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 DISCORDER
may
2019
JLocal + ifree
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UPCOMING SHOWS
MAY
BELTAINE BACCHANALIA:
WYRDING WAY'S ALBUM
RELEASE EMILY MOLLOY, DAVE
TVLUCID AFTERLIFE, HEOFON,
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MAY
SUPERSUCKERS
20TH ANNIVERSARY OF "THE
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SPEEDEALER
MAY
MAY
MAY
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TECHNO DESTRUCTO FROM
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TOMMY STINSON
DEVASTATION ON THE NATION
TOUR: BELPHEGOR & DARK
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AT THE WISE HALL:
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fejSl
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May 25
)un 07
	
jun 07
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Aug 05
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JENN GRANT
CHROMEO
(ALL AGLS)
OPERATORS
FORTUNE
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^Nl
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Jun 08 1
/death^
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Inn  rtft 1
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(ALL AGES)
COMETHAZINE
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PIXX
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EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE
CHARLIE CUNNINGHAM
[I arivTMm: Ifrn'Mti 11 ■. 1JI ku ■#
VANCE TICKETS AND MUCH MORE
THE FOX
IMPERIAL
THE FOX
THE FOX
'?*W*JW«?Wl9rVli»' 'ir*
 TABLE Of COTITETITS
MAY 2019       ~tttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttm
COVER I PHOTO OF CHEYENNE RAIN LEGRANDE BY CONNIE LEGRANDE
JFeature*
05  - pensamientos en la frontera
"...the skin of the earth is seamless." Gloria Anzaldua
07   - A CONSTELLATION OF REMEDIATION
Decolonizing the city by healing the land
10  -  CHEYENNE RAIN LEGRANDE
Marking Indigenous presence in the city
15  -  RAVEN JOHN
Authenticity and humour: an artist's provocation
3 Hotter Cfieto* W&iib
3t* £>tomacj>
EDITOR'S NOTE
THIS IS MY LAST ISSUE AS EDITOR;
I RAN OUT OF LOBSTER METAPHORS.
In this issue you'll read that borders are things we carry; that Indigenous presence is
more than physical; that healing the land is decolonial; and that humour and provocation are creative mediums.
Yours,
M'aritime N'8V
t&e Ifoflitfanf + otter tfmtQ*
04 -  Campus Beat
First Generation
Students Union
11  - Art Project
By Cheyenne Rain LeGrande
14  -  May 2019  Calendar
18 - Real Live Action
Music  + Experimentation
19 - Under Review
20  - On The Air
La Fiesta
21 -  CiTR Program Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 - April  2019  Charts
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©Discorder 2019 - 2020 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by
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 Discorder magazine | MAY 201^
CfilUPUS BEAT
First Generation Student Union
words by Hannah Toms
illustrations by Lua Presidio
photo by Alistair Helming
I
I v  ith university attendance rates
I I   around the world climbing
^F^r    higher than they ever have
before, we're living in an age where an
increasing amount of young people are
part of the first generation of our families
to go to university. Holding this status is
obviously an enormous source of pride for
both the individual and our parents, but if
there's one thing I've learned as a first-generation student myself, it's that people
don't tend to realize the social, cultural
and financial factors often accompanying
the first-generation identity that can make
succeeding at university almost impossible
for us.
The First Generation Students Union
(FGSU), is an organization recently established on campus to represent UBC's
first-generation student population. In a
statement to Discorder, the organization
says that a disproportionate number of
first-gen students come from low-income
backgrounds compared to their peers,
and that this is their biggest barrier to
a smooth university experience. Many
first-gen students must take on multiple jobs
a semester in order to help their families
pay their tuition and student fees, which
decreases the amount of time they have
available to complete their course work and
adds to the already overwhelming stress of
being a university student. "This devalues
the experience of a university life by making
it a continuous, relentless uphill battle,"
says the FGSU.
The other major adversity faced by
first-gen students is our sense of alienation
from campus life. As the FGSU puts it,
first-gen students "often feel that they do
not belong in the student community." I'm
privileged enough that low socio-economic
status has not been a factor to contend
with in my university experience, but I can
confirm that trying to feel at home in an
environment where the vast majority of
your peers come from university-educated
families and you don't, is a difficult task.
No matter how hard your parents may
try, they cannot give you the same support
in terms of navigating the academic and
social ins and outs of university compared
to parents who have experienced university
first-hand, and you'll always feel at least a
little bit lost because of it.
For the above reasons and more,
first-gen and low income students at UBC
need support, and the FGSU's goal is to
provide it. Aiming to build a network of
first-gen students on campus who will
support each other as they work toward
graduation, the FGSU intends to begin
hosting social events and panel discussions focusing on the first-gen identity, and
to establish peer support and mentorship
programs uniquely for first-gen and low
income students. In order to "help bridge
the gap between first-gen and non first-gen
students" that exists at UBC, the organization has already begun collaborating
with UBC's Equity and Inclusion Office
to bring awareness to and promote the
first-gen student identity among our peers
in an effort to encourage more integration
between these two communities. The FGSU
also has its own podcast in the works,
which its members will use to "share their
stories about barriers in accessing education
within the context of the first-gen identity"
with other first-gen students at UBC and
with the student population at large.
Finally, the FGSU has established partnerships with existing UBC organizations that
address needs often experienced by first-gen
students, including the AMS Food Bank,
the Centre for Student Involvement and
Careers, and the Financial Wellness Peers,
in order to connect first-gen students with
these organizations' services.
The creation of the entirely student-run
FGSU in January 2019 marked the first
official time a presence representing the
needs of first-gen students has existed at
UBC. In fact, while the administrative
bodies at universities across Canada, such
as McMaster University and University of
Ottawa, have in recent years established
support services designed specifically for
first-gen students, such an initiative has
never been undertaken by UBC's administration. But the FGSU is not disheartened
by UBC's delayed efforts of inclusion and
support toward first-gen students, and
in fact feels that UBC has accelerated
its actions to follow their organization's
example by increasing its commitments to
ease university life for us.
"We believe that even if changes take a
long time to come into effect," the FGSU
states, "knowing that the university is
supportive of our efforts in enhancing
equity and inclusion allows us to be
optimistic about our future."
4
CAMPUS BEAT I First Generation Student Union
 gXOS YAM| 9nixDgDffl i9bioD2iQ
HUTAH
"To fragment, to uproot lives, to cross livelihoods, to respond to everything else before
responding to the responsibility towards a people's sovereignty, and to interrupt the
ancestral movement of life across land- this is the legacy of border regimes. "
WORDS BY KATHERINE CHAMBERS
ILLUSTRATION BY AMY BRERETON
PHOTOS COURTESY OF MONIKER PRESS
Pensamientos en la frontera is an
honest, resilient and beautiful response
to the inherent violence of border
regimes. Co-authored by andi icaza-lar-
gaespada, Gabriel Benavente and Roxanne
Charles, and published by Erica Wilk at
Moniker Press, pensamientos en la frontera
is a publication that combines visual art and
the written word to explore the personal
and collective experiences of borders and of
displacement.
andi icaza-largaespada, the project
coordinator, has been living outside of
her home of Nicaragua for ten months.
Displacement and forced immigration has
not only impacted her life, but the lives
of her peers, her family, and generations
before her. She understands the "experience
of being in two places physically, mentally,
emotionally." The borders that are being
explored in pensamientos en la frontera are
not limited to physical divisions between
countries. Instead, andi explains that
borders are "things that we carry."
Published in Vancouver, pensamientos
en la frontera encapsulates a discussion of
the borders that people carry with them,
andi explains, "I'm looking to recognize
that there are different ways in which
displacement has shaped the experience of
living in the city and the experience of living
across borders. It's not something that just
responds to political borders, but borders as
a way of living." Vancouver itself has "an
often hidden history of displacement, as
past and ongoing colonization has enforced
uninvited settlement."
Translating in English to "thoughts on/
at the border," the title pensamientos en la
frontera captures the work that andi and
her collaborators have created. "To be able
to think about [a border] or to think on it
is a little bit of an act of resistance. Borders
are meant to be spaces of transition, a
supposedly straightforward process where
we are screened and allowed or denied
passage, but such a liminal space forces a
lot of thoughts and questions to happen
really quickly about one's belonging." andi
notes the potential of reflection through
art to prevent the continued repetition
of violence and of disastrous errors that
we see throughout history: it "hopefully
allows us to gain perspective and not repeat
things, or at least not in the exact same
way." In holding both a sense of urgency
and a need to reflect, pensamientos en la
frontera takes on the complexities of art,
reflection and resistance.
andi explains that throughout the
political crisis in Nicaragua, there is resistance, and "one of the areas where civil
resistance has emerged is in art." When
looking at art coming out of her country's
political movements, andi was searching
for art that embraced ambiguity. "A lot
of art that comes from political crises is
reactionary and tends to find a black and
white perspective," andi explains, "when
there's urgency, it's hard to do otherwise."
andi was grateful to find something that
"looked back into a wider pattern," in her
friend Gabriel's creative work. It acknowledged the history of immigration in
Nicaragua, and his work "Pensamientos
en la Frontera" published with Colectivo
20/20 in San Jose, inspired the content and
title of the project he, andi, Roxanne and
Erica have created.
