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  ttfOCStiAW
254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
COMING SHOW
BLACK WIZARD
10TH ANNIVERSARY GIG
ANCIIENTS, WE HUNT BUFFALO,
HASHTEROID, EMPRESS
10 YEARS OF
10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY SHOW
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GONE IN APRIL
Additi
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blueprint
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cuco
(ALL AGES/19+)
COMETHAZINE
(ALL AGES)
THE MARIAS
BBOYS
BODGEA AND DUMB
MIYA FOLIK
VENUE
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FORTUNE
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FOX CABARET
PIXX
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FOX CABARET
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THE DRUMS
EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE!
IMPERIAL
FOX CABARET
THE MIDNIGHT
COMMODORE
NO FUN AT ALL
OLIVER TREE
CHARLIE CUNNINGHAM
NITZER EBB
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FOR ADVANCE TICKETS AND MUCH MORE
 TABLE of COtlTEIITS
SUMMER 2019
COVER: PHOTO OF BABY BLUE BY ALISTAIR HENNING.
JFeature*
06   -  COLE PAULS
Indigenous Futurisms, but Make it Punk
08  -  BABY BLUE
Death, Lore, and Techno
10  -  KAMIKAZE NURSE
Soundtrack to a Deleuzian Romance Norel
GD&ttor*'* iptote
^"^7W\   s we nurse our collective eclipse hangovers, take comfort in the words that
V       I   await you. Pour a hot cup of joe, open all your windows and crank the
■        I   stereo so loud your neighbours are slightly concerned as to why you might
\J I   be playing Pachelbel's "Canon" on repeat. In the East, we have the sun,
and we have Cole Pauls. His brilliance, warmth, and humility, bringing lightness and
strength. In a world obsessed with distorted notions of power he demonstrates it's true
meaning. In the South we have the forest; Vanessa Kwan's words serve as a reminder
that sustained efforts bear fruit, and community nurtures the heart. To the West is the
roaring sea; Kamikaze Nurse embraces the darkness, decay, and death that is intrinsic to
the natural world. And in the North we have the stars; and there Baby Blue personifies
with grace, that there is life after death and destruction, bearing a promise of love, a
return to innocence.
Hold onto your hats. Life is a highway — and this is a convertible.
xoxo,
Chandra
14  -  VANESSA KWAN
A Conversation with a Director
tfje Hegula r*+ otfjer tfrnts*
20
20
12
13
16
21
22
23
- Wristband
Unibrow Arts Festival
- Filmstripped
Bhittos by Elle-Maija
Tailfeathers
- Art Project
By Sara Baar
- July 2019 Calendar
- Under Review
Music  + a little  extra
18 - Real Live Action
Just music this
time around
CiTR Program Schedule
CiTR Program Guide
June  2019  Charts
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CUDDEMT
MENTORSHIP PROGRAM
JULY 23 - 25TH, 2019
CURRENT
MENTORSHIP PROGRAM
JULY 23 - 25TH, 201 9
MEET THE PARTICIPANTS AT WWW.CURRENTSYMPOSIUM.COM
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FILIHSTRIPPED
BHITTOS BYELLE-MAUATAILFEATHERS
words by Lidia Cooey-Hurtado  //  illustrations Alejandra Sanmariiego
"I don't take shit from ANYONE"
Elle-Maija Tailfeathers' mother
declares through painted speech
bubble, read aloud by a child
narrator in Sami. We are well into hour
14 of sunlight on the longest day of the
year, and the Cinematheque is screening
Bihttos, Tailfeathers' fifth film, a 14-minute
documentary that recounts the epic love
story of her parents and the systemic
injustices that influence it.
Post-introduction, the first moments in
the film are 100% cartoon: bold colours,
simple lines. A girl looks through a reel
viewer at slides from her past, the camera
entering into the Viewer itself, framing the
story from her perspective. Through digital
hand-drawn, collage animation Tailfeathers
gradually introduces photographs and
other more "realistic" images to the story
as the child narrator ages and becomes
more aware of the details of her world.
These vibrant scenes are the mixed-media
creation of animation director Kunal Sen
and, animation assistant Tisha Deb Pillai.
They use a bright, emotive visual palette
paired with the immersive instrumental
music of Jordan Wilson and Chad Neufeld.
Overall it shows both the selective realism
of a photograph and the intense but limited
perspective of childhood. As the narrator
(Tailfeathers' stand-in) grows, reenactments
and personal documentary footage are used
to tell the story. Throughout this portion
of the film, audience perspective is often
confined by tightly composed frames and
sparse shots, a roving spotlight providing
only a small circle of light at a time. The
position and motion of the camera often
hides the features of the main subject, or is
kept very tight to a single face, obscuring
the background. These approaches draw
attention to not only what we are able to
see, but what remains unseen. During an
emotional scene, we can see the back of
her father's head, obscuring his expression
from the viewer. Important information
is constantly withheld. Tailfeathers has
created an experience demonstrative of the
context available to children as they live
their lives and bear the consequences of
other people's choices.
Today, June 21st, is 'National
Indigenous Peoples Day', as
declared by the Government of
Canada in 2017. It was known as 'National
Aboriginal Day' before then, and as
'National Aboriginal Solidarity Day' before
that. 'National Aboriginal Solidarity Day'
was established in 1982 by the National
Indian Brotherhood, now the Assembly
of First Nations. It was in part a response
to the impending 1982 repatriation of the
Constitution Act, when clauses affording
Indigenous people certain rights under
the British Crown were at risk of being
dropped from the Canadian constitution.
The Constitution Express was one of the
most famous protests for the recognition
of these rights, a protest Elle-Maija
Tailfeathers mother attended, as recounted
in Bibttos. In this very specific 1981-82
moment, Tailfeathers' mother participated
in the same fight that brought about
'Indigenous Peoples Day', and even though
establishing 'Indigenous Peoples Day' was
not the overall goal, both her riding of the
Constitution Express and the establishment
of Indigenous Peoples Day served the
broader fight of advancing acknowledgment of Indigenous rights, a movement
Elle-Maija Tailfeathers continues.
Elle-Maija Tailfeathers, a member of
the Kainai First Nation and Sami from
Norway, was in New York during the June
21st screening. Despite this, she took the
time to film an introduction to Bibttos and
her feature C3sna?3m for their Vancouver
screening. Seated in front of a camera, she
looks straight down the lens, acknowledges
the xwm30kw3y3m (Musqueam), Sslilwsta?
(Tsleil-Watuth), and Skwxwu7mesh
(Squamish) territory that the screening takes
place on, and asks the audience to consider
what it means to be here, on this day, in
what is currently known as Vancouver in
what is currently known as Canada. She
asks settlers to do the work of reflection
and learning about Canada's relationship
with Indigenous people, and their personal
implications in this relationship.
Bibttos , in spite of demonstrating deep
resilience in the face of government-perpetrated violence, is funny. This is especially
evident during the frenetic animated
moments that depict her lovelorn father, or
100 reindeer on an airplane, as well as the
narration delivered by Maret Aile Gaup
Beaska and Tailfeathers herself, with their
controlled delivery of both wry humor and
difficult facts.
The riveting, nuanced quality of the piece
is astounding. Elle-Maija Tailfeathers has
produced, written, and directed a wonderful
work. As an audience member, I am sure
it will stay with us for a long time after
today's solstice, as we emerge, blinking, into
the unset sun.
Co-directed with Kathleen Hepburn,
Elle-Mdijd Tailfeathers' most recent feature
film, The Body Remembers When the World
Broke Open premiered at the Berlin Film
Festival in February 2019, and will be
appearing at select festivals.
monday productions
FILMSTRIPPED \   Bhittos   by   Elle-Maija  Tailfeathers
5
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | SUMMER 201?
somebody into existence, a superhero per se,
who would they be? Yonr experiences undeniably inform the
paths of your imagination, so it could be fair to assume that
ouwouiddesignsomeonewhorenectsyourexperrencesupm
arth. ha Cole Pauls eom.es and mustrattons, We see both a re e«
^daprojeetion.Anorehestratorofsuperheroesmhtsownnght.Pauls
and beyond.
transcribes stories onto paper,
COLE
INDIGENOUS
FUTURISM
words by Lexi Mellish Mingo
photos by Scott Rossi
illustration by Karla Decoran
Cole Pauls comics are stylistically and
intellectually complex, weaving in
cultural and linguistic context with
his own punk flare. "I'm really influenced
by underground and indie comics, but
I'm also really guided by my culture and
heritage" expresses Pauls. Cole Pauls is
Tahltan but grew up on Southern Tutchone
territory in the town of Haines Junction,
Yukon and is a Champagne Aishihik
citizen. The artist and story-teller imagined
his destiny into existence during his earliest
years of grade school.
"I wanted to be a comic artist since I
was in kindergarten," expresses Pauls. It
all started when Paul's mother, who was
adopted, reunited with her biological
family. "When I was six, I met my mom's
biological brother, who was a comic artist
and worked in the video game industry,"
explains Pauls. "He had a career based off
just drawing, and that was my first introduction to believing that I could actually be
a professional artist." Cole Pauls has been
practicing his own brand of Indigenous
Futurism since then.
Envisioning himself and his community
in the future is a recurring theme in Pauls'
work. His connection to his home and
language has been a major influence
throughout his creative practice. Cole Pauls
gives credit to a work in particular that
inspired him to dedicate his practice to his
community and culture.
"There's this one book that I read as
a child that I was obsessed with called
Alsek's ABC's," Pauls says excitedly. "The
story is an alphabet book of hunting in the
Alsek Valley, where an Indigenous teenager
goes hunting with her brother, looking
for a moose" he explains. "I couldn't
believe there's an actual book about my
hometown" says Pauls.
