Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Oct 1, 2019

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0385844.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0385844.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0385844-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0385844-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0385844-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0385844-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0385844-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0385844-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0385844-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0385844.ris

Full Text

 Oct-Nov
2019
"THAT RESILIENT MAGAZINE FROM CiTR 707.9 FM"
WLtiL 7,6    jjiO, 07    ItliUt, 412
JLocai + JFree
 twacsttAW
CTOBER & NOVEMBER SHOW HIGHLIGHTS
OCT
OCT
OCT
OCT
OCT
OCT
OCT
OCT
BLACK JOE LEWIS & THE
HONEYBEARS TRAILERHAWK
LUCERO
VANDOLIERS
AT PAT'S PUB:
THE ATOM AGE uptights
SONGHOY BLUES
BRASS CAMEL
IMMOLATION
BLOOD INCANTATION, AUROCH
BLACK PUMAS
NEAL FRANCIS
APE SHIFTER bort,
CHUNKASAURUS&MORE
CHAMELEONSVOX theatre
I OF HATE, JAY ASTON & MORE
OCT
TEENAGE BOTTLEROCKET
'jtt ISOTOPES, MODERN TERROR
OCT
THEADICTS
I & GUESTS
OCT
KERO KERO BONITO
'XT! NEGATIVE GEMINI
OCT
JINJER THE BROWNING,
I SUMOCYCO,KOSM
NOV
STRUNG OUT
THE CASUALTIES
NOV
LEMON BUCKET ORKESTRA
& GUESTS
NOV
AT PAT'S PUB: GUTTER
DEMONS & guests
NOV
SWMRS
& GUESTS
NOV
SEAWAY
YOUTH FOUNTAIN, FIRST GHOST
5
NOV
NOVALIMA
LOS DUENDES
NOV
DUNE RATS
& GUESTS
Mil
Wm J
NOV
YEMEN BLUES - HALLEL
& GUESTS
W» M
NOV
AVEVA
& GUESTS
l)
NOV
AT PATS PUB: JD PINKUS &
EDDIE SPAGHETTI
El
NOV
ATLANALOU'S:
K-MANANDTHE45S
i H
NOV
ALESTORM
AEPHANEMER
[jj
NOV
AT PAT'S PUB: DANYLAi
AND THE LOOKS & guests
[•J
NOV
IN FLAMES
& GUESTS
17
NOV
DEATH ANGEL
EXMORTUS,HELLFIRE
U
NOV
THANK YOU SCIENTIST
BENT KNEE, THE TEA CLUB
wVl
NOV
PROZZAK - NEVER GET
OVER YOU FAREWELL TOUR
WA\
NOV
JENNY AND THE MEXICATS
MARIA BLUES, CAWAMA
22
NOV
DESERT DWELLERS
ATTYA
23
NOV
SHE PAST AWAY
WIRE SPINE, DJSHARLESE
Fit]
MORE OCTOBER & NOVEMBER SHOWS
PLUS TICKETS, BAND INFO, VIDEOS & MORE
ii]:ni;U;)i;iiH;<si!!;V/iiii?;ii;ii
254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
blueprint
UPCOMING EVENTS
Oct 08
Oct 11
Oct 18
Oct 19
Oct 27
Nov 03
Nov 04
Nov 04
Nov 06
Nov 14
Nov 16
Nov 16
STARCRAWLER
FORTUNE
Oct 10
MARIBOU STATE
(DJ SET)
CELEBRITIES
INJURY RESERVE
(ALL AGES)
FORTUNE
KEY!
FORTUNE
JAKOB OGAWA
VENUE
Oct 25
GUERILLA TOSS
FORTUNE
CRACK CLOUD
FORTUNE
Oct 28
CAT POWER
COMMODORE
LIL TJAY
(ALL AGES)
VENUE
BERNER
(TAYLOR GANG)
CELEBRITIES
PETER HOOK
& THE LIGHT
SHAED
VENUE
FOX CABARET
Nov 08
BRYCE VINE
VENUE
SNOTTY NOSE REZ KIDS
& THE SORORITY
VENUE
Nov 16
DEVON WELSH
I
PARADISE
JACK HARLOW
FORTUNE
EARTHGANG
VENUE
PLEASE CHECK OUT BPLIVE.CA
FOR ADVANCE TICKETS AND MUCH MORE
 TABLE of CONTENTS
OCT-NOV2019
COVER: PHOTO OF DJ  PAISLEY  EVA  BY  R.   HESTER.
Editors'
Note
FEATURES
06 • 12TH ANNUAL OPPENHEIMER PARK ART SHOW
An excercise in meaningful exchange
08   DJ PAISLEY EVA
Gatecrashing Gatekeepers
10   HOPE
The  making  of  Red Man
12   NUZI COLLECTIVE
Protecting the spaces they fought for
14 • TREVOR McEACHRAN
illustrating the Journey from Chilhood to Recovery
20   LACIE BURNING
A  legacy  of  resistance
REGULARS, ETC.
05-FILMSTRIPPED
THE FOUNDATION:
Indigenous Hip Hop In Canada
15 • "The Reluctant Cowboy"
Guest Art Project
by Trevor McEachran
16 * "Two-Headed Dragon"
Contributor Art Project
by Max Babiuk
17 • OCTOBER 2019 CALENDAR
18 • NOVEMBER 2019 CALENDAR
23'REAL LIVE ACTION
Music   and Activism
26'UNDER REVIEW
Music,   Podcast,   Books
29'CiTR PROGRAM GRID
30 • CiTR PROGRAM GUIDE
31* Top 50 Charts
ADVERTISE: Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca.
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To learn how
to get involved with Discorder
contact volunteer@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque
for $20 to LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute
Discorder in your business,
email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR,
a registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you
love. To donate visit:
citr.ca/donate.
Ill
• ••
To inform Discorder of an
upcoming album release,
art show or significant
happening, please email
all relevant details 4-6
weeks in advance to
Chandra Melting Tallow,
Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
comments, complaints
and corrections via email.
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising
Coordinator: Alex Henderson // Discorder Student Executive: Dan Miller // Editor-in-Chief: Chandra
Melting Tallow // Sections Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo Laredo // Social
Media Coordinators: Alex De Boer, Dora Dubber // Administration Coordinator: Jessica Hood //
Charts: Jasper Sloan Yip // Production Assistants: Enya Ho, James Spetifore //Writers: Anton Astudillo,
Sarah Bakke, Milena Carrasco, Daniel Chen, Arjun Doraiswami, Mildred German, Tate Kaufman, Lucas
Lund, Tasha Hefford, Gabby O'Hara, Milena Markovich, Chandra Melting Tallow, Jordan Natarer, Kianna
Pizans, Aaron Schmitdke, Fraces Shroff, Sam Tudor, Tom Whalen, Afrodykie Zoe // Photographers &
Illustrators: Bryce Aspinall, Max Babiuk, Duncan Cairns-Brenner, Neetu Dha, Alistair Henning, R. Hester,
Tate Kaufman, Bre McDaniel, Trevor McEachran, Hayley Schmidt, James Spetifore, Tatiana Yakovleva
Proofreaders: Ana Rose Carrico, Ricky Castanedo Laredo, Neetu Dha, Dora Dubber, Jordan Naterer,
Maya Pershyon, James Spetifore, Phoebe Telfar, Jasper D. Wrinch.
©Discorder 2019 - 2020 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by
CiTR, located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemirierh speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9
FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at starjonmanager©citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada
*■ ^^ am incredibly proud and honored to share this issue with all of you. It's my
y ^L third and last issue, and it encapsulates what has been amazing about doing this
H I work. Having the opportunity to provide a platform is a huge honor, while also
^^L very intimidating, and not something I've taken lightly. As a musician and artist
^^^ myself, I've always felt much more enthusiastic promoting and highlighting the
work of others rather than my own, and being able to do this has given me a great deal
of joy. I feel like this was an opportunity to think critically about normalised journalistic
practices, and also the ways I would have preferred to be approached by media — how I
could create that experience for those being featured. Which is not to say that I achieved
this necessarily, but it was an objective I worked towards. Unfortunately, I will not be
able to see that through, but I hope the trajectory that began with former editor Brit
Bachmann continues. I struggled a great deal during this brief time to do this work, as
it coincided in the aftermath of leaving a deeply traumatising relationship, with ongoing
antagonism, that led me to decide it is in my best interest to leave for my safety and
well-being. I feel a responsibility to share this because I know for a fact that I'm not
alone, and it was through others brave enough to talk about their experiences that helped
me to survive. Omitting this would be an act of erasure to myself, and a widespread
societal problem. I also believe that in spite of the advances in conversations around
protecting and believing survivors, it feels like we are only at the precipice of the changes
that need to take place. Music communities, arts and culture spaces everywhere have
often been ground zero for these issues.
Through this lens I am constantly reminded of the ways in which society mirrors the
power relations present in harmful intimate partnerships. We live in a time where there
is direct social, financial, and academic capital from affiliating with issues of oppression
— issues that are often a matter of life or death for marginalised people. When we are
surrounded by those more concerned with reputation and affiliation, as opposed to the
wellness of the most vulnerable people in our society, there is a very serious problem.
In these pages I found a great deal of hope. The individuals being featured are a
testament to carving out space and protecting each other. Forging a path through the
wilderness, in the hopes that those who follow, will one day emerge unscathed.
Kitatama'sino,
Chandra Melting Tallow
#ir
Bn^»^
MUSI
FM
MENT
ifriffffiri
MR<m®mw
 NOV 7-10
ll
CN
DIRTY JOHN
SECRET LIFE OF CANADA
THEALLUSIONIST
RED MAN LAUGHING
THUNDER BAY
DARKPOUTINE
HiM,
LIVE SHOWS o MASTERCLASSES
PANELS o MEETUPS     POD FAIR
vanpodfest.ca
* [o-]
#vanpodfest
VANCOUVER l^gDCAST FESTIVAL
by DOXA
 glOS   VOH\T0O      snisBgBMtsbtooaia
FILMSTRIPPED
THE  FOUNDATION:
INDIGENOUS  HIP-HOP   IN   CANADA
words by Mildred German
Illustrations by Tatiana Yakovleva
«iana Hellson, aka Mamarudegyal
MTHC, of Rudegang Entertainment
strengthens her Community Voice
to make changes against injustices, as she
takes inspiration from diversity as a BIPOC
woman artist in today's world. With her
work representing many demographics.
Hailing from Siksika Nation, growing up in
Calgary, Alberta, music started with Hellson
when she was given a rare opportunity to
be in a recording studio as early as the age
of 13 years old. Now as a young mother,
Hellson is not only busy with Rudegang
Entertainment, the producer of multiple music
videos under her belt, she is also the Project
Lead of the documentary The Foundation:
Indigneous Hipbop in Canada which debuted
on September 23, 2019.
A 10-minute documentary, The Foundation:
Indigineous Hiphop in Canada, is a project
funded through the Telus Story Hive. Hellson
applied for the Indigenous Storytellers
Funding Series in 2018 and received $20K
to make this documentary. Hellson applied
with hopes to bring to light Indigenous music
which has been the core value of Rudegang
Entertainment since its beginning. At the time,
she was in the middle of filming Hope's music
video for Red Man.
ocusing on the earlier years of Native
hip hop, the documentary explores the
First Wave of Indigenous hip hop storytellers. Featuring the early vanguards of the
1970s from Melle Mel, Ernie Litefoot—to 90's
War Party, Eekwol, and Kinnie Star — to the
present artists such as Snotty Rez Kids. Faced
with social problems of their communities,
hip hop music has been a life and home to
many djs, dancers, grafitti artists, emcees,
youth and adults alike. With the impacts
brought by colonial trauma, this medium
provided the empowerment of showcasing
Indigenous strength, and an uprising against
a history of attempted assimilation. Now
in the present time, Indigenous hip hop has
undeniably made its mark. The documentary
has brought forth an array of opinions from
Indigenous artists defining what Indigenous
hip hop is. It is evident that the power of hip
hop creates a space for modern storytellers.
Hellson, one of the founders of Rudegang
Entertainment, is a pioneer as a BIPOC
woman representing and speaking her Truth.
The opportunity she had in her early teens
was only the beginning of her journey. Since
then, she has been exposed to many expressions through dance as KRUMP, Dancer of
Empirical Freedom Dance Crew. She also
taught beginners hip hop at her local YMCA
youth drop-in. In 2016 she released her
debut EP as Mamarudegyal "MRP EP." Her
excellency in music was highlighted when
she took home two Fraser Valley Awards in
2017 in the category Best Hip Hop - Female
Excellence in Music. Truly building a name
and reputation in the hip hop music scene
has made Mamarudegyal MTHC an unforgettable hip hop artist. Her venture into
filmmaking is only the beginning.
r ith high hopes that Rudegang
Entertainment will expand The
Foundation: Indigineous Hiphop
into a docu-series, Hellson hopes to continue
the project with a more deep-dive look at
Indigenous communities, culture, roots
and the intersection between Indigenous
culture and hip hop culture. Currently The
Foundation was officially selected to be
screened at the 44th annual American Indian
Film Festival in San Francisco in November
this year. Congratulations Mamarudegyal
MTHC and Rudegang Entertainment!
The Cinematheque
It's in the Trees!
It's Coming!
British Folk Horror!-
|October25,26,31
The Wicker Man v
Night of the Demon a
Kill List v
Folk Horror Freak-Out! Thursday, October 31
7:00 pm-Doors
8:00 pm - What Lab performance
8:30pm-K///L/sf
Tickets: $20 in advance; $25 at the door
m\\
1131 Howe Street, Vancou
thecinematheque.ca   -
i
"'A\As
ver
Kr        A
in   hi
bea role model
friend advocate
burger expert
mentor
Our volunteer
mentors help
youth recognize
their many
strengths and
work towards
their goals.
To learn how you can become a mentor, visit:
unya.bc.ca/mentorship
Urban Native Youth
Association
FILMSTRIPPED
Indigenous Hip-Hop In Canada
5
 Discorder Magazine      OCT1/NOV   2019
was greeted by a sculpture of a miniature baby man with a fashionable
baby pink headband and what looks (to me) like a lucha libre body.
I smiled back.
