between the two places: it was recorded in
Victoria, a city Marek lived in for some years before returning home to
Edmonton. It was in Edmonton that, during a family get together, he
and his cousin, Kris Harper, began working on music together. The two
cousins — Kris on guitar and vocals — sought out Matthew Cardinal, the
bassist and synth player, who brought a steady, lulling intensity that has
become integral to their sound.
The album — like its namesake — is ambient, intense and full of
movement. Each track is different in that they evolve from one into
another, each flowing into the next. The sound is honed and consistent,
yet like staring at the same rock in a rippling stream over time, there is
always something new to hear. Each song is complex, both lyrically and
sonically, like a melodic winding journey. The opening and closing tracks
of this record are timed to the running tempo of the North Saskatchewan
River, and that sense of movement is prevalent throughout. Not only
physical movement but across time, as Matthew's dream pop synth is
punctuated by Marek's traditional hide drum sounds.
nipiy is an album that is immediately good, but not necessarily easy.
The song's subjects are often the voices not heard — Indigenous women
and children who have been stolen, or the generations affected by the
residential school system. In this album, the listener is pulled out of
place and time and into an ebbing pool of eerie synth, drumbeats and
storytelling. One is submerged into decades — even centuries — of
Indigenous history. But there is also something irresistibly immediate
about this music. The listener is left in the space between blue and green.
The liminal space where music sounds its best. —Sage Broomfield
'£ W L ij ft '& 'i
alexanbria Maillot
Benevolence
(sElf-releaseb)
November  22,   2019
%
lexandria Maillot opens a new chapter
in her remarkable artistic career (that
started at only the age of seven) with
her album Benevolence. A well-known
artist in the Vancouver music scene, she moved back to Vancouver Island
in 2017, far from the overwhelming nature of the city. Music "naturally
returned" to her as she expresses in a quote on her website, and the
album is excellent evidence of that. Benevolence is a refreshing take
on alt-rock and indie-pop, blending the styles together and creating a
unique and comforting sound.
The seven songs would not be as impressive without Maillot's
soothing and gritted vocals that carry the tracks through a journey of
moods, from grief to fearlessness and acceptance. Her voice starts calm
and delicate in the opening track, "I Never Liked Your Friends," matching
the floaty melody in the background, and gradually intensifies with the
lyrics: "How could you think this would end well? / I've been through hell."
Maillot's vocals are at their best when they are at their most expressive,
like in the emotive single "Messed It Up."
Instrumentally, Benevolence does not fall behind. Every song offers
listeners something distinct, showing another side of the emotion Maillot
attempts to convey. The strings are a standout feature — the light plucking
26
UNDER REVIEW
February-March, 2020
 in the background of "The Judge" (and many others) complements the
vocals and synth perfectly, becoming a recognizable and distinctive
element throughout the album. A track worthy of mention is "Someone
to Keep You Warm." It takes an unexpected turn at the chorus with a
bass drop — surprising for the record, but an effective fit to the intriguing
atmosphere of the song.
With a thematic focus on making life decisions and reflecting on choices
and relationships, Benevolence feels intimate and honest. The lyrics
reveal hard times in specific situations — in "Lose My Mind," Maillot
explores the struggle of chasing a dream while having unrelated jobs
and the commitment neccessary to achieve it, which is propelled by
determined vocals.
Benevolence is a solid release, with wonderful instrumentation and
vocals that guide the listener through a variety of emotions, making it well
worth repeated listens. —Angela Villavicencio
SaraljJaneScDutett
Confessions
(iCigljt c©rgan)
November  22
2019
ff
orn into a musical family on Bowen
Island, Sarah Jane Scouten is a fresh
breath of air within the folk music genre.
With a new perspective on the established
form of music, it is no challenge to see why Scouten is a three-time
Canadian Folk Music Award nominee. In her fourth album Confessions,
Scouten delves into emotional frictions with elegance.
For instance, the song "I'm A Rattlesnake," features rugged bass,
along with other elements of garage rock. The dynamic and choppy
beat compliments the confidence emitting from the vocals. Its rough
style provides an unforeseen, yet pleasant, change from the rest of the
album. This is just one of the examples of how capable Scouten is with
incorporating various genres into her music with fluidity.
