Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 2019-12-01

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0388726.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0388726.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0388726-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0388726-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0388726-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0388726-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0388726-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0388726-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0388726-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0388726.ris

Full Text

 Dec-Jan
2019-20
"THAT RESILIENT MAGAZINE FROM CiTR 707.9 FM"
WlaL 3d   jjiO, 08   llWUt, 413
JLocai + JFree
 CEMBER & JANUARY SHOW HIGHLIGH
DEC
DEC
WARM & TOASTY:
A CHOIR COZY
JAN
MIDGE URE
WITH GUESTS
THE PINEAPPLE THIEF
FEAT. GAVIN HARRISON
SOLD OUT - KEITHMAS X:
A FOODBANK FUNDRAGER
STATIC-X
WEDNESDAY 13
UIJHiliMMUiliH'l
JAN
NEW YEAR'S WINTERFEST-
nighti: GROSS MISCONDUCT
SAINTS OF DEATH, POUND,
OBSIDIAN, SCIMITAR, & MORE
NEW YEAR'S WINTERFEST -
NIGHT2:ANCIIENTS
THE HALLOWED CATHARSIS,
REVENGER, APOLLYON, FIRST
REIGN, TRUENT.& MORE
AT THE COMMODORE:
THE HOWARD JONES TRIO
WITH GUESTS
00k m :
'AA
VZ^
DEC
THE KINGFISHER BLUEZ
12TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARTY
m
a
HOWARD JONES
ACOUSTIC TRIO TOUR
INGNICKBEGG
^L.
BOWIE DALL 2020
JAN
BATTLEWORLD'88-
31
A RICKSHAW WRESTLING
PRESENTATION
7
FUCK FEBRUARY FEST-
BISON BOB SUMNER, WAR
BABY, HASHTEROID, KILLER DEAL
o
EMMET KIRWAN
I WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
BOBSUMNER
WARBABY
HASHTEROID
KILLERDEAL
ICKETS, BAND INFO, VIDEOS & MORE AT
JAN
SH0C0RE
THE RUBES
UPCOMING EVENTS
12/05
12/06
12/06
12/12
12/29
01/02
01/20
02/07
02/18
02/20
03/13
03/27
04/04
04/17
04/17
RICH THE KID
KAMAAL WILLIAMS
THE CHAINSMOKERS
(ALL AGES)
RYAN CARAVEO
(ALL AGES)
DAM FUNK
NOSAI THING. MACHINEDRUM
CASHMERE CAT
REX ORANGE COUNTY
(ALL AGES)
GOTH BABE
METRONOMY
SUDAN ARCHIVES
EVAN GIIA
ALLEN STONE
ELOHIM
(ALL AGES)
BRENT FAIYAZ
POLIQA
VENUE
FORTUNE
12/19
[        CARTEL MADRAS
FORTUNE
12/20
LIL KEED
(ALL AGES)
VENUE
PNE FORUM
COMMODORE
COMMODORE
COMMODORE
PLEASE CHECK OUT BPLIVE.CA
FOR ADVANCE TICKETS AND MUCH MORE
1 .IT">"
 TABLE of CONTENTS
DEC-JAN 2019-201
COVER S ILLUSTRATION  BY  SUNNY  NESTLER.
FEATURES
08-ADtLEBARCLAY
"on a chart that roughly maps / the gender spectrum /
I select femme and dirtbag / instead of masc and dapper."
10MASKARA
More slow, more warped. Way more props.
12•KATAYOON
Finally discovering the theoretical second way to rock
14   SHARON A FRANKLIN
Art at the hem of our nerves, our skin, our organs.
20 • SAMANTHA MARIE NOCK
Decolonial love! Radical Reciprocity! Tenderness! Care!
REGULARS, ETC.
04* ART REVIEW
CHOREOGRAPHY FOR CARROT
Shizen Jambor at Ground Floor
Art Center
05-FILMSTRIPPED
THE BODY REMEBERS WHEN THE
WORLD BROKE OPEN
15 • "Ritual Shame"
Guest Art Project
by Sharona Franklin
16 * -Shadow Biosphere Landscape-
contributor Art Project
by  Sunny  Nestler
17•JANUARY 2020 CALENDAR
18 • DECEMBER 2019 CALENDAR
22* NO FUN FICTION
BODY and WET by Lena Belova
24'REAL LIVE ACTION
Book    Launches,     Music,
and Happenings
26'UNDER REVIEW
Music"n'podcasts
29 •CITR PROGRAM GRID
30 • CiTR PROGRAM GUIDE
ADVERTISE: Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca.
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To learn how
to get involved with Discorder
contact volunteer@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque
for $20 to LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute
Discorder in your business,
email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR,
a registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you
love. To donate visit:
citr.ca/donate.
Ill
• ••
■
To inform Discorder of an
upcoming album release,
art show or significant
happening, please email
all relevant details 4-6
weeks in advance to
Tasha Hefford,
Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
comments, complaints
and corrections via email.
31* Top 50 Charts
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising
Coordinator: Tasha Hefford // Discorder Student Executive: Dan Miller // Outgoing Editor-in-Chief:
Chandra Melting Tallow // Incoming Editor-in-Chief: Tasha Hefford // Sections Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch
//Web Editor: Fatemeh Ghayedi // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo Laredo // Social Media Coordinators:
Alex De Boer, Dora Dubber // Administration Coordinator: Angela Nguyen // Charts: Jasper Sloan Yip
// Production Assistants: Enya Ho, James Spetifore //Writers: Anton Astudillo, Sasha Balazic, Susanna
Barlow, Lena Belova, Katherine Gear Chambers, Arjun Doraiswami, Clara Dubber, Sara Genge, Fatemeh
Ghayedi, Almas Khan, Hana Golightly, Lucas Lund, J Ockenden, Gabby O'Hara, Alexis Ola, Milena
Markovich, Jordan Natarer, Jane Procyshyn, Idaresit Thompson, Valie, Justine Yiu // Photographers &
Illustrators: Perry Chahal, Fiona Dunnett, Alistair Henning, r. Hester, Bre McDaniel, Emma Potter, Daniela
Rodriguez, Alejandra Sanmaniego, Hayley Schmidt, Beau Todorova, Isa You Proofreaders: Ana Rose
Carrico, Ricky Castanedo Laredo, Fatemeh Ghayedi, Tasha Hefford, Jonathan Kew, Dan Miller, Jordan
Naterer, Jasper D. Wrinch.
©Discorder 2019 - 2020 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published bi-monthly by CiTR.
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the heriqemirierh speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM.
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager ©citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Editors'
Note
IJ used to spend my time writing poetry about gaming, turning
\W copypastas into essays and making art about Second Life. While
^r this could be a parable, one concerning someone who knows her
narrative, practiced the script, prizes coherency, it instead suggests there
is often no intelligible throughline. That chance happens without pattern.
That my front-facing camera is broken and maybe that is a metaphor
for my stepping into this role. Though let this be clear: I am indebted to
everyone past and present at CiTK/Discorder for welcoming me into the
fold— it is incredibly humbling and I am grateful for this opportunity in
ways I may not be capable of expressing verbally.
As an incidental by-product of our continued activity in Vancouver, with
its irrepressible aimlessness, it's especially cruel commercial footholds,
Discorder continues to be home to stories of purposeful accommodation.
The scaffolding of care Kathleen Hepburn and Elle-Maija Tailfeathers
build into filmmaking, the industrious stampede of selfhood J Ockenden
finds in Adele Barclay's Renaissance Normcore. Many of these pitches have
been passed down from Chandra Melting Tallow — Discorder's previous
editor— to me. In turn, these stories are picked up by Discorder's generous
contributors, who activate everything around which the magazine orbits.
Forgive me for my summarization of the quotidian — I'm new to this and
also prone to awe. This issue is a collective effort of varying narrative lines
colliding; it's not simply the telling of stories in order to understand, but
the imposition of them upon disparate images. It's growing into your skin
like a wolf in a human suit. That's it, that's all I've got to start. Let's do this.
GL/HF
:-)   Tasha
bee. role model
friend advocate
burger expert
mentor
Our volunteer
mentors heLp
youth recognize
their many
strengths and
work towards
their goals.
To Learn how you can become a mentor, visit:
unya.bc.ca/mentorship
Urban Native Youth
Association
 Discorder Magazine      DEC/JAN   2019-20
art REVIEW
CHOREOGRAPHY  FOR  CARROT
Shizen Jambor at Ground Floor Art  Center
words by Clara Dubber
photos  courtesy of  Shizen. Jambor
Illustrations b y Bre  McDaniel
fveryone wants to believe they're
self-aware; that they are conscious of
■ the concessions they've made to play
whatever games they have committed to.
Choreography for Carrot, a video installation
piece by Shizen Jambor, forces artists to
recognize their own complacency within
myths and norms of the art world. The
exhibition was short-lived but immersive. It
was made up of two videos centered around
a fictional artist (played by Jess Waters) and
ran from November 15 to 20 at Ground Floor
Art Center.
One video depicts an interview with the
fictional artist speaking about their art
practice. The other video, which Jambor
attributes to the fictional artist, shows an art
piece Jambor and Waters actually executed.
It was only viewable through a peephole, and
in it Waters is seated on a mounted bench
wearing long blonde wigs on their head and
waist. They hold a pole tipped with an inflated
glove, and interact with a suspended carrot in
their studio, following the instructions in the
show's literature:
Stretch
Inch forward, inch forward, inch forward
Gather (collect self)
Drive hand forward
glide towards goal, feeding inches at a time
full extension
reach for it
reeeaaaaaach   h    h     h    for it
swipe, swat, swat
strain, put everything into it
relax and reset
One of the most effective and endearing parts
of Choreography for Carrot is the unobvious
satire. Jambor knows how to be exaggerative.
Their recent show, High Ferformance Object
at Charles Clark Gallery, was explicit and
intentional in its exaggeration and crudeness.
It was self-definedly campy. However, with
Carrot there is no winking at the camera
— Waters' earnest delivery of "We live in a
society," is with sincere conviction, it does not
waver. It is past deadpan; it makes us sit in
reality-as-ridiculousness until we realize how
ridiculous it is.
r n Carrot, Jambor explored the "contex-
f tualization of art on display." Carrot's
^" structure was intentionally layered
and implicit, contorting standard routes of
interacting with the work. The reality of
the humor, the facility of the show itself,
the intentionally mimicking-to-mock, forced
the audience to eschew certain standards of
contextualization yet made the show more
dependent on others. Without the show's
literature, without being told that it is satire,
you would not know. You might think the
work is bad, but not intentionally. This satire
is explicit in the literature accompanying the
show, but the pieces themselves don't have
embedded points of entry.
The opening was simultaneous with the
Eastside Culture Crawl, and the Crawler
audience often takes work at face value. This
transient demographic, en route to participating Crawl events, magnified those elements
of inaccessible humour in Carrot The layers of
reality in Jambor's work successfully created
a whole and believable world, so whole that
the messages became almost over-coded. In
challenging art contextualization conventions,
the show also demonstrated how standardizing
art-interaction allows for concise communication to a broader audience.
till, Choreography for Carrot was
I not necessarily made for a broader
audience. What makes it relatively
inaccessible to those outside the art world
made its communication to those within it
more effective. Ground Floor is run by Emily
Carr students and alumni, and acts as a
community cornerstone for young, emerging
artists who were hoping for an obvious
or heightened silliness — Carrot's satirical
sincerity was not comforting. At the opening
reception the interview's audio was played
off the monitor speakers and the audience
watched it together, reacted together, and
where Waters did not wink at the camera
we winked to each other. The
hyper-closeness to reality was
proximal to the ways in which
audience members interact
with, or perpetuate myths
around art production. There
was a comradery in these
emerging artists, collectively
recognizing the goofiness
of these behaviors. That
comradery was comforting
where the pieces were not.
Carrot's interrogation of the
conceptions of art production
indicates their contradictions.
Such as when Jambor and
Waters' unnamed artist claims,
"if making art is difficult for
someone then maybe it's not
for them," despite the fact
their own art practice focuses
on struggle and striving.
The "peeped performance" is
the kind of art culminated by these art-production myths. It is filmed in a large white
room, the fictional artist is intent, they "put
everything into it". It alludes to the Lady
Godiva legend, but is too dependent on the
associations it expects its audience to already
have made and does not say much itself.
Jambor seriously and steadily holds a mirror
up to the art world and tells it that it is silly
— providing itself as a negative for how artists
can approach their practice.
f'  *"•'.
ART REVIEW
Choreography for Carrot
 OS-eiOS   VOH\TOO      snisBgBMtsbtooaia
FILMSTRIPPED
THE  BODY  REMEMBERS  WHEN
THE  WORLD  BROKE  OPEN
words by Susanna Barlow and Sarah Genge
Illustrations by Alejandra Sanmaniego
fr
have spent many days on a cloudy
Vancouver film set; dragging heavy
r cases down the back alleys, anxiously
watching loaded trucks and crew busily
clearing the remnants from those who spent
the night there. As I scurry up a ladder
to adjust a light that burns my fingertips,
with the gaffer's screams ringing in my ears
"now, we need it NOW!" I question why
I am contributing to this industry. It is a
militarized system that erases spaces in order
to fictionalize them.
Directors Elle-Maija Tailfeathers and
Kathleen Hepburn offer an entirely different
model of filmmaking with their 2019 film
The Body Remembers When the World
Broke Open. Inspired by an experience
Tailfeathers had, the film walks with two
young Indigenous women from very different
backgrounds as they deal with the ramifications of domestic violence.