According to the bio, the artist, Mike McNeely: "...makes clay sculptures
and has been practicing as an artist for all of his life. In order to survive
as a youngster, it was vital that he tried his best to observe the expression
in people's faces, which he then started to draw & sculpt. He believes that
memories can be manipulated, molded, fired and glazed. Mike would like us
all to be aware of what we are molding, before we put it in the fire."
words by
Milena Carrasco
illustrations by
Bryce Aspinall
photos courtesy of
Gallery Gachet and
Milena Carrasco
IJ visited the 12th Annual Oppenheimer
1W Park Art Show at Gallery Gachet, on the
^r corner of West Hastings and Carrall. This
year's themes were centered around virtual
reality, the art of the natural world, changes,
attraction, and the rules of engagement, all of
which were topics chosen by the community.
The pieces range from nameless sketched
portraits, to hundreds of popsicle sticks that
are painted to create images when put beside
one another. Bright greens, dark blues and soft
pinks bounce off the walls. All of the art pieces
come from community members local to the
Downtown Eastside.
I spoke with Amal Rana & Erv Newcombe,
who are the Artists in Residence at the Carnegie
Community Centre as part of the Vancouver
Park Board's "Artists in Communities"
program, who helped with the Opening Day
Parade of the show on September 13th.
Rana & Newcombe's role within the Carnegie
Community Centre, is to sustain a space of
creative release, and explore art in ways others
might not have because of access to resources.
Newcombe: Our role there was primarily
to fit in, augment and support that. We
are looking to activate the spaces and
support communities. Personally, a big
drive is to primarily engage with people
who are creative but have been convinced
otherwise and find ways for them to
make art.
Rana: When we were first selected we
made it clear that we are not from the
community and our primary role has been
to learn, listen and then facilitate kinds
of art making based on what they want.
Because of our background in street art,
we helped out with the Opening Parade
with the Oppenheimer Art Show, that this
year started at the Carnegie Centre and
ended at Gallery Gachet. We created art
banners with the community and a key
piece of the parade was to welcome and
share multiple mother tongues, greetings
& words to honour multiple Indigenous
languages and so many other languages
people speak in the Downtown Eastside.
Discorder: What were some of the sayings on
the Banners?
R: Greetings in various languages,
Hello, Salam; Bengali, Cree, Blackfoot,
Chocktaw and more. Whatever people
wanted to put. The idea was that there
are other ways to make relationships and
connections that might not start with
'Hello'.
N: Doing it on the streets was a highlight
in my residency, the energy in front of
Carnegie -- seeing people walking past
and then joining in because it looked fun,
lovely and inviting.
R: Making the banners lightweight and
accessible was important to us because of
our experience with resistance art and the
feedback we've gotten from past marches,
so we used bamboo poles. People stuck
them to wheelchairs and scooters. People
with mobility and access needs as well as
elders marched with us. It was beautiful
to see the accessibility.
They explained how the energy
on opening day was vibrant,
positive and joyful—emotions
that I had felt through passing the
gallery before I had spoken with
them. It's the type of unspoken
sentiment that doesn't need to
be mentioned in the shows title
because it's simply a way of
life within the community— to
want the best for others, to
be happy.
Amal Rana and Erv Newcombe
are not directly a part of the
local community, but through
participating in events, felt
changed by it.
N: Every time I leave one of the events we
participated in, I feel exhausted-(laughs)
but also happy, fulfilled and inspired
by the people and the process I've met.
Universal Access Art: meeting people
where they are, in all respects, and jointly
exploring ways to create meaningful art
— meaningful for them. We're trying to
provide ideas, inspiration, materials and
methodology, and some assistance, but
really we're just following people's ideas
and inspiration and being overjoyed by
these experiences.
R: I'm blown away and continuously
surprised by the boundless creativity
and innovation by people in the DTES. I
feel like I'm learning and growing as an
artist in the DTES. It's like a lesson and a
release, because the art world can feel at
times pretentious and hard. But we're in
a community of artists that are authentic
and expect you to be authentic as well,
otherwise they will see right through you.
tt
uftj &twtml (tyjttttfjdttttc f*ac& (gororomttftj %tl Jftjattt
t*
 glOS   VOH\T0O      snisBgBMtsbtooaia
12th Annua
Oppenheimer Park
Art Show
Why should people check out the show
R:The diversity of art, multi-media, painting,
the community piece made of popsicle sticks.
N: When I look at the show in its entirety,
I think it does a great job at amplifying
the brilliance of the Downtown Eastside
and really challenges the narrative of the
Downtown Eastside. So even if people don't
buy anything, they are going to be inspired
and changed by it.
The show is running until October
26th, so stop by because either way,
I guarantee you will not leave empty-
handed. The 12th annual Oppenheimer Art
Show is a reminder that art is not so much
of what you say, but what you make of it.
The power that lies within the artwork in this
exhibit speaks to the gallery's motto in that art
is a means for survival. A survival that looks
like bright greens, dark blues and soft pinks
that just might bounce off the walls.
Editor's Note: On August 19th, the park board
manager ordered a mandate to evict approximately 240 people living in Oppenheimer Park.
The Vancouver Park Board had an emergency
meeting late September and voted 5 - 2 in
favour of a motion to support the voluntary
collaborate decampment for residents living
in the park, meaning at this time they will not
seek an injunction to legally remove campers
from the park. As Pivot legal society pointed
out on their Twitter account, residents ask:
decampment to where? There are no actual
affordable & safe housing options. They say
city pushing decampment is settler colonial
violence on unceded Indigenous lands.
tt
II
OPPENHEIMER
ART SHOW 'If
DOTMOCRACY
PUCE A DOT NEXT TO YOUR
FAVOURITE THEME!
ART OF
THE
NATURAL WORLD
attraction
\z\$ fttwtml (tyjttttfjdttttc f*3t& (gawwtwtfy %tl tffjattt
tt
  glOS   VOH\T0O      snisBgBMtsbtooaia
DJ
PAISLEY
EVA
words by Sarah Bakke // illustration by Hayley Schmidt //Photos by R. Hester
^wl aisley Nahanee enters
'fl T the cafe where we've
f^~ chosen to meet, quickly
spots my table at the back, and
gives a friendly wave.
She reaches me in a few quick strides and
takes off her coat, draping it across the back
of her chair in one beat. Happy conversation
starts immediately, and after both ordering
a cup of tea from the counter we exchange
stories about not-for-profit work, the pains
of Skype meetings, and the joys of juggling
multiple projects at once. Nahanee is an
expert at the latter, as the rising success of
Dame Music Society, a collective of self-identifying women, trans and non-binary DJs,
attests. She started Dame roughly two years
ago, as a response to the exclusionary culture
of Vancouver's DJ scene at the time and to her
own experiences as one of the few women of
colour working with vinyl.
"There wasn't really a community at all,
and it felt like all these older white dudes who
were 'vinyl heads' and who had been doing it
for so long, just wanted to see my career end
or wanted to fuck me, or a weird combination
of the two — [it was] just horrible," Nahanee
says. "But I loved [DJ'ing] so much, I just kept
doing it and kept showing up to these gigs."
After one of said "vinyl heads" smashed her
needles on the floor of the Fox's Projection
Room, Nahanee (as DJ Paisley Eva) was given
a solo weekly slot to use however she pleased.
She decided to turn it into an all-girl, all-vinyl
night, training some friends to DJ alongside
her and telling them to play whatever they
wanted. Thus, Dame was born. There weren't
many places you could go to hear Blondie's
"Heart of Glass" play in the same set as
Nigerian disco and classic post-punk, but
Dame delivered.
Eventually a system of mentorship formed,
with a small number of new DJ's being
brought on every few months and passing
their skills on to the next group in turn.
"It's always been very hands-on, everyone's
helping each other," Nahanee explains. "It
grew pretty quickly, it outgrew the Projection
Room, and so we started using Red Gate Arts
Society and the Clubhouse; bigger venues
and spaces. Now we're two years in, we've
trained probably around 40 women, queer
and gender non-conforming folks how to DJ."
In those two short years, the scene in
Vancouver has palpably changed, and we
largely have Dame to thank for much of that
feeling. "It all goes back to the conversation
around these white, male gatekeepers who
had the scene for a really long time, and in
the past few years we really saw the horrible,
disgusting consequences that came out of
them having power. They still have a lot of
power, but it's so important to [also] have
these really small communities [that prioritize] diversity; of race, but also diversity in
what you're playing," Nahanee says.
Same's ethos of collectivity and support
has roots in Nahanee's identity as
an Indigenous woman. "I'm from
Squamish Nation — I grew up in Strathcona
and I also grew up in my community on my
reserve, and that culture is very different
from North American culture," she begins.
"Everything is so shared, whether its your food
or stories or your house, or skills." Nahanee
started getting involved in Vancouver's
music scene as a teenager, and immediately
noticed the difference in community values.
Knowledge was kept secret and safeguarded
by a select few, which bred a culture of elitism
and homogeneity. Nahanee's presence in the
scene was disruptive, simply because she
Bott) me're ttuo uears in, Uie'Ue trained
probably arouno 40 uiomen. queer anb
genber non-cnnfotmrng folks bntu to B3."
prioritized collaboration. "When I got taught
how to DJ I was like, I just got given this
really cool opportunity, this really cool skill,
why would I not share it? I was taught that
every time you have a new skill you share it,
with your community. And that comes from
my Indigeneity."
\W^ n terms of Dame's future, Nahanee hopes
1W to secure a permanent home and build it
^r~ into an artist-run centre of sorts, for DJs.
Her tone rises in excitement as she describes
plans for workshops, drop-in hours, and
opportunities for shared studio time. In the
face of constant venue closures and strict city
by-laws, this kind of community-run, creative
space sounds like a Utopia. "They're closing
down DIY spaces ... but they're also the
spaces that queer and BIPOC feel comfortable
in," Nahanee attests. She names the venue
crisis as perhaps Dame's biggest challenge.
Regardless, the momentum of Dame as an
inclusive movement, run by all who were
previously excluded from Vancouver's DJ
scene, is decidedly hopeful.
"It's this community and network of
support, and I think that it's just going to
get bigger and bigger, and I think that even
if Dame [ends], there'll still be remnants of
it — people training other people," Nahanee
explains. "It's never felt like it's just been my
project. I just happened to start this thing,
but then everybody made [Dame] what it is.
In the beginning, when it felt like I was super
isolated and alone and had no-one to really
turn to, as an Indigenous woman, a woman
of colour, in the DJ scene — I just don't think
that's a thing anymore."
tt
M $m*h$ %m
tt
 Discorder Magazine      OCT1/NOV   2019
words by Arjun Doraiswami
illustrations by James Spetifore
Photos by Duncan Cairns-Brenner
**
JtOJtt
tt
 glOS   VOH\T0O      snisBgBMtsbtooaia
)W    s I walked through the streets of Commercial-Broadway on
T"^   my way to Cafe Deux Soleil, I found myself admiring the vivid
^ ▼" colours and graffiti on the exterior of the buildings, with the
sight of artists painting murals and the sound of people busking.
\W^ couldn't have asked for a better spot to
1W meet with Mr. Patrick Kelly, also known
^r as Hope, a professional hip hop artist
and performer from Leq'a:mel First Nation,
currently based in Vancouver. Inspired by
tradition, Hope uses the art of storytelling
and rhyme to depict life on the reservation
and illustrate to others what it means to be
Indigenous.
Hope greeted me with a big grin and an
exchange of pleasantries. As the chat between
us ensued, I was pleasantly surprised at his
charismatic and humble personality, especially
considering the strength of his artistic profile.
He has been prevalent in the BC music scene
since 2011, when he released his first album
with Indigenous hip hop duo Status Krew. He
has since gone on to release an EP in 2014,
Lights Out, an album in 2016 Handle Bars,
and various music videos over time. In 2014
Hope alongside his rhyme partner, Doobie,
joined local artist Mamarudegyal MTHC
in co-founding Indigenous hip hop and
Multimedia group Rudegang Entertainment.
In 2017, Hope won Best in Hip Hop (Male
category) in the Fraser Valley Music Awards!
MX* rowing up in East Vancouver, Hope
I rw distinctly recalls "feeling judgement
\L^" and stereotypes towards Indigenous
people," and feeling like "it gets embedded in
you as a kid." It was only after the retrospection
of growing up and seeing the dangerous effects
this type of thinking has on young kids, that
Hope decided to challenge these stereotypes
and judgements by becoming a positive
influence through his music and art.
Having family members who work with
the Federal government, as well as family
members that are freedom fighters created a
divide in perspectives that shaped his youth,
which often finds its way into his music. With
songs like "I Scream" and "The Pacific," he
utilized his experiences to "think about both
sides, and to reason through the steps that
cause certain things to happen or not."
«ope's latest album, Red Man, is in his
words "the most important album of
his career," due to the evolution and
growth Hope had gone through in making this
album. With a little grin, he describes his first
two solo releases as being "fun to make, but
almost without mention of Indigenous people,
or issues faced by them." When I prompted
him about this, he paused for a second and
responded, "I grew up listening to Tupac [...]
and I thought it was all about being a gangster,
being tough you know? But as I grew older,
I realized that it was important to speak up
against the bad things I saw and experienced
back then." He paused here and reflected in
silence for a moment. "I recently lost my best
friend — my cousin, and really, once that
happened, everything kicked into gear for me,
I knew exactly what I needed to do next."
For Hope writing has always been a responsibility that he takes very seriously. Red Man
was no exception, with Hope spending hours
writing and working on the songs. He pushed
himself to go in and perform unwritten songs.
With hard-hitting lyrics, stunning rapping,
intriguing collaborations and a message to
remember, Hope's Red Man has it all.
" Jt gets
embebbeb
**
JtOJtt
ft
 Discorder Magazine      OCT1/NOV   2019
words by flfrodykie Zoe // illustrations by neetu Dha // photos by fllistair Henning
""J W lack womxn are the salt of the earth. They break open
rfl W their rib cages and remove needed organs so that we
fW^ can find home within. Black womxn fight. For us.