Pensamientos en la frontera puts
Gabriel's original work in conversation with two other works, one by
andi and the other by Roxanne. Like the
project as a whole, Gabriel's piece is not
linear, but is best described as a graphic
poem. Beginning with a picture of three
people squeezing between two trucks,
the piece proceeds to both examine and
expand the photo by breathing thought into
each person. Gabriel describes it as: "the
moment they leave their lives and enter the
unknown." The child asks for their mother,
the woman wonders if the life she carries
will weigh as much on the other side, and
a man recognizes the place where he will
cross into another land. The original image
is made from a photo Gabriel's partner
took at the border between Nicaragua and
Costa Rica.
"pensamientos en la frontera'
A
 Discorder magazine | MAY 201^
0180 a reflection on Nicaragua,
andi's short story brings her
reader into her backyard at her
beach-side home in Nicaragua, where her
absence is marked by the growth of three
sea-almond trees. A picture her parents
sent over Whatsapp in December shows
one tree as tall as her father. Further north
on the same coast, Roxanne explores the
ability for arbitrary border laws to disrupt
an ancestral way of life, andi explains
that Roxanne's piece "is a response to her
nation being only able to dig for clams on
the south side of Semiahmoo Bay, the part
under United States jurisdiction, because the
north side of the bay is in Canada, where
digging remains banned. She can literally
cross the border, go dig for clams on the
other side of the bay, bring them back to
her house and eat them."
The differences between the pieces allow
for a complex and rich experience of interacting with the project. The stories Gabriel,
andi and Roxanne share are intimate and
brim with their own personalities and life,
yet also somehow touch a sense of shared
experience. "Gabriel's incisive poetics
really puncture the soul," andi acknowledges admiringly, "they create that opening
space." Her work, by contrast, is "more of
a journey" that explores temporality, and
how it alters in moments of drastic change.
Embracing the importance of family that all
three pieces acknowledge, "Roxanne's piece
is a bit of a love letter to the clams and her
family." Both Roxanne and andi's works
focus on the land, "and the experiential
aspect of knowing a place and being forcefully removed from it."
Assembling pensamientos en la frontera
has been a cautious, careful process. "I
think [the pieces] are all protective of the
language or the space that holds these
stories," andi observes. Language is
especially important for Roxanne's piece,
which is written in her language, Xwlemi
Chosen. Not only does writing in different
languages allow each contributor to find
the words to express an experience that
cannot be translated, but language is "a
key element in how [the project] speaks to
borders and how these political and cultural
divisions have provided tools of separation
and unity at the same time."
As it is written in three languages -
Xwlemi Chosen, Spanish and English, there
would be few people who would have full
linguistic access to the book, andi reflects
on the way language can be a form of resistance and a means of honest expression.
Both English and Spanish are colonial
languages, and "the agreement to not have
full access to everything is not only resistance and having a political stance in terms
of accessibility, but also reflects the reality
of people's lives." As people move across
borders and across land, speaking and
living in different languages becomes a part
of their lives.
pensamientos en la frontera was printed
with risograph, a process at the juncture of
traditional printmaking and contemporary
mass-printing, both precious and accessible. Yellow, a colour full of contradictions,
"associated with danger as well as joyful
things," holds the various pieces together.
Nothing in the book is bound, but is instead
held together by the way it is folded and
arranged, andi explains that the lack of
binding was very intentional: "not binding
them, but still grouping them together
acknowledges the fact that in the Americas
we are forced apart, but we can also come
together, and not pretend that it's all the
same experience."
now on its way to launch,
pensamientos en la frontera is
only on its first iteration as a
growing series of works. Because it is so
loosely bound, the book will easily hold
more stories, and the work of many more
contributors. The project has evolved
at the pace of conversation, and it will
continue to do so. It will continue to be a
space of unity and of difference, to be built
on relationships of trust, and to generate
community. "It's not that easy to talk about
displacement," andi shares, "and I don't
know that this work will make it easier. But
it's a starting point."
pensamientos en la frontera will launch
on May 10, 6 PM at Massy Books. Follow
@momkerpress for more information or
pre-order the publication at momkerpress.
ca/shop
k
SHELF LIFE ! pensamientos   en  la   frontera
 gXOS YAM| 9nixDgDffl i9bioD2iQ
HUTAH
Imeet T'uy'tanat Cease Wyss and Anne Riley, collaborators on the public artwork A Constellation of
Remediation, at the cobb oven installation day of Cease's
Garden project at 221A Semi-Public Site, which is the
culmination of Wyss's one year fellowship with 221 A. It's fitting.
The space is filled with at least 30
folks preparing to throw down,
stomping clay, adding hay, building
an oven facilitated by the mud girls, putting
in the garden beds. It's also fitting that Riley
joins us after her Beading and Reading
gathering at Massy Books for a closed
event for 2SQ folx as part of the Together/
Apart Queer Identities symposium that was
happening through grunt gallery, co-curated
by Whess Harman, Kali Spitzer.
Also fitting: constellations in our conversations, in the design of the plant beds, in
the folks working and chatting around the
garden, between introducing me to friends,
the use of straw waddles as a base for the
beds. Of their shared project, through
which Wyss and Riley will plant Indigenous
Remediation Gardens throughout the city
decolonizing the dirt back to soil: "I'm so
excited about what Anne and I are doing.
We get to grow mushrooms, and spread
mulch and throw seed bombs - that's our
public art, remediating things. And the
top notch part of it? The heart and soul
of this project? We are creating a tool kit
for Indigenous youth to teach themselves
ethnobotany."
Folks keep arriving, many of them
checking in with Cease, who recently broke
her foot and has to sit, which is difficult.
Anne shares more about their project—
commissioned by the City of Vancouver
for their Artist Initiated Projects program
in 2017. "Ceremony is centered in this
work. The application process was really
important, because as part of our application we had three letters from three
matriarchs [from the xwm30kw3y3m
(Musqueam), Skwxwu7mesh (Squamish),
and SsiilwstaV/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)
Nations] that Cease knew and invited to
be a part of the project to aid in the development of the work and healing of the
land, which is a part of the deep practice
of Cease's durational work-relationship ...
3
"A Constellation of Remediation'
A
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | MAY 201^
this being her [Skwxwu7mesh] territory...
and their letters, I got so emotional reading
them because — they believed in the work
and to me they read like love letters to the
earth. And I think that's the importance,
you make work that people can believe in,
and they want to be apart of, which goes
against this very colonial notion of it just
being about you, which is the way we're
taught to make art. The work is so much
bigger than you/us. This project is a process
based work and we knew back in 2017
when the project was commissioned that
it was going to be a long wait and conversation with landowners to get access to
land to plant the Indigenous Remediation
Gardens. We also knew we may never get
access to any sites. Right now, we are close
to the possibility of planting soon and for
us the process of getting all the initial no's
and waiting and more waiting speaks to
a colonial time and consciousness we are
facing in this project. The matriarchs love
letters to the earth are the examples of the
decolonial clocks that are guiding our time
and direction"
For Anne, both Cease's project and their
collaborations are based in "a pedagogy of
love, a love ethic, so when I speak about
my practice, and what I've seen in Cease's
work, it has values and responsibilities. And
the ethic lives through what a practice is,
how you start it, why you do what you do."
Ofew days later, Cease reflects,
"that's one of the things I really
align with Anne about is we often
talk about love, the many forms of love,
our family, our friendships, our lovers, our
feelings, we get into the core, we do the
work on knowing each other. It's not just
doing a collaboration. [And] the work of
the garden... it really is my happiest place,
it reminds me to look to the future, how it's
going to grow. Doing gardens, I found that
that's what deeply rooted my daughter and
I, and the more that I did work with my
mother, the more I realized the real story [of
our family] was growing food."
Of Cease, Anne says, "she really is
someone who works from her happiness,
and that's the core of this artwork, too."
"With Anne, we would walk on the
land, and I would ask Anne to ask herself
questions about relating to the land and
water... And that's where the ideas for
our projects come from, from sitting with
a specific part of the land and asking
questions... [Anne] walks the walk, she does
the work."
"I first met Cease five years ago
through a mentorship grant through the
BC Arts Council. I approached it as the
decolonial MFA I wanted, but didn't exist.
I wanted to mentor with queer women
of colour since it's so rare within educational institutions to have the opportunity
and space to learn from other queer/2SQ
women. Laiwan one of the main mentors
for this grant — a poet and visual artist
— introduced Cease and I and then Cease
became my second mentor for the grant,
and often for our time together during the
grant we would just walk in the forest —
sometimes it's all you need to do, because
it's another way of being together and
learning and the forest is Cease's classroom.