It is a loving portrait on and of the unceded
land of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-
Waututh Nations. The film looks and feels like
East Vancouver, which is something the film
industry rarely lets happen. A roaring truck
soars past Rosie (Violet Nelson) as she walks
down Clark Drive; the rain clings to her hair,
plastering it to her cheek; CBC radio blares
in the taxi cab, announcing the approval of
the Kinder Morgan pipeline. We sit in the cab
with Rosie and Alia, we open the door and
walk the streets, we enter buildings and we
exit buildings. There is no pointing, there is
no judgement — we are just there with them.
vt The core of the film is
about love, motherhood
and sovereignty of the
body. Being able to have
the right to choose to have
a child and have the right
to raise that child. It's been
this fundamental rupture of
Indigenous community: this
removal of our children, this
fracture of our families and
our communities, which has
done so much damage. **
-Elle-Mdijd Tailfeathers
These deeply present colonial wounds are
exactly what Indigenous poet and scholar,
Billy Ray Belcourt, is referring to in his proposition from which the title was taken: The
Body Remembers When the World Broke
Open2. We see it in Aila's guardedness and
mistrust of the white male doctor inserting
her IUD, and even more clearly in Rosie's
resistance to entering the system of public aid
in fleeing her abuser. Rosie states, "No one
is going to take my baby away from me."
Their bodies inherit the ongoing history of
colonizers deciding what happens to them and
their children.
The film resists a didactic moral message
without being neutral, though — it's nuanced.
They're able to show how important it is for
us to look out for one another while still
acknowledging the power dynamics of giving
and receiving help. Rosie endures domestic
violence and decides to return home, but
it seems that the film asks us to respect her
decision. Domestic violence is terrible, and we
should support women living in those circumstances but sometimes that means supporting
them in their decision to stay. The power to
decide what happens to her and her body is
a fundamental human right and we can't take
that away from her.
are and specificity are at the core
of this film and that further extends
into its production. In preparation
for The Body Remembers set, the directors
and producers had a lawyer come in and
give a seminar on colonialism in Canada for
the entire cast and crew. For example, they
discussed why certain culturally appropriated
words are harmful and that they wouldn't be
using them on set.3 That's what making a safe
space means: It's a verb. It requires action. It
takes time, education, unlearning, learning. It
requires taking a stance, defining what a safe
space means for that particular cast and crew
dealing with that particular topic and then
taking the steps to take everyone there with
you. They are actively building new worlds
to exist in, make work in and teach new
filmmakers in. How we make films matters.
What good is a film that perpetuates a cycle
it is critiquing?
Furthermore, Hepburn and Tailfeathers
set a goal of having at least one Indigenous
person in each key department.4 After not
being able to fill those positions, they started
a mentorship program wherein they brought
Indigenous youth from the community to
train in each department. It's an upstream
solution to the problem of unequal representation. They also workshopped the script with
Indigenous women who had experience with
domestic violence and public aid systems in
order to show not just any trauma or victim,
rather, a lived-in reality that so many indig-
inous face. They are brave mothers that
deserve to be honoured on screen.
Hepburn and Tailfeathers have developed a
situated way of making films filled with care:
away from extracting and exploiting, towards
collaborating with and strengthening the
communities represented.
Dear Elle-Maija Tailfeathers and Kathleen
Hepburn, will you write a manifesto? Also,
thank you.
r
1. See Radheyan Simonpillai, "TIFF 2019: Elle-Mdijd
Tailfeathers Takes on the Foster Care System," web, NOW,
August 29th, 2019. https://noivtoronto.com/movies/
features/tiff-2019-body-remembers-when-ihe-worldl
2. See Billy-Ray Belcourt, "The Body Remembers
When the World Broke Open," blog, February
8th, 2017. https://artseverywhere.ca/2017/02/0S/
body-remembers-w orld- broke-open/
3. See Norm Li, CSC, Interviewed by Carolyn Wong,
CSC Podcast, January 20th, 2019.  http-.ll.
knowledge/yoacasis/201901Fi/
4. Kathleen Hepburn and Elle-Mdijd Tailfeathers, Q&A
presentation at the VIFF Premiere screening of "The Body
Remembers When the World Broke Open," Vancouver
Playhouse Theatre, September 28th, 2019.
FILMSTRIPPED
The Body Remembers When The World Broke Open
 m PYUfi
vodka soda
  Discorder Magazine      DEC/JAN   2019-20
dele Barclay clearly has an effect on people. When I go
into a bookshop to ask for her latest volume of poetry,
Renaissance Normcore, the bookseller beams at me. As I
explain it's for research and that I'll be interviewing the author,
she overflows with enthusiasm and tells me how lucky I am to
have such a good assignment. At the Renaissance Normcore book
launch, the host, Brit Bachmann, laughs about a time she was
mistaken for Barclay's partner, calling it a great honour. Another
poet reads a piece that pays tribute to her, by name. Everyone, it
seems, is just a little bit obsessed with Adele Barclay.
M SUM
fven before she comes onstage at The
Lido to read from her new collection,
C - you get a hint of her character from the
surroundings. The bar is a little divey. The
audience is visibly queer. The table set with
copies of Renaissance Normcore also bears
a large cake. After the reading, the audience
eat cake and drink beers while local band
Pale Red prepare to play a set. The vibe is
wholesome, gay, arty and punky.
The night kicks off with a moving land
acknowledgement from Bachmann that
goes beyond the usual formula and asks the
audience to imagine the land as it would have
looked before colonization. The first poet to
read is Brandi Bird, author of the chapbook I
Am Still Too Much. Their reading is confrontational, raw and powerful. They are followed
by Kyla Jamieson, whose poetry is no less
hard-hitting, although spiked with dark
humour. She is the author of the chapbook
Kind Of Animal. The audience is responsive
by turns; solemn and cheerful. Each poet is
accompanied by sign-language interpreter Joy
Emerson. The translation of each poet's work
into gesture, body language and intricate
finger-spelling is incredibly hypnotic.
Barclay is up next. She wears large cat-eye
glasses and smiles a lot. When she speaks,
she seems to lean on certain words. Her
poetry is different again from Bird's and
Jamieson's — lyrical, romantic, and studded
with pop-culture references. There is trauma
and pain, but it's tempered and digested,
turning almost to wistfulness. Later, when I
interview her, she talks about "building escape
routes" into her poetry and "finding ways
to deliver the hard things with equal parts
humour and joy."
Barclay is introduced as a poet of "East
Vancouver self-love and queer love" — it's a
very good description. Self-aware references
to therapy and queer femme culture abound in
her poetry. Before reading a poem dedicated
to her partner (Tor Ariss), Barclay explains
that she wrote it early in their relationship as
_
tt
%Mt Jtadaj)
t*
 OS-eiOS   HAt\oaa      snixBgBMisbiooaiCI
a gift because she thought buying something
would be "too intense". Instead, she decided
to read their grandmother's poetry and write
a poem in response, which she jokes, was "not
intense at all."
Sarclay's poems are full of queer joy,
queer anxiety, queer yearning and
queer solidarity. She has a knack for
juxtaposing words and images in playful,
unexpected ways: Renaissance Normcore, for
example. That's the first thing I ask about,
when I interview her in her East Vancouver
apartment. A painting captioned "Virginia
Wolverine" hangs on the wall. Her cat,
Cricket, is gently trying to eat my socks. It's
exactly what you'd expect a queer femme
poet's apartment to look like.
"Renaissance normcore originated as a term
that I used to describe my clothing style", she
explains, "the combination of Boticelli curly
hair and button-ups, normcore infused with
a floral flourish." Later, she started applying
the idea to her poetry, as she moved away
from the surrealism of her first collection, If
I Were In A Cage I'd Reach Out Tor You. "I
was taught aesthetic is really superficial, but
it's something that women and queers are
really good at. It can be really powerful to
take all of the things you've been bequeathed
and then remix them [...] forging your identity
and yourself out of a world that doesn't quite
match it."
Many of the poems in Renaissance Normcore
play with the language of queer identity and
associated roles. In The Tish, Barclay writes
"on a chart that roughly maps / the gender
spectrum /1 select femme and dirtbag I instead
of masc and dapper." I ask how she thinks
this sort of language will be understood
outside the queer community and she says
she's curious to find out too. She gives an
example of an editor misunderstanding the
descriptor "stone," asking if the word should
be "stoned," She's not worried about her
words being interpreted diversely by a wide
readership, though. "I think poetry can hold
all of the different facets of life and language
[...] Maybe it will have its own meaning to
them and I'm kind of OK with that."
There is a certain mysticism about
Barclay, a gay witchy vibe that comes
out in her references to astrology and
her use of the verb "conjuring" to describe
the act of writing. As she explains, "the
thing I really like about astrology is not that
I really feel defined by it, but that it gives
me a lot of images and archetypes that I
can then make meaning out of." She's also
refreshingly unpretentious about her craft
and the romanticisation surrounding poetry.
"It's so weird. Being a poet is so weird,
because you're simultaneously really coveted
by society, but not super compensated and I
think I'm comfortable with that — but it's a
weird paradox."
In person, she is much the same as on stage:
warm, laughing, pausing at the end of her
responses to ask "does that make any kind of
sense?" At one point, we pause the interview
during a meditation on cultural identity for
a cat-petting break. "Feel free to just write
about the cat," she tells me, as Cricket rubs
her head against the spiral binding of my
notebook. Let the record show: Adele Barclay
has an exceptionally charming cat.
I leave her apartment, my socks miraculously
intact, eating the leftover Halloween candy
she pressed on me, making a mental list of all
the people I will give Renaissance Normcore
to this Christmas. Everyone, it seems, is just a
little bit obsessed with Adele Barclay. I think
I'm starting to see why.
tt
%Mt Jtecdat)
t*
 Discorder Magazine      DEC/JAN   2019-20
words by Gabby O'Hara
illustrations by Beau Todorova
photo by Perry Chahal
J met with Nxc Hxghxs at a busy coffee
shop in East Van. New to the neighbourhood, and to Vancouver in general,
I feared a wave of impostor syndrome would
come over me when meeting them. Nxc is a
pioneer of the now wave scene in Vancouver,
fronting bands like Shearing Pinx and Princess
Apparently, as well as pursuing several solo
endeavors. Their current personal project,
Maskara, is set to release the cassette Winston
Slip in the coming months. Nxc is also behind
the label Isolated Now Waves, and has one
of the biggest discographies (300+ pieces) I
have ever seen. So yeah, I was nervous.
**
Masfcaca
t*
 OS-eiOS   HAt\oaa      snixBgBMisbiooaiCI
^t T et meeting Nxc was genuinely comfortable and welcoming. They explained
'W to me that sometimes they're okay with sitting in silence because they
^r" have a hard time talking about themselves. Nxc explains they have also
experienced their share of impostor syndrome, despite living in Vancouver for
almost 20 years. "When people move [to Vancouver] they always feel like it's so
hard to meet people and crack into a community," Nxc suggests, joking "maybe
we're all so siloed off in capitalism stress and daily life existence."
I can agree — Vancouver is a huge city with a multitude of scenes, it can be hard
to find your niche. I was curious to know if they'd found a distinct community
in music since moving to Vancouver. Nxc explains,"I've honestly never quite felt
like I had a queer community. There is a community of bands that support one
another, but in terms of a queer scene I felt attached to — I've never felt that here. I
think people are inclusive in the music scene, and they want to support minorities,
but it's hard breaking the ice." Nxc explains that it can be complicated finding a
niche when you don't fully know which one you belong to, "I don't really know
where I stand sometimes, it's so weird, navigating an existence in these binary
terms when you don't quite fit either. Sometimes you can fit in one lane for a
while but then not. Sometimes I wish I just felt comfortable in one of the others."
Nxc's music career is both fluid and expansive, with tenure in the Vancouver
now wave music scene. When asked about their gender identity, Nxc explained,
"If you're an artist and people want to talk to you in a magazine you shouldn't
hide the fact that you're non-binary, it's the only way we're going to navigate
through this societal change we're going through."
As a teenager, Nxc's first band consisted of themselves, their cousin and their
neighbour. Together they built their own punk scene in the Okanagan. Nxc then
moved to Vancouver and started playing solo shows in 2004 and has been a
staple of the independent scene since. Nxc explained that because they have been
musically involved in Vancouver for so long they are a bit more relaxed now —
"I'm kind of a homebody these days, I go to my jam space which is also Red
Gate, and there will be shows happening and me and my friends will hang out in
our room and do karaoke or jam." I asked Nxc what's changed over the years,
and if their music has followed this maturing of personality, to which they said;
"Maskara is a little bit more slow, more warped, and I've added performance art
and props when I perform. I have my backing track and sing over my songs, then
have an instrumental break, like I'm performing my own karaoke."
What's next? Nxc says they would like to tour Europe. "It seems
so inviting. You can see a bunch of these little towns and you're
welcomed in with a bed and food." They also want to get
back into making movies, "I haven't since like 2003, but I'm much more
inspired by watching movies these days and getting ideas from that."
Nxc Hxghxs is insanely multi-talented as a musician and overall artist
— meaning they have been, and currently are redefining what it means
to be fully yourself on any platform. Their originality in sound and stage
performance expands and shapes Vancouver's music scene by welcoming
newcomers and allowing them space to express themselves. I am eagerly
waiting for Nxc's forthcoming release under Maskara, as well as Princess
Apparently's Last Night's Ass: Demolition Mix Tape, which is soon to
be available on Bandcamp. If you get the opportunity to see them live,
I would take it and run.