With us. In spite of us.
uZi Collective's co-founders Samira
I Warsame and Betty Mulat embody
this philosophy completely. I had
the privilege of sitting with them. To get to
know a little about them, together, as well as
their upcoming New Forms Showcase. To be
honest, I highkey ship the hell out of these
two! These folks have created a dynamic
that many marriages fail to achieve. A brave
tenderness oscillates between them that you
can't help but smile sheepishly. "We are both
passionate, intelligent, strong women." That's
ZamZam, given names Samira Warsame. "We
went through some deep shit. Personally,
and together. We really just clicked. You
know when that happens? It just happened."
Their back and forth flows, conversationally
translating well, into a delicious give-and-take
in underground spaces.
ZamZam, a natural storyteller whose bright
eyes, ease of conversation and passionate,
poetic flow, have you continuously leaning
in as she speaks. She is a slim, thoughtful,
woman with a sleek natural hairstyle, soft yet
striking features, and long lashes that make
her liquid amber eyes sparkle. She is of strong
Somali heritage, having grown up in a multicultural neighborhood in Whalley, Surrey
most of her life."I was really uplifted when I
was younger... I grew up with my family and
we were a unit. My grandparents, my uncles,
my sibling, my mom, and my aunt. We were
all in a house together [...] Then, my mum
got remarried to a white man, and my life
changed drastically after that. We moved to
a white neighbourhood in White Rock. And
I noticed how my assimilation process was
constant. It was at school. It was at home. I
was aware of what was going on but I did not
have the language. I could see it happening
to my mum, see it happening to me, and see
how my sibling who is half white, was treated
differently than me, [I could] see how the way
that I spoke, the way that I dressed, the way
that people spoke to me, was so different from
what it used to be...I was the only black girl in
my school. In Surrey there were East Asians,
Nigerians, Somalis, it was so diverse, I never
felt bothered. But when I moved to that white
neighbourhood, and I was in my teens, I was
very hyper aware of it [my blackness]."
Betty Mulat, artistically known as Venetta,
with her wide, striking eyes, teeny weeny
afro, golden skin, and smokey bourbon voice
you'll recognize captivating audiences during
her techno/house sets at parties throughout
the city. Wearing a '90s ski jacket and high
waisted jeans, she exudes an elegant charm
that lightens your spirit. She leans back
in her chair and her voice softens as she
adds somberly, "...dealing with hella racism
growing up, being one of the only open Black
girls in my school, I never thought the day
would come where I thought things would
change, so I wouldn't think about political
issues and stuff; for the sake of preserving my
own safety and sanity, because I didn't think
things [c]ould change, especially so rapidly; you
grow up and realize the only way forward is to
unlearn what you've been indoctrinated with,
to do your own shit and also seeing all these
boss Black people, running shit. I wish I knew
then what I know now. Growing up I tried
to be anything but Black, but I realize it's the
biggest blessing in the world. Like, there was a
time I didn't want to be like this. There was a
time where I tried to not look like this. When
I look at old pics I think [to myself] 'I feel for
you and what you were going through.' And I
think about the young Black girls now who are
surrounded by people who aren't quite there yet
in seeing who they are, and I can't help but feel
for them; but [I] never judge [...] some people
judge [...] people are going at their own pace
and we have to meet them where they're at in
their inner growth journey." Venetta grew up
an only child, to a single Ethiopian immigrant
mother in Burnaby, BC. She attended a fairly
diverse school however attributes the many
experiences of the normalization of the institutionalized violence and discrimination to what
drives the work the Collective does today. "
I feel as if it is actually a privilege to bear the
responsibility of starting this [Collective] and
doing this work," she beams.
T
he women met in 2015 at an after hours
party. They clicked instantly and spent
the next 24 hours together talking about
pretty much everything you could imagine.
There's something magical that happens
when you get more than one Black person
in a room together. "We just talked about
our dreams and our intentions, and what we
want to see in our community in the city,"
recalls ZamZam, "and why it's hard for
Black folks to come together. And ever since
then we've been inseparable professionally; a
sisterhood was formed and we were just on a
tt
mm
ti
 glOS   VOH\T0O      snisBgBMtsbtooaia
path. Back then you could see all this talent
trying hard to find space [...] and not feeling
like there was enough space and feeling kind
of defeated and depleted [...] We could see
both sides and we decided to accumulate
our talents and knowledge [and] we're like,
alright this is happening. This is the future,
this is our generation, and it's what we need
to survive in the city. We are not going to be
pushed out or silenced or ostracized or feel
like we don't belong. We were both raised
here, why the fuck do we feel we don't belong
here? Y'know?"
elonging. That is an action, isn't it?
We are always actively doing the work
to make space for ourselves to feel
like we belong, right? NuZi Collective does
that for the community. And in a pretty
grassroots way too, often using their own
personal funds to book artists for shows
they've produced. The showcase at New
Forms Festival has a line up boasting names
like Afrodeustche, bearcat, Prado, House of
Kenzo and more. "All black artists. Strictly
black and gay!" squeals ZamZam. New
Forms Festival connects artists locally and all
over the world. To have an opportunity to
showcase your work, skills, talent, or art on
this platform, as a local artist, is a huge deal as
it provides you with a broader audience. The
importance of having community spaces to
gather that are safe for Black and Indigenous
and brown, queer and trans and non-binary
and genderfluid and genderless and all of us,
is not lost. Especially now, especially against
the backdrop of gentrification in our cities,
climate change in our world — and the greater
picture of the crime of colonization on the
lands we all currently inhabit. It's important
that our spaces are given back to the peoples
who matter. "It's easier to feel safe holding
back than it is to express yourself," surmises
Venetta, "but finding the right spaces, where
blackness and freedom are embraced, is what
we need to continue pushing for [...] The
mission was to create a space for us, and now
the mission is to protect that space as hard as
we can. No ones coming in to disrupt that."
3 UIISll } lillCUl tl)Cll
uili.it } liiunu iiinii.
(irouring up 3 trieb
to
but
tlic biggest
blessing
in
UUH'll)
**
mm
tt
 Discorder Magazine      OCT/ NOV   201 <
revorJ.
McEachran
words by Tom Whalen
lustrations courtesy of Trevor J. McEacrhran
"I grew up in a town full of bloodsuckers called Malakwa... My mom
told me it meant 'big mosquito9 in
our native language... I still don't
know if she was joking or not..."
^~T platsin First Nations artist
■ Trevor J. McEachran
^V^° produces his work in a
variety of mediums; whether it's
music, animation, or comics.
His most recent endeavor is
a comic called Big Mosquito
#1, comprised of two longer
stories ("Randy's Dog" and
"Uncle Mike") and intercut with
various collage works, portraits,
and prose. Together, the work
illustrates his journey through
childhood trauma, poverty in
the Downtown Eastside, and
the process of recovery.
"[The comic] fell into place as I was doing
it. I don't ever really have an intent when I
sit down and do something, it's always that
things just unfold that way," he explains.
"It's a tool for me to process my trauma and
my recovery. I started needing a vehicle or a
way to convey these things that I needed to
get out of me."
In addition to the two longer stories in Big
Mosquito #1, three portraits by McEachran
are featured, accompanied by quotes. Each
portrait is a drawing of a photograph from
Heroines, a 1999 exhibition by the photographer Lincoln Clarke, documenting women
in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver.
Each quote is an excerpt from Red Women
Rising, a 2019 report on Indigenous women
survivors, published by the Downtown
Eastside Women's Centre.
"There's this through line in a lot of my
work that I've done in music and poetry, and
now comics, that has to do with my disconnection from my roots, and my tradition, and
my family and culture. And a lot of that has
to do with my mom dying at a young age,
as well. I gravitate more towards the matriarchs, and I want to be able to help others
heal. In the ongoing history of colonization
and Indigenous people, men always were put
on a pedestal until recently, but women were
always the leaders. Historically it was the
matriarchs that largely were the backbone of
the tribe, or nation."
Before publishing this comic, McEachran had
started an Instagram account to document
the progress of his art. He explains: "I felt so
guilty about reaching out and sharing these
extremely personal things with people, but
when I'd read someone else's story about
something similar that really helped me get
through something, my first thought was never
'Oh, this is too much to take on for me.'"
~mj ooking around his apartment where we
conducted the interview, McEachran's
f^~ book collection is extensive, especially
when it comes to graphic novels. During our
conversation, he brought up a specific work
that assisted him in the process of creating
his own comic. He explains: "there was a
comic book I read recently by Travis Dandro
called King of Kingdom Court. [It's about the
author's] upbringing and his estranged father
coming back into his life after getting out
of prison, and him trying to reconnect. His
father's a criminal and a heroin addict, and the
child having to be exposed to that — surviving
trauma and processing it. [I felt] like, this is
what I want to do with my own experiences,
I want to be able to convey the weight of
these experiences, and that it is possible to
survive. It's been very important for my own
recovery, being able to see myself or some of
my experiences reflected at me."
McEachran also has played music in bands
like Hospital Blonde, Lesser Pissers, and Girl
Dracula. This summer he released an album
for his long-standing solo project Industrial
Priest Overcoats entitled The Years Barely
Left a Trace. He also currently sings and plays
bass in the group Bedwetters Anonymous, and
recently animated a music video for them.
At the age of 17, McEachran hitchhiked from
Vernon to Burnaby, and from there slipped in
and out of employment and stable housing.
Following an ill-fated move to Toronto, he
finally returned to the west coast. Upon his
return, he found himself living in a series of
single room occupancies in the Downtown
Eastside, where the events from the forthcoming Big Mosquito #2 will take place.
"I lived in a back room in the abandoned
retail space on the main floor next door illegally
rented to me. I had my own room, really thin,
just the bed and barely room to walk beside
it, and it was $500 a month. Then they moved
me into the Silver & Avalon once they saw
that I was having my girlfriend over, they
thought I was attracting too much attention. I
was in there for maybe half-a-year."
«uring our conversation, McEachran
had a chance to reflect on his past,
how it has affected him and how it has
changed his work: "I've only recently been
able to look back and realize how much I've
truly surpassed or gotten through, but art has
always been a huge tool for me to live, survive.
Before, it was music.
"I've noticed there's a real sense of chaos
in a lot of my older work; it's all messy and
no structure. I feel like that's a recent thing
for me, considering structure of my work.
It's been interesting learning how to tell a
coherent story.
"It was never a conscious thing for me,
really. I just always need to be creating, to
have something to focus my mind on. With
comics though, it's more focused. If I animate,
I can let my mind wander and see what
happens. It's just pure joy."
Trevor J. McEachran is currently preparing
Big Mosquito #2. He has also recently finished
animating a music video for Vancouver band
Divorcer, along with new material for a
7" single with Bedwetters Anonymous.
You can find Trevor's work on Instagram
@johnny halfbreed
— from page 1
of Big Mosquito #1
«
Xt^tiat Mt% ntfytnn
tt
   ti w
00        "  o
g o cO
* flP4
p >>
«n
m
<
n
a
O
CQ
CD
CD
CQ
CD
rH
CQ
rH
CO
d-H
CD
rH
O-cJ
s S
^
« 3
P cO
4J
.C
a
"CO
+» CQ
CO
-PI
f-  V
a cq
(DO
u
<D-cJ
CQ-H
t> o
#«
«o
•IS
2-°
.2"
at o
3*
■ m
3
>^
<H(f\
CD
CD
-pi
d
>>o
f^X.
u
bit
«J-H
f- 3
o
cO
<^
@
4J
-®
4J
CQ  d)
W.C
a cq
a
^53
CD O
o
P-i a)
+»-h
d-H
O'-cJ
a
S^
cO o
CD -J
^ a
CO+j
w
WC1
*H1
•   CO
•   CO
•   CM
o
.c
m
a
at
N
at
=M
CO+j
IB
C
O h
Wl
at
q
X
"J3
-pi
«a)
«
«
Ba
a. at
•>>B
£ q at
^ q.c
U        o
m sea
«SI
f->  CQ
Cti+J
P  CD
SH.C
HrH fH
P-i      u"
00
>>
•PI
«SI
T3
o
PQ
3
1-3
CD
£
CD
Eh
CD
CD
CD
3E
»u
CD^
+» cfl
-Ceo
CO
Ci cO
o» s
o
T3
H
^
+J
at
CQ
rH
S
o
rH q
•PI
o
a
ill s
MJ
IE
at
«*>
CBrH
at
>>
^<§>
q a
>>rt
>>
q u
at q
+■ o
O (p
■H S
+■ h
XI Q.
rH  W
l»
*>. a
3-M
O
t<rH
an
n 3
3-1
m at
<■:
■   IE
■ m
■ ©
«SI
en
•Sk a
gw w
gp>
ftg M
fflO
<+■*
"R
s
WO ft)
8h k
la
•gpo
Sp a
+4
pf< o
Ci> tfl'-H Cm
U CO
So
in
+■ u
tu
3rH
atrH
"at
■ m
■SCB
<=)
■«;    a cd
a^l     cO cq
Wo     3E     bj
CD
a
d
4J
rH
Ph
CO
o
-PI
(*l
CQ
Ph
M
CD
d
o,
r-<
H
CD
t-H
O
s
(/)
i!
a
cO
^
d
CD
£
n
r-<
T)
CQ
t-H
a
-PI
^!
W
CO
r>
o
<^
H
W
-pi
>
CQ
«
CD
o
-PI
rH
*
rH
CO
<S
CQ
M
>v
CD
CD
Ph
3
^
rH
CD
CO
CD
r/i
.c
rH
T3
i!
4J
fe
a
s
O
-pi
CO
Ph
a
^
H
t^^
«SI
"HCO-H
^ atrH
m-rt o
£hCO
S •"K
•rH  3
lJ-r-
cop
-   =8
a-rt
at 3
^ a
« o
1
1
!
1
I
 _
 ■
\NCOUVER BC COLLECTIVE DEBUT THEIR FIRST
\REFULLY ASSEMBLED MACHINE OF AN EP THAT
AYFULLYEMANATES FRENETIC POST-PUNK"
IMPLEMENTED WITH SLIDING FUNK AND JAGGED
LODIES TO PROPEL THEIR POLITICAL MANTRAS."
EXP
FACTOR Canada
ROOMING SHOWS
JTOBER 4 SEATTLE @ TIMBRE ROOM
WITH/ DRAHLA
;TOBER 5 VANCOUVER @ SCB RESTAURANT
WITH/ DRAHLA
ITOBER 19 PORTLAND @ DOUG FIR LOUNGE
WITH/ LOVING
LiCEMBER 8 VANCOUVER @ THE ASTORIA
WITH/ CORRIDOR & DUMB
Jm
ii'«m \
_0.