And the things that we do in cultivating
relationship are really important to what
kind of relationship we want to make."
Anne continues, "and at the core of the
work is how we're healing each other, because
that ripples out into everything else."
Days later, at Cease's place, after her
tough postoperative day that also included
good visits from community, with Cease's
healing foot raised up, Anne looks back at
our previous conversation: "when you're
investing in your pleasure/healing toward
liberation, people become curious about
what it is that you are doing, which is
so different when we're taught so much
in capitalism that our relationships are
about product, about performing that, and
about how we don't actually know our
own pleasures. And so, I think with Cease,
that's the really radical work of hers.
Yes, these things were being built [in the
garden], she got to see them built, and for
her I think it was also that moment where
what she's witnessing, it's all of these
relationships built over time and being
built in the present."
"It's true," Cease whispers.
Ofew days before, Anne, who is Cree
and Dene from Fort Nelson First
Nation spoke about being a woman
whose Indigenous and a visitor here on
Cease's territory: "As a Indigenous visitor
and artist here I need to not perpetuate
colonial ways of making and taking/up
space, I need to hold up the women of
this territory and their work, to honor
their work of caring for this land and to
collaborate with them in their dreams of
liberation and healing"
Our conversation overlaps with a conversation between Cease and two Indigenous
youth participants of Cease's 221A garden
k
A Constellation of Remediation'
 eiOS YAM! 9nixDgDffl i9bioD2iQ
3HUTAH
project being installed. Valeen, who recently
wheeled up a baby in a stroller, a baby she
caught at birth, and Jazz, who is wheeling
rocks up to a bed and buttressing it with
them, are both poets. They explain how
Jazz, who will tattoo Cease in the next
couple of days, gave them both hand poke
tattoos in the design of the garden and
Cease got a Wapato leaf on her arm. Valeen
looks around at one crew of folks working,
turns back to us and points to her tattoo,
"this is being built over there right now."
She moves her finger, "and this is being
built right now by Jazz, this spiral — and
you all are sitting right here. This garden,"
she waves her hand over the full piece, "it's
growing right in front of us."
And growing, clearly, from relationships,
"Meeting Cease in the garden, and all that
tenderness, and," she turns, "you were so
open, and so giving, so inviting."
This finding and building of community,
like a collaborative garden is, Cease
had described as, "a whole body effort.
Sometimes people's fears just get in the
way of realizing projects. Collaborations
aren't easy. If you nurture one another,
if you watch out for one another, you do
build that trust. It's needed especially in a
large scale project with legal components,
and cultural components, environmental
components... and of course looking to the
future, grounded and empowered by the
teachings in each of our cultures."
Anne riffs, "Rather than beginning with
yourself, we begin relationship by thinking
about what the other person needs, and
finding ways to meet that in ways that
haven't been met before."
Cease adds: "When Anne approached me
two years ago about the city project, I said,
sure, let's try it, I'll do it with you. Because
I trust you ... when we're working, we
have a task list, and it seems stressful until
we sit together, and we always make sure
we eat something together, and we eat and
talk, and we popcorn between our personal
life stuff— because we're nurturing our
friendship always — and talking about the
project. And it all weaves in and out in a
healthy way... and then we realize we've
done our list... but it is really about trust,
and it is really about nurturing the times we
are together. It's not just about the work,
it's taking care of our spirit, our soul."
fl Constellation of Remdiation'
A
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | MAY 20]
Cheyenne
Rain
LeGrande
words by Jasper D. Wrinch
photo (pg.10) by Jake Kimble
photo (pg. 11) by Connie LeGrande
* was thinking about the color red. Red as
race, red as history, red as pain, red as blood,
red as protection," explains Cheyenne Rain
LeGrande, an interdisciplinary Nehiyaw
Isko artist from Bigstone Cree Nation, about her upcoming
installation at the Emily Carr University of Art + Design Grad
Show. Over the past several months, LeGrande has been
working on this project, entitled Nehiyaw Isko Pl~<-3, that
combines the many disciplines she works within — video,
sound, performance and sculpture.
1
ehiyaw Isko Pr<P is primarily a performance piece,
in which LeGrande covers her body in red paint.
As LeGrande explains, "I rub my body all over the
walls of the institution, and aggressively try to scrub the red
was able to create a community
off," with a sheer white sheet of fabric, while LeGrande's
mother, Connie LeGrande, sings. "Kinanaskomitin to
Nimama, it has been a true honour to perform with her."
While there is an inherent violence in the imagery being
conjured, LeGrande's intent isn't to simply spotlight colonial
violence that has been and continues to be inflicted upon
Indigenous women. Instead, LeGrande takes a much more
active role, reclaiming her agency and "addressing [her]
own Indigenous body within these institutional spaces... I
was literally rubbing my redness all over the wall."
Negotiating how to produce evocative and intensely
personal art within an institution like ECU AD has long been
at the forefront of LeGrande's work. And while she has been
working through these issues of fully expressing herself and
her identity through her art for years now, Nehiyaw Isko
Pr<P is about as concise an artistic statement as LeGrande
could make. "I think rubbing up against the institutions is
really easy when you're literally doing that," says LeGrande.
"Pushing up against it, using my body as a paint brush and
rubbing my redness all over the walls."
Even while rubbing up against these institutional spaces,
LeGrande isn't entirely critical of ECUAD. "Honestly,
that 1 m able to express all this in an institution is really
cool," says LeGrande, "maybe we are getting somewhere.
In addition to the freedom and resources to express her
own artistic vision, LeGrande has also found at school a
collection of like-minded artists. "Through Emily Carr, I
was able to create a community of friends who are there for
each other and understand the importance of art-making."
Notably, LeGrande recently performed an iteration of her
Nehiyaw Isko Pr<P performance at Ground Floor Art
Centre, an accessible artist-run centre recently founded by
three ECUAD alumni that focuses on providing an accessible space for emerging artists in Vancouver to exhibit their
work and connect with one another.
ut Emily Carr isn't the only place LeGrande has
found a supportive artistic community. She is
       currently an artist in residence at the Skwachays
Lodge, Canada's first Indigenous arts hotel. Along with
24 other Indigenous artists, LeGrande has been living at
the Skwachays Lodge for the past six months. "It's more
of a living residency. Basically, it allows you to be able
to afford being a practicing artist in the city," something
LeGrande says she's planning on doing for the near future.
"I'm so thankful and honoured to be able to live and work
on the territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-
Waututh nations."
Even now, LeGrande has explored the processes of
art-making outside of the urban context. While the initial
iteration of her Nehiyaw Isko Pr<P performance happened
at ECUAD, she repeated the work on three other occasions
— once in the ocean along the Seawall in Vancouver, and
twice in her hometown of Wabasca, Alberta last winter.
"It's so beautiful and peaceful there," she says. "It's one of
my goals to do art there and brine art to the community.
because it's not really alive there right now."
Of the two Wabasca iterations, one took place on the
edge of a frozen lake, "in the snow, in my bare feet for five
minutes... I basically froze my feet," shares LeGrande. "I
never experienced that before — it was really intense;" the
other within a ring of fire, built by her uncle. While the
central framework remained the same for each iteration,
rubbing the redness off her body while she moved to the
sound of her mother singing, LeGrande says that her
experiences and the outcomes of all four performances were
vastly different. "My mother and I are reacting to each
environment in the moment. Whatever happens, happens,"
says LeGrande. "It's a very intuitive performance."
For the final presentation of Nehiyaw Isko Pr<P,
LeGrande will be combining all four iterations of the
performance in an immersive installation. Each of the videos
will be projected onto the sheer sheet of fabric she used in
the performances hanging just in front of the four walls of
a room. Along with the sounds of each iteration, LeGrande
nal iteration within the completed installation,
tween the sheets and the walls, bringing the
ce back to ECUAD, full circle. "For me, this
ce has been a cleanse. Expressing this thing inside
LeGrande's next performance will be at Emily Carr University
on May 5rd
'Cheyenne LeGrande'
  JULIEN BAKER JAPANESE BREAKFAST* RAPSODY JPEGMBFIA* LE1F
HOP ALONG* BULLY* OBLIVIANS MAN OR ASTRO-MAN? CATE LE BON
CASS MCCOMBS JESSICA PRATT THE MESSTHETICS (FEAT. MEMBERS OF
FUGAZI) CHANDRA HAR MAR SUPERSTAR LUBOMYR MELNYK FLY PAN
AM OURI KID CONGO POWERS ♦ THE PINK MONKEY BIRDS
WILLIAM BASINSKI JACK HARLOW MICHAEL CHRISTMAS TORRES
THE COMET IS COMING SINJIN HAWKE ♦ ZORA JONES LIVE AV
TASHA* MUQATA'A KING AYISOBA
WORRIERS* DEATH BELLS*
SQUIRREL FLOWER'
Out July 5th on Mint Records
 IF
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HUTAH
Raven John
words by Mallory Amirault
illustration by Megan Pereira
photo by Minh Ahn Nguyen
met up with my pal Raven, a two-spirit, trickster-transformer and
multidisciplinary artist to talk about what it means to Indigenize
an urbanized territory. Dropping you into the middle of that
conversation...