Another highlight, "Pneumonia (To Love)," is a heartfelt ballad that
mourns the blissful ignorance of youth and shares the pains of an internal
agony. The song's simple, cheeky melody and casual humour provide a
substantial contrast to the grim lyrics. The torture from the trauma can
be felt through Scouten's trembling and tearful voice, exposing to the
listener a hidden pain.
The lyrics throughout Confessions expose everyday ups and downs
with intimate vocals that can capture anyone. The honesty of the album
evokes empathy, making it both refreshing and comforting to the
listener. The songs do not attempt to hide their humanity and flaws —
they are meant to be taken in as is. This unapologetic approach is quite
applaudable, especially in the present climate of overproduction and
autotune. If one needs captivating, taste-breaking music, Confessions is
my recommendation. —Tatiana Yakovleva
girlsnails
girlsnails
(self-releaseo)
November 29
2019
J*
uch like the ambiguity of this band's
name, girlsnails' self-titled EP is a
beautifully constructed melting-pot of
different genres made accessible by the
catchy brass-section and dreamy vocal performances. Compared to their
summer demos 2018, the musical repertoire of the winners of last year's
Shindig now includes an additional saxophone and bass trombone — as
well as an increased emphasis on overdubbing vocals. Many members
of the band have progressed in their musical education from various
programs such as UBC, Capilano and VCC, and it shows in the increased
complexity and attention to detail in these three new tracks.
"Tapioca Tadpole" beautifully opens up the EP with a cathartic drone
of sparkly metallic strings, and then promptly switches to a new time
signature with drums and horns to immediately catch the listener's
attention. However, even with all these instruments in the mix, the singing
is clear and fits well within the orchestration. Halfway through the track,
waivaa aacmu
an impressive riff sweeps in, which could either be a digital arpeggiator, or
an incredibly talented musician. The end of the song wondrously repeats
the catchy line "Awful feeling but I never earned it / I wasn't born to be a
winner," in a culmination of overdubbed chorus chants and saxophone
playing along with the melody.
The next track, "You're Not Martin Luther King!," brings a groovy riff that
is emphasized with a unique electric guitar melody in each ear along with
the horn sections arriving at different points within the song. The lyrics "In
the water we all float away" sticks with me as it ends each of the verses.
The final track, hilariously named "Domin-Oh-No I Ordered Another
Pizza" picks the pace up again with seriously impressive drumming. On
top of that, there are points within the song that the two guitars sound like
rainbow droplets lightly showering my ears in the form of dreamy electric
melodies.
These three tracks made me feel as though I was deep in the forest on
a magical camping trip, gazing out into the sky from the comfort of a calm
yet cathartic cave, while a meteor shower of extraordinary guitar tones
and warm vocals filled my field of view. Well done girlsnails.
—Jordan Naterer
Jcebergjferg
Let It Grow
(Criple Crouin 2taoio Kecoroinp of Canaoa)
Dec   13,   2019
^jW ust over three years since his last release,
r 2016's In the Valley of the Purple Prince,
2w~ Victoria-based Iceberg Ferg arrives again
with a brief but sweet collection of folk
songs with Let It Grow.
With most of the tracks on Let It Grow, Iceberg Ferg manages to sound
nearly timeless, though anachronistic might be a better word. Drawing
heavily on the folk and country stylings of the '60s, Ferg's songwriting
and guitar-playing sound at home alongside the likes of Bert Jansch, John
Fa hey and Leo Kottke.
Rarely on Let It Grow does the orchestration extend beyond guitar
and voice — more often than not, the music doesn't need any further
ornamentation. On tracks like "Jacqueline" and "Willows," Iceberg Ferg
makes his guitar playing a focus. Diving into complex and constantly
varying finger-picking patterns, Ferg makes his lone acoustic guitar fill
out the musical world of the songs entirely. On "Dreams of Daylight,"
running less than a minute long, he eschews the vocals completely,
focusing on harmonically rich guitar work, meandering through a quaint
but impressive composition.