L^fc
2019 AMS ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
If you're interested in getting involved
in student initiatives at UBC, the AMS'
AGM is a great first step. The AGM is your
opportunity to learn what the AMS has
planned for the coming year and how to
get involved. All students are welcome
and a networking lunch is included.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23
12-2PM LOWER ATRIUM, THE NEST
 Discorder Magazine      OCT1/NOV   2019
\ \
>JJ-J
photo* byAfota/rHftr^
f you haven't heard of Kanyen'keha:ka artist
Lacie Kanerahtahsohon Burning, then you
^" have probably been living under a rock.
ey've just barely completed their undergrad
udies — overcoming the multiple barriers that are
-present in the inherent ableism of academic
institutions — while managing to firmly establish
themselves in the visual art world. Early in their
practice they've already featured in Canadian Art,
collaborated with heavy hitter Dayna Danger,
participated in Plug-In Institute residency at BUSH
Gallery, as well as exhibited extensively, with a
hand in curating. The trajectory of their practice
is promising, and an important component in a
wave of tight knit Indigiqueer artists, making
work on their own terms.
At your artist talk, through grunt galleries
Spark Talks, you mentioned that one of
your first installations was in a former
residential school. Could you tell me how that
came about?
So the piece came about after I saw a
video of Irene Favel talking about her
experience at residential school. I was
really upset and angry. It was basically
the culmination of most of my anger from
what I learned about injustices toward
Native people at NEC [Native Education
College] the year before, and also a
reflection of having heard horror stories
about Residential school as a child.
Had you wanted to work in installation
before or did it come about as a natural
kind of progression, in terms of an outlet to
express those thoughts and feelings?
Oh yeah, it was totally a weird natural
progression. I had no idea what installation art was when I made it. I was really
interested in animation through watching
weird YouTube videos like David Firth
(embarrassing) and Brian Chippendale.
I was mostly into photography and used
the DSLRI bought In high school to make
the video using animation techniques.
And I was in art stores and secondhand
clothing stores a lot, so I was just like
"oh I wonder if it would look cool if I
projected it over this plastic and these
mannequin heads like a screen." But I
remember when I was making it, I was
putting so much of what I felt into it, I
really wanted the viewer to feel how I felt.
When did you realize that there were other
artists working in a similar manner? And
which artists resonated with you?
Shortly after, when I was entered into
native art, I discovered so many more
artists. They weren't always covered
at school. It's hard to say which artists
because there's so many. The artists that
I've written about mostly were Rebecca
Belmore, Brian Jungen, and Shelley Niro.
Also after I dropped out of school and
discovered Mourning Coup was when
I was like "I need to keep making art
there's other weird alt natives!" But yeah
I just felt like the weird kid in native art,
haha"
Yeah it's really exciting to find other weird
alt natives. I basically cling. "Please don't
leave me."
Now we're taking over.
So true! It's an ongoing critique I conversation
of the lack of inclusion of Indigenous
people in punk or alternative communities,
particularly because it doesn't necessarily fit a
preconceived notion of Indigeneity through a
white gaze. Have you found this has shifted?
In what ways do you find it still remains?
Oh yeah totally. I still feel tension with
it, like I'm "too white." But at the same
time I never really fit in the alternative
scenes that I was into because they are
dominated by whiteness. So I talk about
whiteness / power in my work a lot too.
I feel like some people are catching on.
There are a few people in the Indigenous
art world that are really supportive and I
have been getting cool opportunities. But
for a long time it felt isolating.
Yeah that's something I've heard talked about a
lot. That Indigenous Punk Instagram page is so
sick have you seen it? Indigenouspunxarchive?
omg yeah I followed them right away.
I'm also interested to hear how your background
and interest in music influence your art practice.
I would say the majority of my work is
inspired by music. Somehow when I am
listening there are gestures that come to
me. Like the gesture of moving / carrying
things that was really inspired by your
album (lol), or the rawness of the Pop
Group or Nu Sensae that I remember
tt
Hack ItocttMij
t*
 glOS   VOH\T0O      snisBgBMtsbtooaia
inspiring my installation. And recently —
I feel like I've shifted more to less abrasive
music like that Sudan Archives song,
"Nont For Sale." Oh yeah, I literally
started making medicine bags inspired
by music so like the colours I think of
when I listen to the song. Yeah, sorry I
keep talking about your work [Mourning
Coup.] Also haha it's like... you're interviewing me — but that work was big
for me.
That's okay, it actually makes me so happy
to hear and is super humbling. I almost quit
music a bunch of times before I put out that
album [Baby Blue,] so I'm glad I didn't.
Oh wow, that's wild. I'm so glad you never
quit! I'm sure more people will connect to
it — it's like a cult jam.
There is a level of social capital in mainstream
white society co-opting I affiliating with
marginalized identities that's also very present
in the arts. As a queer Indigenous non-binary
person you're at the intersection of different
communities. How do you navigate that,
particularly when in spite of conversations
about making space for marginalized
voices, the positions of power are often still
maintained by white people?
I'm just like, "burn them all DOWN."
But yeah, it is really hard to navigate. My
biggest issue is that they want us — they
really want us. They want to put our art
in their gallery for like a few months or
whatever, but they would never hire us for
a full-time or even part-time position. It's
really hard. They really aren't about us if
they aren't about our survival too. And
they should see that throwing us a bone
every once in a while isn't helping. It's a
big issue in the arts; the way funding is,
etc. "We can hire a native person but only
for 2-5 months." It's tiring.
Yeah, the funding structure is totally set up
intentionally that way. It's like widespread
gaslighting."We love you, why are you so
ungrateful?" — In your bio you mention
coming from a politically grounded
upbringing. In what ways did you witness
and learn about resistance and political
engagement growing up? How has this
informed your practice?
Well my upbringing was complicated
because my grandma and grandpa took
me to church, but my mom put me in as
much Mohawk language classes as she
could. She was really trying to break
the cycle. My dad was a land protector
and he was at the Kanonhstaton land
reclamation site. I think I was 12 or
13 when things started erupting with
police and standoffs. It was in the news
almost every night and we watched from
home. Everyone was talking about it
and everyone on the reserve was unified
for it — we were all ready to fight. I
remember being ready to fight, and that
feeling of not caring if I lived or died for
it, even when I was so young. But it felt
bigger than that because it was about
preserving culture through preserving
our land. The KKK even sent letters to
everyone. It was really eye opening how
the world was and how people saw us:
the function of white supremacy. It was
all literally staring me in the face, my
whole life, I guess.
That's such a powerful experience at a really
critical age. It makes sense you come from
such a special background, because there is
a visceral strength in your work. I also find
in histories of resistance the backlash from
white supremacists really gets glossed over.
Yeah, totally. I feel like it's a lot of
experience to draw from. And white
supremacy is barely talked about period,
but it seems like recently it is becoming
more of a thing. And for sure it's coming
from people in activist spaces.
In what ways does having a Haudenosaunee
perspective and upbringing inform your work
as well as in conversations ofTndigeneity and
resistance?
I like to define it that way because I don't
want it to be looked at in a pan-Indigenous
way, or seem like I am imposing my own
beliefs on anyone. All these nations have
so many ways to activate and take up
space, and my way feels Haudenosaunee
because that's how I was raised — it's
also the people I am accountable to. I
do often think of tradition, because in
learning language for so many years and
being in ceremonial spaces, there are so
many protocols. So if I am doing activist
things in my art I have to filter it through
that first.
To close, I wanted to ask you about your
artistic process. How ideas come to you for
your work, and whether they're more process
based or planned in advance and executed
with a specific vision. You also talked earlier
about wanting to transmit the emotions
to the viewer of your work. What are the
main themes and experiences that you are
currently working with?
Sometimes it's like a vision. I will just
visualize things until I get to the point
where I just have to make it. Only
recently have I gotten to use studio
spaces at residencies, but only briefly.
They did lead to my ribbon shirt piece.
I'm kind of all over the place. It can
be really logic based, like, "I'll use this
and make this." With my photoshoots I
always have a vision and then when I go
to a space with a model, there's always
something spontaneous that happens.
But the emotions lately — there's still
a sense of urgency — I think that's
what drives me. There's also confrontation and wanting to be energetic in my
activism. I have had a lot of people be
unsettled by my work and I think that's
just the confrontation working.
tt
Hack ItocttMij
tt
 TALKS
PERFORMANCES
ARTIST
PROJECTS
OCTOBER 18 20, 2019 11-7PM
EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN 520 EAST 1ST AVE
°'ART+ DESIGN
m D
Na W
PUBLISHING a SFU
Canada
snaweyai lelam.     Langara.
NJ
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ARTS COUNCIL
w
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
Supported by the Province of British Columbia
CITY OF
VANCOUVER
^yuAAa/u&
/AN
metrovancouver
cItrwumimj
 J&M, IMACTION I
Drugdealer
/ Donny Benet
JULY 30TH / FOX CABARET
(TJW- s I trailed behind a line of people shuffling inside the Fox
♦* Cabaret, we were welcomed by a man on stage with his top
^"▼'three buttons undone. That man was Donny Benet. Alone
on stage, the Sydney-based crooner played looped audio tracks
from his laptop while singing his heart out into the microphone
and into the ears of hundreds of fans — more than most opening
acts can expect.
Benet, who has been releasing music since 2011, has a certain
likability to his personality and performance. While his catchy,
post-disco synthesizers grab the audience, it was his charismatic,
underdog character on stage that tightened the grip and held
them steadfast. Benet's on-stage presence and demeanor of
being so unapologetically himself was reminiscent of fellow
Australian musician, Alex Cameron.
After playing a handful of swaying and swinging songs, including
his hit track "Konichiwa," Benet surrendered the stage to the main
attraction: Drugdealer — as emphasized on the glowing white
board above the venue's bar.
Michael Collins, the face behind Drugdealer, lead the collective
on stage which included pro-skater Kenny Anderson on trumpet,
Shags Chamberlain on bass, Josh Da Costa on drums, Michael
Long on lead guitar, Benjamin Schwab on rhythm guitar and
backing vocals, and Sasha Winn on lead vocals. Wearing a red
bucket hat, Collins sat down at his Nord keyboard with a notepad
resting on the right side of it (which he did not open all night)
and insisted we dive head first into the music — which consisted
primarily of Drugdealer's second studio album, Raw Honey.
Through tracks that embodied a country-rock twang like
"Lonely" and a Beatles-esque vibe heard in "Lost in My Dream,"
vionoA avu JAaa
the atmosphere was off the charts with everybody grooving and
shaking. This ambience reached its pinnacle when the band
performed a beautifully idiosyncratic rendition of "Suddenly,"
their most popular song. Not only did Drugdealer play songs from
both their first two albums, The End of Comedy and Raw Honey,
they also performed three new untitled tracks to look forward to
on their next release.
While lyrically the message conveyed was that of criticism
directed towards a modern, preoccupied world, musically the
body of the set was full of warm melodies — illustrated best when
Collins asked the technician for "more red from the stage lights."
It was all too appropriate given Drugdealer's evident attempt
to revive '70s nostalgia that their encore song was a cover of
"Livin' Thing" by Electric Light Orchestra. Although, I did find it
rather peculiar that they removed Anderson from trumpet for this
song, leaving a noticeable absence in the chorus where ELO had
inserted violins.
Drugdealer is as transparent about their influences as they are
with the audience at their shows as they search to speak to a
group of like-minded people that believe just as their Bandcamp
page suggests: "All anyone wants to be is what they can."
—Aaron Schmitdke
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine
and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to:
Jasper D. Wrinch, Section Editor
rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences. Feel
free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
Vancouver Housing
Stories: Podcast
Miniseries About
Renting
SEPTEMBER 13 / VIVO MEDIA ARTS
<7V-sat at a table with headphones on, flipping through a book
H r filled with historical aerial photographs of Greater Vancouver.
^"Though I started listening partway through, Tiffany
Muhoz's podcast, "Vancouver's Post-Modern Displacement,"
was an insightful glimpse into the history of civic displacement
in Vancouver, from the colonial theft of land from Indigenous
peoples, through the city-wide infrastructure booms Expo 86 and
the 2010 Olympics, to Vancouver's current housing crisis.
There were two other tables situated around the room, each
housing a few sets of headphones, each playing a different
podcast produced by participants of VIVO Media Arts'
ALT+SPACE+CONTROL: Vancouver Housing Stories podcasting
mentorship. These listening stations gave the guests of the
program's final presentation and reception a chance to listen to
the podcasts in full. Just as I put on the next set of headphones,
I saw the rows of chairs in the centre of the room, all facing
towards a large projection screen, began to fill. VIVO Media Arts'
educator Pietro Sammarco took the microphone as I took off the
headphones to join the rest of the crowd.
In addition to a long list of acknowledgments — the people and
organizations that made the reception happen, as well as an
acknowledgment of the Squamish, Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh
nations, on whose land the podcasting mentorship took place
— Sammarco gave a brief synopsis of the mentorship. Eight
artists — Maddi Delplain, Jamie-Leigh Gonzales, Helena Krobath,
Susan Lu, Tiffany Muhoz, Melissa Roach, Victoria Spooner and
23
 Yijia Zhang — all with varying podcasting experience, produced
audio stories that reflected upon some aspect of housing and
housing insecurity. With the guidance of mentors Kell Gerlings,
Kim Villagante, Alex de Boer, Madeline Taylor, Alexander Kim,
Pietro Sammarco and Helena Krobath, the eight participants of
the program spent four months developing and shaping their
stories, each with a different angle on the issues facing housing
and renting amidst Vancouver's housing crisis.
The lights dimmed and the screen lit up with projected slideshow
of photos of the artists hard at work during the mentorship,
as well as other housing-related images. Over the speakers,
the podcasts began to play — a snippet of each, varying from
a few seconds to a few minutes, were melded together in a
audio-mosaic of the eight stories. This medley highlighted the
vastly different approaches to podcasting each participant took,
from historical, research-based journalism, to interview-based
personal storytelling, to amorphous sound collages.