Mallory: I feel like queer people have the best
imaginations, because it's necessary.
Raven: There's a quote from a queer filmmaker who
described how he always had to translate his life and
experiences into non-queer media. Where someone
says: "Oh yeah, I can understand a straight person
going through that," and him being like "No, fuck you.
You have to translate now." It's amazing to not have
to translate yourself, and I've definitely felt that as a
woman of colour, and a queer person, and just a really
loud and hilarious person, even.
With your work, you use provocation, but I find that
you're able to do it within an embodiment of generosity
and love - well, to me it is - it's never so abrasive that you
or your work become inaccessible. So often, I see the term
'unapologetic' associated alongside people who use it as
permission to be assholes about whatever they're doing/
making. How do carry your work with the amount of
grace you do, while also being unapologetic about it?
It's hard. It's very difficult. I learned that people take
any excuse to shut down from learning, especially
online - a fucking misspelled word, or punctuation -
they'll literally take any out from actually listening to
you and your opinion, because it's hard to confront. My
initial performance for On Native Land, I kind of trick
people into standing on residential school tiles. When
I filmed the part where I'm speaking to the viewer ...
there's no point where I look at the viewer in the eye.
I'm kind of looking off to the side, and the camera isn't
filming me directly, but a reflection of me in the mirror.
I never raise my voice, and I separate the part where I
talk about what happened in residential schools and
how awful they were, from where I actually talk about
my family going to them. There's a lot of different
strategies to try and make it so people had to be in that
space, stand on those tiles, and not run away from it.
It's definitely a skill, but it's been really hard to
hand-hold people through these lessons, especially
when they so often need to see and feel that one-on-one,
and because they're also going to make it about them.
That's part of the reason why I'm moving more into
performance work, where I'm at least talking to a
crowd of people and not a single person. But even then,
you still have to be soft with people. Which is hard,
because they're like, "I've definitely heard how awful
residential schools were, and have had ample opportunity to look it up online and read about it, and there
are first hand accounts by residential school survivors
on video and audio that I can look at, and also the
ridiculous amount of stats that are available, but also,
I'm really only going to absorb that information if you
tell me and show me how much that's hurt you and
how much that's hurt your family."
It's just frustrating, because I have multiple papers
and texts available on the lessons I give out, but it ends
up being that I need to sit with you and hold your hand
and say: "This is what happens," while also re-contex-
tualizing it against the propaganda that we constantly
see. Yeah, this happened fifty year ago, but it also
happened the same year that the Spice Girls came out.
Relating the residential school timeline to Breakfast
at Tiffany's, Psycho, the Spice Girls, Toy Story, all of
those things that are super important to our lives that
we remember and we don't treat like "back in ye olden
days," but then we talk about residential schools and
we historicize it. Just trying to re-contextualize for
people in ways that they can't not associate with. So,
for myself, Spice Girls is my favourite things to bring
up when they ask "when did the last residential school
close?" 1996, the year the Spice Girls got big.
I've seen the work I've done massively change people,
and it's really rewarding, but I'm not as willing to just
open myself up like that. I am grateful for the people
who have listened and have taken up mantle to reteach
those lessons to other people, especially as white
people - they're going to have an easier time getting
other white people to listen - because, yeah, it's hard
for them to learn those truths and find a way to live
with it. On the other hand, I've also had people be very
aggressive about it and come at me yelling and pointing
"Well, what do you want me to do. Tell me what to
do." And...I don't fucking know. I'm literally in survival
mode 95% of the time.
Would you say that with provocation and humour, as
much as it is a strategy to relay information and connect, it
is also a method of your own survivance?
Definitely. Humour is a huge thing in Native culture,
it's also how we show love.
I saw on your website, your Need to Know if Something
is Racist consultations, moving into performance work
"Rauen John'
where it's less one-on-one is a very different space to
be working within. It seems that social and community
engagement is still a common thread for you, though.
How does community engagement in the city encounter
re-Indigemzing various landscapes, be it urban,
institutional, or even on the internet like social media? Is
that something you think you're doing, re-Indigemzing, or
do you think this is a problematic term?
No no, I think my work totally is doing that. A lot of
people would say that my catchphrase is "that's racist,"
[laughs.] After going through school and learning how
to spot and also be able to call-out, especially in a more
academic way, the various racisms that we live and
engage with and accept in our lives, I have no qualms
with calling it out now, and I encourage other people to
do it, too, because that's how a lot of change is made.
Allowing and accepting a lot of small things, whether
they be catchphrases or prevailing aesthetics, especially
unquestioned, is the way microaggressions become
hate-crimes.
An on-going project of mine is trying to get land
acknowledgments to be a regular thing in film as a part
of the credits. I want to get the city of Vancouver - and
we're a huge film city - when allowing permits to film
within it, while also thanking the city, you have to
do a land acknowledgment as a part of that. It's not
saving the world, but it is making people rethink their
position, and is way of holding people accountable.
There are definitely people who use land acknowledgments as lip service, and when they do stupid shit,
they're going to have that land acknowledgment as
something to backup on them, and say "Hey, you're
super supportive of these pipelines, but you did a land
acknowledgment, do you care to address that?" or,
"You spoke over this Indigenous elder, but you also
have done this land acknowledgment. Care to address
that?" Sure, it's a cultural commodity that is easily
A
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | MAY 201^
acceptable by many people, but it's also holding people
accountable.
In an urban environment, can our presence be more
than physical? I think land acknowledgments could be an
example of that. What would you say are other ways in
which our presence can be more than just physical?
Language is a big one. There are a few campaigns to
have more Indigenous languages on signage, but that
can also become a bit of cultural capital propaganda
bullshit. It's hard navigating Indigenizing spaces
while also being in such a tourist trap of a city where
our cultural commodities are heavily relied upon,
like Indigenous mural projects. It rides the line of
supporting Indigenous artists and Indigenizing space,
but also gentrifying them and making tourists more
hungry for our culture. It's complicated.
It is complicated. Do you think humour can be used as a
tool to navigate the design of an urban landscape, in a way
that resists the commodification of our culture? Maybe
there isn't a clear answer...
I can tell you how I kind of do it. So, I work with The
Cultch, a really amazing place. If there's ever a front
of house speech, we include the land acknowledgment
in it - and I work front of house. So, when I do those
speeches, I always modify them, because it feels weird.
I also know a lot of settlers and white people feel
more comfortable having the land acknowledgment
as a way of them being "Oh, I'm allowed to be here,
because that person did a land acknowledgment and
a welcome ceremony for this event, or festival I'm at.
There's a Native person that said 'Welcome, welcome
to Native land.' So, I have weird feelings about reading
a land acknowledgment as a Native person for work,
so I just changed it. I usually say: "As a representative
as the front of house person for The Cultch, we are
honoured to be on the land to work and play on Coast
Salish Territories. And then I usually go "But also, I'm
Coast Salish and Sto:lo. You're on my land. So, feel
free to come find me after the show for reparations and
repatriation accepted in cash, or as bills of property."
[Laughing] Holy fuck.
[LAUGHTER] I've literally only have one audience so
far that didn't laugh at it.
But did anyone come up after and be like "here..."
I am thinking I should have a little bentwood box that
is in my aesthetic that says "repatriation."
How does The Cultch feel about it?
I think they'd let me, and they're fine with my
modifications. They think it's hilarious. There's only
been a couple patrons where they're like "we need more
injun jokes," and I'm like "are you a white-passing
native person saying 'injun,' I hope so." Also, like, I'm
Native, so every joke I make is Native, and sometimes
I have people come to me afterward and say we need
more of that, because they understand that a lot of it is
lip service.
That took me a long time to figure out. It was this major
epiphany moment when I was thinking to myself - I come
from my family where my step-dad adopted me, and then
coming out here where there's such Indigenous vibrance
- back home Mi'kmaq people are totally shut down - and
just...I was thinking "I kind of want to have a dinner and
invite my close friends," and was like "is that very Native
of me?" And then I was like, "Mallory, everything you do
is Native."
*
Oh yeah.
It was this big, beautiful moment, and I started to cry
and laugh, and I was snotting-
Just snotting Natively.
Yeah! [laughter] I guess this goes to my last question
about visibility. As with front of house and other
environments you occupy with your art, how do these
various environments impact the expectations of
Indigenous visibility, and how can that change our sense
of self within Indigenous visuality?
Are you asking if I rez it up and wear my regalia to
different events? Because probably. I don't really think
about it. I miss my teal hair, because for me, I loved
people asking me about it and talking about why it
was one of the things I loved about presenting queer
and presenting Native. A lot of people are like "what?