In other songs, the guitar settles into calming strums, simply and
effectively guiding Ferg's unique voice. On the opening track, "Come
on Baby," his voice sounds right on the edge of his upper range, soaring
high into falsetto and quavering on the precipice. These imperfections fit
perfectly within the organic and traditionalistic style of the record.
Despite being a short album — ten tracks spanning just over twenty
minutes — Let It Grow does seem to retrace some of its own steps. The
second half of the record bogs down into simple, more country-tinged
ballads that, on their own, are perfectly pleasant. But put in quick
succession, "I'll Be All Smiles Tonight," "Careless Love," and "I'm Thinking
Tonight of My Blue Eyes" slow down the pace of the rapid-fire record a
bit too much. And even though the final song, "Heart On Ice," introduces
a new element — vocals from Ferg's "true love" Jacqueline Tevlin — the
momentum is already gone, letting the album conclude without any of the
energy with which it started. —Lucas Lund
i&ittj) Prozac
My Side of the Split
(self-releaseo)
January 2, 2020
fi
itty Prozac's sound is powerful pop
punk, and this is definitely reflected in
the album. Mentioned in the name itself,
My Side of the Split is made up of tracks
from a split EP that wasn't released due to
a fallout with a fellow artist. The album's four songs — "Lucy," "Vacation
A
 Song," "Kitty You're a Fuckup," and "Hydrogen" — despite being fully
acoustic, are all powerful and undeniably pop-punk.
"Lucy" gripped me from the very get-go. Simple, genuine and incredibly
personal, the opening lines immediately caught me with their earnest and
emotional impact: "Well hey there Lucy, I've got a stupid question for you
/ Would you like to get coffee with me today?"
Opening with the ever-so relatable anecdote about friendships and
insecurities, listening to every verse was like peeling a new layer of the
onion. By the time I reached the chorus, I was transported back to ninth
grade, re-living the tensions that come with the combination of friendship
and drugs.
"Vacation Song" and "Kitty You're a Fuck Up," on the other hand, failed
to evoke a similar effect on me. With a strong instrumental openings
and emotional lyrics, the songs still felt in need of a little fine tuning.
However, they don't fail to showcase Kitty's potential, if only they were
slightly more complete.
But it's Kitty Prozac's initiative to record the music in a basement suite,
while cat-sitting, that really calls out to their passion for songwriting and
creative expression. That drive to put out such emotionally expressive
music is what really make My Side of the Split stand out. —Shreya Shah
poftcasts
Cales of jfrost Cricket
(Caue (§oblin Bctlnorh)
January - July 2019
■ales of Frost Cricket, a podcast series
by the Cave Goblin Network, harkens
back to tales told around the fire.
Each episode immerses the listener into
a different tale within the fantasy world
of Frost Cricket. The podcast follows her
journey as a former bureaucrat (or "prefect"), as she steps out of her
comfort zone to explore the world outside of her safe Celestial City walls.
It's a world filled with creatures that inhabit dead bodies, demons that
run cultish communes in deep forests and dragons that darken the night.
However, Frost Cricket is not the stereotype of the typical fantasy
protagonist. For one, she is an older woman, a group rarely represented
as the hero in the genre. Instead, they are usually relegated to the oft
repeated tropes of the wise old mentor, the kindly grandmother, or the
crone with evil powers. Secondly, she is a multidimensional character
"ea role model
friend advocate
burger expert
mentor
Our volunteer
mentors help
youth recognize
their many
strengths and
work towards
their goals.
To Learn how you can become a mentor, visit:
unya.bc.ca/mentorship
Urban Native Youth
Association
— unlike the aforementioned roles — being kind enough to hold a dying
soldier, in one tale, while still looting and betraying a dragon royal in
another. She even has her moments of weakness, such as cruelly bashing
a cult-leader demon's head. She can be quick-witted and powerful in
one story, but also foolish in another tale. I could see myself in her —
especially in the first episode, when she decides to step back from her
beloved work in law administration, succumbing to wanderlust.