<yo
tt
Masfcaca
t*
 Discorder Magazine      DEC/JAN   2019-20
"Jtafajjoott"
 OS-eiOS   HAt\oaa      snixBgBMisbiooaiCI
JI must admit, I was a little nervous to meet Katayoon.
HI With a CV boasting 10 music videos, being a member
(^ of noise rock band Puzzlehead — an amorphous rock
cosplay, with over 25 members across North America
— and most recently, the September Artist-In-Residence
at Warm Notice, it was difficult to not be overwhelmed
by her clear passion and obvious artistic talent. In the
half-hour that I spoke to her, I was blown away by her
humble and thoughtful nature, as well as her vision and
ambition for Puzzlehead. Her artistic approach to music
has changed the way I think about composition, and the
impact that music can have.
"1^ atayoon spent about 7-8 years in the Vancouver music scene, playing
B-Z in various bands, working at a record store and being involved in event
^ V promotion for herself and the Red Gate Arts Society. With years of
experience touring and booking gigs, she found herself wanting to start a project
that would allow her to hone her songwriting skills, one that would allow her
to write and record song ideas as they came up. This venture was not without
difficulties — In its infancy, member turnovers were frequent and Katayoon soon
found herself interested in how new members would interpret and play the same
riffs differently. She started to incorporate this into her songwriting by making
structures and riffs more ambiguous.
According to Katayoon, this opened up the conceptual side of Puzzlehead, as she
started approaching writing songs by "thinking about how it would sound when
this person would play this [...], and what combinations of people would make for
an interesting sound and structure, and how would that sound if another combination of people played it." With the collaborative nature of the instrumentals,
the many-membered contributions accumulated to create a big and complete
rock sound, one that marries melodic passages with multiple harmonies from the
guitars and basses.
Katayoon
by Arjun Doraiswami // illustration by Hayley Schmidt     // photo by Isa You
*
(•■| uzzlehead's debut album, Big Sniff, was written by Katayoon alongside the
W"t Montreal version of Puzzlehead. Although iterations of the band exist here
f^~ in Vancouver, and as far as Olympia, Katayoon was writing and playing
shows in Montreal at the time and decided to record the album alongside "the
truest version of the band." The album is a "rock concept album" that combines
elements of cock rock, psychedelic rock, surf rock and even hardcore punk.
The album was inspired by what Katayoon was listening to at the time — Led
Zeppelin, Red Cross and Royal Trux — as well as all the bands she had formerly
played in.
This is all part of Katayoon's goal for Puzzlehead. She is looking to franchise
the band by creating iterations of Puzzlehead across North America, that will
play Puzzlehead songs, either with Katayoon, or on their own. The project will
allow for different versions of Puzzlehead to interpret and perform the songs
written by Katayoon in their own way, giving each version a distinct sonic flavour,
while playing with the same ingredients. Katayoon is hoping to start iterations
of the band across North America and abroad, with Japan and Russia being two
countries she mentioned in particular.
With the ambition to spread rock music across the globe, Puzzlehead and
Katayoon are going to give rock a big kick — changing the conventions of how
we make and share music, and I for one, can't wait to see Puzzlehead do this.
"$nln#ixixnff
 Discorder Magazine      DEC/JAN   2019-20
SHARON A FRANKLIN
^ T harona Franklin is a disabled artist who recently attracted
^« much mainstream attention after Gucci plagiarized her cake
^^^ sculptures, with no compensation or credit given. She runs
@paid.technologies, which houses her edible sculptures, @hot.
crip, for charged memes touching on disability and chronic-illness,
@disabled.personals, co-ran with Tash King as a community-building
initiative for disabled individuals, and @star.seeded, where Sharona
posts more personal work. This includes written work, digital art
and textiles, along with insight into navigating life through her
diagnoses and lived experience. On behalf of Discorder, I had the
opportunity to talk to Sharona about the evolution of her practice
and advocacy, erasure, and the impact social media has had on her
work and community.
words by
Fatemeh Ghayedi
artwork images
courtesy of
Sharona Franklin
photo of the artist
on pg. 19 by
r. Hester
To start, I wanted to ask for an overview
of what has lead to your current projects,
since they expand over multiple accounts and
mediums.
I've been making all sorts of work since
I was a kid. In my early twenties, I was
baking a lot but was also really interested
in community organization and how
spaces can be embodied and shared, so I
was curating a lot. I started making more
personal work when I was 27 but was
never really public about anything related
to my life or disability — I found that I
preferred to focus on facilitating. I was in
the hospital a lot and it just became more
apparent the older I got that I couldn't
really live with this division and started
making work trying to communicate
about disability and invisibility. I started
sharing work online and remember it
being kind of confusing for people; I got
a lot of weird feedback. When I started
the New Psychedelia project, it was really
important to me to destigmatize these
topics. There was this interesting thing
where bakers — or this very specific type
of person into craft and artisanal work —
would start following me, and a separate
group of people, who were more interested in advocacy and disability, would
as well and they wouldn't mesh. A lot of
them didn't want to engage with the other
things I was engaging with, or weren't
interested in accepting the complexity of
how I live and choose to communicate.
In January, I was like: You know what?
People are so specific in how they engage
with me, and I'm so used to feeling erased
on a day to day basis anyways, that I
began to separate everything. When I was
curating and doing graphic design, it was
great in the sense that I never had to talk
about myself or be vulnerable. After quite
a few years of that, I realized there was
a lot of division in how I was living. Me
creating my own artwork and poetry, and
starting to change my practice, was part
of trying to give visibility to all of that.
That's interesting because my next question
was as to whether the separation happened
to fill a gap or if it was more an attempt to
divide things into more digestible chunks for
people to engage with.
I think that there was a major intent in
clarifying my own ideas as well, because
@paid.technologies helps normalize and
destigmatize my life in that I get to live
photo   by  Rashelle   Campbell.
and share my art like anybody else. There
doesn't necessarily need to be a constant
political answer or a vulnerability in how
I'm making things. A lot of my work can
exist and be enjoyed on its own. A lot of
the time, I don't wanna talk about politics
even though I think about it all the time.
For me, too, it created a space where I
can relax and not have to dig up trauma
or be prone to hyperpersonal questions. I
realized that in my advocacy and personal
art, I'm creating a large place for those
conversations to happen but it's not
healthy for them to always be happening.
The Q&As and surveys you hold on
Instagram attempt to actively engage with the
experiences of disabled individuals. It has the
function of engagement but also education.
How has social media allowed you to expand
your practice and to cultivate a community?
I used to be very anti-technology. I think
that drove me to put on community
events, but then I got burnt out by these
dominantly able-bodied events that
seemed to keep happening. I couldn't
really leave home in my later twenties
and thought I would try hashtagging
some things, like a few of my medications and illnesses. I realized the way I
had been approaching community was
the way I was told was the right way,*
tt
£fjac<wa ftmftlh
ti
     OS-eiOS   HAt\oaa      snixBgBMisbiooaiCI
FEMINISM THAT
ONLY VENERATES
ABLE BODIED
WOMEN IN THE
WORKPLACE
IS NOT
INTERSECTIONAL
* but when you're at home or in doctor's
offices a lot, it's hard to cultivate that.
I also realized when I was engaging in
person, I was most often the only disabled
person. It made me feel like I kept hitting
a wall — I could talk to my friends about
it, and they would be kind and nice,
but they couldn't relate. I also couldn't
get tips on how to function or navigate
the disability system. I felt like the only
person dealing with these problems in
my community. For a long time, I didn't
know a single person who was receiving
disability, who had ever even heard of the
medications I was taking, and I had gone
my whole life like that. When I started
hashtagging I felt so much less alone —
the irony of it was that I felt judged by
my IRL community. I think a lot of abled
people use social media as entertainment
[...] and for people with disabilities it's
often the only safe space. If we can find
one person through a hashtag who takes
this medication and can have an unjudged
conversation, no able people involved,
it's so comforting. It started that way
and I now have so many friends with all
different disabilities, who can and can't
relate, but we can all empathize and try
to understand.
Even in art, a lot of my disabled friends
use computer programs like I do and
there's a lot of elitism in construction
and a studio practice that uses your
hands. I remember when I first started
using my computer, people were like
"Oh, that's just digital art." I know that
I can make things with my hands, but
it doesn't mean that I always should be
because that can be really damaging to
me. Within the disability community, a
lot of friends are talking about access to
resources — finding ways to have lightweight or affordable materials that can
be easily manipulated with little physical
exertion. When I was younger, I put so
much pressure on myself to make things
by hand and then I inherently wouldn't
be able to do things or wouldn't finish
things. When I took that pressure off
of myself, it was such a steady flow of
creativity because I wasn't as inhibited by
my body. In a creative respect it's helped
@hotcrip
me a lot too.
It seems in listening to the changes in your
physical health you often accommodate for
that in your practice, as well.
I have probably ten different people that
help me, and three people that specifically help me in the kitchen; lifting and
carrying ingredients. I have friends who
help me document and transport work.
It depends on my ability levels. It's funny
because when I make cakes, often I can
lift one ingredient at a time but once
I've made [the whole sculpture], I can't
lift it. When I make papier-mache, the
cool thing about it — similar to the jelly
sculptures — is that you use little bits at a
time. Then, in the end you have this giant
structure, which I couldn't physically
create at once. It's interesting because a
lot of able-bodied people hire assistants
and they don't get judged for it. As soon
as you're a disabled person, people say
"Could you do it without help?" I can
do everything without help but it's very
damaging to me. Why should disabled
people have to put their body into worse
and worse pain just for the satisfaction of
an able-bodied viewer?
tt
£fjac<wa ftaaSim
t*
 Discorder Magazine      DEC/JAN   2019-20
^T amantha Marie Nock
^B is a Cree-Metis woman
^^^ who grew up in Treaty 8
territory in North Eastern BC,
with her family from Sakitawak
(lle-A-La-Crosse), North
Saskatchewan. She has been
living, working and writing in
Vancouver for the past ten years;
and has since been observing
and experiencing the rhythms
of life that shape relationships
to land and to people, and
reflecting them back in work
that is radically true.
^fc y  ock's writing has been included in
H %| magazines such as Shameless, SAD and
fr^r Guts, however recently her voice has
taken on a new medium through her podcast
Heavy Content, which addresses the harmful
exclusion or misrepresentation of fat bodies in
mainstream media.
"I didn't really plan to do a podcast like
Heavy Content, talking about body politics,"
Nock admits. The podcast was created out of
her response to a trailer for the Netflix show
Insatiable, as a way to have open conversation
about fat representation in the media. "It also
is a way for me to think about these things
for myself," Nock shares, "because a lot of
my writing, and this podcast, has been part of
my own journey of self-acceptance and loving
my own body."
Representation is a personal issue for Nock,
as much as it is a political one. "I often don't
see a lot of myself represented in the media,"
she admits, "And there's one part of me that
doesn't really blame the media. Like, ok, yeah,
I'm a fat mixed woman who's from these
really specific places and who has had specific
experiences [...] There are little bits I can see,
but in terms of seeing the whole picture [...]
that doesn't happen in one character, or in
one piece."
However, between seeing parts of her
identity in film/TV such as Dumplin' and
Shrill, or in literature, such as Half Breed
(Maria Campbell) and A Really Good Brown
Girl, (Marilyn Dumont), Nock has been able
to "hodge podge together things that I can
read, watch or listen to that make me feel
more whole."
Heavy Content takes on the challenging
questions surrounding media representation. For example, in her episode "The
Problematic Fave," Nock observes that the
media repeatedly shows women—especially
women who are not considered normatively
desirable—seeking validation from straight,
cis, white men, and other figures of power.
The episode raises the question of whether
the media is successfully portraying complicated issues, such as internalized racism and
internalized misogyny, or is merely reinforcing
their dangerous and toxic ideals.
"When you have a body that runs against
the norms, and isn't considered normatively
desirable, you definitely look for those classic
figures of desirability to look at you and want
you." Nock explains, "I've definitely hunted
out what I thought were good, hot, straight,
white men to think I was hot, too. Like, 'Once
I get that then obviously I'm like everyone else,
and everyone will think that I'm hot, and it's
ok, and everything's ok - right guys?' Which
is so normal. And I think it's so important to
have depictions of that experience, because if
we don't, we're just lying to ourselves. But, I
think what's important in those depictions,
too, is moving beyond it."
hen we're undoing inter-
'»/■/ nalized misogyny, or internalized racism, or internalized
self-hate, it's a really complicated, messy
thing," Nock continues, "And we're going
to make mistakes and we're going to do
shitty things. But, what's important is our
accountability, and our care for each other.
When we have these depictions of people
living this very real process, we're going to
create more conversation and create empathy
for each other."
Part of the complex and harmful structures
surrounding body politics that Nock addresses
in Heavy Content is the false hierarchy that is
placed on romantic and platonic relationships, a hierarchy that undermines those who
are excluded from mainstream ideals of desirability. "What's been really helpful for me
is to dismantle that hierarchy," Sam shares,
"Loving everybody equally, all your friends
and all your partners, in ways that you're
not reserving specific care for specific people,
depending on these antiquated and arbitrary
distinctions we have for relationships."
Nock describes love that defies the boundaries of romantic and platonic — love that
is reciprocal and caring — as decolonial and
radical love. "It really takes away that idea of
scarcity that capitalism and colonialism loves
to put on everything," she explains, "That
there's not enough of everything and we all
have to fight for it. That can be resources, or
that can be literal care." Nock claims that "if
we can work together and re-imagine this,
there's not going to be a scarcity of care."