"When I became a practicing artist I
decided I should make a book that could
make myself feel that way again." Pauls
expresses. When considering the audience
for his book, Dakwakdda Warriors, Pauls
explains: "I made my book for Yukon
Indigenous youth as a learning tool and a
way for them to see themselves in media. I
wanted to give them the same feeling I had
with The Alsek ABC's."
Through observing both the success of
his Uncle's artistic career, alongside his
experience with The Alsek ABC's, the
groundwork for Pauls future endeavours
was laid. In his own work, Pauls plays
with Indigenous identity by contradicting
stereotypes and expressing Indigenous
individuality. Pauls is currently completing
Dakwakdda Warriors as a collection, which
will be released in October.
The first issue of Dakwakdda
Warriors came out in 2016, telling
the initial story of his trilogy. The
first book follows the Indigenous youth
power rangers, Ts'urki (Raven) and Aghay
(Wolf), as they protect the sun from Villains
Cyber Na'j (bushman) and Kwaday Dan
(long ago people). The story was inspired
by Raven Steals the Sun, a creation legend
belonging to Indigenous communities of
the Pacific Northwest. Rather than having
typical non-human superpowers, Ts'urki
and Aghay's use technology to protect their
culture and language. "I didn't want it to
be like, this person has the ability to fly,
because no one has that ability," explains
Pauls. "I wanted to show it could be anyone
in that suit."
Cole Pauls' relationship to his language
becomes very apparent when reading
Dakwakdda Warriors. Pauls embeds
Southern Tutchone words within the comics,
creating a space for learning and appreciation. "My community teaches Southern
Tutchone starting in kindergarten all the
way through to grade 12, so that's what I
did," says Pauls, "my book is really accessible in the sense of how I've written in the
language." As you read the current edition
of Dakwakdda Warriors you are prompted
to learn and absorb Southern Tutchone
words, with the assistance of a glossary.
Pauls makes it very clear that he is
not the first and only Indigenous
comic artist. Pauls pays homage
to artists such as Gord Hill who penned
500 Years of Indigenous Resistance and
Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas who created
Red: A Haida Manga. Both artists came
long before Pauls, but their work is
nowhere near outdated.
a
'Cole Pauls'
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"When I looked more into Michael
Nicoll Yahgulanaas, I found out he'd been
doing comics for almost 50 years at this
point," surprised Pauls, "The grunt gallery
released a collection of his called Old
Growth, and there are comics he did in that
book from the '70s. He did it for the Haida
newspaper and they're all about saying
fuck you to the oil tankers," he follows.
"They're so punk but they're also super
informative, all done in form line." prides
the young artist.
It's no doubt that the feelings of political
resistance and cultural strength emitted
through Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas' work
have inspired the traditional and counter-
cultural narratives embedded in Pauls'
comics and illustrations. The stories from
the past continue to speak to the minds of
today, who will tell the stories that will
beam into tomorrow. The story of the
Dakwakada Warrior is both a story and a
tool for the next generation of comic artists
and writers.
"Indigenous Futurism, to me personally,
is to be able to see yourself in the future
generations ahead and not accept that our
culture is a thing of the past, because it
is in the present and we are practicing it,
and we want to continue practicing it,"
explains Pauls. "I want Indigenous youth
to read my book and see themselves and
their culture 1000 years from now. It's the
idea that we're still here and we'll be here
in the future."
After the release of the Dakwakada Warriors
collection 2K October, Pauls will be heading on
a Northern book tour. The artist has already
started expanding his work beyond paperback
pages, working with Cloudscape Comics
on a story about the burning down of his
Grandfather's cabin. The artist has also been
commissioned by the city to create a utility
box. For this project, Pauls has partnered with
Cease Wyss, a member of the Squamish Nation
to create a series of eight mask illustrations
that represent sacred plants of the Squamish
Nation. You can find more work by Cole
Pauls at Lucky's Comics on Main Street and
Spartacus Books on Commercial drive.
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"Cole Pauls'
A
 FEATURE  .
wo weeks after releasing her album Death of Euphoria, Baby Blue was
on a plane ready to begin her first tour of Europe. The music she is taking
across the Atlantic demands attention, emotion and expression. It is in
every way Baby Blue.
k
'Baby Blue'
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Baby Blue's relationship with music
began with her career as a DJ.
Inspired by the iconic DJs of the
90s and early 2000s, she uses DJ equipment
as instruments. Baby Blue explains that,
not unlike the experience of composing her
music, when she performs live she loses
track of time and space. "I love DJing," she
enthuses, " [...] I love seeing people just
kind of lose themselves and dance and being
the one curating that."
The music Baby Blue is sharing in Death
of Euphoria connects listeners to her
own life and identity. The album draws
attention to her ability to view death as
an opening to, rather than a closing of,
life. Baby Blue explains that one of her
sources of inspiration when making Death
of Euphoria was the Tarot card of Death:
"Death is not a scary thing, it's a door that
opens and changes your life and rejuvenates you." "I feel like I've died in many
ways and then come back," she reflects,
insisting on the positivity of death. "Like
how a phoenix emerges stronger every time
in its life cycle."
Addressing the ability to find a source of
life in ashes, Death of Euphoria is deeply
personal. "A lot of the sounds on that
album are just from personal experience,"
Baby Blue shares, "The music is just a
personal reflection that I think a lot of
people will be able to connect with. And I
think a lot of people do hear the pain in it."
Death of Euphoria, Baby Blue explains, is
about "that euphoric feeling of being with
somebody who in the end is violent towards
you. And that it's actually quite a beautiful
thing to let that go."
The abuse that trans women
experience is brought into light in
Baby Blue's music video Visage of
Truth. Working with one of her closest
friends and one of the artists she most
admires, Alex Kazemi, Baby Blue recreated
the traumatic experience of being sexualized
and used by a man. The video became
"a way to work through the trauma."
Baby Blue expresses her gratitude for the
opportunity to work with Kazemi on the
project, noting that "he was really able
to translate the darkness into a visual
medium." The video indeed captures an
eerie, haunting darkness. "I hope people feel
unnerved by it. Because I feel like it's a very
intense song, it's a very intense video. I hope
people feel unnerved by it because I felt very
unnerved for many, many months."
The darkness of Visage of Truth and
the album that contains it is connected to
the image of ashes giving life to a phoenix.
The goal is "to push forward a new type of
beauty." She sees the beauty she is working
to express mirrored in "people who are
unwinding their trauma." "We need to
understand that we have to start thinking
about things in a global perspective, and
not just an individual sense of self. That
beauty is expressed in anyone, whoever it
may be, actively trying to do that."
Finding love beyond trauma is a
grounding message of Baby Blue's
work. "I think just the statement
of loving yourself and sharing it is very
powerful, because we all are very wounded
creatures that don't do that. We allow our
traumas to take ourselves," Baby Blue
explains, "And I really just want to share
love with people."
While Baby Blue doesn't associate
her work with a political message, she
acknowledges that her experience as a trans
woman has strongly influenced her role
and identity as an artist: "I try not to let
things like material qualities of myself be a
defining factor for my work, I would never
say that, but it's part of it." She explains,
"My identity has only really formed in the
last little while because I lived my life so
unaligned with my soul until recently. After
being immersed in such darkness, now I
definitely feel that my identity as a musician
has changed, because I am a trans woman
in this industry that is dominated by white
men, and people are responding well to it."
Baby Blue now feels she is driven by new
life. "I feel very fresh right now in my life,"
she explains, "I always say that I'm one
years old because I feel like Blue came into
my life in the last year." The past year has
been a source of confidence and energy for
Baby Blue. "I feel very at ease with myself.
I feel like my identity is solid, I feel like my
voice is solid, and my will is being enacted
when I am performing and through everything Baby Blue."
Baby Blue's goal is for her music to
evoke emotion. "I hope [people] feel
something, period, from the music," she
says, "Whether they hate it, whether they
love it, whether they like it. As long as
they feel emotion through it and it makes
them think about something, I feel like I'm
doing my job." "I hope my music connects
with every human out there," Baby Blue
continues. "The Baby Blue message is
to love yourself so you can share it with
others. And to protect other people,
especially trans people."
In an effort to prevent the perpetuation
of violence against trans people, Baby
Blue and her team spread 500 posters
around the city. The posters simultaneously draw attention to violence against
trans women and emphasize Baby Blue's
defining message of love and forgiveness,
concluding with a statement of purpose:
"so that what happened to me does not
happen to anyone else."
"I had a lot of people messaging me
saying that it was such an important
thing to see walking to work," Baby Blue
remembers, "Other times we were walking
down the street and we could see people
had torn them down. It was a powerful
thing that happened." Baby Blue is not
afraid of taking risks and opening up. "I
don't think people were ready for that," she
reflects, "But we're here."
The act of being present, of being here,
is essential for Baby Blue. She reflects that
"just being is resistance." "We're at this
point right now where trans identifying
people and to turn death into life is characteristic of Baby Blue's identity: "I have
to fight every day to be who I am, to be
seen as valid for who I am. And although
it's extremely exhausting, I love a good
challenge. I'm a soldier at heart."
Baby Blue's European tour will take her
from Berlin to Paris, Barcelona to the Czech
Republic. "I hope people stay tuned because
I'm not going anywhere," Baby Blue shares
in an expression of her excitement to
continue making and sharing her music. "I
hope to bring this voice to the mainstream,"
she declares, "I think there's a place for me
there." In her words, Baby Blue has her
sights on the world.
"Baby Blue'
A
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It's a classic grey July day, summertime sadness is the name
of the game and what better fitting way to meet with dark
lords of noisy rock Kamikaze Nurse. Seated on a patch
of dead yellowing grass I succumb to the witticisms of
Adams Family values. The band is both wholesome in it's familial
intimacy yet grim, celestial and, dare I say, raw.