Not that the podcasts weren't interesting, but I'd never before
experienced podcasts in a live-setting quite like this. As the
slideshow of photographs began to repeat, the solely auditory
stimulus started to lose the crowd's full attention — sitting still and
just listening is not an easy task for any group of people. Luckily,
the podcast mosaic concluded quickly, and a handful of the eight
podcast creators came up for a restrained Q&A, which finished
off the night.
Having gotten an auditory glimpse of each, I know they are well
worth the listen. The housing crisis being such a multi-faceted
and complex issue, it only makes sense to present it through a
diverse collection of stories. Unfortunately, I didn't get a chance
to listen to all the podcasts fully at the reception, and I haven't
found a place to listen to them since. —Frances Shroff
Tropa Magica / Brass
Camel / Colby Morgan &
the Catastrophes
SEPTEMBER 18 / THE CLUBHOUSE
w^-itting outside on the patio of The Clubhouse, which
P~m seemed to be a car dealership moonlighting as a music
^^- venue, I talked with David, a projectionist who operates
The Northern Lights Show, which provides many concerts around
Vancouver with a stunning, dynamic live visual element. As Colby
Morgan & the Catastrophes prepared to head inside for their set,
David stopped Colby to ask what his favorite color is, in order to
work his visuals for the set around that color.
Morgan and his band, bathed in purple projections, were
performing an entirely new set of songs that night, each of which
seemed an evolution of the previous, as the deep reverberation
and fuzz compiled upon the alt-country twang and jangle stealthily
underlying each track. On the track "I Miss You Like Crazy," the
percussion came to the fore, vibrant and popping, as if cultivated
by firing pistons embedded in drummer Dan Stenning's arms.
Indeed, the band's intent seems to be the maximising of each
instrument within a folk / country rock context, with punchy bass
lines driven to the cracking point of distortion, and stuttering
maracas punctuating the occasional track. Near the end of
the set, the band hit a punkish stride, blasting out chords
and open-strumming their guitars, creating a massive wall of
feedback, as Colby sang, "I'm sick of feeling nothing."
Then, as if to slyly interject, Brass Camel took the stage and
declared "Ain't nothing wrong with feeling good" to bursting and
dynamic funk grooves. Taking a classic Led Zeppelin blues rock
swagger (which is especially apparent in vocalist and guitarist
Daniel James' Robert Plant-esque howls) and mixing it up with
more progressive, almost jazzy accoutrements, Brass Camel
commanded some serious hip-sway
Their songs can be highly sectional, evoking the work of The
Who on albums like Tommy or Ouadrophenia, with verse to
chorus transitions almost seeming like transference between
completely different songs but conducted seamlessly. After a
suave and confident cover of Supertramp's "Bloody Well Right"
which culminated in a guitar duel of sorts, the band moved on
to a new batch of tunes, which will see them heading back into
the studio in December. Here, a more psychedelic, spaceytone
coursed through the performance, as the swirling oil and light
projections bloomed across the stage.
Finally arrives headliner Tropa Magica, a rather unique Hispanic
tropical psych-punk band who have developed such a perplexing
and infinitely amusing sound that it's hard not to be all smiles
during every moment of their stage time. The band's lyrics are
written both in English and Spanish, and knowing only a little
Spanish, I had to piece together the meanings from the words
I did recognize, and more significantly, from the details filled in
by band leads, David and Rene Pacheco. What did translate 100
percent of the time, however, was the band's happy-go-lucky
vibrance, as David utilized a half full tequila bottle as a slide for
his guitar, and the cheery danceable melodies soared above the
sweet chiming instruments.
It's worth mentioning that the brothers previously worked together
on another project called Thee Commons, and they brought many
of those songs along with them to perform. A particular highlight
was "Milk and Honey" off 2018's Paleta Sonora, in which Rene
utilized his growly, raspy vocals to deliver a spectacular rap verse
while maintaining the drum beat.
To end the show, Tropa Magica busted out the Classic
"Everywhere We Go" chant, leading the audience along. Tropa
Magica had an incredibly warm, euphoric direction (indeed they
even have a song titled "UFORIA") and as they ended the night
with the line "Recuerdo los dfas," or "I remember the days," it's
hard not to become immediately nostalgic for the night that had
just transpired as I headed outside under the dark of the moon.
—Tate Kaufman
Punk the Vote Festival
w/ D.O.A. / Chain Whip
/ Corner Boys / Tony
Baloney & the Rubes
SEPTEMBER 21 / WISE HALL
nip
W:
hen I was running my campaign for the first time,
my slogan was: You usually elect shitheads, why
not Joey Shithead?" Joe Keithley smiled, pausing
to let the laughter wane before continuing his speech. "If we don't
do anything, there's going to be nothing left. Not for you, not for
me, not for anybody."
Roused yelps of agreement reverberated throughout the
WISE Hall, where Keithley, hardcore pioneer and Burnaby city
councillor delivered an impassioned, invigorating speech exactly
one month prior to the 2019 federal election date. He made his
purpose clear: "D.O.A. started in '78, fighting racism and sexism,
greed and warmongers. When (people) ask me what I'm fighting
now: racism, sexism, greed and warmongers."
Those gathered for the Punk the Vote Festival seem united in
this cause, making it one of the most age-diverse audiences I've
ever seen at a punk concert, as both the Burnaby Green Party
and the Green Party of Canada had shown up to advocate these
causes alongside the stellar lineup of bands. I managed to speak
to a few candidates for the upcoming election, including Louise
Boutin, Green party candidate for Vancouver Granville, which is
quite possibly the hottest riding in the nation, as former Liberal
Cabinet member Jody Wilson-Raybould who currently holds the
riding is now running as an independent candidate.
Punk has long been an advocate genre: action music, designed
to engage, inform, inspire, and finally inspire action. Indeed with
Tony Baloney & the Rubes taking the stage, the night kicked
off to a boisterous and triumphant start. Pleasant, surprisingly
harmonic choruses wove through verses constructed with the
cheery pop-sensibilities that made groups like The Ramones
famous. Despite Baloney's warning that the lyrics are terrible,
REAL LIVE ACTION
October - November, 2019
 "Pontiac" burst with energy: rapid, percussive vocals and a funk
groove in hyper-speed that combined with chiming rhythm guitar
to create a density of sound reminiscent of the Talking Heads
work on Remain In Light.
After a very brief break in between bands, Corner Boys invaded
the stage, driving through their set with a relentlessly high tempo.
Performing some songs from their new release Waiting for 2020,
vocalist and drummer Patrick described the title track as being
about "watching something you love die." Despite their pace,
Corner Boys never felt too heavy, always maintaining a jubilant
energy during each of their songs.
Then came Chain Whip. While they consisted of a lineup that
is Corner Boys plus one, Chain Whip radically turned the tone
and aggression levels up a notch. The vocalist Josh — the only
non-Corner Boy — was a big contributor to this change, gripping
the mic backwards from underneath as he unleashes his grit
laden chants and screams upon the audience. As he leapt
from speaker to speaker across the stage, there rose such a
whirlwind of energy that after one song he folded his arms over
his chest and death-dropped onto the floor, his head barely
missing the drum kit.
Then, the D.O.A. banner that was lurking in the shadows at the
back of the stage lit up in full glory, and the jumpy drum beats
of "The Enemy" — a 1980 classic — drew the crowd into full
blown mosh. D.O.A. had arrived. Voice still ripe with gravel and
pulsing with power, frontman Keithley took the audience through
a career spanning setlist. From "Fucked Up Ronnie," a scathing
lament which dates back to the Reagan era in 1981, to 2016's
"Fucked Up Donald," the band demonstrated how despite the
progress that has been made since the band's founding, we still
have a long way to go. It reminded me of some of Joey's words
from earlier in the evening:
"I didn't imagine we'd be talking about the Ku Klux Klan in 2019.
We have to fight them, fight the sons of Odin, fight racism and
fight climate change... You gotta vote strategically this election,
and that means voting for what matters." —Tate Kaufman
Vancouver
Climate Strike
SEPTEMBER 27 / CITY HALL
tTW-t's hard to say how many people showed up for the strike.
H r The crowds were too large to be taken in from any singular
^"vantage point. 22,000 said they were going on thefacebook
event page. The CBC says over 100,000 showed up. The strike
organizers say it was closer to 200,000. Added together with
the rest of the strikes that happened across the world, literally
millions of people took to the streets. Regardless of the exact
number, the message was clear: we are in the midst of a climate
emergency and we demand change now.
Organized by the Sustainabiliteens, a youth-led organization
of climate activists who have been striking from school every
Friday — a protest movement started by the Swedish activist
Greta Thunberg — Vancouver's Climate Strike was a resounding
success in demonstrating the public's desire to see political
action to address the global climate crisis. Local university's
cancelled classes, the Vancouver School Board encouraged
students to participate and countless local businesses closed
their doors in solidarity with the strike, making the demographics
of those participating in the demonstration diverse in almost
every way. While the main protest was slated to begin at 1pm,
the parks and streets surrounding city hall were teeming with
protestors by noon. Before the march began, the crowds were too
thick to move through. Shoulder-to-shoulder, the climate-strikers
held up signs demanding action and chanted for politicians take
immediate steps to quell the escalating climate emergency.
On the steps of city hall, a series of local environmentalists,
Indigenous activists and student organizers spoke to the crowds,
but no sound system could carry their voices to the edges of the
sea of protestors. Only those up close could catch their words
of outrage and inspiration — those spilling onto the streets had
only to look at the signs around them to understand the reasons
for the mass movement. "Sea levels are rising and so are we."
"Denial is not a policy." "Climate champions don't buy pipelines."
"None of this would be happening if we listened to Indigenous
people instead of killing them."
Shortly after the speeches, the march began. From Broadway
and Cambie, the view of the protest filling the entirety of the
Cambie Bridge was incredible, and as the march snaked its way
through the streets of Yaletown and the Downtown core, the
magnitude of the strike was impossible to gauge. Yet seeing
people at their desks in office buildings alongside the strike
seemed especially disappointing. At the march's terminus,
outside the CBC buildings at the intersection of Georgia St. and
Hamilton St, the crowd amassed once again to hear more music
and speeches.
With any gathering of people on this scale, there are inevitable
downsides: seeing the littering of protest signs on the pavement
after the strike seemed almost sacrilegious. And while it wasn't
at Vancouver's march, the fact that Justin Trudeau couldn't see
the irony in attending Montreal climate strike — literally just after
being told to his face by Greta Thunberg that he wasn't doing
enough to fight climate change — is astonishing.
While it is important for all of us to be active in our own complicity
in climate change, in making everyday choices that don't actively
harm contribute to the rising global temperature and adopting
more sustainable lifestyles, Vancouver's Climate Strike proved
that one of the most productive things we, as individuals, can do
to help in this climate emergency is yell. We showed our anger at
the inaction of our government in adequately responding to the
very real and very pressing issue of climate change and we need
to continue to show it. Any government that isn't willing or able
to take on the task of fighting climate change isn't fit for office.
Please remember to vote in the federal election on October 21.
—Lucas Lund
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine
and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to:
Jasper D. Wrinch, Section Editor
rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences. Feel
free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
it.
Submissions open
*OCTOBER7-28*
16 BANDS
I WINNER
"WE'RE SHAKING THINGS UP/'
GOTO:
CITR.CA
TO APPLY/
^^
^—ii
^F
vionoA avu JAaa
25
 %\kt Wvim
SONGS OF LOVE AND LOSS IN
THE AGE OF FENTANYL
BY HOLZKOPF
music
I ftolzkopf
Songs of Love and Loss in the Age
ofFentanyl
self-released
June  3,   2019
&
^#•1
s the title may imply, Songs of Love and Loss in
the Age of Fentanyl by Holzkopf — Jacob Audrey
Tavesh's experimental project — has an emotional
tenor to all its chaos. Lending shades of industrial and
breakcore to its equivocal title, Songs of Love and Loss is
full of mutant samples and pummeling breakdowns. It's not
only well crafted — it is by its own proclamation a dedication so pertinent, so unsettling, that
I couldn't imagine anything more suitably Vancouver.
The sound of Songs of Love and Loss is hallmarked by sputtering electronics and distort-
ed-to-oblivion beats, feeling at once steely and cyber-noir as in "Mortgage," but also
textured and vicious. Throughout tracks like "Far Off Places," Jacob layers in ribbons of
digital whirring, chopped up soundscapes and jagged yelling — a maximal, clobbering
approach, which is nimbly curled around a splitting intimacy. "Ghosts on Each Street"
lurches headstrong into the heart of it, as unsettling as the album's namesake, the lyrics
consist of a rolling catalog of deaths hung on vocals so coarse it's as if they've pushed
through a hole in the ceiling. "Somewhere to Rest" slows its tremor, but only to lean into the
calls of "I need somewhere to rest," not so much restful as dizzying, inevitably pummeling
the song into a squealing tailspin.
More than a hard and fast sound, it's a direct collision approach that hammers this whole
thing together — as in "Mortgage" with lyrics like "I need an explanation or a transplant,"
or in the electronics constantly skittering like nerves in an acid bath. It captures a tense,
emotional environment that's reaching an exhaustion point, kind of akin to what the album
art signals — a self portrait of Jacob in fur hugging his dog, smothered together with so
much combined fur it could be comforting, but also quite easily claustrophobic. Songs of
Love and Loss is organized around a vivid sense of loss, significant when poised against the
tightening grip of upheaval in Vancouver these days. Listening to this album is like hearing
the force of the opioid crisis, like the sound of Low Tide snuffing out one more art space.
Holzkopf captures an emotional resonance in electronic music that is so formidable, it's
almost pacifying. —Tasha Hefford
Becking
Cut Your Teeth
Mntlecorte
July  5,   2019
f
- unky Vancouver band Necking did not come to play
"with their experienced and powerful debut album,
Cut Your Teeth. It opens with the brash hit "Big
Mouth" — which has the catchiest chord progression I've
heard since playing guitar hero in my basement in middle
school — and keeps that same energy all the way through.
Lyrically, Necking don't shy away from touching on
personal topics, albeit with an often satirical tone. The album runs dives into ideas like being
attracted to your boss, but only because he's in a position of power and you want to climb up
the corporate ladder; not putting up with men who aren't team female pleasure in 2019; and
having cyber sex on online game Habbo Hotel. With a total run time of just over 22 minutes,
Cut Your Teeth is a head spinning-ly short album meant to be played live or to rage with your
friends in the car.