Her tales don't only fit into the fantasy elements, though — some serve
as a great allegory for our modern times, as fairy tales often do. Of this,
the tale "The Philosopher Demon" is most fitting. It tells the story of a
demon that lures people into the forest, under the guise of achieving
enlightenment. However, he is only using people to gather food for him
so that he doesn't have to work. Eerily, his followers get thinner, are told
not to think and to trust his "alternative" facts. The philosopher demon
meets his end at the hands of Frost Cricket through a violent bashing,
though after she tried to reason with him and his followers. Although
I am personally against violence, I understand Frost Cricket's actions.
By removing the source of these untruths, like removing misleading
Facebook ads, we can hope to prevent any further damage.
The podcast itself is rich in the way it conveys each tale. Each story
crafts a vivid image through creative voice acting, beautiful music, and
sound effects that enhance the atmosphere — I feel like I'm listening to a
darker Studio Ghibli story. I can feel the genuine love the creators put into
the stories in the series, it creates new and original tales that aren't just
alternative retelling of common fables. —Almas Khan
III
• ••
To submit music, podcasts, books, or film for review consideration to
Discorder Magazine, please email:
Jasper D. Wrinch, Section Editor
ur.discorder@citr.ca.
Send physical items of any kind to Discorder Under Review at
CiTR101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, v6t1z1
ks5afi2020|
i
FEBRUARY 28
THE BILTMORE BALLROOM J
I
1
1
VANCOUVER, BC
28
UNDER REVIEW
February-March, 2020
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talent and music you won't
hear anywhere else. The
morning after what? Whatever you did last night.
• Twitter: @sonicvortex
• THUNDERBIRD EYE
1PM - 1:30PM, SPORTS / TALK
CiTR Sports interviews
UBC's premiere athletes,
discovers the off-field
stories of the Thunderbirds,
and provides your weekly
roundup of UBC sports
action with hosts who
are a little too passionate
about the T-birds.
• programmingcitr.ca
• FLOWER POWER HOUR
2PM-3PM, MUSIC	
The Flower Power
Hour, hosted by Aaron
Schmidtke, is designed to
give a platform for artists
that are underrepresented,
underappreciated oreven
underplayed. While the
primary focus of the Flower
Power Hour is to play quality music to ease listeners
into their afternoons, it
is also to educate them
on these artists played.
• programming@citr.ca
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/POP
a show with music
about being uncool
• programming@citr.ca
• INTO THE WOODS
TUES SPM-6PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Lace up your hiking boots
and get ready to join Mel
Woods as she explores
music by female and
LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree?
Nope, just another great
track you wont hear
anywhere else. We provide
the music mix, but don't
forget your own trail mix!
• programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and
hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from
around the world.
• programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
8PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop
& Trill $h*t. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Homeboy
Jules, Relly Rels, Malik,
horsepowar & Issa.
• dj@crimesandtreasons.com
• www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED:
CAN/AUS MUSIC SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds past and present,
from his Australian homeland. Journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
• programming@citr.ca
uittitrestiay
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information and insanity.
• dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths
of contemporary and
cassette vinyl underground.
Ranging from DIY bedroom
pop and garage rock all
the way to harsh noise,
and of course, drone.
• programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future. Genre need not apply.
• programming@citr.ca
• LA BONNE NUIT
WITHVALIE
1PM-2PM	
A new show on the air?!
From mellow and indie,
more experimental, join
La Bonne Heure' for a
little bit of it all- both in
English and en Francais!
With some interviews on
the horizon and many
good times too... soyez
sur de nous rejoindre!
• programming@citr.ca
• ALL ACCESS PASS
ALTERNATING WED 3PM-4PM,
TALK/ACCESSIBILITY POLITICS/
DISABILITY
."
We talk about equity,
inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse
abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every
second Wednesday from
3-4pm for interviews,
music, news, events, and
awesome dialogue.
• Twitter: @access_citr
> SHORT STORY SCORE
A biweekly radio show
drawing connections
between the narratives and
themes of my favourite
short stories and music!
Listen as I attempt to
fit a soundtrack to a
particular author or
anthology each episode.