Having gone through several configurations featuring past members
like Mareesa Holmes of Cave Girl
fame, Late Spring alumnist Nik Gauer,
the band finds themselves fully settled
into their present configuration. They're
now comprised of original members John
Brennan, an old cowboy in the experimental music community; and renaissance
woman KC Wei, alongside new members
that include her sister Sonya Eui of Necking
on bass, and Ethan Reyes, a local music
darling with an extensive CV boasting such
tender projects as Bedwetters Anonymous
and Puzzlehead.
The band finds their humble beginnings
halfway around the world, in South Korea.
It was there that the notoriously multi-talented KC Wei found herself grappling with
the intrinsic loneliness all too familiar to I
the journey of a solo music project: "That
was in March [of 2018] and I was really I
missing playing in a band." She recollects
"I was playing some hazy solo stuff and
just feeling really alienated and alone. I
missed playing with people. Then John and
I were messaging and from there it led to
us jamming."
In spite of the newest members only
joining the band as recently as last
November, their chemistry has fuelled and
nurtured the collective creative process in a
way that could be described in literally no
other way than a Deluezian romance.
"I think this band has made me a much
better guitar player. On these new songs
I'm able to do shit I probably wouldn't
have been able to do when I first started
practicing," Reyes reflects "the songs are
so weird, and they force me to think in a
different way about playing guitar."
"Like Deleuzian?" Wei quips.
"Like Deleuze. They make me play guitar
in a Deleuzian way." Reyes confirms.
Brennans background in experimental
music fosters a reciprocal relationship when
participating in the bands creative process
"I've mostly played in kind of improv
music... This was a challenge in a way for
me, and it was exciting because I got to have
the time to play with these incredible people,
and think and compose differently on the
drums..." he expresses "I think a lot of my
approach to playing is a little bit more... it's
stranger. And I think I get that from [playing]
with [musician] Jake Hardy - Jacob Audrey
Taves aka Holzkopf [...] playing all these
disjunct beats. I try to take from that palette
and those microrhythms and micropatterns
and then incorporate them in this setting. I
feel free compositionally with this project
and that nobody's like, "You're going off the
rails, this is too crazy."
For Sonya, Kamikaze Nurse has offered
a new way of relating to and performing
music outside of the realm of her classical
music beginnings and upbeat post-punk
endeavours, "Literally I feel like my body
changes when I play compared to Necking
its so weird [...] its like birthing a different
persona [...] [Necking is] very freeing in that
it's mostly for fun's sake. But in Kamikaze
Nurse it feels like shrinking into a ray, if
that makes sense. It's very... I just keep
thinking violent is the word to describe it.
It feels so intense, and I even notice I don't
smile when we play at all..." Sonya reflects,
"Because I just feel so fucking cool." she
adds jokingly.
Iv  ei contributes riffs and while she
I I  previously wrote much of the
^F^r    material, the lyrics have evolved
into a more collaborative process, with
Reyes penning "Blue Garlic Man," and
both Eui and Brennon completing "Johnson
D." While she was part of spearheading
the bands formation, she embraces sharing
equally in the creative process. "When a
riff is starting to come out in my head, I
can see how everyone can contribute and
fill it out more, and trusting that 'maybe
this riff sounds like this now', but being
okay with bringing it to the group and
having it sound completely different when
the layers are added up. I actually really
love that; that's what I look forward to."
Reflecting on her growth since her previous
band, Late Spring, it's clear her experiences
in Kamikaze Nurse have enriched her
creatively, "it sounds so affected to me now.
I definitely feel that, finally, I've moved on
from that project, 'cause that project meant
so much to me. But Kamikaze Nurse is
more fulfilling 'cause I feel like I'm actually
where I'm supposed to be, or I wanted to
get here when I was in Late Spring."
Rather than an explicit concept,
Bucky Fleur (titled after publishing
artist Jo Cook's best friend)
explores visual esoteric themes, conjuring
mood and feeling. The relationship each
member has to their intimate experiences
with literature and film finds its place
amidst the dense layers of sound. The
album manages to evoke the cinematic
— and albeit intellectual — with a rough
irregularity and subtle humor that frees it
from the vulnerabilities of pretension.
"When I wrote the lyrics [for Johnson D]
I was reading Mayakovsky, I was reading
his revolutionary poetry, and it's very
bloody and cruel. And like, colourful..."
Sonya reflects.
Similarly, Reyes draws from literary
influences, "The lyrics for "Blue Garlic
Man" were Joseph Conrad and Deleuze. A
lot of my lyrics for my other stuff as well
have a lot of nautical themes. Just because I
love Joseph Conrad and that's all he wrote
about... [in] "Blue Garlic Man," one of the
lines is just about sinking a boat, basically.
That comes in a lot of my other songs as
well... lots of rivers and boats."
"Each of the songs are kind of like their
own little world [...] because there's lots of
parts and it's not always really a verse-chorus-verse-chorus banger, " Brennan elaborates, "it seems like even within one song
you'll be transported into a different place
[...] [they're] more dimensional compositions
instead of linear compositions, where we're
able to experience these sounds together."
"For me the most powerful kind of
artwork is evocative of a mood. Or a
feeling, and that feeling is the thing that
sticks with you, 'cause you have those
feelings all the time throughout your life,
whether it's like heartbreak or excitement or
desire, and then we just have these movies
or books or songs that trigger those moods
and feelings. So I think it is all related but
I don't really know what comes first?" Wei
muses, "I think they influence each other in
this circle. It's like nature's circle... of decay
and desire."
The visceral, immersive nature of the
band's work creates a space for both the
audience and its members to be transported,; a process that has bloomed
emphatically, like sarcastic blossoms on a
grey July. The guitar, the drums, the bass,
the vocals — these pollinators of rock
and roll let us know this is only just the
beginning for this transcendent band.
"Kamikaze nurse'
1.
   FEATURE
Discorder magazine | SUMMER 201?
A
C     O     N     V     E     R
A    T    I     O
W    I    T
VANESSA KWAN
words by Fiorela Argueta II illustrations by Dona Park II photo courtesy of Spencer Quir
^^9^^   o start the new year, grunt gallery made an official
announcement that long-term program director, Glenn
^^^ ^   Alteen, will be stepping down from the role after his 3 5-year
\    commitment to the artist-run centre since its inception in
1984. By early May, it was decided that the position will be passed
down to grunt gallery's curator, Vanessa Kwan, who has been with the
gallery for about five years.
In late 2017,1 sat down on behalf of Discorder with Vanessa to
discuss her role as Curator at grunt gallery as she balanced her own
artistic pursuits as an artist, and her involvement in other organizations
such as Other Sights for Artists' Projects. Almost two years later,
Discorder sat down once again with Vanessa to follow-up her transition
as program director at grunt gallery.
•
Fiorela: Why don't we begin by discussing
your transition into your new role?
Vanessa: Sure. It is an interesting time
for grunt at the moment. I've been
working for five years at grunt at
the capacity of curator, so I already
know the context of what grunt does
and the position we are in. Right
now, we are at a moment of growth
due to all the projects we are taking
on: the Blue Cabin Floating Artist
Residency; the Mount Pleasant
Community Art Screen; the Rebecca
Belmore publication that we are
launching in August, our international
programming, and, of course, our core
exhibitions programming, grunt has
been expanding in different directions.
When I stepped into the role of
Program Director, it was really clear
to me that my interest is in helping the
organization get through this growth
period and find a way to support all
these activities. In the next six months,
I do not have immediate plans to create
change; it's more about getting to know
the organization through the financial
side: grant writing, budgeting and
fitting all the pieces together.
Glenn is still around isn't he? Right now,
there are technically two directors.
Oh, yes. The plan is to have a year of
crossover and training as I take on the
new role. Glenn has a magical way
of bringing the right people in and
allowing the organization to grow
with all the different voices of what
grunt is. What I want to do is to learn
as much from Glenn and figure out
what my particular take on that is. It's
a work in progress!
Is there something about the role that you
did not expect so far?
It's not necessarily 'unexpected,' but
what became more apparent to me
is how every project we do has a
particular 'ecosystem' or community
behind it. Exhibitions programming
is one thing; then there are the more
emergent projects like the Mount
Pleasant Community Art Screen; and
long-term projects like the Blue Cabin,
which has an extremely complex
community forming around it. There
are also other international projects I
want to initiate, and those are equally
intricate communities. I guess on the
surface grunt seems like a homogenous
organization, but when you really take
a look, grunt has many branches. This
is super exciting; I'd like to continue
making these meaningful connections
while respecting the cultural mandates
of those communities.
How is your role different as a Program
Director than it was as a Curator? What
has been added or changed?
Some things are similar — the focus
on programming and working with
artists, but this new role is much more
concerned with holding the higher level
vision for the organizations. I also
supervise staff as well as overlook the
financial aspects, such as budgeting and
fundraising; facilities management; and
more involvement with the Board —
Definitely a step-up in responsibility.
What is it like managing people who were
your co-workers at first? You already
have a friendship with them. Will you be
allowing more democracy in regards
to decisions?
That's a conversation in progress. I
have increased responsibilities, but my
leadership style is very collaborative
and very transparent. If I am concerned
about something, then I will express
it. I also will not pretend to have all
the answers — that's not my nature. In
regards to my colleagues, my focus is
on how to continue working together
and how I can support them better in
what they do. As a leader I want to be
someone who is uncompromising to
the values that drive grunt, but also be
responsive to new modes of operating
and emergent practices at all levels of
the organization, grunt has always been
a space that questions established forms
of leadership and remains open to other
voices; that won't change.
As Curator, you were part-time, but as
Program Director are you full-time?
Yes.
So before you had more free-time to
pursue your own artistic interests.