Despite several of the band's members going through a break up while writing and
producing these songs, Cut Your Teeth isn't any old break up album. Necking channel all
of that emotion while not even once making me long for a man. It was excellently produced
by local superstar Jesse Gander (Woolworm, Japandroids), especially for anyone a fan of a
good transition — "No Playtime" into "Drag Me Out" is my personal favourite.
Cut Your Teeth makes me think that if one were to rewrite Scott Pilgrim and have him not
succeed in the battle of the bands, Necking would be the final boss to defeat him using
their secret weapon of raw and honest wit. If one lyric could encompass all of the wonderful
attitude on this album, it would be from the chorus of "Spare Me": "Unless you want to talk
about my degree / I've had a long day don't talk to me." —Gabby O'Hara
b
Kongf
ftinkCooHecortis
July 12,   2019
ft
■ ongf s new 7" release, (.), is a te-riff-ic accumulation
.of catchy licks and ferocious fills that makes me
want to bang my head, but not against a wall or
anything like that. The album, pronounced 'period,' is a
collection of three distinct punk rock tunes that each leave
no room to breath. The band continuously deliver new
ideas via the lead guitar's effect toolbox, or backing vocal
harmonies each track.
The album opens up with "Moving On," a track about getting out of tough situations
you've found yourself in, and knowing when to move on from unhealthy relationships.
The fast paced lyrics that st-stammer at some points to keep along with the rhythm are
incredibly fun to sing along to. The lead guitar mirroring the vocal melodies are a nice touch
and fit very well within the mix. During the breakdown halfway through the song there is
some sweet studio magic where the guitar melodies begin to swap between each earlobe
creating a dizzying but pleasing outcome.
The next track, "The Antidote," takes a step back to assess how gender roles suck. The
song is built on the strong lyrical foundation of a difficult-to-reach answer being an antidote
to toxic gender roles. The same dizzying guitar modulations come back in this track, but with
more kick as I literally visualized little ducks spinning around my head like asteroids orbiting
Saturn. This would be the track I would recommend to get a feel for the sonic space Rongf
occupies.
The final track, "Bitter Suite," is a take on a punk-driven evil classical ensemble like if The
Nutcracker was produced by Queens of The Stone Age —it also has a great music video with
some sweet retro stylish static and CRT effects. Again, the lyrics are about getting out of
tough relationships, but they are markedly more pissed this time. Although the tempo of this
track isn't much different than the others, the drumming really shines. The double kicks and
crazy fast fills make me want to jump out of my seat, hop on a motorcycle and jump through
some flaming wheels of death.
Rong f's rabid rapid-fire record fills a nice void in the Vancouver music-scene for catchy,
riff-centric, adrenaline-pumping tunes. —Jordan Naterer
luax coVuboH
scoff.'
Soft^unEecortis
July 20,   2019
HV-n the beginning of the second track of scoff/ "jano,"
HB" somebody proclaims, "wax cowboy, we're just trying to
^T" spread positivity and a healthy lifestyle," a somewhat
ironic jest where the band attempts to display a placid
cheerfulness in an otherwise distractible and jittery state
of mind that they hold. The music itself radiates under
the past summer months, perhaps a distraction from the
mindless wandering brain of someone who's lost someone important. On scoff/, the tight
four-piece wax cowboy — featuring Atley King on guitars and vocals, Tai Mason-McCrea on
guitar, John Domenici on bass, and Eric Sanderson on drums — present a case for catharsis
in poppy garage rock and power pop.
With some slight pop-punk influences on their sleeve, wax cowboy evoke that sense of
sorrow and dejection from failed relationships while trying to seem apathetic about it. On
opener "scott," sparkling guitars pour in like a waterfall gushing forth liquid metal, a tone of a
mercury-like substance that is prevalent throughout the album. And although this quality can
evoke a summer-like disposition, there's an apparent loss of hope and motivation: "I used to
be fine / With somewhere to go." On "toothpaste," the dual-guitar attack of Mason-McCrea
and King glisten like steel. Cleansing punk riffs are painted over with glitter all the while
King's lyrics are in the mundanities of hygiene: "I don't think I'll be okay / If your toothbrush
is going away." One can look into something as small as a missing toothbrush from a former
partner, then end up reminding oneself about your loneliness.
There's a way King stretches out certain notes in most of these tracks that conjure the
classic frontperson of a garage rock band from the '60s. It conveys an understood kind
of yearning and authenticity as exemplified at the end of the record on "glove guy." The
track offers a parting gift, a blanket for your troubles: "Gloves can keep you warm / Gloves
go on your hands / When your hands are cold / Mine are here to hold" sings King. There's
a charming youthful energy espoused by wax cowboy when they decide to switch gears
to a tone of playfulness. When life is difficult, gloves provide kindness. Gloves deliver
endurance. Gloves give you love. One can only go so far in drowning your sorrows in your
tears, and singing your heart out. —Anton Astudillo
UNDER REVIEW
October - November, 2019
 gaum
You&l
self-released
July 25,   2019
■awn's new EP, You & I, transports the listener into
an adolescent dream world. The first track, "We
Were Kids" has the frolic of piano keys to introduce
the listener into the frame of childhood. The steady build
of electric guitar situates the listener in a nostalgic state
of mind, marred by some turmoil of the past. The song
continues to build into a steady crescendo that dissipates,
with unsteady lyrics — "From that day on, something was gone" — turning the childlike song
into a more complicated meditation on nostalgia.
The titular track, "You & I," maintains the youthful motif of the EP by entering with a
mobile chiming. But with the deep vocals and sensual muted trumpet, the childish chimes
are juxtaposed against a more mature sonic palette; the lyrics further reveal the loss of
communication in a relationship, grown out of its idealized beginnings. "The problem was
our poetry got caught in the other." The lyrics reveal the emotional depths of the relationship
that took place during adolescence and beyond.
The electric guitar intro in "Wanna Do Right" shreds the sober mood of the previous track.
Although not as lyrically complex as the other tracks, the song creates a feeling of optimism
towards a new relationship. Yet, the abrupt cut off before the final "there" in "All the love is
there," leaves the listener wondering if the happy tune didn't have a satisfactory ending.
The album finishes the thematic element of adolescence with "Song For A City." Moved
on from a relationship and entering a new life in a new city, the isolation in the song is
palpable. The strong vocals paired with the country electric guitar accompaniment doesn't
fit with the usually upbeat motion of city life, further instilling the isolation being painted by
the lyrics.
The EP's gradual transition from childhood to early adulthood takes the listener through
an array of sounds that reveal the complexities of growing up. The alternating between
upbeat and slower tempos mimic the ups and downs of life while still leaving the listener
with a positive outlook. —Kianna Pizans
I ffimtljefflute
Welcome to the Sad Cafe
Aingfislier-BIueH
August 31,   2019
Tim   WeksmTo
TkMiA   neStut&fo
arely a year after his last full-length, Do In Yourself,
Tim the Mute returns with yet another album filled to
its breaking point with self-deprecating sadness. The
title of the new album, Welcome To The Sad Cafe, perfectly
captures Tim Clapp's light approach to typically heavy
issues, like depression, suicide and heartbreak. The first and
titular track sets the tone, with lyrics like "You can find me
at The Sad Cafe / Facedown in the bolognese / I'm deep in my head over something I said /1
can't control myself, I need help."
Unfortunately, the light-heartedness of the first track is quickly eclipsed by Clapp's intensely
heavy and personal subject matter. The auto-biographical lyrics are so hyper-specific that
they become unrentable: "That guy you were dating was pretty whack /You nearly gave him
keys to the range / When I said that I didn't like college kids / He asked if that's a class or a
cultural thing." While it's admirable that Clapp so openly and honestly shares the particulars
of his trials and tribulations, hearing the minutiae of his failed relationships doesn't make for
an especially captivating listen. At times, it feels uncomfortable — almost invasive — to hear
such specific details of someone else's romantic life.
Musically, Welcome To The Sad Cafe is a solid, well-produced indie rock record, and the
juxtaposition of Clapp's always-expressive and routinely-pitchy voice against the clean and
neatly arranged instrumentation plays into Tim the Mute's classic self-deprecation. But, like
the heaviness of the lyrical matter, Clapp's elastic vocals tend to bog down the album.
All things considered, Welcome To The Sad Cafe is not without its standout moments.
In addition to the crisp and exciting lead guitar throughout the track, the chorus of "Ain't
It Funny" is both catchy and clever, making it one of the most memorable moments on the
album. But the song that stands far above the rest is "Back." In a moment of clarity, Clapp
sheds away all the irony and excess. Just his voice, plus some background noise, as if he
were performing at an open mic night, Clapp delivers an almost-sung, almost-chanted
stream of words that hit exactly where all the rest of the album's lyrics seemed to be aiming.
The urgency Clapp imparts into every lyric charges them with an emotional weight that isn't
felt anywhere else in his discography
"Now I'm all muddled up/Will I ever again be the guy that I was?/Am I the same person
you met in '01? / Am I the same guy you tried kissing for fun? / Fun, fun, it wasn't fun /
You know what it was / Who am I to myself? / What would I pay to be rid of the pain?"
—Lucas Lund
Jom Comp
Crawl
self-released
September 6,   2019
(TW-om Comyn is the musical project of Edmontonian Jim
Hi" Cuming, whose rich baritone and songwriting are
2w staples of the Edmonton music community. On his
newest full-length, Crawl, Cuming creates a meditative
slow burn of an indie rock record; it's his most affecting and
precise release to date.
"Mountain," the opening song, sets the tone perfectly
for the album — the isolated feeling throughout is perhaps best appreciated late at night or
alone on the road. The song has a striking airy-ness to it — the electric guitars sound like
they were recorded in an empty parkade, and Cuming's vocals rest in a wide, thoughtful
palette. The production is ingenious throughout the entire album, and much credit for this
goes to Calgary musician and Crawl producer Chris Dadge, who also collaborated with
Cuming to co-arrange the entire record.
"Street Sweeper" is another example of compelling production, and one of the strongest
waivaa aacmu
songs on the album. Beginning with what sounds like an acoustic guitar bedroom recording,
the song soon unfurls into a groovy and melancholic rhythm, with a repeated metallic synth
note embedded in the rhythm and multiple guitars played in unison. At times, it feels like
Dadge and Cuming are taking a leaf from fellow Albertan songwriter Chad VanGaalen's
book; the few backward tape echoes and analog synths add a freakier element to the more
traditional electric guitar arrangements.
At times, the striking production absorbs Cuming's rich baritone into the mix, and it
can feel like his songwriting is sinking into the song. For the most part this is a welcome
sensation but occasionally, Jom sinks so deeply that his songwriting gets lost in the murk.
However, just when the gloom threatens to envelope the listener entirely, the album arrives
at the propulsive rock song "Change Your Mind," on which Comyn claims "I'm going where
the wind is warmer." It's a welcome change, a fresh driving song where Jom's pop writing is
front and centre without being trite or cliche.
Cuming's lyrics are dense and poignant, addressing loneliness and isolation. The word
'crawl' is used many times throughout the album, each time with a different context,
embodying a slightly different idea. It's a task to discover why exactly Comyn is so fixated on
the idea; but after repeated listens, it seems like Cuming is not always crawling in defeat, but
rather as a first step in a slow return to motion. "The Song Can Take The Weight" addresses
the hard to articulate comfort that comes with simply having distance, as Cuming sings "Out
in the sound of a sudden distance / Out in the distance under a memory, ringing out."
Crawl is a beautiful and expansive album. It feels distinctly Canadian, and reminds me of
the first time I drove across the country. That trip felt like a mental reset, where the distance
and terrain gave me the space to feel emotions I had avoided addressing. This album feels
like a similar catharsis, addressing pain and exhaustion, but with a resilient tone and a
constant sense of movement. —Sam Tudor
pobcasts
Cuerytlpg economics
Caoe (Soblm Betuiorli
umans live in a world with limited resources —
'everything comes with a price. To obtain something,
one must also offer something of equal value in
return — the basics of trade. When the desired item is
especially low in quantity, people are willing to offer more
to get this item in their hands - Microeconomics 101. From
pre-modern bartering to The Wolf of Wall Street, economics
have evolved as humans endlessly search for something
more in the game of life.
However, before beating the game, one must first understand it. Enters Everything
Economics, a podcast hosted by economics major Tahlia Murdoch under the Cave Goblin
Network. This show takes a keen observation towards concepts of economics scattered in
elements of human lives and explains them in a simple way through relevant examples.
Each episode of Everything Economics begins through the entry point of a current
event, then identifies and defines the economic concepts at play. In the most recent
episodes, these are: the lifespan of memes and their influence on social media; Earth strike
and the costs of climate change; science funding cuts in Australia (the home country of the
host); reproductive rights, from abortion, to contraception, to paid parental leave, and the
unfair pricing of internet services in Canada.
In the recent episode titled "Meme Economics," Murdoch whimsically uses unconstrained
meme culture as an analogy to a free market — the internet offers no barrier of entry
for anyone interested in the industry of meme production. Meme likers and sharers are
equivalent to buyers and popular memes are recreated as a supply would increase in
response to a high demand. Listening to someone compare the stages of a meme to
economic indicators of meme value is at first perplexing, but Murdoch composed tone
convinces her listeners to think critically of "dank" and "dead" memes.
Her interest in Game of Thrones and superheroes has also led to several episodes
exploring the science of production and consumption of goods in fantasy universes, such
as how citizens of Westeros would ration food to survive unpredictable winters on episode
33. Regardless of reality or fiction, equality and environment sustainability are common
themes throughout the episodes. Everything Economics is an informative medley of current
events and pop culture with amusing connections to easily digestible economic theory.
—Daniel Chen
WATER & POWER
STEVEN DUNN
Books
Watcr&pouier
Steven Dunn
€arpaulin£RO, press
Wi
est Virginia born author Steven Dunn is no stranger to
the twisted military culture of the United States. Drawing
from a decade spent in the Navy, Dunn takes a touching
personal memoir and twists it into a collection of short vignettes
that collectively bring the reader inside the reality of military life.