Is she part Black, part white and very Native?" - every
ethnicity thinks I'm their ethnicity - but I love getting
asked about my hair, because when it was teal, it was a
way for me to carry with me the water of my favourite
swimming holes. I was able to have it the colour of the
creeks I loved swimming in. I feel like we're expected
to have regalia regalia. It's like, did you really punch
an eagle out for his feathers and wrestle a coyote
until you got one of its teeth. You know? Like being
super "Native" about everything. The realization that
everything I do is Native, and that I can have contemporary regalia. We already see contemporary regalia
and consider it traditional. Like jingle dresses come
from using tobacco can lids to make the jingles, but we
treat that as "back in the ancient days, looooong before
colonization."
I didn't know that about the jingle dress.
I never really thought about it until I went to the play,
Kamloopa. I have one here, [passes me their keychain,
with a rolled up tuna can lid attached to it] which
was a mind-bendingly amazing play. I saw it literally
as many times as I could. It was the first time I didn't
'Rauen John'
have to translate myself into a story, into a person, and
also saw my sister and my mom, my family. One of the
characters wanted to make a jingle dress. She had read
how they used tobacco can lids to make their jingles,
so she got tuna cans and washed them and tried to
hammer them and sew them into jingles for her regalia.
It was hilarious and sad. And I thought: "Oh yeah, so
obviously we didn't have tobacco can lids 600 years
ago." We already treat that as traditional and sacred
and not new, but we've always been adapting into the
materials of whatever time we're in. It was a really
beautiful realization and I got to actually go and get
one of the jingles of the tuna can lids. Read question
number 4, because I really love that one.
Yeah! While you work within various mediums, arguably,
I'd say that your primary media is provocation and
humour. Would you agree with that?
Definitely. I love it. I never thought about it that way,
and I'm honoured that you came with that to me.
One phrase that I really love, no idea where I heard it,
maybe I just made it up or mashed it up, was: "Better
an honest fool than a clever liar." It's something I feel
really strongly about. I'm constantly pushing people
to be their authentic selves, even if that's not as put
together or elegant or even if it grates people.
By modelling it?
Yeah, I think so. I think I'm very open and honest
about everything, and I'd rather look like a complete
goof if it means that people having an easier time
understanding me. I'm doing my best being fine with
failure, as well, and being wrong and being called out
for being wrong. I feel like a lot of people won't voice
their fears or thoughts in fear of being wrong, but I'd
rather be wrong, then be told that I'm wrong and learn
from it, than just continuing internally.
That's a wonderful offering even to the authentic racists.
I had an interesting interaction recently where I got
called a white woman to my face multiple times.
 gXOS  YAM| 9nixDgDffl i9bioD2iQ
HUTAH
What the fuck?
I'm not really offended, but I also kind of get to live
in this bubble being in the theatre and art world and
having a really great queer community. But people who
are still very new to understanding what privilege is, we
can't just let them be stuck, you know? Understanding
they're having problems with understanding - [this]
is work that we still need to do. We can't completely
isolate ourselves from the people who don't have the
same kind of education that we have - and that's also
place of privilege too, but it's also part of surviving.
Like my name is Raven and I feel that has really
guided who I could be as a person, the trickster-transformer. The second name that I was given was Paceet,
which means butterfly and is another transformer that
brings medicine down from the mountains. The other
name I was given is Exwetlaq, I found out roughly
translates to "being true to oneself."
That makes me think of a term I heard recently
"white-back-to-the-landers." I laughed, because I
remember reading from Lee Maracle's, I am Woman - I
just encountered that text, I don't know why it took
me so long - where she writes that it's a delusional
thought to get "back to the land," because we're always
with it, concrete or not. Still, I'm fascinated with this
idea of being in an urban landscape, being in the city
of Vancouver and seeing certain kinds of Indigenous
programming alongside the resistances from white back
to the landers. Like, what is that discourse? For you as
an artist, what ways does being with the land come to
mean for you, here, in a concrete environment? You hair
seemed to be one way of holding that.
Yeah, definitely. Especially someone who grew up in
isolation in the middle of nowhere on the mainland,
and on reserve outside of a small town. It was definitely
a huge change to start living in the city. It wasn't until
my sister moved in with me and was doing spiritual
work and having a very hard time with it. I came to
the realization of "what the fuck are you doing,"
because the spirits are strong in our territories where
we grew up, in a more natural environment. Here,
we're surrounded by "x" number of people, "x" being
the greater Vancouver area, who have lived and died
here and not have addressed any of their spiritual or
cultural traumas. And all of that spiritual work that's
not done, as an empath, it can be very, very tiring being
anywhere in the the city. You have to learn how to
spiritually and emotionally close yourself off to that.
You never know who you're going to come across and
what their struggle might be, and they might completely
drain you. So, being in a space where spiritual work is
almost never done, that's really hard, especially when
you don't really have a way to ground yourself in
nature. It's amazing to see the cultural, spiritual, and
environmental work that Cease Wyss does by bringing
nature back into the ways that we interact with our
environment on a daily basis, and talking about the
native plants that we constantly see and have never
been able to identify or bond with, and then breaking
down that barrier.
When you talk about spiritual work and spiritual
expression, I can't help but also go back to how we resist
and engage with the putting together and separation
of "Indigenous" and "Art," and where does spirit live
within those divisions and relationships. How are you
holding all that?
I don't know how to hold all these lies. I mean, my
health is not great...I guess, because you have to? And
that's what a lot of Indigenous woman say, is because
you have to, and because no one else is going to do
it. Indigenous women are expected to do fucking
everything. We're expected to be traditional dancers
and singers, we're expected to be language revivalists,
we're expected to be herbolists, were expected to
be spiritual and cultural leaders, we're expected to
be writers, we're expected to be academics, we're
expected to have long-ass natural hair, and have great
cheekbones and super stoic and also have the patience
of a god in the face of adversity and never get angry.
And on top of art-making, also be a silver and copper
engraver, be a traditional tattoo artist now, too, be a
carver, know how to sew, know how to can, know how
to bake...I know a lot of Indigenous women and queer
folk who do, though, because we're the ones that are
carrying everything. And no shade, but shade toward
Native men, but 1 feel like a lot of Native men get away
with just being able to carry their trauma and fuck
around, then throw out some Native jewelry or totem
poles and...this is getting very shady, very fast...but I
definitely feel that's kind of the way it's been.
Are those expectations that come from our Native
community or broader than that?
Broader than that. I was just making whatever art at
Emily Carr and had white women, be like "but when
are you gunna make 'x' or 'y'?" My mom loves to
point out that literally my whole life I've had fear of
missing out. I've been trying to learn every medium
that I can, because I thought if I wasn't supporting
or doing workshops, they might not happen: "There
weren't enough people at that weaving workshop, so
the next one we're not going to be able to fund." The
expectation, I'm not sure where it comes from, but well,
we might all get murdered tomorrow.
Actually, I should have brought this up earlier. One
of the quotes I've saved - I recently learned about
how amazing Josephine Baker is. She's a Black, queer
burlesque dancer, and at one point one of the most
famous women in the world. I started watching her
movie and in the first three minutes, she's growing up in
adversity in the states, they're doing raids on the slums
she's living in, people are dying, and she says: "When I
was fourteen years old, I found out that no one hates a
cute, funny Black girl." I've been racking my brain with
this quote, because I think part of being loud and funny
possibly comes from understanding that the more out
there I am, the harder it is for me to get lost.
I'm a big natural hair advocate, but when I was in
school, I hated being confused for other people, because
I had very long, beautiful straight black hair, but being
confused for other Native girls, it made me so mad.
And I'm all about being extra, anyway, so dying it these
crazy colours and cutting it short grounded me in that
a bit, and I also love it just as an expression and being
able to constantly change as a transformer. But I was
recently thinking that being loud and being performative could partly come from a place of fear, of where
at least this way, they're gunna know I'm gone. They're
going to say something, they'll say "Raven, she was
hilarious, so we definitely have to make sure we find
her dead body in the river." Because I think that being
funny and being cute and being charming is a survival
tactic. It's harder to hate you, and I definitely have had
racists still like me.
Wow. I wonder how many people will be comfortable
hearing that? [chuckle]
A lot of my art practices come from wanting to be as
visible as possible so that people like myself - when
I was a kid, I had no one to really look up to, I had
no one I really identified with, like maybe Whoopi
Goldberg. She's not even gay -
What? No? I think she's gay!
Did she come out, finally?
"Rauen John'
Yeah...yeah!... [chuckle]
Okay cool. Finally, [chuckle] I thought I could play
with this idea of fame and visibility, and be a very queer,
out, visible Native person, so that - I don't even want
kids to be like me. I want Native kids to look at me and
be like "I can do that, or more," because I never had
anyone where I thought "Oh! That's who I could be."