• programming@citr.ca
• DIALECTIC
4PM-5PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Defined as "The way in
which two different forces
orfactors work together",
Dialectic brings the distinct
music tastes of hosts
Chase and Dan together.
Each episode showcases a
variety of indie rock and
beyond, bound together by
the week's unique theme.
• programming@citr.ca
• ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ARTS &
CULTURE 	
The Arts Report on CiTR
brings you the latest and
upcoming in local arts in
Vancouver from a volunteer
run team that likes to get
weird! Based primarily in
Vancouver, BC, your show
hosts (Ashley and Jake)
are on the airwaves.
THE MEDICINE SHOW
ALTERNATING WED 6:PM-8PM,
ECLECTIC/LIVE INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing
Energy with LIVE Music
and laughter! A variety
show, featuring LIVE music,
industry guests and insight.
The material presented
is therapeutic relief from
our difficult world. We
encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
•   vancouvermedicineshow@gmail.com
SAMSOUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM,
ROCK/POP/INDIE
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss herspins,
every Wednesday.
• programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-10PM, HIP HOP/ RSB/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and
the snow capped rocky
mountains, A-Ro The Naut
explores the relationships
of classic and contemporary stylings through jazz,
funk and hip hop lenses.
• Facebook: NinthWaveRadio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREWWILLIS
IOPM-IIPM, TALK
Listen to your favorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
• programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD
LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird
Locker Room gives you a
backroom perspective on
varsity athletes, coaches
and staff here at UBC.
• programming@citr.ca
• arts@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT A ND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces
you to topics through his
unique lens. From news,
to pop culture and sports,
Issa has the goods.
• programming@citr.ca
• CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
8AM-9AM, TALK/COMEDY/SOCIAL
OBE SE RVATIONS	
Convictions and
Contradictions is about
our own convictions and
contradictions about
society, shown through
social observational
comedy. To boot, a comedy
Kif human psychology and
istrumental music.
• programmingcitr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
IOAM-IIAM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I
interview bands and
play new, international,
and local punk rock
music. Broadcasted by
Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
• rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com
• rocketfromrussiacitr@email.com
• @tima_tzar
• Facebook: Rocket From Russia
• U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM, ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from
across the decades. Acid,
Afro-beat, Lo-Fi, Ambient
and plenty of classic
house. Let Galen do his
thing so u can do urs.
• programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Sweet treats from the
pop underground.
Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored bydonuts.
• duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
FINE.
1PM-2PM, TALK/THEATRE
A previously recorded
evening of storytelling
and otherwise.
Each show features a real
nice mix of Canada's best
emerging and established
writers, comedians, musicians, artists and more.
It's fun, yeah. It's
a fine time.
Hosted by Cole Nowicki,
recorded by Matt Krysko.
• Twittenn @afmeshow
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, TALK/SCIENCE
Space is an interesting
place. Marco slices up the
night sky with a new topic
every week. Death Starts,
Black Holes, Big Bang,
Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
• programming@citr.ca
• LISTENING PARTY
3PM-4PM, MUSIC
The best new music
curated by the CiTR
Music Department.
• music@citr.ca
• DEMOCRACYWATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CUR-
RENT AFFAIRS	
Forfans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
• news101@citr.ca
HEAVYCONTENT
6PM-7PM, TALK/DISCUSSION
Heavy Content is the
podcast where I, your host
Sam, watch everything
with a fat person in it and
tell you h ow damaging the
representation will be to
your well being. Sometimes
solo and sometimes with
a superspecial guest.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
• UNCEDED AIRWAVES
7PM-8PM, TALK/INDIGENOUS
STORIES/MUSIC	
Unceded Airwaves is
produced by CiTR's
Indigenous Collective.
We centre Indigenous
voices with narratives
that empower Indigenous
people and theirstories.
We recognize that media
has often been used as
a tool to subordinate or
appropriate Indigenous
voices and we are
committed to subverting
these dynamics. The team
is comprised of both Indigenous and non-Indigenous
people who are passionate
about story-telling,
alternative media and
Indigenous affairs.