Dunn's second novel, Water & Power, takes an unflinching look into
the United States military and the social and psychological issues
which brood below the surface of the smiling, patriotic soldier. Dunn's
eloquent prose succeeds in lulling readers into the world he creates,
enriching the non-fiction structure with biting narrative voice and unapologetic detail.
Looking into every crevice of military society, Dunn doesn't hesitate to strip bare the
power dynamics of such a world. With each chapter Dunn chips away at the repercussions
of a system which fails to benefit those who uphold it; a system which values glimmering
d
 illusions of power and proud, silent dignity. Each personal interview offers a new perspective:
a veteran reminiscing on the horrors he witnessed during his service in Iraq; a patriotic
soldier, proudly boasting about his service; a husband recalling his wife before she left,
pleading him to leave the Navy. The reader is left with a handful of information, with no
forced moral direction. This novel lays out the rules of the game, but never forces the
spectators to pick a side.
At the same time, one is surprised at every turn with the poetic beauty of the harrowing
true stories Dunn crafts into a stunningly real portrayal of military life. With a combination of
interview-style sections, personal entries and a collection of images, academic discussions
and historical allusions, Water & Power expertly brings together all these different forms of
storytelling into one, flowing novel. Although at times grotesque, the novel reminds readers,
with a humorous tone, to look beyond the shiny exterior of the military, and criticize the
system which serves to protect the United States. Dunn's Water & Power is sure to make
you laugh one minute and stare out of the bus window with disbelief in the next. —Milena
Markovich
To submit music, podcasts, books, or film for review consideration to
Discorder Magazine, please email:
Jasper D. Wrinch, Section Editor
rla.discorder@citr.ca.
I      Send physical items of any kind to Discorder Under Review at
CITR101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, v6t1z1
The zeal deal.
We've seen cheap knock-offs.
We've seen expensive knock-offs. But for
quality and wear, nothing steps up
like the original, time-tested
Blundstone boot.
Pull-on comfort since 1870.
That's the deal.
#S8S
LeatherLmed Classic
Rustic Brown
$229.95
Tasmania Australiaibvd
Australian Boot Company
104 Water St., Vancouver 604-428-5066
1968 West 4th Ave., Vancouver 604-738-2668
Free shipping at australianboot.com
'JJJJ))j)jjjjjjjjjn\\
LOOKING FOR CONVERSATIONS ABOUT ARTS AND CULTURE, POLITICS,
SOCIAL JUSTICE AND THE ENVIRONMENT?
WE'VE GOT H PODCAST FDR THAT.
BELOW THE RADAR
AMPLIFYING IDEAS FLYING BELOW THE RADAR.
LISTEN & SUBSCRIBE ON APPLE PODCASTS, SPOTIFY, GOOGLE
PLAY, SOUNDCLOUD, OR WHEREVER YOU FIND YOUR PODCASTS
b
->
Available November 8th from Mint Records
?Q Box 2612, Dancouuer, SC D6K 2V6 • mintrecs.com
UNDER REVIEW
October - November, 2019
 (gams, iififfloOTM jpimmmm mimm
it
DISCORDER MAGAZINE RECOMMENDS  LISTENING  TO  CiTR EVERY DAY!
n
SPonDap
Cues&ap
Sftctmcstiap
CJmrsDap
ifriDap
&>aturDap
gmn&ap
6AM
TRANCENDANCE
CiTR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
6AM
7AM
GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICKIN"
CiTR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CANADALAND
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
7AM
8AM
CONVICTIONS
S; CONTRA
DICTIONS
AUTUMN
GHOST
MIX
CRACKDOWN
PACIFIC PICKIN"
8AM
9AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
THUNDERBIRD EYE
YOUR NEW SHOW
9AM
AUTUMN GHOST MIX
10 AM
SPILL: RADIO
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10 AM
11AM
CiTR CHARTS WITH
KAILA
MORNING AFTER SHOW
U DO U RADIO
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM
12 PM
SYNCHRONICITY
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
VIVAPORtJ
THE ROCKERS SHOW
12 PM
1PM
SUMMER GHOST MIX
LE BONNE NUIT w.
VALIE
fine.
TOO DREAMY
1PM
2 PM
FLOWER POWER HOUR
DIALECTIC
ASTROTALK
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
2 PM
3 PM
SUMMER GHOST MIX
SUMMER GHOST MIX
AUTUMN GHOST MIX
AUTUMN GHOST MIX
3 PM
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
4 PM
SHOES ON A WIRE
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
C-POP CONNECTION
FEELING SOUNDS
4 PM
5 PM
DELIBERATE NOISE
INTO THE WOODS
ARTS REPORT
DEMOCRACY WATCH
WORD ON THE STREET
MANTRA
LA FIESTA
5 PM
6 PM
AUTUMN GHOST MIX
THE
SPENCER
LATU SHOW
RADIO    FRIDAY
PIZZA    NIGHT
PARTY     FEVER
NASKA VOLNA
6 PM
7 PM
EXPLODING HEAD
MEDICINE
SHOW
SAMSQUANCH'S
HIDE-AWAY
AUTUMN GHOST MIX
THE LEO
7 PM
8 PM
MOVIES
AUTUMN GHOST MIX
CANADA POST ROCK
SHOW
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
NINTH WAVE
LIVE FROM
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
HELL
TRANCENDANCE
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
AUTUMN GHOST MIX
AUTUMN GHOST MIX
THE AFTN SOCCER
11PM
12 AM
SHOW
12 AM
1AM
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
CiTR GHOST MIX
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
1AM
2AM
OF INSOMNIA
CiTR GHOST MIX
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
D
<-hey, this kind of cell means this show is hosted by students
They are also highlighted in this colour on the guide,
you can't miss it.
 TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM, ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
• programming@citr.ca
BREAKFASTWITH
THE BROWNS
8AM-11AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiarand exotic in a
blend of aural delights
•  breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmaH.com
• CITR CHARTS WITH KAILA
11AM-12PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Playing tracks from
CiTR's weekly charts!
Tune in to find out what
we're pumped on.
• programming@citr.ca
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B in spirituality, health and feeling
good. Tune in and tap
into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
• spirituaIshow@gmaiI.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
IPM-3PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Host Chrissariffic takes you
on an indie pop journey
not unlike a marshmallow
sandwich: soft and sweet
and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and
held close to a fire.
• programming@citr.ca
SHOES ON A WIRE
4PM-5PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Music + Stories, by and
for Women + Queers.
• tnsta: @shoesonawirepod
• Twitter: @Shoesonawire
• DELIBERATE NOISE
2PM-3PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Love rocking out to live
music, but don't feel
like paying cover? Tune
in for the latest and
greatest punk, garage rock,
local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
• programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television,
along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge
new tracks, and strange
goodies for soundtracks
to be. All in the name
of ironclad whimsy.
• programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On airsince 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker
takes listeners from the
past to the future of jazz.
With featured albums
and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
• programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time
music and its derivatives
with Arthur and the
lovely Andrea Berman.
• pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
8AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the
LGBTQ+ communities
of Vancouver, Queer FM
features music, current
events, human interest
stories and interviews.
• queerfmvancouver@gmaiI.com
SPILL: RADIO
IOAM-IIAM, TALK
Spill: Radio extends and
enriches the themes of
the Spill exhibition at the
Belkin Gallery. Each week
on Spill, performances
and field recordings
will offer insight into
artistic processes engaged
with the environment,
extraction and embodied
performance.
• programming@citr.ca
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM, ROCK /POP /INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera
plays your favourite
eclectic mix of Ska, reggae,
shoegaze, indie pop, noise,
with live music, local
talent and music you won't
hear anywhere else. The
morning after what? Whatever you did last night.
• Twitter: @sonicvortex
• FLOWER POWER HOUR
2 PM- 3 PM, MUSIC
The Flower Power
Hour, hosted by Aaron
Schmidtke, is designed to
give a platform for artists
that are underrepresented,
underappreciated or even
underplayed. While the
primary focus of the Flower
Power Hour is to play quality music to ease listeners
into their afternoons, it
is also to educate them
on these artists played.
• programming@citr.ca
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/POP
a show with music
about being uncool
• programming@citr.ca
• INTO THE WOODS
TUES gPM-6PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Lace up your hiking boots
and get ready to join Mel
Woods as she explores
music by female and
LGBTQ+artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree?
Nope, just another great
track you won't hear
anywhere else. We provide
the music mix, but don't
forget your own trail mix!
• programming@citr.ca
FLEXYOURHEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and
hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from
around the world.
• programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
8pm-iopm, hip hop
Uncensored Hip-Hop
& Trill Sh*t. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Homeboy
Jules, Relly Rels, Malik,
horsepowar & Issa.
• dj@crimesandtreasons.com
• www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED:
CAN/AUS MUSIC SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds past and present,
from his Australian homeland. Journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
• programming@citr.ca
SUBURBANJUNGLE
8am-ioam, eclectic
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information and insanity.
• dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths
of contemporary and
cassette vinyl underground.
Ranging from DIY bedroom
pop and garage rock all
the way to harsh noise,
and of course, drone.
• programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future. Genre need not apply.
• programming@citr.ca
LE BONNE NUIT WITH VALIE
1PM-2PM
A new show on the air?!
From mellow and indie, to
more experimental, join
La Bonne Heure' for a
little bit of it all- both in
English and en Francais!
With some interviews on
the horizon and many
good times too... soyez
surde nous rejoindre!
• programming@citr.ca
DIALECTIC
2PM- 3PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Defined as "The way in
which two different forces
or factors work together",
Dialectic brings the distinct
music tastes of hosts
Chase and Dan together.
Each episode showcases a
variety of indie rock and
beyond, bound together by
the week's unique theme.
• programming@citr.ca
C-POP CONNECTION
4PM-5PM, C-POP /INTERNATIONAL
C-POP Connection brings
you some of the most
popular songs in the
Chinese music industry!
The show also talks about
Chinese culture to connect
you to the Chinese society.
Tune in with your host DJ
Sab to get updated on the
hottest singles, album,
and news in C-POP!
• cpopconnection@citr.ca
• ARTS REPORT
SPM-6PM, TALK/ARTS &
CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR
brings you the latest and
upcoming in local arts in
Vancouver from a volunteer
run team that likes to get
weird! Based primarily in
Vancouver, BC,yourshow
hosts (Ashley and Jake)
are on the airwaves.
• arts@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
ALTERNATING WED 6:PM-8PM,
ECLECTIC/LIVE INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing
Energy with LIVE Music
and laughter! A variety
show, featuring LIVE music,
industry guests and insight.
The material presented
is therapeutic relief from
our difficult world. We
encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
• vancouvermedicineshow@gmail.com
• THE SPENCER LATU SHOW
6pm-6:3dpm, talk/ political
commentary	
The Spencer Latu Show is
a progressive politics show
that speaks truth to power.
We provide much needed
coverage, and media
criticism of stories at the
municipal, provincial,
national and international
level from the perspective
of two progressive working
class students; Spencer
Latu and Ajeetpal Gill.
We are based out of
UBC in Vancouver BC.
• program ming@citr.ca
SAMSOUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM,
ROCK/POP/INDIE
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins,
every Wednesday.
• program ming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-IOPM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and
the snow capped rocky
mountains, A-Ro The Naut
explores the relationships
of classic and contemporary stylings through jazz,
funk and hip hop lenses.
• Facebook: Ninth Wave Radio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
lOPM-HPM, TALK
Listen to your favorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
• program ming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER
ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird
Locker Room gives you a
backroom perspective on
varsity athletes, coaches
and staff here at UBC.
• program ming@citr.ca
TUURSMjJ
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces
you to topics through his
unique lens. From news,
to pop culture and sports,
Issa has the goods.
• program ming@citr.ca
• CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
8AM-9AM, TALK/COMEDY/SOCIAL
OBESERVATIONS	
Convictions and
Contradictions is about
our own convictions and
contradictions about
society, shown through
social observational
comedy. To boot, a comedy
of human psychology and
instrumental music.
• programmingcitr.ca
• THUNDERBIRD EYE
9AM - 9:30AM, SPORTS / TALK
CiTR Sports interviews
UBC's premiere athletes,
discovers the off-field
stories of the Thunderbirds,
and provides your weekly
roundup of UBC sports
action with hosts who
are a little too passionate
about the T-birds.
• programmingcitr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
IOAM-IIAM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I
interview bands and
play new, international,
and local punk rock
music. Broadcasted by
Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
• rocketfromrussia.tumbIr.com
• rocketfromrussiacitr@gmaiI.com
• @tima_tzar
• Facebook: RocketFromRussia
U DO U RADIO
11 AM-12PM, ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from
across the decades. Acid,
Afro-beat, Lo-Fi, Ambient
and plenty of classic
house. Let Galen do his
thing so u can do urs.
• programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Sweet treats from the
pop underground.
Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts.
• duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
FINE.
1PM-2PM, TALK/THEATRE
A previously recorded
evening of storytelling
and otherwise.
Each show features a real
nice mix of Canada's best
emerging and established
writers, comedians, musicians, artists and more.
It's fun, yeah. It's
a fine time.
Hosted by Cole Nowicki,
recorded by Matt Krysko.
• Twitter:n @afineshow
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, TALK/SCIENCE
Space is an interesting
place. Marco slices up the
night sky with a new topic
every week. Death Starts,
Black Holes, Big Bang,
Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
• programming@citr.ca
• FEELING SOUNDS
4PM-5PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
All about indie music and
its many emotions. I'm always looking for local and
student artists to feature!
• programming.executive@citr.ca
• DEMOCRACYWATCH
SPM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CUR-
RE NTAFFAIRS	
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
• news101@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s)
every week performing in
the comfort of the CiTR
lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the
country and around the
world are nice enough
to drop by to say hi.
• programming@citr.ca
TRlMjJ
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance,
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
• auraftentacfes@hotmaif.com
CANADALAND
(SYNDICATED)
87AM-8AM, TALK/POLITICS
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on
media criticism as well
as news, politics and
investigative reporting.
Their website also has
text essays and articles.
• jesse@canadalancIshow.com
CRACKDOWN
8AM-9AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
The drug war, covered
by drug users as war
correspondents. Crackdown
is a monthly podcast about
drugs, drug policy and the
drug warled by drug user
activists and supported
by research. CiTR is airing
all episodes weekly until
early November 2019.