Yes. I had time to concentrate on my
artistic practice, I am a producer /
curator with Other Sights for Artists'
Projects, and have also held other
positions — teaching at Emily Carr, and
overseeing other, independent projects.
That's awesome! Not only are you a
curator, but an artist, an art educator, and
also a director. How do you expect to
juggle all these different roles?
My new position demands more time
from me, so I will be mainly focusing
in my role at grunt going forward. I'm
very committed to grunt and its future.
I share the sentiment! I have volunteered
at grunt for a few years now. And I think
it's the people and all the communities
that support grunt that make me excited
to partake in all the great projects or
opportunities that Dan Pon, grunt's
Archives Manager, shares with me. I
always feel so welcomed and that I have a
%
Uanessa Kwan'
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HUTAH
space where I can express what I think.
grunt is certainly a special place! I truly
believe in this.
Recently there was an Indigenous queer-only
symposium grunt held, grunt has been
the first gallery to have ever done this in
Vancouver. Are you interested in continuing
hosting such events?
Absolutely! Together Apart, Queer
Indigeneities was created by Whess
Harman in conjunction with artist Kali
Spitzer. All the credit goes to them for
their curatorial vision. Programming
such as these makes me think: How
do we as an institution give space
for groups or perspectives that will
resist what institutions do? How do
we bring people in and allow space to
grow organically? grunt has always
been engaged in queer communities,
in Indigenous communities, and queer
Indigenous communities. It is our
intention to do more.
Whess and I were discussing ways to
provide spaces for Indigenous curators
and how we could create crossovers
as well. We want productive exchange
and not be reductive to those we want
to represent, such as 'you are x so we
want you to program x.' We don't want
it to be linear from point A to point B.
I am wondering if you have considered
in creating programming that not only
provides 'safe spaces,' but also allows
people to take what they have learned
to the spaces outside that are not
necessarily as welcoming. I sometimes
feel some programming can make me feel
empowered, but how do I actually use
what I learned outside in the world?
I think for grunt, and for my own
philosophy, there is a question of
change: what are we actually doing?
More than just creating exhibitions or
cultural products, we're also investing
in each other's capacity to keep making
work and to creating productive spaces
for healthy art communities. How do
we create capacity in a community to
keep creating change? So it's not just
what you say — or what shows you
put on — but how you are in collaboration, what relationships you hold
and maintain, and how you invest in
one another in the long term. Ideally
the artists, curators and staff that come
through grunt increase their capacity to
do great work — at grunt and beyond.
I don't often see other leaders in the
world that look like me. I want to
know that there other queer BIPOC
people in leadership positions, that's
important to me.
Similarly to Janus, we have looked into
the past, but now I want to look into the
future. What do you hope to do in the next
year or so in terms of programming? Do
you want to expand grunt internationally?
I'm very excited to keep expanding on
projects such as the queer Indigeneities
program, our archival programming
has grown immensely under Dan's
leadership, and all the other programs
we've already mentioned. The international program will expand as well;
my interest has always been in the
Pacific Rim and in the future we have
projects planned with Australian artists
and possibly other collaborations
around the Pacific. Our focus is always
connecting with the local — and you
can see this clearly reflected in what
we do. The trick is finding ways of
expanding this — our ideas have to
start here primarily and then we'll see
what happens in terms of international
partnership.
I am very excited to be a part of this
incredible team, grunt gallery really is a
special place.
'Uanessa Kwan'
f>
 ■ *
n
Mil
/mages
(self-released)
April   24,   201
images
Sigh is relatively new in the Vancouver scene, despite
being a band made up of veterans: Shelby Vredik plays
guitar, Jenny McDermid on drums, Morgan Ferrier on bass
and Dorothy Neufeld on vocals. Released this past April,
Images is their first record. Entirely self-produced, each song
on Images is sweet and sharp at the same time — a very
effective combination.
Whether in her previous project Swim Team or here on this
record, Neufeld's vocals are always striking. In Images, they
sound close, intimate and quietly sung — a distinct contrast
to the biting, heavily distorted guitars on the tracks. Vredik's
guitar playing is a highlight — her riffs are interesting and
unexpected without being busy or crowded. Songs like "Hydra"
feature catchy, washed out guitar melodies that occasionally
become discordant. The same goes for the end of "Magpie."
This is in line with the overall feel of the album — a meditative,
thoughtful record with deliberately jagged edges.
"Pretty Furious" opens with enveloping acoustic guitars
and a hummable melody before the chord progression
switches into something more melancholy and complex —
alternating between pop-y major progressions and darker,
more augmented chords. As with all the songs on this record,
the guitar panning is very effective — Neufeld's vocals
ground each song as the shoe-gaze-y guitar tones come at
you from all other angles.
The title track, "Images," is another stand out — it's
simultaneously groovy and sad. Neufeld's vocals are at their
most clear as she sings of fading love. A wordless vocal hook
finishes the song in a perfectly wistful way without being
corny or ham fisted. It makes sense for this to be the album's
title track — the band feels at its most unified in this song and
it's easy to bask in its melancholy feeling.
Because each member of the band has been active within
the Vancouver music community in their own right, Sigh
synthesizes all of their experience into something that is
more intimate and lilting than your average DIY rock record.
—Doug Todd
LEAVE
JeremiahlCarolina
(self-released)
May  29,   2019
R EM 1 AH | CAROLINA
Leave's two song EP Jeremiah\Carolina is a dichotomous
venture highlighting the opposing voices of Emma Citrine
and David Knights Cowling against a backdrop of complex
sound. Jeremiah\Carolina is the band's first release since
their 2015 full length album Allow to Remain, and it is the
band's first release as a quartet, despite new members Nicole
Gilley and Bryan Michael not actually playing on the album.
Instead, drummer Jeremiah Ackerman, along with Citrine and
Cowling, make up the personnel for this release.
The first track, "Jeremiah," features vocals by Citrine
reminiscent of Daughter's Elena Tonra. The song begins
with an ethereal introduction combining a strong drum
beat, melancholic guitar and subtle harmonies for a dreamy
layered sound. What appears as a beautiful indie-folk tune
sees an unexpected shift to a more intense and haunting
sound around the three-minute mark, building to a repeat
of the catchy yet profound refrain "I've lost it all now / I'm
not enough / You brought me back home / You filled my
cup / With good intentions / I'm holding on / To where you
brought us / I'm not alone now." The track concludes the
way it started: soft and light like lavender, yet one feels that
they've been on a journey
"Carolina" features the vocals of Cowling and delves
deeper into a more dissonant soundscape that "Jeremiah"
only hinted at. The shadowy-feeling and more experimental
half of the EP offers listeners the National vibes featuring
abrupt yet effective sounds. Engineered by Cowling (and
produced by Citrine and Cowling), "Carolina" testifies to
the promise to not "prioritize loudness, but instead...space,
depth, and timbres" that is written on Cowling's website.
This shorter track (less than four minutes, versus almost
six-minutes for "Jeremiah") has instrumental depth and
highlights Cowling's voice while keeping his vocal levels low,
which intensifies the feeling of the track overall.
"Jeremiah" is an outstanding track and "Carolina
complements" it and emphasizes the experimental side of the
band. Because the tracks are so different from one another, it
leaves listeners wondering which direction Leave would take
a full album. As a whole, the EP combines rich instrumentation with two well-suited voices creating a comprehensive
sound that would be excellent live. —Jeanette Steinmann
16
It's difficult to find bands in today's rock landscape that
deliver a grandiosity in their sound. One may go through
the endless filler of the internet, finding music that may not
stretch past the boundaries of a certain genre. The forward-
thinking Kamikaze Nurse works to eradicate that sentiment.
Led by artist / curator / filmmaker KC Wei, Bucky Fleur offer a
fresh take on shoegaze, noise rock, art-punk and dream pop,
all exhibited in stellar quality — an album with range.
One of the stand out features on this record is the
vibrant production, where dissonant chords illuminate in
cacophonous euphoria. Ethan Reyes and Wei's guitar hooks
beam like distorted lasers as John Brennan's perpetual
drum blasts serve to disembowel, all while frontperson KC
Wei's warm vocals provide a comfort in the chaos. The
music itself feels grand in scope in a way that Sonic Youth
imposed themselves on Daydream Nation. On "Sophie's
Dad," "Dead Meat," and "Weeping Bone," drum rolls and
guitar crescendos signal an intensity that threatens to break
the stage. There's a weight to the way each band member
plays their instruments. The appropriately afflicting out of
tune riffs are played like hammered sheets of metal yet make
an impression that these are proficient musicians at work.
The only sense of stability contained in these songs is Sonya
Eui's bass which drive songs forward. On the end of a track
like "So Blue," guitars and drums become uninhibited as the
bass's rhythm remains steadfast.
As a vocalist, Wei might channel her influence from Cocteau
Twins' Elizabeth Fraser, whose unique vocal delivery operates
to hypnotize one's consciousness. A song like "Sun Song"
showcases that influence, where Wei brings an ethereality in
her "oohs" all the while slogging out an unrestrained whirlwind
of shoegaze-y guitar. Not to mention her penetrating screams
on songs like "Sacred Cow Hot Dog" and "DDD + KNurse"
would definitely impress a punk or hardcore crowd. Lyrically,
she explores dreams ("Darkening mysteries down from the
sky / Passing by little eyes how many years"), and probes
into the existential ("Unnatural feeling / You so boring to me /
Impossible to feel, if I peel, would you heal?"). Guitarist Ethan
Reyes even contributes Thurston Moore-esque schizophrenic
abstractions that boggle the mind on "Blue Garlic Man."