I love that. My last question is about taking up space,
actually, but also, I just want to say it's not only maybe
that the resonance of your name as someone who can
transform the person, but you're also able to take these
really painful and destructive, but honest narratives, and
transform them to say "I can be this and I can do more."
You're working with transformation as your medium, too.
And definitely with people. It's not just about changing
myself, but helping other people and helping them
change. I just watched homecoming, Beyonce's new
film. I put it on while I was crafting and I got devastated
by some of the dialogue in it. At one point, he's talking
about racism and Black people, about people not
having hope, but being the hope that they needed. I was
like "ouuuhf." Just devastated at that. Then there was
another quote: "You can't be what you can't see." And
I was like "bet!" There's nothing like me that I knew of
out in the world, and I am so proud of embodying the
things that I wanted when I was young.
Fuck yeah.
I had nothing like what I am now to look up to, unless
I mash it together from fuckin' before memes were
memes. I make all my own clothes for the most part,
I love playing with makeup, and I love dying my hair
whatever fuck colour I want. Recently, I was thinking
about the things I used to draw and want and long for
when I was young, and I am those fucking things now.
I get to embody this and embody these aesthetics that I
loved and do it better. That's super valuable to me.
That's so encouraging. I'm emotional a little bit.
[laughter]
Okay, last question. How would you define taking up
space versus making space, and how do you think you're
doing that creatively? And maybe we should throw in the
notion of holding space, too.
They're all things that I super overthink and navigate
a lot, but also at times don't even think about. I try to
queer and Indigenize every space I'm in by just being
my authentic self, and by making sure that people know
if a space is safe if you're queer, if you're Indigenous, if
you're femme, and if it's not, I'll make it that way. Or
I'll let you know that it's not safe, and it's not changing,
which sadly means that I don't get the jobs that I want.
I refuse to validate other people and institutions that
aren't safe for queer, Indigenous, femme folk, because
that's what my presence does. Wherever I am, I'm
giving that place my validation.
That's beautiful, Raven. When you talked about how
we're doing all the work - my hope for this issue has been
for the Indigenous people reading it to be able to find one
another, to see people doing their own work and that it's
all contributing to our vibrancy and creating safer spaces
for us to be whole. I wanted to show Indigenous youth
especially that there are Native people to look up to, and
to learn how to create these spaces for themselves - I think
you're a wonderful inspiration for that, Raven.
V
 Heal Hue
fiction
APRIL 2019
ALIEN BOYS /RIVER JACKS
APRIL 5 / SBC RESTAURANT
Pt the iconic loud SBC Restaurant (formerly the Smilin'
Buddha Cabaret), Alien Boys slayed with a high energy
performance that engaged the entire crowd. They were
preceded by a performance from the opener River Jacks,
a five-piece band performing punk music with a folk twist.
Straight out of Calgary, their sound was inspired by the
originators of punk rock, with both politically fuelled and
conversational lyrics. Their blend of punk and folk, almost
resembling a street busker style, created an easy listening
experience for the audience.
Following a necessary smoke and beer break, the five
members of Alien Boys erupted onto the stage with intense
chaotic energy that made the crowd, who were scattered
across the venue's halfpipe, go wild. The powerful energy
that the lead singer manifested was absorbed by the crowd
— as she jumped from one side of the stage to the other, the
audience could barely keep up. The sweat mixed with cheap
beer remains the perfume at a punk show wafting from one
side of the venue to the other. The aggression from the
group is to be expected when at a punk show.
The vocalist screamed out politically fuelled lyrics
about fentanyl and gentrification poisoning the streets of
Vancouver, reminiscing about a lifestyle choice involving
benders to numb out reality. All the while, the guitarist
slammed out one riff after another as the bassist picked
up speed. The drummer kicked it all up a notch with an
addictive beat — the fast composition releasing a rush of
pure punk power into the audience. As a response, the first
row of the audience started headbanging along to the quick
rhythm. A few of the more passionate audience members
threw punches into the air, their fists eagerly rising as if in
the hopes of sparking a revolution.
The scene at SBC resembled a '70s punk show that
fuelled an era of angst and rebellion against the status quo.
Despite all that angst and rebellion exploding throughout the
room, Alien Boys remained diligent in maintaining their tight
and intense punk sound. Right before the end of the set,
a buddy brought over five cans of beer for the band to fuel
the encore, and finish the night with yet another engaging
performance from Alien Boys.
The evening showed that punk is not dead — far from it. It
is alive and ready to show em' how it's done.
—Alexis Zygan
BLESSED (ALBUM RELEASE)/SWIM
TEAM /MASCARAS /PRIMP /WARM
AMPS
APRIL 6/KW STUDIOS
The first thing I noticed as Warm Amps played their first
lilting chord was that this show was loud. And no, not
just ears-ringing-as-you-step-outside kind of loud — it was
ear-splittingly, bass-rattling-your-jeans loud. Luckily, KW
Studios were nice enough to provide a big basket of free
earplugs for audience members. Normally, I'm a purist
and enjoy having my hearing destroyed in the name of an
authentic experience, so this was my first (and probably
last) gig wearing ear plugs. Regardless, I'm grateful that it
was an option.
Primp, the garage rock trio, were second to the stage,
acting as a brilliant contrast to the slower, melodic low-key
songs of Warm Amps. Primp was the sunniest of all the
bands that night, laughing and chatting away to the audience
while joking around onstage. Their songs swung between
being peaceful and dreamy to taking turns screaming at
each other through the microphone assisted by call-and-re-
sponse riffs.
KW Studios, a black box theatre that doubles as a
production and recording studio, made for a fantastic
blank canvas for the five contrasting bands to play their
sets. Portland-based psych rock three-piece Mascaras' set
was lit by a single flat blue light, giving their set a gloomy
undertone. Despite their songs not featuring vocals, their
music was super-charged with feeling, with the fastest
drumming and head-banging combo of the night. Their
songs truly came alive in the venue, culminating in a wash of
drawn out hi hats and cascading psych riffs.
rk
Vancouver locals Swim Team followed with only a slightly
more subdued set. Before their set, I'd noticed their drummer
taking a minute to pogo around at the front of the stage
during Mascaras' final songs — needless to say, Swim Team
were fired up and ready to go. Drumsticks were chipped,
picks were thrown, and yet the band somehow managed to
maintain their endurance to the very end, despite ending
up physically dripping in sweat. Bass player and vocalist
Dorothy Neufeld's red lipstick somehow stayed intact
throughout the entire set, adding to the roster of the night's
many spectacles.
Blessed — whose newest album, Salt, heralded the
creation of the event — had some tough acts to follow. After
a lengthy soundcheck, Blessed entered the stage awash
in an eerie red. Their set arrived as a wall of post-punk
experimental sound, barely pausing for breath in between
songs. Despite a few pedal-related technical issues, their
show was certainly worth the wait, and felt so nuanced,
exciting and almost otherworldly. As they tied up their set, it
became clear that the audience had become transfixed with
Blessed's stage presence, combined with the sheer volume
of the performance making it incredibly hard to focus on
anything else.
Perhaps it was the long length of the show itself (which
by this point had lasted for a solid few hours) or maybe it
was just the atmosphere of the deep, dark underground
studio, but Blessed's set felt almost hypnotic. It was difficult
to tell where songs began and ended, and as the final song
cut out I realized I'd been standing, spellbound in a trance
for a long while.
As the house lights came on and the audience filtered
out from the room, I wasn't sure whether to feel exhausted
or relieved — or both. The culmination of Blessed's
album release was a lengthy, but brilliant and varied show
supported by a long roster of local talent.
—Sophie Galloway
SLAM DUNK / NOT AMUSED / CAVE GIRL
/ PUZZLEHEAD
APRIL 19 /RED GATE
Dating back to the days of Myspace, Victoria based
garage rockers Slam Dunk are known for putting on a
great show. After a bit of a hiatus the band played alongside
Vancouver staples, Puzzlehead and Cave Girl as well as the
Queens, NY noise band, Not Amused. Under the revolving
disco balls of Red Gate, this Easter weekend show sure
crucified the crowd.
I walked into the venue to hear the languid vocals and
commanding guitar of Puzzlehead's Clarence lulling listeners
into a head bobbing trance. As half the band was out of town —
or so I heard — Claire of Cave Girl jumped pretty seamlessly
from playing synth on the ground to drums throughout the
performance. Clarence commanded attention with her powerful
presence on stage playing both new and old songs.
REAL   LIVE  ACTION
I was intrigued to see the next band, Not Amused, who
were playing Vancouver for the first time as part of their North
American tour. Their latest release, Dante, is a punk album
that has a loud and lo-fi (dare I say Myspace-y) feel — the
kind of music I felt would thrive in the live setting. The crowd
had thickened by this point and with guitarist, Ben making
use of the floor and the stage, it was engaging to watch. The
harsh vocals and loud guitar riffs riled up the crowd.