• @crackdownpod
• THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, FILM/COMMENTARY
The Reel Whirled is an
hour long adventure
through the world of film
focused around the UBC
Film Society's scheduled
programming where we
connect with campus
organizations and local
cinematic events to talk
about films and stuff.
• programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
• daveradiopodcast@gmaif.com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP / SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on
each other and leave mix
tapes and love letters in
each other's lockers xo
• Facebook: @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF RADIO
ART in a snack size format!
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
• Twitter: @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour
and a half of Manhattan
Clam Chowderflavoured
entertainment. Doot doola
doot doo... doot doo!
■  nardwuar.com/rad/contact/
• WORD ON THE STREET
gPM-6PM, ROCK/INDIE/POP
Hosted by the Music
Affairs Collective, every
episode is packed with
up-to-date content from
the Lower Mainland music
communities including
news, new music releases,
event reviews and upcoming events, interviews
with local musicians and
industry professionals
and discussions over
relevant topics.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
• RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7:30PM, TALK/COMEDY
Every week Jack, Tristan
and a special guest
randomly select a conversation topic for the entire
show; ranging from God to
unfortunate roommates.
Woven throughout
the conversation is a
cacophony of segments
and games for your
listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
• FRIDAY NIGHT FEVER
6PM - 7:30PM, DISCO/R.&B
Friday Night Fever- an
exploration into the disco
nation B-) Every alternating
Friday, join Sophie and
Max on a journey of disco,
funk, and RnBon CiTR
101.9. Night-time is just
around the corner, so get
ready to head out with
some groovy tunes.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
CANADA POST ROCK
7:30PM-9PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Formerly on CKXU,
Canada Post Rock remains
committed to the best in
post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and
basically anything your
host Pbone can put the
word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
• program mi ng@citr.ca
• Twitter: @pbone
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-IOPM, TALK/RADIO DRAMA
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through
the art of Radio Drama.
Story readings, poetry
recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host
Brian MacDonald. Have
an interest in performing?
Guest artists are always
welcome, contact us!
. Twitter: @Skatds_ Hall
SaTURMjJ
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30AM-6am, electronic/
AMBIENT
The Late Night Show
features music from the
underground Jungle and
Drum and Bass scene,
Industrial, Noise,
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
• citrfatenightshow@gmaiI.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31st year on CiTR,
The Saturday Edge is my
personal guide to world &
roots music, with African,
Latin and European music
in the first half, followed by
Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
• steveedge3@mac.com
VIVAPORU
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
• program mi ng@citr.ca
POWER CHORD
IPM-3PM, LOUD/METAL
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darkerside of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided
by Coleman, Serena,
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
• program mi ng@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and
blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
• codebfue@paufnorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, ELECTRONIC/MANTRA/
NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the
many faces of sacred sound
- traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic
array of electronic and
acoustic beats, music,
chants and poetry from
the diverse peoples and
places of planet earth.
• mantraradioshow@gmaif.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, TALK/RUSSIAN
Informative and entertaining program in Russian.
• nashavofna@shaw.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
7PM-9PM, INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews and
only the best mix of
Latin American music.
• programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, ELECTRONIC/RETRO/
TECHNO
Every show is full of
electro bleeps, retrowave,
computer generated,
synthetically manipulated
aural rhythms. If you like
everything from electro
/ techno / trance / 8bit
music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
• Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no
concept of genre, style,
political boundaries or
even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our
focus on a series, The
Solid Time of Change, 661
Greatest Records of the
Prog. Rock Era -1965-79.
We're not afraid of noise.
• Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
OF INSOMNIA
IAM-3AM, EXPERIMENTAL/
GENERATIVE
4 solid hours of fresh
generative music c/o the
Absolute Value of Noise and
its world famous Generator.
Ideal for enhancing your
dreams or, if sleep is not on
your agenda, your reveries.
• programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
8AM-10AM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
A repeat of Tuesday
morning's favourite
Bluegrass Show - Bluegrass,
old-time music and its
derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
• pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SHOOKSHOOKTA
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
• programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time.
Playing the best in roots
rock reggae, Dub, Ska,
Dancehall with news
views & interviews.
• programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
3PM-5PM, COUNTRY
Real cowshit-caught-
in-yer-boots country.
• programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL/LATIN
AMERICAN
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
• programming@citr.ca
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, INTERNATIONAL/BHA-
JANS/OAWWALIS/SUFI
Presenting several genres
of rich Indian music in
different languages, poetry
and guest interviews.
Dance, Folk, Qawwalis,
Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also,
semi-classical and classical
Carnatic & Hindustani
music and old Bollywood
numbers from the 1950s
to 1990s and beyond.
• rhythmsindia8@gmaif.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, ELECTRONIC/DEEP
HOUSE
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house,
prog-house and techno +
DJ / Producer interviews
and guest mixes.
• programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, ELECTRONIC/TRANCE
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from
Vancouver, BC since 2001.
We favour Psytrance, Hard
Trance and Epic Trance,
but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, Hard Dance
and even some Breakbeat.
We also love a good
Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
•  dj5mileymike@trancendance.net
THEAFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer
discussion show is centered
around Vancouver White-
caps, MLS and the world of
football. Est. in 2013, the
show features roundtable
chat about the week's big
talking points, interviews
with the headline makers,
a humorous take on the
latest happenings and
even some soccer-re la ted
music. If you're a fan
of the beautiful game,
this is a must-listen.
• programming@citr.ca
lslaub°f
• STUDENT PROGRAMMING
ECLECTIC	
Marks any show that
is produced primarily
by students.
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a
show to CiTR? We are
actively looking for
new programs. Email
programming@citr.ca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease
you from the moonlight.
Moon Grok pops up early
morning when you least
expect it, and need it most.
CITRGHOSTMIX
ANYTHING/EVERYTHING
Late night, the on air
studio is empty. Spirits
move from our playlist
to your ear holes. We
hope they're kind, but we
make no guarantees.
• 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC	
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive
time block is for BRAND
NEW programmers who
want to find their feet,
practice their chops, and
rep CiTR's playlist. Get at
us if you want this airtime
• @CiTRRadio
• programming@citr.ca
 immm
ptember2019
Artist   I  Album
Label
F
NIMKISH*#+
Heartbreak On The Coast
Self-Released          |
! ^
Rae Spoon*
Mental Illness
Coax                 |
I ,
Gal Gracen*+
Fantasy Gardens
Jaz Records            |
! *
Bridal Party**
Too Much
Kingfisher Bluez        |
! »
Black Belt Eagle Scout*
At The Party With My Brown
Friends
Saddle Creek          |
I ,
Debby Friday*#+
Death Drive
DeathbombArc         4
! »
Chris-a-Riffic*+
Treats
Self-Released          |
I .
Becky Ninkovic*#+
Woe
Paper Bag              |
! »
Puzzlehead*#+
Big Sniff
Stucco                |
I   "
FRANKIIE*#+
Forget Your Head
Paper Bag              |
l«
JerkJails*#+
Intra Slop
Self-Released          |
N
alimony*#+
release
Alarum Records        |
I"
Non La*+
Demos
Self-Released          |
!m
Lightning Dust*#+
Spectre
Western Vinyl          |
I   «
Tim the Mute*+
Welcome to the Sad Cafe
Kingfisher Bluez        4
I"
Little Destroyer*#+
21
Strange World         |
I   0
kylie v*+
lotus eater
Self-Released          |
|M
Murray Porter*+
Stand Up!
Self-Released          |
!«
Kevin Hackett*+
YOUTH
Culdesac              |
I*
Chain Whip*+
14 Lashes
Sabotage Records       |
I a
Dadweed*+
Mighty, Always
Kingfisher Bluez        4
h
Helene Barbier*#
Have You Met Elliott?
Michel                |
In
Winona Forever*
Feelgood
Self-Released          |
I*
Ada Lea*#
what we say in private
Next Door /Saddle Creek^
U
Brevner*
1K1GAI Vol. 1
Urbnet                1
I a
Snotty Nose Rez Kids*
Trap line
Minay Music            |
l»
Alex Little and the
Suspicious Minds*#+
No Control EP
Light Organ Records    |
13.
Mauno*#
Really Well
Tin Angel              |
N
Kalvonix*+
Summer Nights, Long Drives,
Vol1.
Virus Tower            |
Entertainment          £
!»
Yawn*#+
You&l
Self-Released          |
I*
Samurai Champs*
Cabernet Sauvignon
Trifecta Sound Co.      4
h
Blocktreat*+
After Dark
Self-Released          |
h
The Vicious Cycles*+
Motorcycho
Pirates Press           |
|a
Kristin Witko*#+
Zone of Exclusion
Kingfisher Bluez        |
I m
Devours*+
Iconoclast
Artoffact             1
|»
Blue Moon Marquee*#+
Bare Knuckles & Brawn
Self-Released          |
|»
Sigh*#+
Images
Self-Released          |
|»
EX-SOFTNESS*#+
Hollow Ritual
Thankless             |
l»
Snackland*#+
Anyway, Wizard Time
Self-Released          |
l«
Necking*#+
Cut Your Teeth
Mint                  |
I   4,
Spring Breaks*#+
In Celebration of Excellence
Self-Released          |
I®
Dumb*#+
Club Nites
Mint                  |
I*
Corner Boys*+
Waiting For 2020
Self-Released          |
I  «
Kamikaze Nurse*#+
Bucky Fleur
Agony Klub            |
I m
Purple Mountains
Purple Mountains
Drag City              |
!<«
Sara Carbone*#+
Irrationale
Self-Released          |
I*
Orville Peck*
Pony
Royal Mountain         |
I*
Sunrise Special*+
Saint Helena
Self-Released          |
I*
Mr. Merlot*+
City Sex Vol. 2
Self-Released          |
I sd
Sam Dowdell*#+
Less Than Three
 2
Self-Released          %
&mm^
Q^^S^^t^S^^^^^d
HRHllRiRllRHi
j*
«
i2   +4
"«
J
FRIEW &SS*!
DEVIL MAY WEAR
198E21STAVE
* 10% off
EAST VAN GRAPHICS
304 INDUSTRIAL AVE
* logoff
LUCKY'S BOOKS
& COMICS
3972 MAIN ST
10% off books and comics
RED CAT RECORDS
4332 MAIN ST
* 10% off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
3934 MAIN ST
A free DIY button with any
purchase over $5.
AUDIOPILE RECORDS
* 10% off
SPARTACUS BOOKS
3378FINDLAYST
* 10% off
STORMCROW TAVERN
1305 COMMERCIAL DR
* 10% off food
RUFUS GUITAR
& DRUM SHOP
1803 COMMERCIAL DR
* 10% off strings and
accessories
DOWNTOW
THE CINEMATHEQUE
1131 HOWE ST
* 1 small bag of popcorn
per person per evening
DEVIL MAYWEAR
1666 JOHNSON ST UNIT #110
* 10% off
FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
147 E PENDER ST
Free Cover to Midnight Mondays & Happy
Ending Fridays (before 10:30 pm)
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
&ART EMPORIUM
1238 DAVIE ST
* 10% off
RED CAT RECORDS
2447 E HASTINGS ST
* 10% off
SAVE ON MEATS
43 W HASTINGS ST
* 10% off food
THE PINT PUBLIC HOUSE
455 ABBOTT ST
* 20% off food bill
VINYL RECORDS
321W HASTINGS ST
' 10% off new and used
ESTSI
THE AUSTRALIAN
BOOT COMPANY
1968 W4TH AVE
15% off Blundstone CSA boots
THE BIKE KITCHEN
6138 STUDENT UNION BLVD, ROOM 36
* 10% off new parts and accessories
KOERNER'S PUB
6371 CRESCENT ROAD
* 10% off
RUFUS GUITAR
& DRUM SHOP
2621 ALMA STREET
10% off strings and accessories
STORMCROW ALEHOUSE
1619 W BROADWAY
* 10% off food
TAPESTRY MUSIC
4440 W10TH AVE
10% off in-stock music books
VIRTUOUS PIE
(UBC only)
3339 SHRUM LANE
* 10% off
BOOK WAREHOUSE (Broadway)
632 W BROADWAY
* 15% off
EAST VANITY PARLOUR
2482 E HASTINGS ST
* 10% off
HOOKED ON PHONO (Burnaby)
4251 HASTINGS ST
* 10% off
 October 8 October 9 October 9
COSMO SHELDRAKE ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES NIKKI LANE
Fox Cabaret
Commodore Ballroom
Wise Hall
October 11
LUCERO
Rickshaw Theatre
October 11     October 11
MIKE DOUGHTY g J.S. ONDARA
Fox Cabaret    Wise Hall
October 12
S0N6H0Y BLUES
Rickshaw Theatre
October 13     October 15
GOOD MORNING     BLACK LIPS
Wise Hall
Wise Hall
October 16
BLACK PUMAS
Rickshaw Theatre
Rio Theatre
October 17
CORY WONG
Fox Cabaret
October 21     October 23
LUCY DACUS I JONATHAN BREE
Fox Cabaret
October 24
THE ADICTS
Rickshaw Theatre
October 25
SHOVELS & ROPE
Commodore  Ballroom
October  26
WHITNEY
Venue
October  27
BUILT TO SPILL
Rickshaw Theatre
October 28
JONATHAN RICHMAN
Rio  Theatre
October  31
MIAMI HORROR
Fortune Sound Club
November 1
G0LDR00M LIVE
Fortune Sound Club
November 1
SAN FERMIN
Venue
November 2
FRANKIE COSMOS
Fortune Sound Club
November 7
THE BABE RAINBOW
Fox Cabaret
November 13
LIGHTNING DUST
Fox Cabaret
November  8
DUNE RATS
Rickshaw Theatre
November 9     November 9
MIKAL CRONIN I TWIN PEAKS
Fox Cabaret      Venue
November 14
TOW'RS
Wise Hall
November 21
SLEATER-KINNEY
Commodore Ballroom
November 15      November 19
NOAH GUNDERSEN   JULIA JACKLIN
Venue
Venue
November 27 I    November 28
MOON DUO SHOW ME THE BODY
Venue
SBC
November 2 9
HARLEQUIN GOLD
Wise Hall
Follow @tlmbreconcerts  for chances   to win   tickets!

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0385844/manifest

Comment

Related Items