In the end, Kamikaze Nurse delivers an excellent debut
that pays tribute to its influences all the while feeling novel
and genre-breaking. In hopes to find innovative rock music,
Bucky Fleur demands that attention. —Anton Astudillo
COLIN SCOTT RULOFF
Doxology
(self-released)
June  7,   2019
It's always strange to hear what kind of music the people
you grew up with end up making. For two people whose
upbringings were essentially the same, the genres and styles
with which they identify enough to emulate can be shockingly
different. Such is the case for me when I hear Colin Scott
Ruloff's music.
Despite growing up together on Bowen Island, attending
the same schools and moving into Vancouver around the
same time, Colin's music sounds entirely of a different time
and place. Clearly drawing from the likes of Bob Dylan, Dave
Van Ronk and the rest of the Greenwich Village folk scene
in the early '60s; or earlier from the balladry associated with
Hank Williams Sr. and country music in the '40s and '50s; or
earlier still, from the birth of the Delta blues in the '20s and
'30s with artists like Robert Johnson to Son House; all of these
influences, Colin Scott Ruloff wove into his own songwriting.
In early April of 2018, Colin recorded ten tracks of guitar
and vocals, what was to be his first full length album,
Doxology. On April 24, 2018, at the age of 23, Colin Scott
Ruloff died in a tragic motorcycle accident. Colin's close
friends — Noah Gotfrit, Clara Rose, Steph Wall, Aaron
Levinson, Theo Story, John Evans, Sky Lambourne, Cody
Turple and Cloe Logan — took it upon themselves to finish
and release the album. Over the course of the following year,
they layered further instrumentation onto the sparse songs,
fleshing them out into arrangements that they felt Colin was
aiming for.
As they write in the linear notes of the record, "Doxology
isn't meant to represent a tragic loss or a pedestal that
we place a legacy on. Rather, the hope is that the album
will be shared and listened to as it was originally meant
to be — with an appreciation for the songwriting and the
man behind it." In this sense, the posthumous release of
Doxology is a true success. The additional instrumentation complements and elevates Colin's rustic guitar and
understated voice. From square-danceable tunes like
"Going To The Garden" to earnest ballads like "My Lonely
Heart Forgets," Colin consistently wrote songs that sound
as if they had always existed.
But still, it's difficult not to let the context surrounding
Colin's untimely passing colour your interpretation of his
music, especially if you knew Colin, grew up with him, as I
did. Songs that would otherwise have passed by my ear as
yet another gentle folk tune are imbued with meaning that
neither he nor I would have predicted. Specifically, on the
third track of the album "Moon Shining Bright" — with some
of the most tasteful and lush instrumentation anywhere on
Doxology— Colin's voice sings out words that are impossible
not to hear as an attempt to comfort those he left behind:
There's hopes and there's dreams, there's plans and
there's schemes
Don't they sound so sweet
And it's hard, oh it's hard to smile, oh it's hard
Come on and laugh with me
The moon shining bright on this cold night
On the edge of town
I'm walking on down to the water
Saw fireworks
Hold on my friend I know in the end
We'll be alright
—Jasper D Wrinch
UNDER REVIEW
Discorder magazine ! SUMMER 201'
 MALLEUS TRIO
Play Nice
(self-released)
June   15,   2019
Tenor saxophone, upright bass and drums: that's all
there is to Play Nice, the latest full-length release from
Vancouver Malleus Trio. While the ingredients might be
simple, the versatility and musicianship with which Dominic
Conway, Geordie Hart and Ben Brown play their instruments
make for an all but simple collection of modern instrumental
jazz songs.
It's easy to imagine the tenor saxophone taking over
the focus in this instrumentation, with the drums and bass
relegated to play a supporting role. Yet Conway's dynamic
playing doesn't fall into that trap. There are ample moments
throughout the record where the sax is the star, overtaking
the songs with incredibly dexterous solos and piercing wails
— but more often than not, Conway steers the song's focus
away from his own playing, either towards the other two
instruments, or to the trio's collective sound. That being said,
this review wouldn't be complete without mentioning the
virtuosic sax soloing at the end of "Blade Runner Brown."
Geordie Hart's bass playing matches Conway's sax in its
versatility and virtuosity. While Hart definitely firmly grounds
the trio within every song they play, that doesn't mean the
upright bass misses it's time in the spotlight. On tracks like
"Tropical Currency" and "C Plus," the bass switches back and
forth between relentlessly soloing and providing a solid base
from which the other two instruments can explode outwards.
And finally, the drum kit, expertly played by Ben Brown,
is as exciting on Play Nice as it could possibly be. Whether
it's locking in with the bass and holding it down, like in the
titular opening track "Play Nice" to adding atmosphere and
ambiance like in "Old Romantics" to the slow and deep
amove, with almost traD-like hi-hats in "Foahorn Factory."
Brown's drumming occupies just about every role the drums
could play in a jazz record.
Over the course of twelve songs, Malleus Trio shape-shift
from one form of jazz to another, effortlessly pulling off
quick-paced, groove-heavy hard bop of "Thereabouts," to the
amorphous free-improv sections of "5 to 9" and "Half Full."
But the way the three musicians play with one another —
complementing each other's styles, making space for each
instrument and seamlessly locking back in together — is
really what ties the record together. And if any one song that
encompasses all the elements that make Play Nice such an
engrossing record, the final track "Ritual" ticks all the boxes.
—Lucas Lund
SH3E?
ifter Dark
eleased)
July,   2019
Blocktreat is something of an anomaly — an electronic
artist with roots in the rural interior British Columbia
folk scene. This meeting of worlds leads to a very organic,
acoustic electronica — a version of Boards of Canada
that is more 'feet in the dirt' than 'head in the clouds.' His
last album, 201 6's Exciting New Ventures in Fucking Up,
was a sample-based instrumental album that emphasized
Hoffman's nuanced production skills.
After Dark is the first Blocktreat album to incorporate
vocals, guitar solos and verse-chorus-verse style songwriting.
Fittingly, after writing the nine songs for the record, Hoffman
enlisted Daniel Ruiz (Leisure Club), Malcolm Biddle (Dada
Plan) and Jessica Rampling (Heavy Days), to join him as
a four-piece rock band for performing the album live. This
shift in instrumentation is reflected in the overall sound of the
record: while still as dense and layered as ever, the addition
of vocals and chorus-laden guitars add a pop bent to the
ambient Dsvchedelia of it all.
Lyrically, Hoffman's songs focus on the pitfalls of love
using very specific anecdotes and, sometimes,- tongue in
cheek humour. The song "One Horse Town" addresses the
way relationships tend to overlap when one is raised rurally
and the dating pool is small. It's a catchy, lo-fi anthem for
small towns everywhere.
"Slow Burn," situated at the center of the album, is a
standout — a propulsive, frenetic track with a driving beat.
It's the closest to indie rock that Blocktreat gets, as urgent as
he gets on the whole album. Mirroring the song title, Hoffman
takes his time building up the song and adding tension —
the main rhythmic drop only happens two minutes into the
song. Blocktreat has always been good at slowly and subtly
unfolding a song by adding layers. On "Slow Burn," that skill
is used to create tension rather than imbue a sense of calm.
The song "Grief" is another standout, and one of the least
dense on the album. A hummable guitar riff plays over a
lazy, satisfying beat. "It can never just be easy," sighs
Hoffman, again addressing the way we tend to over-complicate relationships. Despite the lyrical theme, this song feels
like a welcome exhale, as if the listener is getting on an empty
highway after weeks of city driving.
Blocktreat's new territory has the potential to confuse
fans of his previous instrumental tracks, music that could sit
comfortably in the background of any given situation. Despite
leaning closer to pop than ever before, After Dark requires
more focus to appreciate. That being said, listeners who take
time with this album (and a good pair of headphones) will be
rewarded tenfold. —Doug Todd
To submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please
email Jasper D. Wrinch at ur.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review
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GALLERY
PATIO & LOUNGE
SUMMER
>T<    SUNSET   SESSIONS
F R I DAY
MAY 10 - AUG 30
7:00PM ONWARD
6I33 UNIVERSITY B
VANCOUVER. BC V6T IZf
FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS I MUSIC I FRIENDS
?I0S   H3MMU8 |   9rti5DpDlTI 19bl00Jia
UNDER REVIEW
 SOFT CEDAR PRESENTS: GRAFTICIAN
(ALBUM RELEASE) / KIMMORTAL
MAY 2019
ILYA KRIVO (ALBUM RELEASE) / CHRIS
BLABER / LAX PHOBIA
JUNE 8 / 240 NORTHERN ST.
1 ith a divided political system, the constant intertwining
^Ar of beliefs and facts and climate change looming
over everything, it's easy to become despondent. But with
a heartfelt expression on raw emotion and moral honesty,
llya Krivo's album release show offered a reprieve from the
seemingly bleak reality in which we live.
But before I can get to Krivo's performance, I must address
the serene welcome Lax Phobia gave to the audience, whose
performance set the mood of the event perfectly. While
complimenting the rising and falling scales cascading out
of the piano with drum beats that became more prominent
as time progressed, the intermingling sounds from the two
instruments began to mimic each other's behaviors, giving
off a sonorous, ringing sound. In other words, Lax Phobia's
instrumental piece sounded like a conversation taking place
between two musical voices. As piano notes trickled by
and showers of drum beats flickered along, the audience's
expression gradually relaxed from scrutiny. Gentle smiles
emerged on several faces, while others diverted their gazes
from looking around the poster decorated room to face the
performance.
Chris Blaber continued this tranquility through his one
hour sonic exploration with mellow sounds escaping from his
electronic stereo, steady drum beats and his serene facial
expression. Blaber's performance ultimately shed more light
on the thematic purpose of the show as he displayed props —
a string of bottle caps, a flat slip of plastic slammed upon his
drums and an image of the ocean's underwater landscape.