After a bit of an interlude, an eclectic mix of low volume
hits allowed for small talk. It's kind of strange to be listening
to "All Star" by Smashmouth in the midst of a pretty noisy
four-band lineup. Cave Girl's set was short but sweet. The
blend of vocals was reminiscent of The Courtneys and the
strong bass built on the night's antics.
Shortly before midnight, Slam Dunk hit the stage to a full
crowd. Guitarist Jordan Minkoff greeted the audience. "We're
super jacked up to be here, we haven't played a show [in
Vancouver] in two and a half years," which really explained
their performance. The crowd clearly felt the same thing,
because it was full and boisterous. The typically four piece
band — two guitars, bass, and drums with a mixture of vocals
— had the addition of a saxophone player that highlighted the
jazzy sounds of their 2013 album Welcome to Miami. As one
Bandcamp user says, the album is "earnestly trying to get you
to dance," and this reigned true for their live performance.
By their second song, "Everyone's a Dying Breed," the
mosh pit was very alive. Once Jordan asked all the boys
thrashing around with skateboards in their hands "to put
them on the stage, it'll look cool," the band launched back
into classic high energy garage rock. Slam Dunk knows
how to engage with a crowd, which is no surprise as the
band is known for their performative antics like their 2015
mockumentary Fireband, documenting a fictitious tour with
Arcade Fire.
After a brief Cranberries cover, the group gave one
person his skateboard back to do a trick in the crowd. Then,
satirically crossing off "skate sesh" from the set list, the band
launched into the few final songs. The performance had
some big DIY energy and the banter between the audience
and band members made the show feel more intimate.
—Jessie Stainton
EMERGE ON MAIN W/JULIA CHIEN,
MATTHEW ARIARATNAM, ALEX MAH
APRIL 23/FOX CABARET
I will admit that this is not the typical sort of event that
Discorder tends to cover. As we are always striving to give
a platform for those artists who cannot find one elsewhere, it
seems almost blasphemous to set aside this space for such
a highly regarded and otherwise publicized concert series.
While Music on Main, an organization devoted to showcasing
both local and international experimental and contemporary
classical music in Vancouver, programs incredible and
diverse performances, the artists they showcase are
generally world renowned and by no means lacking publicity
and support.
But this show is different. Providing the same resources
and support they would to their other, more established
artists, Music on Main chose three local musicians and
composers to feature for their Emerge on Main concert at
the Fox Cabaret.
What is normally the large expanse of floor space usually
packed tight with dancing crowds was instead neatly
arranged rows of chairs, all facing the stage, containing
a motley assortment of musical instruments and sound
equipment, as well as furniture and various small objects
and trinkets. Typical of a Music on Main show, the audience
— in general a bit on the older and wealthier than the
average night at the Fox — was seated and awaiting the
commencement of the evening at eight o'clock sharp.
Music on Main's artistic director, David Pay, started off
with a warm introduction to the program and music series
as well as a thorough acknowledgment of the Musqueam,
Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh peoples, on whose land the
event was taking place.
Percussionist Julia Chien, the first of the three local
artists chosen, stepped on stage. Taking her place on the
far right of the stage, behind a selection of drums — two
Discorder magazine | MAY  2019
 toms, two congas, two bongos and a kick drum behind her —
she began tapping out a soft and steady pulse. After a few
moments, her other stick struck a single, syncopated hit on
another, instantly changing the initial feel into a triplet-based
groove. As Chien worked through the composition by Michio
Kitazume, the intensity rose and fell, with various polyrhythms
shifting in and out of focus with masterful precision.
Next up was composer and guitarist Matthew Ariaratnam,
performing his own piece "Altar :-: Source." Sitting behind
a shrine constructed from objects related to his Sri Lankan
heritage, including a pendant with an image of his own
grandmother, as well as a guitar, Ariaratnam began. Using
a microphone as well as the heavily affected guitar with a
vibrating toy, Ariaratnam created swells and jerks of sound.
As the first wave of sound subsided, he removed a tape
recorder from the shrine, and placed it on his guitar, with
the microphone facing it, and pressed play. The voice of
Ariaratnam's grandfather singing in Old Tamil emanated.
Then, as the recording ended, he picked up his guitar
and played, as if in conversation with the voice of his
grandfather. Using various physical objects to manipulate
his instrument, including a spoon, a hair elastic and a credit
card, his guitar morphed from an almost sitar-like sound,
into a wall of distortion and delay. He ended his piece with
the tape of his grandfather again, sitting and listening along
with the audience.
After a brief intermission, Alex Mah's piece, "chimes,"
began. Inviting the audience to moved around the room
and experience the performance from various perspectives
(which hardly anyone actually did), Mah sat across from
Ariaratnam at a table with a guitar and various pieces of
paper with text atop. Methodically, the two performers took
turns plucking, strumming or tapping the instrument, with the
other singing out words from the texts before them in unison
with the instrument. Almost as if it were a game, they seem
to be striving to throw each other off, stopping abruptly and
letting their opponent's voice trail off acapella or detuning
and re-tuning the guitar to create inimitable sounds for the
other to attempt to vocalize. The playfulness of Mah's piece,
as well as the freedom to move around the room, even peer
over the shoulders of the performers, felt fresh and exciting,
especially in such a formal concert context.
Finally, Julia Chien arrived on stage again to perform the
final piece of the night. "Manifesto," composed by Aaron
Graham, was written especially for Chien to perform, and
far from being a typical percussion piece, Chien sat behind
a desk at centre stage, complete with a typewriter, three
lamps, an assortment of papers and some drumsticks. In
perfect time with the prerecorded music and sounds playing
out of the speakers, Chien typed away, turned lamps on and
off, arranged and rearranged papers, made hand gestures,
and tapped the desktop with the sticks. With almost
mechanical precision, Chien's performance was as much a
feat of musical ability as it was a carefully choreographed
dance. It was mesmerising.
Despite the evening's formality, all four performances
were bristling with energy and excitement that is so rarely
associated with contemporary classical concerts. For Music
on Main to share its valuable resources — as well as its
virtually built-in audience — with local artists in the early
stages of their career is indispensable to the future of this
city's music and art scenes. I only wish they did it a bit
more often. —Lucas Lund
III
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and
online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences. Feel free
to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
in
i submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please email
Cae Rosch at ur.discorder@citr.ca.
) media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review at
CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1.
Untie t
HeoietD
RUSSIAN TIM AND
PAVEL BURES
Greatest SuperHITS (So Far)
(Self-released)
April   12,   2019
Russian Tim and Pavel Bures' first album, long awaited
by pop punks across Vancouver, crashes in with speed
and power. Greatest SuperHITS (So Far) just doesn't let
up. It leaves you without a chance to breathe from its first
raucous notes until the final, slow guitar fade at the end of
its last track. It's an album that wants to be shouted out loud,
off of the record and into the pit.
From the very first track, "Slava is Your Uncle," the album
is upfront with its focus on high energy, big fun punk rock.
The song's dynamic chord progression, shouted Russian
vocals, and call and response chorus toss you right into
this circle pit of an album. Tim's vocals feel like another
soaring instrument, his hard rolled Rs wild and forceful. The
propulsion it starts whirls the whole album into motion, and it
doesn't get less intense from there.
But it's not only the punchy energy of the album that
makes it so engaging. Russian Tim and Pavel Bures is a
band of remarkably talented musicians. They're a single,
cohesive unit, their sound consistently tight, yet they also
mobilize dynamic contrast and carefully placed, breathless
pauses to avoid the potential for boredom that a straightforward pop punk album risks.
This is nowhere more clear than in their fan-favorite
adaptation of t.A.T.u's "All the Things She Said," here
titled simply "Tatu." One of the few songs on the album
that combines English and Russian lyrics, it uses the low,
steady thump of the kick drum in its first verse to contrast
the full-bodied, speedy interplay of Julia and Kristy-Lee's
guitars. It sprawls llya's bass beneath arcing, transcendent
guitar riffs for a song that doesn't just drive crowd motion
in live shows, but invades your brain and doesn't let go for
weeks even in its studio version.
Speed, rhythm, and unabashedly catchy hooks are
Greatest SuperHITS (So Farfs clearest strengths.
'Alkogolik," which feels like a Russian pop punk
reincarnation of Aram Khatchaturian's Sabre Dance in its
skittering, wild sixteenth notes, showcases these talents
perfectly. But those characteristics are not in the slightest
all the album has to offer. "Marshmellow" demonstrates this
in its jazzy pace and the slouchy promenade of its brass
part. Kristy-Lee's trumpet and Mike Allen's saxophone lazily
slide the track into masterful genre blending, but the track's
simple, shouted chorus show that the album's love of gang
vocals is there to stay.