While radical and decolonial love might be
fairly absent from media representation, it is
visible in literature, in the works of writers such
as Billy-Rae Belcourt and Leanne Simpson.
"I think that radical and decolonial love
obviously is open for everybody and is
something that everyone needs to experience
and work towards," Sam observes in
reflecting on the media's absent representation
of decolonial love, "it's folks who've lived
under immense marginalization [...] under
colonialism, who are looking for ways to love
and live that aren't colonial. And so we're
looking for that decolonial love, and what that
means for us [...] And obviously we're not the
ones that are at the helm of making media -
especially popular media - so [those stories
are] not quite out there yet."
For Nock, decolonial love contains all
aspects of radical reciprocity, tenderness and
care. Although, she admits, "Tenderness and
radical tenderness is something that I struggle
with [...] I think especially for fat folks, and
especially, especially, for racialized fat folks,
we don't get tenderness shown to us [...] It's
no secret that Indigenous people aren't exactly
treated with tenderness in this country."
Radical tenderness requires attention and
respect. "I hate the pressure that I feel exists
tt
£aroaaftja Mnth $oc6
t*
 OS-eiOS   HAt\oaa      snixBgBMisbiooaiCI
in a lot of alternative communities or artist
communities and queer communities to be
this radical, tender thing, 'cause I'm like 'Oh
that is not me.' But, it's also super cool and
amazing to work on yourself and to learn how
to accept tenderness and be tender."
^ T ock explores these ideas of radical
n%| tenderness, of decolonial love, and
^^r of her relationships with people and
with the land through her writing. Several of
Nock's poems include Cree words, specifically
when she is referring to the land.
"There is a very simplistic reason why I put
Cree in my poems," Nock tells us, "For me
it's a way to re-claim and use those words,
and it's a way to be disruptive on the page
for readers who don't know the language, for
them to stop and be like, "Oh, what is this?
Why is this uncomfortable?" And also, it is a
way for me to begin to reclaim those things
that have been lost through colonial trauma, a
way for me to use my language and a way for
me to re-think of things with Cree, and bring
that world view back into my own writing,
and my own brain.
A lot of the words I use are often words for
plants and other things, because one part of
me just loves to know the Cree words for
plants I see around. I just love to know that.
And it is a little bit of a reclamation — like,
no this is what this is called. We may call it
this, but this is the name for this plant, and I
just want you to know that."
Although Nock's writing is not always
strictly related to body politics, there is a
relationship between the body and the land,
perhaps not unlike the relationship between
the language and the land that her writing
brings to attention. "I don't think that any of
our bodies are separate from the land," Nock
reflects. "This is something that is complicated because of colonization and because
of losing so much culture, but in terms of
looking at ways that I may honour [the] deep
responsibilities I have to my ancestors, and
the ones that came before me, I think this all
is definitely rooted back to the land. We all
exist because of the land, and my body is no
different than the bodies of other animals that
are from this place [...] It all begins and ends
with the land."
"Every single person on this earth, regardless
of where you're from or who you are, has a
responsibility to the land, to earth," Nock
continues, "And maybe you don't have the
same ingrained connection, because you're
not living on your ancestral land, or you're so
far displaced through colonial settlement or
through force. That looks different for a lot
of people, and it's complicated. But at the end
of the day, we all are responsible to this place,
regardless of how you got here and regardless
of who you are. And so I think really working
on your own relationship with what that
means, and your own relationship with the
land you're on, is really important, and that's
a sign of respect to the peoples whose land
you're on."
As Nock continues with her work, it is this
exploration of decolonial love and creating
communities of care that propels her forward.
Nock reflects that a lot of her past work has
been focused on hurt, and she is ready to focus
more and more on creating futures.
Regarding Heavy Content, Nock is excited
to start incorporating more interviews and
using them to build stories around a particular
topic. "The conversations I've gotten to have
with people through the podcast have been
absolutely amazing," Nock enthuses. "That's
what my goal was, and is: to open up conversations and to create space to have those conversations in ways that people feel cared for."
As her work continues to address issues of
representation, and to promote love and care,
Nock reflects that success does not lie in the
capitalist notion of production, but rather
in the ability to notice, to pay attention.
For Nock, success is "a part of just slowing
down [...] and focusing on what people are
experiencing and what you're experiencing
through it."
"Be it body politics or ingrained racism in
our communities, or decolonization, or resiliency," Nock reflects, "just creating spaces,
having artists and content creators create
space where we can have these conversations in a safe and good way, I think is what
success should mean." In her honesty and her
attention, Nock's work is opening space for
connection and for care.
tt
£aroaaftja Mnth $oc6
t*
 Discorder Magazine      DEC/JAN   2019-20
NO fun FICTION
by Lena Belova
illustrations by Fiona Dunnett
Bodies
Before Him, buckets drained the well. Cheap takers never complimented the
way the water reflected their image so clearly, not one ripple; never threw in a
penny or two after sipping from the surface. But now I know what it means to
share bodies. As I lay awake and listen to the rain, I wonder about the girls in
this city walking paths I have worn. And I wonder if they know of what they
live without. If they know they will walk with weary steps. I saw better life once
on TV. Might I find freedom in the country? Far from the shoreline, past the
mountains, in the cat-tail fields? I stepped on a cricket once at night. If they
don't, they might never get out. All I see is the tumultuous tides, needles in the
park, bodies orbiting farther from each other. There's nothing I can do but stay
here and tread water.
22
NO FUN FICTION
"Body" by Lena Belova
 OS-eiOS   VOH\TOO      snisBgBMtsbtooaia
Last night, a rain-drop (drip) landed on my cheek
and it was the first time I've been touched in months. I
stripped down to my underwear in the light of August
meteors and waited for the clouds to thicken. Drip.
Drip, drop — my nails cut crescent moons into my
fists as the rain touched other women's rooftops.
Wet
I stayed out all night, till the sun broke the sky, then
walked home with the remnants of our encounter —
dew sliding down leaves onto concrete, tires swerving
through puddles on the street (splash). Once inside,
I ran to the shower and sat under it for hours. Who
cares about a drought when the drip and drop of a
shower head simulate and stimulate.
When the water went cold, I stood there until every
pearl had run off — down my thighs like soft fingers,
down the drain like best laid plans. I squeezed my
hair out onto the tiles, drip, drip, (slip?). I squeezed
until my hair went brittle and split. I laid towels on
the floor to listen to the lullaby of the leaky sink an
waited for a flood. I once watched a star burn out,
vacuumed up without a sound. (Slip).
i
Lena Belova is a writer, poet, and activist. They are currently
pursuing a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Creative Writing at Kwantlen
Polytechnic University (KPU), are the Managing Editor for pulp
MAG, and the proud recipient of the 2019 PIPS Wordsmith
Endowed Award. Lena's writing explores freedom and the lack
thereof, and all the resilient ways people can reclaim their identities
in the face of oppression and depression.
NO FUN FICTION
"Wet" by Lena Belova
23
 J&M, IMACTION i
Dakwakada Warriors
Book Launch
OCTOBER 4 / LUCKY'S COMICS
The street door to Lucky's Comics is closed, but there's a
sandwich board out front advertising the launch of the
young adult graphic novel Dakwakada Warriors. I push
the door open, accidentally flattening someone standing behind
it. The bookshop is packed, although it only takes a handful
of people to fill the tiny space. The crowd is young and hip:
there are a lot of horn-rimmed glasses, piercings and even a
couple of mullets on display. In the main room, Cole Pauls sits
behind a desk in a punky jacket bristling with patches and pins,
signing copies and selling merch. In the back room, pages from
his graphic novel decorate the wall, covered with adventurers,
spaceships, villains and stylized starscapes.
The lurid sci-fi style carries a trace of teenage boy enthusiasm,
but the character design and visual world-building also draw
heavily on traditional formline art. The text is a bilingual mixture
of English and Aishihik dialect. The dialect words are integral to
the narrative, so an English reader can only follow the plot by
consulting a language key.
It's time for the artist's talk, and I am weirdly reminded of
primary school assemblies as we sit on the floor in front of a
projector screen, tightly packed and desperately trying to avoid
putting our feet in our neighbours' laps.
Dakwakada Warriors, as Pauls explains, is about two heroes
who protect the world from evil. Their spacesuits boast crow-and
wolf-inspired helmets, referencing the two clans of the Tahltan
Nation. Dakwakada is the traditional name of Haines Junction
in the Yukon, Pauls' hometown. Pauls describes the influence of
Southern Tutchone culture on his work and shows pictures of the
Dakwakada Dancers, a traditional song and dance group from
Haines Junction. Pauls was once a member, and he carefully
points out his relatives in each in each photograph. He talks
movingly about family and about Annie Ned, an Elder and
founder of the Dakwakada Dancers who appears in the comics.
Dakwakada Warriors is clearly a labour of love, designed
to honour and preserve Indigenous art and language. It also
has a strong anti-colonial message, evident in the choice of
villains: an evil pioneer and a brainwashed cyborg sasquatch
(the latter a reference to the exploitation of Indigenous children
in residential schools). That said, it also belongs to the nerdy
sci-fi canon. Among his influences, Pauls lists Star Wars, Power
Rangers and the video game Metroid. He deftly blends his two
sources of inspiration, inventing the "lightsaber version" of the
atlatl, and weaving Indigenous cosmology into his space saga.
—J Ockenden
np magazine Launch w/
Sam Tudor / Gal Gracen /
Rooms
NOVEMBER  9 / VANCOUVER  SPECIAL   NO.  1
w^-ince 2016, four volumes of Pip Magazine have been
P~m published online, but the latest edition, The Music Issue is
^^■the first to appear in print.
The magazine — brainchild of editor-in-chief Julia Pepler — is
long, slender and spiral-bound, looking a little like a calendar
in its newly printed form. Its content is stylishly designed. Each
two-page spread is inspired by a different song from a playlist put
together by contributors. Some pages carry poems or miniature
essays, while others are dominated by photographs, with only
a few words scattered across them. Pepler's background in art
and graphic design, explains the impeccable visual design, which
slightly overshadows the text content.
The magazine was launched at a party thrown by Julia Cundari
and Sarah Genge at their beautiful house in Kensington. Much
like the magazine itself, the party was a collaborative, multidis-
ciplinary show, where hand-crafted jewellery created by Katie
Yokota was sold alongside copies of the magazine in the back
room, while various bands played in the front room.
The aesthetic of the house and the crowd could best be
described as art school chic, although mention must be made
of the bathroom, which was lovingly but inexplicably Danny
Devito-themed. I didn't stop to count the Danny Devitos, which
I regret, but I would guess that about 20 Danny Devitos were
arranged around the bathroom walls.
Music was provided by Rooms, Sam Tudor and Gal Gracen.
The Georgia Straight recently described a Gal Gracen track
as a "lounge-tastic soul-pop anthem for the young urban
sophisticates of Alpha Centauri." The crowd at the Pip Magazine
launch were probably the closest to that demographic you could
find this side of Voyager 2.
The house-party atmosphere was delightful but the event
was so popular it soon became a victim of its own success.
The audience was tightly-packed during the first set by Rooms
(highlights of which were the line "Fuck you and your MBA" and
one band member endearingly exclaiming "I didn't know that!" as
the singer introduced a song and explained what it was about.)
By the time Gal Gracen took the stage, the spacious apartment
was packed so tightly that getting from the front room to the
back of the house was a lengthy pilgrimage requiring patience
and (ideally) steel toe caps.
I confess: your correspondent succumbed to mild
claustrophobia before the final act of the night, but even as I left,
more people were flowing in. Pip Magazine's transition to print
appears to have been a success, so keep an eye out for future
editions. Meanwhile, Julia Cundari and Sarah Genge have found
a winning formula to tempt Vancouver's art scene — now they
just need a bigger house. —J Ockenden
Aural Oracles w/ Ivanna
Baranova / Kaitlyn
Purcell / Aja Moore /
Shazia Hafiz-Ramji /
Tarene Thomas / Brand!
Bird
NOVEMBER   13   /   RED   GATE  ARTS   SOCIETY
The more you look around Red Gate, the more strange
things emerge to catch your eye: two disco-balls, jarring
against the exposed pipes of the ceiling; a ring of brightly-coloured plastic streamers; a tree in a pot, looking lost; an
orange and purple booth that engulfs the people sitting in it like a
monster's mouth; a sign on the stage that reads "MMM... Toasty."
When I arrived there for the for the launch of two new books from
Metatron Press — Confirmation Bias by Ivanna Baranova and
bedayine by Kaitlyn Purcell — the whole place felt like a garage
filled with old art projects. And poets.
Four guest readers took the stage before Baranova and Purcell:
Brandi Bird, author of the chapbook I Am Still Too Much (Rahila's
Ghost Press); Tarene Thomas, a Gitxsan, Tahltan, Haisla, and
Nehiyaw artist from Enoch Cree Nation, whose work weaves
English and Cree vocabulary together; Aja Moore, another
Metatron Press poet and author of Hotwheel; and Shazia Hafiz
Ramji, author of Port of Being (Invisible Publishing).
After the four guest poets, Ivanna Baranova took the stage.
She read in a rather dreamy, deadpan voice with lots of pauses.
Her debut collection, Confirmation Bias, sets out to discuss
"feminine conditioning, racialization, Slavic and Latinx diaspora,
experimental therapy, and nausea under capitalist hegemony."