A repetition of "plastic" and facts of climate deterioration
escaped from the speakers. After an hour, we were met with
a brief intermission, allowing ourselves a chance to reflect on
our observations of the abstract, yet emotionally expressive
images splattered across the walls.
After the intermission, the lighting became warmer, as a
single string of light bulbs were left to illuminate the room.
Before the night ended, llya Krivo (with his cigar box mandolin)
and the rest of his bandmates — Martin Reisle (cello),
Spencer Swarts (drums) and John Evanson (pedal steel) —
entered the room, charming us with wide-brimmed hats. With
Krivo's opening lines "There's nothing dead about the sea /
Only the people that you see," from the first song off Kingdom
Went, "Nothing Dead," the set seamlessly transitioned from
Blaber's environmentally-focused performance. The lyrics
from the following songs began to move away from this theme,
veering more towards honest expressions of the emotional
turmoil inside the human heart.
Krivo's last song "Dancing with Dogs," drew ohhs and ahhs
from the audience — there was something deeply intimate within
the bluntness of the lyrics. It did more than express an emotional
experience belonging to the singer: it provided the audience a
roadmap to an understanding of the weight of knowledge and the
clarifications that come out of knowledge gained.
Although the show came to an end, the audience's gaze
remained hypnotized to the lead singer and his bandmates.
The emotional honesty of "Dancing with Dogs" had so much
forwardness in it, I found myself breathless with the weight
of moral clarity it provided. Several shouts of "one more!"
resounded within the colorfully decorated room, encouraging
Krivo and his bandmates to play the "Nothing Dead" one more
time. The wise finality of Krivo's performance that day revived
Blaber's environmental purpose for his music, reminding
the audience that the reality we live in is subject to change.
—Joy Astudillo
JUNE14/THECULTCH
The Cultch slowly began to fill as the final concert
presented by Soft Cedar commenced. Providing local
musicians a chance to perform at theatres typically out of
reach, like the Cultch and the York Theatre, Soft Cedar has
hosted a diverse range of artists, including Holy Hum, Only
A Visitor and Khari Wendell McClelland. This time, it was
Roxanne Nesbitt's turn. Any number of Nesbitt's projects
could have been the focus of the show, from her symbiotic
instruments, to various graphically scored compositions,
to her tuned floor tile installations. But this show was
to celebrate the release of Mandarins, the latest EP from
Graftician, Nesbitt's experimental art-pop project.
To open up the night, local hip hop artist and activist
Kimmortal took to the stage. Along with Mary Ancheta on
keys and a guitarist / backup vocalist Ariane Custodio,
Kimmortal played a selection from their latest album, the
Polaris prize long-listed X Marks the Swirl. Despite usually
performing with backing tracks, faithfully reproducing the full
sound and production of their recorded material, Kimmortal
stripped down this set to its essentials. The nearly acoustic
instrumentation left ample space for Kimmortal's lyricism and
vocal chops to shine through. While some songs weren't far
from their typical form — "I'm Blue," the smooth R&B lead
single for their last record was almost unchanged from the
album version, except for the lack of a drumbeat — but tracks
like "Sad Femme Club" were transformed into minimalistic
adaptations of the typically upbeat and energetic songs.
Still, with Kimmortal's infectious energy, plus the immensely
tasteful playing from their band, the songs took on a new and
exciting life.
After a brief intermission, Graftician took to the stage.
Nesbitt stepped behind a table littered with sample pads,
cables and a computer, as her backing band — Joshua Zubot
on violin, Ridley Bishop on clarinets and Mary Ancheta on
keys — took their places. Without a word, Nesbitt triggered
the first track. A stuttering, almost arrhythmic beat emerged
from the speakers; each sample sounded cut apart from the
rest, with jagged seams rubbing up against one another. But
somehow, the disparate collage of sounds snapped together
to create a mosaic-like atmosphere on which the rest of
the band began to play. Ancheta's keys filled in the many
spaces left by the collage of sounds, while Zubot's violin and
Bishop's clarinets ornamented the songs with textural and
melodic flourishes.
While the songs were intricately constructed, with
emphasis placed heavily on texture and rhythm, Nesbitt's
vocal melodies seemed at times to almost be cut free from any
tonal centre, wandering and weaving from key to key. Paired
with the stop-motion video projections that accompanied
all but one of the songs, the evening was a medley of soft
stimulus, with no one aspect immediately grabbing the
audience's attention, yet every piece of Graftician's sonic
and visual mosaic casually asking to be studied further.
—Lucas Lund
PUDDING (ALBUM RELEASE) /
ANYBODYS / NECKING / SHROUDED
AMPS
JUNE 15 /RED GATE
The crowd was still sparse when opening band Shrouded
Amps took to the stage. The bulk of the night's attendees
had not yet arrived or were outside finishing their pre-show
smoke. Still, Shrouded Amps brought a heaviness to the
chill indie pop sound of their recordings that commanded
the small audience's attention. Guitarist Matthew strummed
jangly rhythms in quick strokes while bassist Tracey played
a foundation of staccato and long, sparse notes underneath.
Vocals were mainly performed by Tracey in a soft, dreamy
voice that reached high soprano notes. A standout element of
the set was the drumming from Eirihn, who played innovative
beats and fills as fast as a human metronome.
Following Shrouded Amps was indie-punk powerhouse
Necking. Melissa's high-energy drumming with frequent
cymbal crashes and a pulsing beat drove each song, while
Sonya laid down jumping bass lines and Nada alternated
between melodic riffs and power chords on guitar. All this
was topped off with Hannah's screaming vocals and lyrics
dripping with attitude. The band was forced to end their
set early due to an issue with Sonya's bass. As Red Gate's
sound engineers tried to resolve the issue, Hannah kept us
entertained by doing a semi-handstand with a water bottle
between their feet and trying to pour the water into Nada's
mouth, while Melissa told us about the Habbo cybersex that
had inspired the lyrics to their song, "Habbo Hotel."
Next up was anybodys, who announced that they were
awake and refreshed from drinking cold brew before arriving.
Guitarists Jonelle and Jaclyn shared vocal duties throughout
the set, layering their synchronized talk-singing over
distorted guitar that gave the band's grunge-punk a sludgy
edge. Karen pounded hard rock drum beats that were for the
most part quick-tempo, but sometimes slowed down to lead
a change of pace, anybodys made frequent use of breaks in
their songs, the silence acting as a powerful contrast to the
band's heavy sound.
Last to perform was headliner pudding, promoting the
release of their debut album. After giving shoutouts to all who
helped them put Pop over together, the band launched into
their set, playing "date night," "baby tax," "double happiness"
and other tracks from the album. Paula strummed cheerful
chord progressions and melodies, while Darren's snaking
bass lines weaved around their guitar work. Meanwhile
Cyndi showed off the creativity of their drumming, with each
beat tailored for a specific section of a certain song and no
two beats alike. Over this poppy, post-punk instrumentation, Paula sung catchy vocal melodies with accompanying
backing vocals from Cyndi. What was really notable about
pudding's set was their effective use of changes of pace,
tone and instrumentation within many of their songs, as if
each of those songs were several different tracks wrapped
into one. The crowd was understandably impressed by
pudding, heads bopping along to their songs and cheering
when each one ended. At the close of their set, the audience
even screamed for an encore, which pudding gladly provided.
—Hannah Toms
SLED ISLAND 2019: AMYNELSON/JOM
COMYN
JUNE 19 / CENTRAL UNITED CHURCH
The stained-glass image of a lamp held by Christ over the
stage of Calgary's Central United Church let the pink of
the setting sun colour the strands of country singer-songwriter Amy Nelson's hair. Early in the evening on the first
official day of the 2019 Sled Island Festival, Nelson, along
with her band, delivered a foreboding, stormy set of ballads.
Thundering drums and lightning bolt lap steel brewed around
Nelson as she derided her lover with a stinger from her song
"How Long Blues:""Loving you is like losing a bet."
Nelson's songwriting is quite incredible, adopting a
machismo and reflective stoicism in her storytelling, while still
allowing her emotions to break through during the climactic
moments of each song. During a quieter moment in the set,
percussion switched from drum kit to washboard, and during
a cover of Alison Krauss's murder ballad "Wild Bill Jones,"
the audience was invited to clap the beat. Nearer the end of
the set, Nelson dismissed the other members of the band to
take the stage alone, allowing her piercing voice to penetrate
the souls of the audience, without dilution or distraction. With
her band joining her once again for the end of the set, Nelson
introduced one of the final songs as "a collaboration between
the dead and the alive," and left the audience with a final
message: "We all carry a heavy load / Being cruel don't make
much sense."
With the room growning ever so slightly darker, Edmonton
crooner Jom Comyn took the stage with his six-piece band,
complete with a dual-drum set up for maximum percussive
inventiveness. Comyn generated a dark, evocative
soundscape, with his almost lullaby vocal delivery creating
an anchor of safety against the whirling tidal pool instrumentation. Occasionally, flourishes of noise shone through
the soundscape, with warble and screeches adding great
k
REAL   LIVE  ACTION
Discorder magazine | SUMMER  201'
 excitement when they rose above the other instrumentation.
There was such incredible depth to be found in the music,
with the size of the band enabling a deep and complex blend
of instrumentation. Comyn's rich and poetic lyrics seem
formulated to sink deep into your heart, like the opening lines
from his song "New Feeling:" "Walking grey and brown / Spill
the light inside of you / Thin air wrapping in a mist for you."