• Twitter: @uncededairwaves
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
8PM-9PM, RSB/SOUL/JAZZ/
INTERNATIONAL
Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and
future. This includes jazz,
soul, hip-hop, Afro-Latin,
funk, and eclectic Brazilian
rhythms. There are also
interviews with local
and international artists.
Truly, a radio show with
international flavor.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, ROCK/POP/IN DIE
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s)
every week performing in
the comfort of the CiTR
lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the
country and around the
world are nice enough
to drop by to say hi.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
TRIMJJJ
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance,
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
• auraltentacles@hotmail.com
CRACKDOWN
7AM-8AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
The drug war, covered
by drug users as war
correspondents. Crackdown
is a monthly podcast about
drugs, drug policy and the
drug war led by drug user
activists and supported
by research. CiTR is airing
all episodes weekly.
• @crackdownpod
QUEER FM
8AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
In case you missed them
on Tuesday, tune in to
Queer FM's rebraodcast
on Friday morning!.
• queerfmvancouver@gmaiI.com
• FRIDAY NIGHT FEVER
10AM - 11AM, DISCO/R&B
Friday Night Fever - an
exploration into the disco
nation B-) Every alternating
Friday, join Sophie and
Max on a journey of disco,
funk, and RnB on CiTR
101.9. Night-time is just
around the corner, so get
ready to head out with
some groovy tunes.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
• THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, FILM/COMMENTARY
The Reel Whirled is an
hour long adventure
through the world of film
focused around the UBC
Film Society's scheduled
programming where we
connect with campus
organizations and local
cinematic events to talk
about films and stuff.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
• daveradiopodcast@gmail.com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP/SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on
each other and leave mix
tapes and love letters in
each other's lockers xo
• Facebook: @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
CITR'S 24 HOURS OF RADIO
ART in a snack size format!
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
• Twitter: @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour
and a half of Manhattan
Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola
doot doo... doot doo!
■ nardwuar.com/rad/contact/
• WORD ON THE STREET
5PM-6PM, ROCK/INDIE/POP
Hosted by the Music
Affairs Collective, every
episode is packed with
up-to-date content from
the Lower Mainland music
communities including
news, new music releases,
event reviews and upcoming events, interviews
with local musicians and
industry professionals
and discussions over
relevant topics.
• programming@citr.ca
• RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7:30PM, TALK/COMEDY
Every week Jack, Tristan
and a special guest
randomly select a conversation topic for the entire
show; ranging from God to
unfortunate roommates.
Woven throughout
the conversation is a
cacophony of segments
and games foryour
listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
• programming@citr.ca
CANADA POST ROCK
7:30PM-9PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Formerly on CKXU,
Canada Post Rock remains
committed to the best in
post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and
basically anything your
host Pbone can put the
word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
• programming@citr.ca
• Twitter: @ pbone
SKALDS HALL
9PM-10PM, TALK/RADIO DRAMA
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through
the art of Radio Drama.
Story readings, poetry
recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host
Brian MacDonald. Have
an interest in performing?
Guest artists are always
welcome, contact us!
. Twitter: @Skatds_Hatl
SATXmTlA®
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30AM-6AM, electronic/
AMBIENT
The Late Night Show
features music from the
underground Jungle and
Drum and Bass scene,
Industrial, Noise,
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
• citrlatenightshow@gmail.com
THE SATURDAYEDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31st year on CiTR,
The Saturday Edge is my
personal guide to world &
roots music, with African,
Latin and European music
in the first half, followed by
Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
• steveedge3@mac.com
• VIVAPORU: THE OINTMENT
FOR THE SOUL
12PM-1PM, INTERNATIONAL/
LATIN X
"Similar to vicks-vapo-rub,
the magical ointment
that seems to cure it all,
we bring you cultural
medicine to nourish
yoursoul Latinxstyle".
• vivaporu.citr@gmaiI.com
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, LOUD/METAL
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darkerside of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided
by Coleman, Serena,
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
• programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and
blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
• codebIue@pauInorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, ELECTRONIC/MANTRA/
NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the
many faces of sacred sound
- traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic
array of electronic and
acoustic beats, music,
chants and poetry from
the diverse peoples and
places of planet earth.