In "Aloe," the speaker wonders "how to be your new translucent
heaven" and fantasizes about being "kept in your pocket like
aloe-infused Kleenex, like cash, cash, cash." Her lines juxtapose
lyrical imagery with the disheartening fact of reality. In "EKG,"
Baranova raised a laugh with the line "Congratulations on your
face. It's a good one." Later, unsure what to read, she asked the
audience to call out a page number. Someone suggested "69!" to
more laughter. Page 69 proved to be home to the shortest poem
in the collection, "Algorithm:" "The habit always dies before the
impulse." Many of Baranova's lines read like epigrams. After her
reading, Baranova passed the microphone to Purcell, introducing
her as "the angel of a generation."
Purcell read from bedayine (spirit), which won the 2019 Metatron
Prize for Rising Authors. The book tells the story of two girls,
Ronnie and Thena, who travel from Portsmouth to Edmonton,
and "get lost in the city and their own addictions." Purcell was
clearly nervous, cheerfully admitted to having had drunk "so
much gin" and was prone to fits of giggling. Her laughter should
have been incongruous as she talked about some of her work's
darker themes, but instead it served as a reminder that, as she
put it, "a lot of cute and funny things come out of the darkness."
She grew more confident as she started to read, although she
interrupted herself more than once to tell stories about how
certain lines came to be written. Purcell's poetry is full of images
that hit like concrete. Flights of fancy provide escape routes from
grim reality: there are penguins and flamingos in these poems as
well as addiction and sickness. —J Ockenden
PARALLEL 02:
Okkyung Lee / Marina
Hasselberg / Alanna Ho
/ Constantine Katsiris
/ Stephan Maier /
prOphecy sun/ Tegan
Wahlgren
NOVEMBER 16 / ROUNDHOUSE ARTS & RECREATION
CENTRE
^V-+ancouver New Music hosted their second PARALLEL
)%J workshop-performance series at the Roundhouse Arts
'^T & Recreation Centre on November 16, inviting New
York-based cellist Okkyung Lee to collaborate with local artists.
Lee embraces the gritty noises often tuned out by more
digestible melodies, producing a cacophonic soundscape that
challenges listeners to question what makes sound music. Lee
gives no impression of wanting to pander to her audience. She
is there to create an experience like no other, and with the help
of musicians using a range of unconventional instruments from
a salad bowl filled with ice water to a modular synthesizer — she
did just that.
The performance began at the lobby with the scraping of her
cello's endpin on the polished cement floor. Lee languidly moved
through the crowd as she dragged her cello in figure-eight
motions. As she meandered around the room, she lifted her
cello and began to play. The low unsettling rumble dissipated all
other chatter. Tension crept up with the subtle pace of someone
in full control of the discordance. Our ears perked, anticipating
a melody, but all she played was friction. This is how she draws
you in: you want to hear the tuneful denouement. Eventually,
Lee disappeared behind the doors to the theatre, the melodious
drone of her cello beckoning us to follow.
Despite being the headline for the show, Lee placed the main
focus on the ensemble. Alanna Ho, on the hydrophone, created a
variety of underwater sounds by blowing bubbles, mixing ice and
rubbing water on glass. Next to her, Tegan Wahlgren manipulated
her voice and violin with a mixer. Guiding the array of sounds
was a steady bass line produced by electronic artist Constatine
Katsiris. Cellist, Marina Hasselberg, played electric whines and
rumbles with such ferocity, her bow strings would visibly break
during the performance. Behind a crowd of wires and machines
stood Stefan Maier, using a string bow and metal plate to create
sawing sounds enhanced by his MDLR Case modular synthesizer.
Finally, prOphecy sun as the second vocalist had a stunning
range that complimented the other sounds, filling the negative
spaces with a touch of lightness in the overall dark tones.
After the first song, Lee placed her cello delicately on its side
where it remained for most of the show. Her back was to the
audience, keeping her focus on guiding the sounds between the
five other performers. Lee used cue cards to conduct the group.
She wrote them on the spot with blank paper and a marker. The
notes were sometimes instructional — "Play w/ me" or "Play w/
Constantine" — at other times leaving it to interpretation such
as — "Low drones" or "Bring in screaming." When asked how
she approached these improvised performances, Lee remained
humble, insisting the creation was all by the other musicians. She
was simply there to facilitate.
It takes an incredible amount of skill and musical knowledge
to combine eclectic noises and create complex tunes out of
it. Okkyung Lee is an exceptional collaborator and performer,
creating a truly unique experience for both audience and
performers. —Justine Yiu
b
REAL LIVE ACTION
December -January, 2019-20
 EARTHGANG / Benji. /
Guapdad4000
NOVEMBER 16/VENUE
When EARTHGANG first announced that their show would
be taking place at VENUE, I was slightly mystified.
However, a spot that I have come to associate with
indie acts or late night clubbing, turned out to be an amazing
location for this hip-hop duo from Atlanta, Georgia.
Opening for them were two acts: Benji. and Guapdad4000, who
both impressed me immensely. While Guapdad4000 did a great
job of getting the crowd's energy up, Benji. was able to connect
to the crowd through his lyrics and storytelling. They engaged
the crowd while also hyping them up, and were the perfect
choice of openers for EARTHGANG, known for their amazing
beats, lyrics, but also kind nature.
It is always refreshing when musicians genuinely care about
their fans and listeners — especially when they make a point
of interacting with their fans throughout their performance.
EARTHGANG did just that. Not only did they invite five members
of the audience to join them onstage during one of their songs for
a dance-off of sorts, but they also made a point of acknowledging
specific people in the audience, and included everyone in the
chanting of "when [we] say EARTH, you say GANG" throughout
the night. The use of coloured lighting, accentuated by the
neon Monster Energy sign, outlined each performer's silhouette
exquisitely, making the concert not only an amazing audio
experience, but also very picturesque.
A personal highlight of the show was the performance of
"Meditate," which was my first introduction to EARTHGANG's
music. They managed to perform the perfect mix of old and new
material, as the packed venue sang, rapped and danced along
to the music — even Vancouver's infamous moshing wasn't able
to put a dampener on the energy EARTHGANG was supplying to
the audience.
The duo brought out their opening acts once more at the end
of the night, encouraging them to sign merch and people's
belongings, emphasizing once more their amazing interaction
and engagement abilities with their fans. As they move on with
the Monster Energy / Welcome to Mirrorland tour, I am sure they
will manage to continue on with as much dynamism as they were
able to bring to Vancouver — it was a great show. —Valie
Western Front Listening
Party w/ Aram Bajakian /
Raven Chacon /
Gabi Dao
NOVEMBER 22 / WESTERN FRONT
tt
T:
► here's so much music out there," exclaimed Aram
Bajakian, Western Front's new music curator. And he
could not be more right. Even at the best of times,
when we set time aside to actively listen to new music; when
we are yearning to discover something new and exciting that
has just been released; or when we dive back into the countless
vionoA avi j JAaa
0S-Q10S, v\nMrtfc\- ^stJmsosQ
artists, albums and time periods we somehow haven't managed
to listen to yet, there's just no way to keep up.
But that doesn't keep us from trying, and Western Front's
ongoing listening party series is doing its best to help us along.
Along with host Bajakian, artists Raven Chacon and Gabi Dao
spent the evening sharing "recent musical and sound works that
exert emotional pull." In other words, the three artists took turns
playing songs they like.
While the playlist was certainly diverse, each person's
selection made perfect sense as a representation of their
artistic practices. Raven Chacon, Navajo composer and artist
from the southwest United States, whose sound and installation
work often deals with the postmodern collision of tradition and
technology, as well as Indigenous resistance,
chose exclusively songs from LA-based artists,
including "He Dead"by clipping, and Luicidal's
"Institucionalizado," a Spanish cover of
Suicidal Tendencies' "Institutionalized," among
others. Gabi Dao's selections exemplified her
interest in the use and limits of technology to
create alternative narratives in her interdisciplinary art practice, most explicitly with two
bombastic songs from experimental electronic
artist Elysia Crampton.
Given the nature of the artists sharing
the music, the majority of their choices
were dense, esoteric and not traditionally
approachable music. And given the setting
— the Western Front being a historic and
international hub of experimentalism and
avant-garde sound and art practice in
Vancouver — the listening party could've
easily veered into an alienating discussion of
art-music, far beyond the sonic vocabulary
of anyone in attendance. And while it did,
at times, seem to be going down that road,
the conversational and relaxed tone of the
event, facilitated by the warm and welcoming
presence of Bajakian, fended off the typical
coldness and elitism often plaguing New
Music circles.
After each song, the chooser talked briefly
about why they chose it. But these statements
often turned into conversations with the
audience, making the event feel more like an
informal hang out than anything. As Bajakian
mentioned in his introduction to the event, it
can be overwhelming to approach the vast
quantity of music being released all the time,
and getting recommendations from friends
is one of the best ways to sift through it all.
While that might be true, the Western Front's
Listening Party Series is certainly the next best
thing. —Lucas Lund
• ••
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine
and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to:
Jasper D. Wrinch, Section Editor
rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences. Feel
free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
A
 %\kt Woitto
Albums
Kingdom Went
(self-released)
June 8,   2019
JS
-n his first LP Kingdom Went, llya Krivo manages
' to put together a deeply personal, yet touching
"story which endeavours to understand the
human experience. While exploring issues of
immigration, family, religion, and environment,
Krivo integrates various aspects of folk music to put
together an album that feels intimate and niche, almost like a conversation with the artist.
With help from Martin Riesle on the cello, Spencer Swarts on drums, and John Evans on
the pedal steel guitar, each melody transcends any preconceived idea of classic folk,
seamlessly blending together traditional bluesy and country sounds with classical and
international flavours introduced through Krivo's mandolin and flute.
The album's second track, "Complementary Wine", sets the tone for the whole album,
blending together a catchy, punchy melody — led by the notable presence of mandolin
— with poetic lyrics looking deep into the human spirit. The song at once explores ideas
of religion and consumerism by combining elements of upbeat mandolin with a dark
undertone that perfectly mirrors the subject matter of Krivo's lyrics. Juxtaposing the idea
of religious fulfillment with images of betrayal and selfish preoccupation, Krivo argues that
true satisfaction requires hard work: "We don't just simply go to the holy land / But we rise."
Another fantastic demonstration of this album's personal tone is "Make the Cut," which
discusses topics of family tradition, history, and immigration. The beautiful, intimate song
begins with traditional Ukrainian vocals and continues with a combination of blues and
soft mandolin elements. The lyrics perfectly describe the struggle of young immigrants
worldwide: the battle between the traditional sense of home you leave behind and the harsh
knowledge that that home is no longer welcoming. Transcending traditional folk music, llya
Krivo manages to make a unique statement both lyrically and melodically through the clearly
personal tone of the song, and the album as a whole.
Between the catchy mandolin melodies, ethereal and candid vocals, and out-of-this-world
cello and pedal steel backtracks, this album establishes llya Krivo as an exciting and unique
modern freak-folk artist. All I can say is that if this album is a testament to the start of Krivo's
music career, I am very excited to see where the next effort will lead. —Milena Markovich
Mt.Metlot
City Sex Vol. 2
(self released)
June  14,   2019
«obert Ondzik's alter-ego, Mr. Merlot, is back
and ready to uncork this punchy sequel of
2017's City Sex Vol. 1. Mr. Merlot's experimental
new album opens with the entrancing "Catch a
Feeling," setting the tone of this album with its spacey
funk and glam reminiscent synths.
Ondzik's vocals border on a yawn, it complements
the dreamy production of City Sex Vol. 2, as Ondzik tackles love, rejection and emotional
reparation. "Love's Going to Get You Again" grapples with mourning a relationship and
then letting it release you, as Ondzik's croons promise future romantic opportunities are on
the horizon.
A talent packed team helps provide Ondzik's musical accompaniment with appearances
from Destroyer's Nicholas Bragg, Supermoon's Adrienne LaBelle, Retail Nightmares' Jessica
Delisle, Milk's Thomas Lougheed, Role March's Richard Sexton and Tommy Tone's Tom
Whalen, with additional writing and performance input from Jay Arner, making City Sex Vol.
2 a dynamic and rhythmically entrancing work of art.
The bright and mellow sounds of City Sex Vol. 2 serve Ondzik's emotionally invasive lyrics
as Ondzik channels operatic vocals and visions of big hair in "For You (feat. Tommy Tone),"
serving '80s pop chord progressions in more modern terms. The throbbing synthesizers and
disco influences in "Fix Your Heart" create an ear-worm that will have "You're going to be a
work of art" etched into the back of your brain long after your music player moves on, while
"Voyage of Delusion (feat. Jendiquois)" lends to your imagination images of arcades with its
video game style synths and sound effects.
The album art for City Sex Vol. 2\ courtesy of Louis Reimer, captures the psychedelic
impression that Mr. Merlot serves up in his latest release, while adding a floral and whimsical
touch to the album's overall appeal.
With City Sex Vol. 2, Mr. Merlot scratches an artistic itch in the Vancouver music
scene for experimental dance. It's such a treat that this itch sounds so great to scratch.
—Jane Procyshyn
tober ffime
Self Care
(self-released)
August  16,   2019
T:
>ender Time's bandcamp page describes the
artist's music as "warm, dark, romance." With
the addition of their newest release, Self Care,
a fourth quality would be a fitting addition to the
description: dream-like.