During a standout track, one drummer held the beat while
the other ran a drumstick across a cymbal, creating a rising
clawing noise that built to a wonderful climax. None of this is
to say that Comyn created any sort of racket — his songs are
invariably pretty and often strikingly romantic. The last song
of the set, "Change Your Mind," came from Comyn's upcoming
record and ended the set on an energetic and upbeat note, as
if Comyn wished to bring us a rainbow after the beautiful rain
shower he had just given us. —Tate Kaufman
SLED ISLAND 2019: MINT RECORDS
SHOWCASE W/ LIE / DUMB / NECKING
/ ENERGY SLIME / KELLARISSA /
QUAKER PARENTS
JUNE 21 / COMMONWEALTH
Despite Calgary being my hometown, the Commonwealth
was one of only two Sled Island venues I had previously
visited; and unlike the other — Tubby Dog — no sober
memories of the Commonwealth were present in my brain
upon my 2:00 PM arrival. I was admittedly skeptical of how
the venue would function for live music, especially at such an
early hour, but these concerns were quickly set aside once
the mathy indie rock of Quaker Parents enveloped the upper
floor of the joint.
This duo had a strikingly unique sound only matched by
their infectious chemistry. Coupling a drum machine with
a live drummer on many tracks, interrupting smooth sweet
melodies with Zappa-esque guitar spasms and never resting
on a single tempo, Quaker Parents surprised at every turn.
On final track "Improbable Friendship 1999," these influences
came to a dramatic finale. In an unwieldy, ever-changing
track that managed a perfect balance between challenging
and comforting its listeners.
Following the dreamy synth-pop of Kellarissa and the
wild indie pop drumming excellence of Energy Slime, punk
outfit Necking bounced to the stage with energy, dancing
III
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and
online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences
Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
and improvising alongside the house intermission music
during their soundcheck. Beginning with the rollicking and
wildly funny tune "Daddy Issues," the band's unconstrained
passion and wailing vocals ushered in a set packed with
endless youthful jubilance. Vocalist Hannah Kay breathlessly
sat backwards onto the drum kit in between songs, giddily
saying to the crowd "This song is called intermission, it's
where we take a little break." Laughter constantly erupted
from the audience throughout both the breaks and the songs
themselves, with relentlessly entertaining lyrics such as
"Cybersex is gonna send me straight to hell." Ending with
"Big Mouth" off their upcoming record Cut Your Teeth, the
set became a constant talking point throughout the rest of
the festival.
Dumb and Lie closed off the showcase with two very
different blends of punk and rock. Dumb blended post-punk
with some good ol' blues rock goodness, sounding reminiscent
of The Stooges, albeit greatly displaced in the punk timeline.
They packed their songs with dense, intricate lyrics that beg
to be heard. After one particularly straining song, the band
suggested a Q&A while they retuned their instruments. This
lead to a rather humorous moment as a member of Necking
took the occasion to question them from the crowd.
Lie followed this by bringing gritty sludgy guitar riffs — which
would be right at home on a classic hardcore record like Black
Flag's Damaged — and lashing out with the occasional hint of
thrash. Through all the chaos, however, an almost danceable
rhythmic groove propelled the socially conscious "You're
Weaponized." It was an exhilarating end to the showcase,
and wonderful beginning to Friday night with another six or so
hours of music still to come. —Tate Kaufman
SLED ISLAND 2019: HOUSEPANTHER/
>••:
BULLY
B Q   I       communities,
rriends and allies are welcome!
Saturday, July 271 6:30-8:30 P.M
FREE ENTRANCE
Contact Cherine: ckhalil@mpnh.org to register
Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House
800 E Broadway, Vancouver
Unceded Coast Salish Territory
www.inpnh.org
JUNE 21/PALACE THEATRE
1 ith an exhilarating pop-punk cover of TLC's "No
^Ar Scrubs," Housepanther established the tone for the
night to come: nostalgic, energetic and immensely fun.
The band's fuzzy guitars and chunky basslines aided in
momentous builds towards their choruses. On the standout
track "Can't Believe They Killed Marissa Cooper Off," vocalist
Bailee woods sang "I watched four seasons of the OC in no
time," before directing her grief over the death of character
Marissa Cooper towards the death of a relationship, stating
"If you go, I don't blame you."
Bully followed Housepanther, bringing a modern grunge
sound with the occasional post-punk accentuation to keep
things interesting. The bass and drums on many of these
tracks were punishing, containing a deep sense of threat
and urgency, despite many songs remaining mostly upbeat,
if slightly nihilistic. During "Trying" off the band's first record,
singer Alicia Bognanno dropped her
guitar to wrap both hands around
the microphone and put her whole
heart into the lines "I am trying to
hide from my mind."
The second half of the set hit
with knockout power, as the band
wheeled through an awesome
rendition of "Running," where Alicia
waved her guitar in the air to build
an anticipatory, ringing feedback;
and "Feel the Same," which sent the
crowd into mosh mode. At the end
of the set, with the crowd echoing
the bridge of "Kills To Be Resistant"
back at Bognanno, she ventured
to the far corners of the stage,
getting as close to the audience as
possible, before leaping into the
fray and joining the mosh pit, where
she remained for a good minute or
so before making her way onto the
stage for the final moments of the
set. —Tate Kaufman
«^|^f*  T'vT        Mount Pleasant
Neighbourhood House
THEATRE
1660 EAST BROADWAY
JULY
JULY
14
GORDON LIGHT FOOT
IF YOU COULD READ MY MIND
www.riotheatre.ca for additional dates
ROCKETMAN
www.riorheatre.ca for additional dates
Bastille Day Double Bill!
AMELIE
Sofia Coppola's
MARIE ANTOINETTE
JULY
15
Tilda Swinton in
THE SOUVENIR
www.riotheatre.ca for additional dates
Jim Jarmusch's
THE DEAD DON'T DIE
www.riotheatre.ca for additional dates
JULY
16
Terry Gilliam's
THE MAN WHO KILLED
DON QUIXOTE
JULY
17
Todd Haynes'
VELVET GOLDMINE
JULY
18
"Tricks are for kids"
Uma Thurman in
KILL BILL Vol 1.
KILL BILL Vol. 2
JULY
19
Steven Spielberg's
CLOSE ENCOUNTERS
OF THE THIRD KIND
JULY
20
50th Anniversary of the Lunar Landing!
APOLLO 11
Double Bill!
Sigourney Weaver in
ALIEN & ALIENS
JULY
21
Stanley Kubrick's
2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY
Andrei Tarkovsy's
SOLARIS
JULY
22
Director in Attendance!
PARALLEL LOVE
The Story of a Band Called Luxury
Jodie Foster & Matthew McConaughey
CONTACT
JULY
24
THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW
#DNDLIVE
JULY
24
Ryan Gosling
DRIVE
Friday Late Night Movie
JULY
27
April O'Peel Productions'
TITTIES FOR KITTIES
A Fundraiser for Vancouver
Orphan Kitten Rescue Association (VOKRA)
Baz Luhrmann's
MOULIN ROUGE
JULY
28
THE IRON GIANT
20th Anniversary Screening
www.riolheatre.ca for additional dates
Terry Gilliam's
BRAZIL
JULY
30
SPICE WORLD
With Live Drag Shadowcast!
JULY
31
The Geekenders Present
Harry Potter's
Birthday Party!
AUGUST
T
Satoshi Kon's
PAPRIKA
Friday Late Night Movie
COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA
eiOS   H3MMU8 |   9nhDgDm 19bl0DJiQ
REAL   LIVE   ACTION
 WESTWARD
MUSiC FESTIVAL
SEPTEMBER 12 -15, 2019 • DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER
THE PAPER KITE:
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&m? UPCOMING SHOWS 2019
STEF
CHURA
with guests Dadweed
GOLDEN
VESSEL
with guests Instupendo & NVY
ALEX
LEHEY
with guests Kingsbury
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'DISCORDER MAGAZINE RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERY DAY!
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6AM
TRANCENDANCE
CiTR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
6AM
7AM
GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICON"
CiTR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
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CANADALAND
CiTR GHOST MIX
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7AM
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CONVICTIONS &
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SEEKING OFFICE:
AT LARGE
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8AM
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BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
YOUR NEW SHOW
MIXTAPES WITH
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9AM
COMEDY ZEITGEIST
10 AM
DRAGGED OUT
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
DREW
10 AM
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SUMMER GHOST MIX
U DO U RADIO
fine.
11AM
12 PM
SYNCHRONICITY
THE SHAKESPEARE
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
12 PM
1PM
SUMMER GHOST MIX
SHOW
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TOO DREAMY
THE ROCKERS SHOW
1PM
2 PM
120BPM HOSTED BY
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ASTROTALK
BEPI CRESPAN
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2 PM
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SUMMER GHOST MIX
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3 PM
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SHOES ON A WIRE
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
CODE BLUE
4 PM
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DELIBERATE NOISE
INTO THE WOODS
ARTS REPORT
DEMOCRACY WATCH
WORD ON THE STREET
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SPENCER LATU SHOW  RADIO PIZZA PARTY
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12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
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SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B in spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOES ON AWIRE
4PM-5PM, rock/pop/indie
Music + Stories, by and
for Women + Queers.
Insta: @shoesonawirepod
Tweeter: @Shoesonawire
• DELIBERATE NOISE
2PM-3PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Love rocking out to live music,
but don't feel like paying
cover? Tune in for the latest
and greatest punk, garage
rock, local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
contact: programming@citr.ca
■ RECORDS MANAGEMENT
10AM-11AM, ROCK/ROOTS/FOLK
A show for Canadian Rock,
Indie, Folk, Country, and other
Canadiana! Curated for you by
your hosts, Nathalie and Adrian.
contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TltESSay
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
3AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmaii.com
DRAGGED OUT
10AM-11AM, TALK
Where has all the drag
in Vancouver gone? Max
Collins explores the city's
drag community in the wake
of multiple venue closures
Listen with headphones.
Contact:
Twitter | @draggedoutpodcast
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM, ROCK / POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
• 120BPM HOSTED BY
AARON SCHMIDKE
2PM-3PM, MUSIC
1120 BPM hosted weeklv
Dy Aaron Schmidke!