• mantraradioshow@gmail.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, TALK/RUSSIAN
Informative and entertaining program in Russian.
• nashavolna@shaw.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
Every show is full of
electro bleeps, retrowave,
computer generated,
synthetically manipulated
aural rhythms. If you like
everything from electro
/ techno / trance / 8bit
music/ and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
• Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no
concept of genre, style,
political boundaries or
even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our
focus on a series, The
Solid Time of Change, 661
Greatest Records of the
Prog. Rock Era -1965-79.
We're not afraid of noise.
• Contact: programming@citr.ca
sunn^iy
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
OF INSOMNIA
1 AM-3AM, EXPERIMENTAL/
GENERATIVE
4 solid hours of fresh
generative music c/o the
Absolute Value of Noise and
its world famous Generator.
Ideal for enhancing your
dreams or, if sleep is not on
your agenda, your reveries.
• programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN':
REBROADCAST
8AM-10AM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUE -
GRASS
Pacific Pickin', originally
aired on Tuesday mornings,
brings you the best in
bluegrass plus its roots and
branches: old time, classic
country, rockabilly, western
swing and whatever
jumps off the shelves at
us. Most shows have an
artist feature and a gospel
set. Hear the historical
recordings and the latest
releases right here.
• pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SHOOKSHOOKTA
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
• programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time.
Playing the best in roots
rock reggae, Dub, Ska,
Dancehall with news
views & interviews.
• programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-
in-yer-boots country.
• programming@citr.ca
• FLASHBACKWITH
ALEC CHRISTESEN
3PM-5PM, MUSIC/ARTS/CULTURE
Each episode, join host Alec
Christensen and friends as
they discuss the pop culture and politics affecting
Vancouver and beyond.
• programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL/LATIN
AMERICAN
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
• programming@citr.ca
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, INTERNATIONAL/BHA-
JANS/OAWWALIS/SUFI
Presenting several genres
of rich Indian music in
different languages, poetry
and guest interviews.
Dance, Folk, Qawwalis,
Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also,
semi-classical and classical
Carnatic & Hindustani
music and old Bollywood
numbers from the 1950s
to 1990s and beyond.
• rhythmsindia8@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, ELECTRONIC/DEEP
HOUSE
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house,
prog-house and techno +
DJ / Producer interviews
and guest mixes.
• programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, ELECTRONIC/TRANCE
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from
Vancouver, BC since 2001.
We favour Psytrance, Hard
Trance and Epic Trance,
but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, Hard Dance
and even some Breakbeat.
We also love a good
Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
•   djsmileymike@trancendance.net
THEAFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer
discussion show is centered
around Vancouver White-
caps, MLS and the world of
football. Est. in 2013, the
show features roundtable
chat about the week's big
talking points, interviews
with the headline makers,
a humorous take on the
latest happenings and
even some soccer-related
music. If you're a fan
of the beautiful game,
this is a must-listen.
• programming@citr.ca
Islam* °f
tostToys
• STUDENT PROGRAMMING
ECLECTIC
w that
imarily
Marks any show
is produced pri
by students.
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease
you from the moonlight.
Moon Grok pops up early
morning when you least
expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
ANYTHING/EVERYTHING
Late night, the on air
studio is empty. Spirits
move from our playlist
to your ear holes. We
hope they're kind, but we
make no guarantees.
• 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC	
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive
time block is for BRAND
NEW programmers who
want to find their feet,
practice their chops, and
rep CiTR's playlist. Get at
us if you want this airtime
• @CiTRRadio
• programming@citr.ca
 tmrnm
FRIENI $&R£!
DEVIL MAY WEAR
198E21STAVE
* 10% off
EAST VAN GRAPHICS
304 INDUSTRIAL AVE
* logoff
LUCKY'S BOOKS
& COMICS
3972 MAIN ST
10% off books and comics
RED CAT RECORDS
4332 MAIN ST
* 10% off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
3934 MAIN ST
A free DIY button with any
purchase over $5.