In all the tracks the vocals sound far away, as if
the microphone was placed far away from vocalist
and songwriter James Gibbs during recording. In this album, whose first track, aptly named
"Reverie" evokes that very quality with its surreal vocals, we head into what seems like a
journey into a dream. The second track, "Chrono 2.1," gives off an '80s techno feel, and the
inclusion of the chant-like vocals further propels this dream-like quality.
"Piece of My Heart" is faster paced than "Chrono 2.1." Along with the interesting drum
solo in its middle, "Piece of My Heart" is also one of the only tracks where the lyrics are
clearly heard. The repetition of the words "You had a piece of my heart / Should've known
from the start," evokes a feeling of regret from the artist. With the next track, "Fortune," the
vocals again take a back seat, while the '80s inspired synths are front and centre. This same
synth appears again in the eerie track aptly named "Haunt," which feels like the beginning of
a twist in the dream, giving it a different atmosphere than the rest of the tracks.
The rest of the album settled back into the calm after this track, with "Moonlight Beach"
being my favourite. With its instrumental flow and vocal fade in the middle, it feels like you
are honestly standing by that moonlit beach in the artist's memories. Overall, Se/fCorefeels
like a calming '80s dream. —Almas Khan
Slam Bunk
In Hell
(self-released)
August  21,   2019
I
-f Slam Dunk's new album In Hell is a more
1 accurate representation than the fiery inferno
"that literature has lead us to believe, I genuinely
think I'd have a pretty swell time down there. The
emphasis on overdubbed vocals, organs and
eccentric effects show the band attempting to
explore new creative ground on top of the musical
foundations they have previously laid. Slam Dunk's last album was released six years ago,
so they have had quite a bit of time to refine their creative palettes and bring Vancouver
some new tunes. Whether it be creating a mockumentary of touring with Canadian indie
legends Arcade Fire, or gigging all across Europe summer 2019, it's pretty clear these
goons just want their listeners to have a good time.
The opening track, "In Hell," is a great way to start off the album, as it immediately
catches your attention with the guitar's bouncy reverb and overwhelming amount of vocals
overlapping each other. I found that the tones introduced in this track — and throughout the
rest of the album — felt very tropical, though it feels a bit weird describing their sound like
that. I could imagine myself surfing out in the ocean listening to these tracks, but instead
of a surf-board I had an oversized Froot Loop. Obviously my blood would be pumping at
substantial rates, because Slam Dunk loves to keep you on your toes with their fast tempos
and rad guitar solos.
Another standout track is the single they released back in 2017, "Fucking Around." Not
only do they keep you on your toes with a train bell holding the rhythm for certain sections of
the track, but the guitar solo halfway through immediately made me pucker my lips and want
to stand on my chair and pretend to air-surf on top of the wave of lush guitar melodies. The
final track to praise is "DYB," Slam Dunk's longest track released yet. At over seven minutes
long, the song is a good break from the other shorter dance tunes on the album, and shows
that the group knows how to use dynamic changes to keep the listener engaged throughout
a garage rock ballad.
If this troop of tenacious troublemaker's past releases have earnestly tried to get
you to dance, their new album In Hell can't help but seduce you into boisterous state of
head-banging and chorus chanting upon each listen. —Jordan Naterer
Ueltt
Swim Slowly
(£elf-released)
September 20,   201?
The album artwork for Swim Slowly is both
lonely and comforting. A single figure waits
for a passenger train pulling into a station
high above the Earth, the planet hovering close in
the background in steely light. Much of the album
feels like this: pressing your face to the cold glass of
a train window, watching the world go by as if from a
26
UNDER REVIEW
December -January, 2019-20
 distance, and finding comfort in your solitude.
Swim Slowly is Meltt's debut full-length release, following their first EP, 2017's Visions.
On the band's Facebook page they describe themselves in hashtags as psychedelic / indie
/ alt rock, and it checks out. With Swim Slowly, Meltt holds their own against other groovy
psych-rock outfits like Tame Impala, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, or Still Woozy.
Lyrically, the album centres on the theme of questioning what you should be doing,
where you should be going, and who you should be loving. "How did it come to this?" the
vocalist sings, "Are we wasting time?" Sonically, the album features a broad variation in
pace and texture. In "S.O.S.", lush harp strums vibrate in the back of your throat, melancholic
and dreamy, and a few songs later, on "Footprints of the Sun," energetic jangly guitar
accompanies the lead singer's clear, optimistic vocals — there's a song for every mood.
The standout ballad of the album, "Love Again," is a deeply wistful but slow-danceable
song; an inner-monologue of someone facing the uncertain end of a relationship. The
lead vocalist sings: "Maybe I could be growing / Instead of always holding / Half my life in
doubtfulness," a meditation on staying with a partner when you feel the boundless potential
of the world outside. In the video, couples sign up for a relationship-saving program called
"Love Again," eat two halves of a purple heart cookie, and relive the intoxication of falling in
love for the first time.
"Photogenie" starts dark and restless, 3/4 time beating us through tension that builds
for the first half of the song, melt(t)ing into a relatively demure second half. Sometimes, you
want them to hold steady with that energy until it burns out, tearing down the steady drum
beats into a frenzy, but they show restraint. For the most part, kinetic potential is contained
on Swim Slowly, but it comes out in the final seconds of the last song on the album, "Moths in
the Darkness", which rises quickly and falls just as fast. —Hana Golightly
jftankiie
Forget Your Head
(Paper -BagKecords)
September 20, 2019
a
FORGET YOJR  H
■n their debut full-length album, Frankiie
demonstrates major label aspirations with a
'wildly cohesive collection of catchy '70s classic
rock inspired dream pop songs. I first heard the
Vancouver quartet on an Apple Music editorial playlist
which had on it their lead single for the album, "Dream
Reader," a groovy Metric-esque bass driven track that
felt made for alternative radio. The single encompasses the essence of Forget Your Head
and the band for that matter — an alarmingly familiar sound, but just varied enough to
stand out.
Forget Your Head is an easy listen. Hook heavy songs like "Sun Queen," "Funny Feeling,"
"Easy Breezy (Je Sais)" and "Don't Be Low" feel like necessary cartilage that hold the album
together. They're pleasant and fit with the best of Canadian dream pop and rock acts like
Always, The Beaches and Metric. The band shines however, the further they drift from these
more formulaic sounding efforts.
Songs like "Nowhere Days" — a patient and thoughtful track that showcases the
fruitfulness of multiple vocal melodies dancing over each other to create a more intimate
performance — or perhaps the distorted climax in the final moments of "Corner," are
highlights. A personal favourite is the spoken word passage just over two minutes into
"Compare," that showcases a poetic approach that would be beneficial to capitalize on
more frequently.
It is no doubt that Forget Your Head will mark a successful leap forward in Frankiie's
career. To continue this momentum, the four-piece will need to mine for more differentiation
and learn from the moments that make this album great. —Sasha Balazic
APOLLO GHOSTS
apollo ©bests
Living Memory
(self-released)
October 1, 2019
Ml
LIVING MEM
■any years after playing their last show,
Vancouver indie rock heroes Apollo Ghosts
•finally return with a new record. On Living
Memory, frontperson Adrian Teacher goes solo with a
new ambient sound, a change of direction from their
pop rock stylings. Recorded with only a spinet piano
and Logic stock plugins, the music echoes the death of his father, and cedar trees being
wiped away due to our destructive climate crisis. Our relationship with nature as human
beings for the most part has been parasitic. News of the Amazon forest burning, wildfires in
Los Angeles, and the refusal of our leaders to take action have only added to the pessimism
and anxiety of our collective psychology. Apollo Ghosts' heavy take on death, disease and
our environment through Living Memory's 14 tracks is imbued with that of mourning, plea,
and recollection.
Just as the memory of his father has decayed, so too has our relationship with our planet,
and the planet itself. On "Gold in the Hill" and "Hannibal's Alps," warbling synths allow us
to explore the divine in nature. The loss of gravity in "Mowing Around Arbutus Trees" and
"Campground Philosophy" gives us a chance to stop and think about the world we live in.
Piano chords are suspended in the air while softer notes slowly flow in like water droplets
on an early Sunday morning. It's the feeling of tranquility of the outdoors that provide us
with a sense of peace of mind until everything is wiped away. On "Reading Chair," a hushed
piano is played as if in bereavement — it reverberates, attempting to connect to a specific
memory. Towards the end of the track, the mood shifts as the piano is played more lavishly,
conjuring Teacher's childhood of yore. He elucidates this feeling of a time and a place from
when all our problems of today never seemed to have happened: picnics on campgrounds,
the smell of the wind and the ocean, the sound of birds and children's laughter. These are
the moments we cherish, that we wish we couldn't have taken for granted.
Teacher's father may have passed, but there is still hope for our planet. Its state of
degradation can still be reversed if we can find our connection with it — just as Indigenous
people have been advocating for all along. The music of Living Memory touches on Teacher's
memories of his father, but it helps us to get in touch with our planet too, to help us think
about why we need a more loving and respectful relationship with it. —Anton Astudillo
waivaa aaawu
0S-Q10S, v\nM!ifc\- ^st-msa
Wfcsam
BaalUiDtm
Awe
(Mmtlecords)
November 8, 2019
ill
-t's perfect listening on a cold, gloomy winter
night, when another human's warmth acts as
'an antidote for frosty sorrow. Awe is the third
studio album from Vancouver's alternative rock
band Woolworm. An analogy for heartbreak, Awe is
an album that conveys the complicated relationship
between lovers. It begins with "Awe," a title track that tackles the endeavour for connection.
"Awe" personifies the fear and wonder attached to the state of love. When lead singer
Giles Roy professes "I don't need money just love," he makes the point that receiving
unconditional love is far more valuable than a million dollars in the bank.
The album continues to communicate the trial and error of a romantic connection, by
using a wide dynamic range introduced right away, to balance high energy with calm. These
swells in volume paint how affection grows, fizzles and terminates — and the inevitable
grief from the loss of love. With the imperative of pain and passion as part of the human
experience and the tenderness of love strummed by the guitar, the music juxtaposes love
and pain throughout.
Woolworm also explore the impact of alienation on dating with Awe, examining the
craving of a bond while being too afraid to act due to pain, rejection and heartbreak.
Alongside the universality of loneliness pouring out musically, solace comes through with
the lyrics "You always act like you're alone / But you're not / No one is."
Conversational disputes escalate to full-blown arguments, grappling with the fact that
you may be the one in the wrong. The album takes the listener down a journey of meeting,
falling in and falling out of love with another person. Each song in the collection represents
a different moment in that journey, ending with a slight shift in atmosphere. The final track,
"Woe is Me," is a chill electronic track, dramatic yet comical, addressing the disappointment
associated with the current dating scene. Capturing the feeling of self pity, of failing to fulfill
the craving for genuine connection, "Woe is me" wraps up the album in a truly self-defeating,
but still satisfying way. —Alexis Ola
£aral)3iclilmg&
Set ©Dob Bail £ucli
The Family Curse
(self released)
November 8, 2019
(I
■n her second album, The Family Curse,
Sarah Jickling and Her Good Bad Luck layer
vulnerable yet catchy hooks over lush electronic
production in a way seldom heard in pop music. The
self proclaimed "Manic Depressive Pixie Dream Girl," Jickling has historically been rather
open about her struggles with mental health. Her debut album, When I Get Better, is an
unfiltered exploration of her experience living with bipolar disorder, anxiety, OCD and PTSD.
Her 2019 follow up, The Family Curse, seams like a natural leap forward. While sticking
to her brand of confessional pop songwriting, Sarah Jickling and her collaborators add
new textures and complexities to her production landscape that only adds new depth to
her music.
The Family Curse's opening track (and single), "Saint," is carried by a reverb soaked
rimshot and rolling high hats that would have it fit in with the very best of 2019's top 40
music. Tracks like this and the greater majority of the album could easily be taken as ditch
efforts at the charts. But The Family Curse will reward those who listen attentively enough to
get lost in moments of instrumental experimentation and provocative songwriting. Its lyrics
like "Showed me grace when he offered to kill him himself instead of me," on "Saint" that
have you pause and marvel at the magnitude of her writing. It's not just manufactured pop
music: it has real substance and Jickling shines through moments like this. Standout songs
like "Hospital Bed" and "Make it Work" challenge the norms of modern pop music in a way
that can only be admired. It's honestly brilliant how catchy songs ranging from overdoses to
hospital run-ins can be.
Sarah Jinkling and Her Good Bad Luck's sophomore album demonstrates that dealing
with mental illness through songwriting isn't just reserved for pop punk, rap or "sad-boy"
indie rock— it very much has a place in modern pop. The Family Curse is a brutally honest,
dynamic and memorable record. —Sasha Balazic
pobcasts
June 2017-present
Black ©trl Brunei)
me  2017-
■hen I first heard the hosts of Black Girl
Brunch discuss the size of Arnold's head
from Hey Arnold for ten minutes, I knew
immediately that this was the podcast for me.
Focusing on popular culture, the hosts provide
their brand of carefree and authentic black girl
commentary on celebrities, dating, health, beauty,
self-care, culture and politics to their listeners. The
best-friend duo, Iman and Sabria, have such genuine chemistry with a unique sense of
humour that it is often difficult not to break out laughing in public as I tune in. Moreover,
Iman and Sabria are such warm hosts that the conversational tone of the show leaves
listeners feeling safe and welcome.