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/POP
a show with music
about being uncool
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• INTO THE WOODS
TUES 5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope,
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES&TREASONS
3PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
Malik, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www. crimesandtreasons.co m
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room:
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC,
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM:
eclectic/live INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vancouvermedicineshow(3>gmail. com
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too) and relished in the merging
of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-10PM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and the
snowcapped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
10PM-11PM, TALK
Listen to your favorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSSay
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8am, talk
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• CONVICTIONS* CONTRADICTIONS
THURS, 8AM-9AM, TALK/COMEDY/
SOCIAL OBESERVATIONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society, shown through social
observational comedy. To boot,
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
• COMEDYZEITGEIST
g:30AM-ioPM, talk
Each week, Doug Vandelay
interviews a current comedian
about their comedic
influences, their careers and
whatever else comes up
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocke tfromrussiacitr(3>gmail. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Rocke tFrom Russia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored bydonuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
• THE SPENCER LATU SHOW
6pm-7:3opm, talk/ political
commentary
The Spencer Latu Show is a
progressive politics show that
speaks truth to power. We
provide much needed coverage,
and media criticism of stories
at the municipal, provincial,
national and international
level from the perspective of
two progressive working class
students; Spencer Latu and
Ajeetpal Gill. We are based
out of UBC in Vancouver BC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:3opm-9pm, hiphop/r&b/
RAP
Best of new and local hip hop
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ TRUiay
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraitentacies@hotmaii. co m
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse@canadalandshow.com
• SEEKING OFFICE: AT LARGE
8AM-9AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
Seeking Office is innovative
storytelling and municipal news
coverage from Vancouver and
the Lower Mainland. Join us for
Season 2, At Large.
Subscribe to Seeking Office on
iTunes, Stitcher or Google Play.
Contact: @CiTRNews
MIXTAPES WITH DREW
9AM-11AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows what
musical curiosities you will
hear from Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
11AM-12PM, TALK/THEATRE
A previously recorded evening
of storytelling and otherwise.
Each show features a real
nice mix of Canada's best
emerging and established
writers, comedians, musicians:
artists and more.
It's fun, yeah. It's a fine time.
Hosted by Cole NowickL
recorded by Matt Krysko.
Contact:
Twitter | @afineshow
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
whaf s happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiop odcast@g maii. com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP/SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on each other
and leave mix tapes and love
letters in each other's lockers xo
Contact:
Facebook | @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CITR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
dooladootdoo... dootdoo!
Contact:
h ttp://nardwuar. com/rad/contact/
• WORD ON THE STREET
5PM-6PM, ROCK/INDIE/POP
I Hosted by the Music Affairs
Collective, every episode is
packed with up-to-date content
from the Lower Mainland music
communities including news,
new music releases, event
reviews and upcoming events,
interviews with local musicians
and industry professionals and
discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7:30PM, TALK/COMEDY
Every week Jack, Tristan and
a special guest randomly
select a conversation topic
for the entire show; ranging
from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:3opm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
imational
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and future.
This includes jazz, soul:
hip-hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
There are also interviews
with local and international
artists. Truly, a radio show
with international flavour.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock
drone, ambient, experimental:
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
C1 RADIO
FRI 11PM-12:30AM, HIP HOP/R&B/RAP
Repeat of Thursday's show -
Best of new and local hip hop
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ saTURSay
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:3oam-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citriatenightshow@gmaii.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
Contact: codebiue@pauinorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact:
mantraradioshow@gmaii. com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavoina@shaw.ca
SOCASTORM
3PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
Papayo!!#SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
Sbit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79. We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ suno/iu
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
3AM-10AM,  ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
A repeat of Tuesday morning's
favourite Bluegrass Show -
Bluegrass, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM, INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
3PM-5PM,COUNTRY
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
5PM-6PM, international/latin
AMERICAN
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MORETHAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
3PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmaii.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
3PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, DeepTrance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem.
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmiieymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
Ulmth°f
VostToys
• STUDENT PROGRAMMING
ECLECTIC
Marks any show that is
produced primarily by students.
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programmin
MOONGROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
• 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
progra mming@citr. ca
be a role model
friend advocate
burger expert
mentor
Our volunteer
mentors help
youth recognize
their many
strengths and
work towards
their goaLs.
To learn how you can become a mentor, visit:
unya.bc.ca/mentorship
Urban Native Youth
Association
 CiTR 101.9 FM JUNE CHARTS
artist
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Dumb*+#
Club Nites
Mint
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1978
Sudden Death
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Necking*+#
Cut Your Teeth
Mint
I   *
LAPS*#
Soon Not Often In It
Terrific Kids
I   3
Nice Apple*+#
This Time Nice Apple is
Auto-Cathecting
Hidden Bay Records
I   *
Co-op*+
III
Self-Released
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Mr. Stee*+
See You Tomorrow...
EASTBLVD
I   •
Haviah Mighty*#
13th Floor
Self-Released
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Divorcer*+#
Debt Jubilee
Comfortable On A
Tightrope
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T. Nile*#
Beachfires
Outskirts Central
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Kamikaze Nurse*+#
Bucky Fleur
Agony Klub
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Chris Hauer*
Hum
Self-Released
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Graftician*+#
Mandarins
Self-Released
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Winona Forever*
FeelGood
Self-Released
1   «
Sarah Davachi & Ariel
Kalma*#
Intemporal
Black Sweat Records
»
Desolating The Curse*+
Desolation Sound
Tinker
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The Vicious Cycles*+
Motorcycho
Pirates Press
1
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Brad Turner*+
Pacific
Cellar
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nehiyawak*
otenaw (Original Film Score)
Self-Released
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Primp*+#
Mother Loose
Self-Released
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Black Mountain*+#
Destroyer
Dine Alone
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Snotty Nose Rez Kids*
Trapline
Minay Music
1
Is
Pudding*+#
Pop Over
Self-Released
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Sigh*+#
Images
Self-Released
la
Devours**
Iconoclast
Artoffact
B
Doomsquad*#
Let Yourself Be Seen
Royal Mountain
l»
Brutal Poodle*+
Crowd Control / Low Tide
Kingfisher Bluez
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Schwey*
Schwey
604
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Mr. Merlot*+
City Sex Vol. 2
Self-Released
«
Hi-Ranger*+
Tire Town
Self-Released
la,
Kuri*+
No Village
Nevado Records
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Kimmortal*+
X Marks The Swirl
Coax
1*
Harpdog Brown*+
Dog House Records
Dog House Records
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kylie v*+
lotus eater
Self-Released
1*
Our Native Daughters**
Songs of Our Native
Daughters
Smithsonian Folkways
»
Irish Mythen*#
Little Bones
Independent
N
Terell Safadi*+
Trap Love and $ex
Self-Released
»
Marigold's
change can be a softness
Placeholder Records
l«
Megamall*+#
Demos
Self-Released
41
Bored Decor*+
The Colour Red
Self-Released
1*
Ninetyfour*+
Best Regards
Yours Truly
®
Big Thief#
U.FO.F
4AD
1*
Anemone*#
Beat My Distance
Royal Mountain
«
Silvering**
Minefield Memory
Self-Released
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Howl
Orphan Girl
4!
Dadweed*+
1 Dreamt 1 was Running
Self-Released
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Digawolf*
Yellowstone
Self-Released
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Indications
American Love Call
Dead Oceans
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Good Job
Transistor 66
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Dare To Care
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ARTS        FESTIVAL 2019
AUGUST  22  ~26
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Soda Fountain
Hell
Night
witri Aaron
Read
(JNidktiDJ)
3x3x?
Comic Strip Show
JWillenial Line
One More Time
a Comedy DJ Set
Unibrow
Tattoo Flash
Day
F/a vourcel
Tim Bauer BookLaunch
Straight to DVD
Ring A Ding Dong
Dandy
Yellow Fever
Talent Waste
The
Sunday
Service
P.ublic
Zine Market
at Antisocial Skateboard Shop
 ^'0
1981
CONCERTS
Peck   .  j.S* J
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
July 22
DEERHUNTER
Rickshaw Theatre
July 27
July 31
F
August 12
A.A. RONDY     MDOU MOCTAR    THE NUDE PARTY
Fox Cabaret
Fox Cabaret
Fox Cabaret
August 17 August 18
KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD    TUXEDO
Harbour Convention Centre        Fortune
August 18 August 24
G0LDR00M HIGH SEAS BOAT TOUR 2019    GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR
Aboard The Abitibi Boat I Commodore Ballroom
August 27IAugust 27I  August 28
ORVILLE PECK      I GENERATIONALS   THE NATIONAL
Commodore Ballroom |   Fox Cabaret   |  Deer Lake
August 30        September 10 September 10
QUANTIC SOLO LIVE    GARY CLARK JR.    PSYCHEDELIC PORN CRUMPETS
Rickshaw Theatre      Malkin Bowl Fox Cabaret
September 20
FONTAINES D.C.
Fox Cabaret
September 20
mxmtoon
Rio Theatre
September 20
POKEY LAFARGE (SOLO)
Wise Hall
September 26
CIGARETTES AFTER SEX
Commodore Ballroom
October 1
SNARKY PUPPY
Commodore Ballroom
October 3
CROOKED COLOURS
Commodore Ballroom
October  7
OH SEES
Rickshaw Theatre
October 8 October 9
COSMO SHELDRAKE ST. PAUL 8 THE BROKEN BONES
Fox Cabaret Commodore Ballroom
October 11
LUCERO
Rickshaw Theatre
October 11
MIKE DOUGHTY PLAYS SOUL COUGHING'S RURY VR00M
Fox Cabaret
Tickets  & more  shows
timbreconcerts.com

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