AUDIOPILE RECORDS
* 10% off
SPARTACUS BOOKS
3378FINDLAYST
* 10% off
STORMCROW TAVERN
1305 COMMERCIAL DR
* 10% off food
RUFUS GUITAR
& DRUM SHOP
1803 COMMERCIAL DR
* 10% off strings and
accessories
DOWNTOWN
THE CINEMATHEQUE
1131 HOWE ST
* 1 small bag of popcorn
per person per evening
DEVIL MAYWEAR
1666 JOHNSON ST UNIT #110
* 10% off
FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
147 E PENDER ST
Free Cover to Midnight Mondays & Happy
Ending Fridays (before 10:30 pm)
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
& ART EMPORIUM
1238 DAVIE ST
* 10% off
RED CAT RECORDS
2447 E HASTINGS ST
* 10% off
SAVE ON MEATS
43 W HASTINGS ST
* 10% off food
THE PINT PUBLIC HOUSE
455 ABBOTT ST
* 20% off food bill
VINYL RECORDS
321W HASTINGS ST
* 10% off new and used
ESTSIDE/UBi
THE AUSTRALIAN
BOOT COMPANY
1968 W4TH AVE
15% off Blundstone CSA boots
THE BIKE KITCHEN
6138 STUDENT UNION BLVD, ROOM 36
* 10% off new parts and accessories
KOERNER'S PUB
6371 CRESCENT ROAD
* 10% off
RUFUS GUITAR
& DRUM SHOP
2621 ALMA STREET
10% off strings and accessories
STORMCROW ALEHOUSE
1619 W BROADWAY
* 10% off food
TAPESTRY MUSIC
4440 W10TH AVE
10% off in-stock music books
VIRTUOUS PIE
(UBC only)
3339 SHRUM LANE
* 10% off
BOOK WAREHOUSE (Broadway)
632 W BROADWAY
* 15% off
EAST VANITY PARLOUR
2482 E HASTINGS ST
* 10% off
HOOKED ON PHONO (Burnaby)
4251 HASTINGS ST
* 10% off
MONIKER PRESS
268 REEFER ST #080
* 10% off
Members of CiTR and Discorder
get sweet deals with these swee
Just show 'em your membership!
For more information about our friet
program please visit:
C/tr. ca/friends
 Yola
Young
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
February 6     February 7 & 8 February 9
MATTIEL    I THE BLACK HALOS    C.W. STONEKING (SOLO)
Fox Cabaret   Rickshaw Theatre Wise Hall
£
February 13
DYLAN LEBLANC
Wise Hall
February 13
February 13
MAGIC CITY HIPPIES    LUNA PERFORMING PENTHOUSE
Fortune Sound Club
Venue
February  14
THE FROGS
Rickshaw Theatre
February 14     February 17  February 18
ILLITERATE LIGHT   STONEFIELD YOLA
Wise Hall
Astoria
Venue
February 21     February 21     March 3        March 7
ANTIBALAS     I JOEP BEVING I BEST COAST   CURL UP AND DIE
Rickshaw Theatre I   Wise Hall       Venue        Wise Hall
£
March  7
HABIBI
Fox  Cabaret
March  8
YOUNG M.A
Fortune Sound Club
March 14
PALEHOUND
Fox Cabaret
March 17 March 19
DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS PUSSY RIOT
Commodore Ballroom  Fortune Sound Club
March 16
TAMINO
Fox Cabaret
March 22
6. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE
Venue
March 21       March 21
DAN DEACON I        WILCO
Venue    IOrpheum Theatre
March 27
THE DISTRICTS
Wise Hall
March 30
TENNIS
Venue
A
April 2
April 3
April 3
April 1
HOLY FUCK KING BUFFALO    EFTERKLANG I MONSTER MAGNET
Fortune Sound Club   Fox Cabaret    Fox Cabaret   Rickshaw Theatre
April 6        April 7 April 7 April 10
ANDREA GIBSON     PORCHES     THE MURDER CAPITAL    POST ANIMAL
T
St. James Hall
Fox Cabaret
Wise Hall
Fox Cabaret
Follow Qtlmbreconcerts  for chances   to win   tickets!

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