Every episode begins with light banter as the hosts welcome their audience with the
A
 topics of the week. Usually, Iman shifts the conversation from the introduction towards a
segment titled, "Fave Four," in which they discuss their four favourite topics of the week. In a
recent episode titled, "Disney and Daiquiris," Iman and Sabria talk about their four favourite
Disney original television shows and instantly proceed to sing the theme song of the TV
show, Hannah Montana. It is often their spontaneous and raucous behaviour that makes
the podcast even more engaging, interesting and hilarious. Moving onto the celebrity news
and gossip section of the show named "Teatime," Sabria and Iman give insight on celebrity
controversies of the week. Both hosts contextualize the controversy, or if they must, criticize
the mess said-celebrity is entangled in while leaving sound advice for their audience.
It can be difficult to maintain a light-hearted tone from the beginning of the show, as the
show transitions into more pertinent topics. But, Sabria and Iman's open, no-holds-barred
personalities make this transition seamless. In the section, "Common Sense Sis," they
speak the truth on important topics such as racism, sexism, homophobia and transphobia
while regaling the audience with tales of their personal experiences. Their willingness to
be vulnerable as they confer with one another produces a sense of authenticity that is an
excellent addition to the show. As a listener, I appreciate the realistic tone in this aspect
of the podcast. Black Girl Brunch prioritizes conversations about popular culture and its
connections to politics, health and relationships in real life with two black girls leading the
conversation at the head of the table. — Idaresit Thompson
III
• ••
To submit music, podcasts, books, or film for review consideration to
Discorder Magazine, please email:
Jasper D. Wrinch, Section Editor
ur.discorder@citr.ca.
Send physical items of any kind to Discorder Under Review at
CiTR101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, v6t1z1
SUPER
SICK
PODCASTS
with Alicia Tobin and Kevin Lee
Super! Sick! ftobcast!
with Alicia Tobin and Kevin Lee
April  2018 - present
V
•ou stroll down the city street and various
strangers pass you by, each with their own
story and unique experience. Some have
stories of joy, some of hardships, sometimes
invisible to passersby
Super! Sick! Podcast! shines a spotlight on the
stories of those diagnosed with a chronic condition
at a young age. Despite changing its name — from Young and Sick to Super! Sick! Podcast!
due to copyright infringement — Vancouver comedians Alicia Tobin and Kevin Lee help
detail and destigmatize medical conditions and illness through storytelling and humour.
Each guest shares insight into navigating life with their diagnosis, from the day they
received the news from the doctor, to the everyday actions they take to mitigate symptoms
— like avoiding cold beverages or managing intrusive thoughts — and how their physical
diagnosis can often intersect with mental health. They also discuss the repercussions they
experienced, even to the extent of bullying as school-age children, which stemmed from
ignorance about their condition — sharing their trauma for listeners to hear while listeners
empathize with their experiences.
Inspired by their own medical struggles — Alicia grapples with an autoimmune disorder
and Kevin with a heart condition called atrial fibrillation — the hosts invite their guests
into a multipurpose "den / office, in a room that is about ten by 8," to have an in-depth
conversation about their condition. The podcast employs humour as a coping mechanism,
in a self deprecating and gritty way. To laugh through the everyday hardships they endure
is to change the narrative about illnesses from glum to comical. Alicia and Kevin succeed in
transforming what could easily be a depressing topic into one that can derive giggles. The
wordplay in the podcast's title is a perfect foreshadowing of the implementation of humour
to discuss often disheartening topics.
Dealing with a chronic illness is not always easy, but Alicia and Kevin succeed in adding
a positive spin on their guests' daily suffering — and their own! They start each podcast
with a check-in to discuss how they are doing in terms of their chronic illness. Due to the
host's ability to use a humorous lens to spotlight commonly unheard-of diseases by the
mainstream, Super! Sick! Podcast! allows listeners to gain an in-depth and empathetic
account of a stranger and their medical struggle. —Alexis Ola
UNDER REVIEW
December -January, 2019-20
 (smm n©fl
b<L
u
DISCORDER MAGAZINE  RECOMMENDS  LISTENING  TO  CiTR EVERY DAY!
it
gpotrtap
Cuetfrnp
&UIctmc6tiap
Cfmratmp
JFri&ap
£>aturt>ap
£>tmtiap
6AM
TRANCENDANCE
CiTR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
6AM
7AM
GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICON'
CiTR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CANADALAND
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
7AM
8AM
CONVICTIONS
& CONTRA
DICTIO'NS
WINTER
GHOST
MIX
CRACKDOWN
PACIFIC PICKIN':
8AM
9AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
THUNDERBIRD EYE
REBROADCAST
9AM
WINTER GHOST MIX
10 AM
WINTER GHOST MIX
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10 AM
11AM
CiTR CHARTS WITH
KAILA
U DO U RADIO
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM
12 PM
WINTER GHOST MIX
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
VIVAPORtJ: THE
OINTMENT FOR THE
SOUL
THE ROCKERS SHOW
12 PM
1PM
WINTER GHOST MIX
LA BONNE NUIT w.
VALIE
fine.
TOO DREAMY
1PM
2 PM
FLOWER POWER HOUR
DIALECTIC
ASTROTALK
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
2 PM
3 PM
WINTER GHOST MIX
WINTER GHOST MIX
ALL ACCESS PASS
WINTER GHOST MIX
BLOOD
FLASHBACK
WITH ALEC
CHRISTESEN
3 PM
4 PM
SHOES ON A WIRE
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
C-PQP CONNECTION
FEELING SOUNDS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
CODE BLUE
SADDLE
4 PM
5 PM
DELIBERATE NOISE
INTO THE WOODS
ARTS REPORT
DEMOCRACY WATCH
WORD ON THE STREET
MANTRA
LA FIESTA
5 PM
6 PM
WINTER GHOST MIX
THE
SPENCER
LATU SHOW
UNCEDED
AIRWAVES
HEAVY
CONTENT
RADIO    FRIDAY
PIZZA    NIGHT
PARTY    FEVER
NASHA VOLNA
6 PM
7 PM
EXPLODING HEAD
FLEX YOUR HEAD
MEDICINE
SHOW
SAMSQUANCH'S
HIDE-AWAY
WINTER GHOST MIX
WINTER GHOST MIX
7 PM
8 PM
MOVIES
WINTER GHOST MIX
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
CANADA POST ROCK
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
NINTH WAVE
LIVE FROM
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
HELL
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
WINTER GHOST MIX
WINTER GHOST MIX
WINTER GHOST MIX
THE AFTN SOCCER
11PM
12AM
RANDGPHGNIC
SHOW
12 AM
1AM
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
CiTR GHOST MIX
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
1AM
2AM
OF INSOMNIA
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
□
<-hey, this kind of cell means this show is hosted by students
They are also highlighted in this colour on the guide,
you can't miss it.
 TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM, ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
• program ming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH
THE BROWNS
8AM-11AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiarand exotic in a
blend of aural delights
• brea Jcfast with thebro wns @h otm a i\. co m
• CITR CHARTS WITH KAILA
11AM-12PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Playing tracks from
CiTR's weekly charts!
Tune in to find out what
we're pumped on.
• program ming@citr.ca
PARTS UNKNOWN
IPM-3PM, ROCK /POP/IN DIE
Host Chrissariffic takes you
on an indie pop journey
not unlike a marshmallow
sandwich: soft and sweet
and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and
held close to a fire.
• program ming@citr.ca
SHOES ON A WIRE
4PM-5PM, ROCK /POP/IN DIE
Music + Stories, by and
for Women + Queers.
• tnsta: @shoesonawirepod
• Twitter: @Shoesonawire
• DELIBERATE NOISE
2PM-3PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Love rocking out to live
music, but don't feel
like paying cover? Tune
in for the latest and
greatest punk, garage rock,
local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
• program ming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8pm, experimental
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television,
along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge
new tracks, and strange
goodies for soundtracks
to be. All in the name
of ironclad whimsy.
• program ming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On airsince 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker
takes listeners from the
past to the future of jazz.
With featured albums
and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
• program ming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time
music and its derivatives
with Arthur and the
lovely Andrea Berman.
• pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEERFM
8AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the
LGBTQ+ communities
of Vancouver, Queer FM
features music, current
events, human interest
stories and interviews.
• queerfmvancouver@gmaiI.com
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera
plays your favourite
eclectic mix of Ska, reggae,
shoegaze, indie pop, noise,
with live music, local
talent and music you won't
hear anywhere else. The
morning after what? What-
everyou did last night.
• Twitter: @sonicvortex
• FLOWER POWER HOUR
2PM-3PM, MUSIC
The Flower Power
Hour, hosted by Aaron
Schmidtke, is designed to
give a platform for artists
that are underrepresented,
underappreciated or even
underplayed. While the
primary focus of the Flower
Power Hour is to play quality music to ease listeners
into their afternoons, it
is also to educate them
on these artists played.
• program ming@citr.ca
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/POP
a show with music
about being uncool
• program ming@citr.ca
• INTO THE WOODS
TUES gPM-6PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Lace up your hiking boots
and get ready to join Mel
Woods as she explores
music by female and
LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree?
Nope, just another great
track you won't hear
anywhere else. We provide
the music mix, but don't
forget your own trail mix!
• program ming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and
hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from
around the world.
• program ming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
8PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop
& Trill Sh*t. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Home boy
Jules, Relly Rels, Malik,
horsepowar & Issa.
• dj@crimesandtreasons.com
• www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED:
CAN/AUS MUSIC SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds past and present,
from his Australian homeland. Journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
• program ming@citr.ca
SUBURBANJUNGLE
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information and insanity.
• dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths
of contemporary and
cassette vinyl underground.
Ranging from DIY bedroom
pop and garage rock all
the way to harsh noise,
and of course, drone.
• program ming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music foryour ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future. Genre need not apply.
• program ming@citr.ca
• LA BONNE NUIT
WITH VALIE
1PM-2PM	
A new show on the air?!
From mellow and indie, to
more experimental, join
'La Bonne Heure' for a
little bit of it all- both in
English and en Francais!
With some interviews on
the horizon and many
good times too... soyez
surde nous rejoindre!
• program ming@citr.ca
• DIALECTIC
2PM-3PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Defined as "The way in
which two different forces
orfactors work together",
Dialectic brings the distinct
music tastes of hosts
Chase and Dan together.
Each episode showcases a
variety of indie rock and
beyond, bound together by
the week's unique theme.
• program ming@citr.ca
• ALL ACCESS PASS
We talk about equity,
inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse
abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every
second Wednesday from
3-4pm for interviews,
music, news, events, and
awesome dialogue.
• Twitter: @access_citr
• C-POP CONNECTION
4PM-5PM, C-POP /INTERNATIONAL^	
C-POP Connection brings
you some of the most
popularsongs in the
Chinese music industry!
The show also talks about
Chinese culture to connect
you to the Chinese society.
Tune in with your host DJ
Sab to get updated on the
hottest singles, album,
and news in C-POP!
• cpopconnection@citr.ca
• ARTS REPORT
SPM-6PM, TALK/ARTS &
CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR
brings you the latest and
upcoming in local arts in
Vancouver from a volunteer
run team that likes to get
weird! Based primarily in
Vancouver, BC, your show
hosts (Ashley and Jake)
are on the airwaves.
• arts@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
ALTERNATING WED 6:PM-8PM,
ECLECTIC/LIVE INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing
Energy with LIVE Music
and laughter! A variety
show, featuring LIVE music,
industry guests and insight.
The material presented
is therapeutic relief from
our difficult world. We
encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
• vancouvermedicineshow@gmail.com
• THE SPENCER LATU SHOW
6pm-6:3dpm, talk/ political
c ommenta ry	
The Spencer Latu Show is
a progressive politics show
that speaks truth to power.
We provide much needed
coverage, and media
criticism of stories at the
municipal, provincial,
national and international
level from the perspective
of two progressive working
class students; Spencer
Latu and Ajeetpal Gill.
We are based out of
UBC in Vancouver BC.
• program ming@citr.ca
SAMSOUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM,
ROCK/POP/INDIE
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins,
every Wednesday.
• program ming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-IOPM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and
the snow capped rocky
mountains, A-Ro The Naut
explores the relationships
of classic and contemporary stylings through jazz,
funk and hip hop lenses.
• Facebook: Ninth Wave Radio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
IOPM-IIPM, TALK
Listen to your favorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
• program ming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD
LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird
Locker Room gives you a
backroom perspective on
varsity athletes, coaches
and staff here at UBC.
• program ming@citr.ca
TUURSMjJ
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces
you to topics through his
unique lens. From news,
to pop culture and sports,
Issa has the goods.
• program ming@citr.ca
• CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
8AM-9AM, TALK/COMEDY/SOCIAL
OBESERVATIONS
Convictions and
Contradictions is about
our own convictions and
contradictions about
society, shown through
social observational
comedy. To boot, a comedy
of human psychology and
instrumental music.
• program mingcitr.ca
• THUNDERBIRD EYE
9AM - 9:30AM, SPORTS / TALK
CiTR Sports interviews
UBC's premiere athletes,
discovers the off-field
stories of the Thunderbirds,
and provides your weekly
roundup of UBC sports
action with hosts who
are a little too passionate
about the T-birds.
• program mingcitr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
IOAM-IIAM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I
interview bands and
play new, international,
and local punk rock
music. Broadcasted by
Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
• rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com
• rocketfromrussiacitr@gmait.com
• @tima_tzar
• Facebook: Rocket From Russia
• U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM, ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from
across the decades. Acid,
Afro-beat, Lo-Fi, Ambient
and plenty of classic
house. Let Galen do his
thing so u can do urs.
• program ming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Sweet treats from the
pop underground.
Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts.
• duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
FINE.
1PM-2PM, TALK/THEATRE
A previously recorded
evening of storytelling
and otherwise.
Each show features a real
nice mix of Canada's best
emerging and established
writers, comedians, musicians, artists and more.
It's fun, yeah. It's
a fine time.
Hosted by Cole Nowicki,
recorded by Matt Krysko.
• Twitter:n @afineshow
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, TALK/SCIENCE
Space is an interesting
place. Marco slices up the
night sky with a new topic
every week. Death Starts,
Black Holes, Big Bang,
Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
• program ming@citr.ca
• FEELING SOUNDS
4PM-5PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
All about indie music and
its many emotions. I'm always looking for local and
student artists to feature!
• program ming.executive@citr.ca
• DEMOCRACYWATCH
SPM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CUR-
RE NTAFFAIRS	
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
• news101@citr.ca
• UNCEDED AIRWAVES
ALTERNATING WED 6PM-7PM,
TALK/INDIGENOUS STORIES/
MUSIC	
Unceded Airwaves is
produced by CiTR's
Indigenous Collective.
We centre Indigenous
voices with narratives
that empower Indigenous
people and their stories.
We recognize that media
has often been used as
a tool to subordinate or
appropriate Indigenous
voices and we are
committed to subverting
these dynamics. The team
is comprised of both Indigenous and non-Indigenous
people who are passionate
about story-telling,
alternative media and
Indigenous affairs.
• Twitter: @uncededairw awes
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
8PM-9PM, R&B/SOUL/JAZZ/
INTERNATIONAL
Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and
future. This includes jazz,
soul, hip-hop, Afro-Latin,
funk, and eclectic Brazilian
rhythms. There are also
interviews with local
and international artists.
Truly, a radio show with
international flavor.
• program ming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s)
every week performing in
the comfort of the CiTR
lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the
country and around the
world are nice enough
to drop by to say hi.
• program ming@citr.ca
TRlMjJ
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance,
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
• auraJtentacJes@hotmaiJ.com
CANADALAND
(SYNDICATED)
87AM-8AM, TALK/POLITICS
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on
media criticism as well
as news, politics and
investigative reporting.
Their website also has
text essays and articles.
• jesse@canadalancIshow.com
CRACKDOWN
8AM-9AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
The drug war, covered
by drug users as war
correspondents. Crackdown
is a monthly podcast about
drugs, drug policy and the
drug warled by drug user
activists and supported
by research. CiTR is airing
all episodes weekly until
early November 2019.
• @crackdownpod
• THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, FILM/COMMENTARY
The Reel Whirled is an
hour long adventure
Lthrough the world of film
focused around the UBC
Film Society's scheduled
programming where we
connect with campus
organizations and local
cinematic events to talk
about films and stuff.
• program ming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
• daveradiopodcast@gmaiI.com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP / SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on
each other and leave mix
tapes and love letters in
each other's lockers xo
• Facebook: @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, EXPERIMENTAL /
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF RADIO
ART in a snack size format!
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
• Twitter: @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour
and a half of Manhattan
Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola
doot doo... doot doo!
■  nardwuar.com/rad/contact/
• WORD ON THE STREET
SPM-6PM, ROCK/INDIE/POP
Hosted by the Music
Affairs Collective, every
episode is packed with
up-to-date content from
the Lower Mainland music
communities including
news, new music releases,
event reviews and upcoming events, interviews
with local musicians and
industry professionals
and discussions over
relevant topics.
• program ming@citr.ca
• RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7:30PM, TALK/COMEDY
Every week Jack, Tristan
and a special guest
randomly select a conversation topic for the entire
show; ranging from God to
unfortunate roommates.
Woven throughout
the conversation is a
cacophony of segments
and games foryour
listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
• program ming@citr.ca
• FRIDAY NIGHT FEVER
6PM - 7:30PM, DISCO/R.&B
Friday Night Fever- an
exploration into the disco
nation B-) Every alternating
Friday, join Sophie and
Max on a journey of disco,
funk, and RnBon CiTR
101.9. Night-time is just
around the corner, so get
ready to head out with
some groovy tunes.
• program ming@citr.ca
CANADA POST ROCK
7:30PM-9PM, ROCK/POP/IN DIE
Formerly on CKXU,
Canada Post Rock remains
committed to the best in
post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and
basically anything your
host Pbone can put the
word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
• program ming@citr.ca
• Twitter: @pbone
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-IOPM, TALK/RADIO DRAMA
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through
the art of Radio Drama.
Story readings, poetry
recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host
Brian MacDonald. Have
an interest in performing?
Guest artists are always
welcome, contact us!
. Twitter: @Skatds_Hatl
SaTURMjJ
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30AM-6am, electronic/
AMBIENT
The Late Night Show
features music from the
underground Jungle and
Drum and Bass scene,
Industrial, Noise,
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
• citrIatenightshow@gmaiI.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31st year on CiTR,
The Saturday Edge is my
personal guide to world &
roots music, with African,
Latin and European music
in the first half, followed by
Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
• steveedge3@mac.com
• VIVAPORU: THE OINTMENT
FORTHE SOUL
"Similar to vicks-vapo-rub,
the magical ointment
that seems to cure it all,
we bring you cultural
medicine to nourish
your soul Latinx style".
• vivaporu.citr@gmaiI.com
POWER CHORD
IPM-3PM, LOUD/METAL
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darkerside of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided
by Coleman, Serena,
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
• program ming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and
blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
• codeb(ue@pau(norton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, ELECTRONIC/MANTRA/
NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the
many faces of sacred sound
- traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic
array of electronic and
acoustic beats, music,
chants and poetry from
the diverse peoples and
places of planet earth.
• mantraradioshow@gmaiI.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, TALK/RUSSIAN
Informative and entertaining program in Russian.
• nashavo(na@shaw.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
Every show is full of
electro bleeps, retrowave,
computer generated,
synthetically manipulated
aural rhythms. If you like
everything from electro
/ techno / trance / 8bit
music/ and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
• Contact: program ming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no
concept of genre, style,
political boundaries or
even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our
focus on a series, The
Solid Time of Change, 661
Greatest Records of the
Prog. Rock Era -1965-79.
We're not afraid of noise.
• Contact: program ming@citr.ca
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
OF INSOMNIA
IAM-3AM, EXPERIMENTAL/
GENERATIVE
4 solid hours of fresh
generative music c/o the
Absolute Value of Noise and
its world famous Generator.
Ideal for enhancing your
dreams or, if sleep is not on
your agenda, your reveries.
• program ming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN':
REBROADCAST
8AM-10AM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUE-
GRASS
Pacific Pickin', originally
aired on Tuesday mornings,
brings you the best in
bluegrass plus its roots and
branches: old time, classic
country, rockabilly, western
swing and whatever
jumps off the shelves at
us. Most shows have an
artist feature and a gospel
set. Hear the historical
recordings and the latest
releases right here.
• pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM, INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
• program ming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time.
Playing the best in roots
rock reggae, Dub, Ska,
Dancehall with news
views & interviews.
• program ming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-
in-yer-boots country.
• program ming@citr.ca
• FLASHBACK WITH
ALEC CHRISTESEN
3PM-5PM, MUSIC/ARTS/CULTURE
Each episode, join host Alec
Christensen and friends as
they discuss the pop culture and politics affecting
Vancouver and beyond.
• program ming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL/LATIN
AMERICAN
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
• program ming@citr.ca
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, INTERNATIONAL/BHA-
JANS/OAWWALIS/SUFI
Presenting several genres
of rich Indian music in
different languages, poetry
and guest interviews.
Dance, Folk, Qawwalis,
Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also,
semi-classical and classical
Carnatic & Hindustani
music and old Bollywood
numbers from the 1950s
to 1990s and beyond.
• rhythmsindia8@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, ELECTRONIC/DEEP
HOUSE
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house,
prog-house and techno +
DJ / Producer interviews
and guest mixes.
• program ming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, ELECTRONIC/TRANCE
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from
Vancouver, BC since 2001.
We favour Psytrance, Hard
Trance and Epic Trance,
but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, Hard Dance
and even some Breakbeat.
We also love a good
Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
•  dj5mileymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer
discussion show is centered
around VancouverWhite-
caps, MLS and the world of
football. Est. in 2013, the
show features roundtable
chat about the week's big
talking points, interviews
with the headline makers,
a humorous take on the
latest happenings and
even some soccer-related
music. If you're a fan
of the beautiful game,
this is a must-listen.
• program ming@citr.ca
lslaub°f
tostTous
• STUDENT PROGRAMMING
ECLECTIC	
Marks any show that
is produced primarily
by students.
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease
you from the moonlight.
Moon Grok pops up early
morning when you least
expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOSTMLX
ANYTHING/EVERYTHING
Late night, the on air
studio is empty. Spirits
move from our playlist
to your ear holes. We
hope they're kind, but we
make no guarantees.
• 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC	
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive
time block is for BRAND
NEW programmers who
want to find their feet,
practice their chops, and
rep CiTR's playlist. Get at
us if you want this airtime
• @CiTRRadio
• program ming@citr.ca
 immm
FRIEN&
QfCTTRft
> 3r
I
DEVIL MAY WEAR
198E21STAVE
* 10% off
EAST VAN GRAPHICS
304 INDUSTRIAL AVE
* logoff
LUCKY'S BOOKS
& COMICS
3972 MAIN ST
10% off books and comics
RED CAT RECORDS
4332 MAIN ST
* 10% off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
3934 MAIN ST
A free DIY button with any
purchase over $5.
COMM
AUDIOPILE RECORDS
* 10% off
SPARTACUS BOOKS
3378FINDLAYST
* 10% off
STORMCROW TAVERN
1305 COMMERCIAL DR
* 10% off food
RUFUS GUITAR
& DRUM SHOP
1803 COMMERCIAL DR
* 10% off strings and
accessories
THE CINEMATHEQUE
1131 HOWE ST
* 1 small bag of popcorn
per person per evening
DEVIL MAY WEAR
1666 JOHNSON ST UNIT #110
* 10% off
FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
147 E PENDER ST
Free Cover to Midnight Mondays & Happy
Ending Fridays (before 10:30 pm)
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
& ART EMPORIUM
1238 DAVIE ST
* 10% off
MONIKER PRESS
268 KEEFER ST #080
* 10% off
RED CAT RECORDS
2447 E HASTINGS ST
* 10% off
SAVE ON MEATS
43 W HASTINGS ST
* 10% off food
THE PINT PUBLIC HOUSE
455 ABBOTT ST
* 20% off food bill
VINYL RECORDS
321W HASTINGS ST
' 10% off new and used
THE AUSTRALIAN
BOOT COMPANY
1968 W4TH AVE
15% off Blundstone CSA boots
THE BIKE KITCHEN
6138 STUDENT UNION BLVD, ROOM 36
* 10% off new parts and accessories
KOERNER'S PUB
6371 CRESCENT ROAD
* 10% off
RUFUS GUITAR
& DRUM SHOP
2621 ALMA STREET
10% off strings and accessories
STORMCROW ALEHOUSE
1619 W BROADWAY
* 10% off food
TAPESTRY MUSIC
4440 W10TH AVE
10% off in-stock music books
VIRTUOUS PIE
(UBC only)
3339 SHRUM LANE
* 10% off
BOOK WAREHOUSE (Broadway)
632 W BROADWAY
* 15% off
EAST VANITY PARLOUR
2482 E HASTINGS ST
* 10% off
HOOKED ON PHONO (Burnaby)
4251 HASTINGS ST
* 10% off
Members of CiTR and Discorder
get sweet deals with these sweeti
Just show 'em your membership!
For more information about our friends
program please visit:
C/tr. ca /friends
 Allah-Las
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
December  8
ALLAH-LAS
Commodore Ballroom
December 13
MAGIC SWORD / DANCE WITH THE DEAD
Venue
£
December 13 - #WINTERBREAKOUT19
SCHOOLBOY Q, DABABY, RODDY RICCH, LIL TECCA, POLO G & MORE!
Pacific Coliseum
December 13
LEE FIELDS & THE EXPRESSIONS
Rio Theatre
December 14
EZRA COLLECTIVE
Fox Cabaret
December 14 &  15
ALEX CAMERON
Venue
January 12
THEO KATZMAN
Venue
January  17
YBN CORDAE
Fortune Sound Club
January 18
CHADWICK STOKES & THE PINTOS
Fox  Cabaret
January  19
COLD WAR KIDS
Commodore Ballroom
January 20
...AND YOU WILL KNOW US BY THE TRAIL OF DEAD
Fox  Cabaret
£
January  23
COM TRUISE (DJ SET)
Fortune Sound Club
January 25
GREYSON CHANCE
Fortune Sound Club
February 7 & 8
THE BLACK HALOS
Rickshaw Theatre
January 24
NIGHTSEEKER
Wise  Hall
January 24
XAVIER OMAR
Fortune Sound Club
January 29
GIRLFRIEND MATERIAL
Fox Cabaret
February 4
TEMPLES
Fox Cabaret
February 9
C.W. STONEKING (SOLO)
Wise Hall
February 13
LUNA PERFORMING PENTHOUSE
Venue
February  6
MATTIEL
Fox Cabaret
February  13
MAGIC CITY HIPPIES
Fortune Sound Club
February  14
THE FROGS
Rickshaw Theatre
February 14
ILLITERATE LIGHT
Wise Hall
Follow Qtlmbreconcerts  for chances   to win   tickets!

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0388726/manifest

Comment

Related Items