No matter the direction a song goes on this album, it
careens there wholeheartedly. Greatest SuperHITS (So Far)
makes you want to shout along, regardless of whether you
speak a word of Russian. It's not just for listening. It's for
slamming into your entire body and throwing yourself into
the music with reckless abandon. -Cae Rosch
SCHWEY
Schwey
(604 Records)
3/15/2019
Schwey's eponymous funk/soul/R&B album has a
pleasant, calming energy. The songs vary in the beat,
slow and fast, but the singer's soothing voice allows the
album to stay consistent in tone.
The album is reminiscent of the low-fi songs I like to
listen to while working or just hanging out because they're
relaxing, and their pleasantness can be uplifting. Even
though the songs have a lot of lyrics to process, I still find
that the tone allows the music to be suitable for moments
when you want to take some time for yourself.
'Flutter" is one of the songs that reminds me most of lo-fi
music. It has a soft rhythm that I find instantly cheers me up.
It's catchy and the tune puts a smile on my face. The lyrics
in this song have a sweetness to them, too. For example,
the lyric "You make me fluttery" creates an image of bright
butterflies in my head. Other songs, like "Family Shop" and
'Can't Stop (The Groove)," have a similar soothing rhythm.
On the other hand, "Sh'qwela" stands out to me because
it's more upbeat, unlike the more lo-fi songs. However, it's
still really enjoyable, because the singer's voice creates a
satisfying atmosphere, one that helps you cool off after a
particularly rough day.
By creating these uplifting, vibrant songs, Schwey has
made an album that suits many moments, especially ones
where you want give yourself a break. — Zainab Fatima
YEP
Sport EP
(Cuchabata Records)
April   14,   2019
Upbeat and sometimes terrifying, the next generation of
synth pageantry is moving in hot after a lull after prog
rock's heyday. Now we have Yep, with explosive keyboard
melodies, whirring noises, and loops broken by chirps and
fills. The band's new EP, Sport, plays with the virtuosity
of an athlete and freaks harder than midnight velvet. Yep,
comprised of Madison Mayhew (keys, synth), Gil Goletski
(drums) and Craig Stensrud (bass), brings together two
tracks recorded with Jo Hirabayashi (Jo Passed) with
two remastered demos on the EP, expressing the band's
requisite collaborative skill — a synergy that shimmies its
way through the almost infinite riffs.
'Sport," the first and title track, kicks off with hard-hitting
fills and acrobatic arpeggios. The song relishes in a bouncy,
percussion-heavy intro that plays about a minute and a
half before breaking into bass grooves and shouts — a
signature move throughout the EP. It's full of manically sharp
surprises and little twists where melodies break and rhythm
swerves, moving the music beyond the pomp of prog and
into something totally unexpected. Sport really takes off with
the thundering, post-apocalyptic "REM," which plays like
falling into a wormhole — fittingly, as it stretches six minutes
across four distinct sections. The song is the kind of feat the
EP is named after, punctuated by super satisfying growled
words and an eerie optimism.
Across its four tracks, Sport isn't strictly a maelstrom of
endless grooves — "Grub" opens with unnerving buoyancy
and descends into a blast of fuzzy bass and hysteric
repetition, while "Julian" is bookended with small hits of jazz
fusion. It's the right amount of wild experimentation that
is expected from an EP put out by Montreal's Cuchabata
Records. Yep tell me they're "always thinking about the
work— interpersonal as much as compositional — the
players must've put in together to pull it off...the camaraderie
and good humour it must've taken," which is what they've
managed to do with a defining finesse.
Component ingredients aside, Stensrud's lyrics perfectly
balance the psychedelia and allow it to land its punches.
Sport is populated by God's rivals, swan dives, and boxed
white wine. "REM" tempers these motifs with sly wit, "I'm a
mountain of a man / Untrammeled my hard rock juts into the
wine dark sea." There is also the surreal bodily/heavenly
juxtapositions in "Julian" ("I'm heaven-sent amen / Pus,
scabs, blood, all God's love") whipped up and delivered
in feverish bursts. The whole EP plays like an Olympic
outpouring of energy, sharpened by infinite grooves and
hypnagogic verses. Yep is clearly dexterous, and Sport
delivers with pure, collaborative horsepower.
— Tasha Hefford
exos yam | 9rti5DpDfn i9bioojia
UNDER REVIEW
19
 Discorder magazine | MAY 201^
Otl THE AIR
LA FIESTA
words by Angela T.   //   illustration by R.  Hester
From 5 to 6 every Sunday, the vivid rhythms of the latest in Latin music exercise full
commotion at Radio Latina La Fiesta on CiTR 101.9 FM, brought to listeners by
DJ MIXXX. In bundling the best of Salsa, Reggaeton, and much more into shows
rounded out by banter, Discorder sat down with Nick Guarna, host since 2012, in light of
the show's recent rebranding.
So what about Latin music do you think
draws in people worldwide?
The reason why I think it draws
people is because it's more of a party
atmosphere. If you look at hip hop, it's
hip hop. If you look at house music,
it's house music. But Latin music
has people who like to dance salsa,
bachata, merengue...really, it unites
people regardless of where you're from.
How do you think it's regarded in the
local community?
There [are] not that many Latinos in
Vancouver, but I believe that Latin
music is just starting to come to life.
There are more people trying it out —
Latin evenings and events. So, that's
starting to move across to different
nationalities, with people beginning to
recognize and enjoy it.
What got you into hosting the show?
I was actually doing radio in Montreal
for about four years, but it was a
different genre of music — more house
music than anything else. Around
2003, as I was getting a little bit more
mature in my age, I started to look at
where I [was] going to fit in and be
comfortable with, moving on. One of
the things that I found is that Latin
music really appeals to everybody:
hence I've been at it since then — so
[about] fifteen years.
How would you say the show and its
listeners have evolved since then?
The show itself used to be just music.
That was it — I wouldn't talk, it was
just play the music and that's the way it
goes. I found out that that's okay, but
people then can't relate to the person
behind the show. So something I did was
I brought in Isabel — and she brings life
to the show. There's a lot of spark on the
air, a lot of communication, and people
enjoy the back and forth, the music, and
what we talk about.
So what was the motivation behind the
show's rebranding?
One of the things that I was doing
before was just, "okay, if people
are listening, great; if people aren't
listening, well, okay, I'll have to try to
get that crowd." But as I progressed as
a DJ, I started to do more events, and
people started to say to me, 'oh, you
have a radio show.' After that, I wanted
to push myself more so that people
identifying with the show could identify
the DJ behind it, as well."
What can your listeners look forward to?
It's kind of difficult, but really amazing
— once you start verbalizing and
playing the music, an hour is really
nothing. What I'm hoping to achieve
in the future is to bring people into the
studio. Not only local, but international acts. People touring in Vancouver
- I'd love to get them in and let them
hear that this is a true Latin radio show.
What about La Fiesta do you think gets
people tuning in, then coming back for
more?
I think the combination of the
latest and greatest music, as well as
information we provide on Latino
events happening around Vancouver.
It's different from all the other Latin
shows here in Vancouver; we're up
to date on what's happening with the
local artists, the most popular artists,
and that's what we deliver - today's
news, not yesterday's.
GALLERY
PATIO & LOUNGE
SUMMER
P1T<    SUNSET   SESSIONS
R Y
E R
F R I DAY
MAY 10 - AUG 30
7:00PM ONWARD
6133 UNIVERSITY BLVD
VANCOUVER, BC V6T \Z\
FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS I MUSIC I FRIENDS
k
ON THE AIRlLa   Fiesta
 o
m m&mm m®m®™
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'DISCORDER MAGAZINE RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERY DAY!
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&UIctmc6tiap
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j&unftap
6AM
TRANCENDANCE
CiTR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
6AM
7AM
GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICKIN"
^T^Hr^Ho^r^^r^^
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CANADALAND
^^^Tt^GHO^^^^^^
^^^Tt^GHO^r M1X
7AM
8AM
CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
SEEKING OFFICE:
AT LARGE
PACIFIC PICKIN"
8AM
9AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
YOUR NEW SHOW
MIXTAPES WITH
YOUR NEW SHOW
9AM
COMEDY ZEITGEIST
10 AM
YOUR NEW SHOW
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10 AM
11AM
FEELING SOUNDS
MORNING AFTER SHOW
U DO U RADIO
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM
12 PM
SYNCHRONICITY
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
THE ROCKERS SHOW
12 PM
1PM
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
K-POP CAFE
TOO DREAMY
1PM
2 PM
120BPM HOSTED BY
AARON SCHMIDKE
YOUR NEW
SHOW
ALL
ACCESS
PASS
ASTROTALK
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
2 PM
3 PM
CiTR Charts With
Kaila Fewster
DIALECTIC
C-POP CONNECTION
120BPM
3 PM
4 PM
SHOES ON A WIRE
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
4 PM
THUNDERBIRD EYE
5 PM
DELIBERATE NOISE
INTO THE WOODS
ARTS REPORT
DEMOCRACY WATCH
WORD ON THE STREET
MANTRA
LA FIESTA
5 PM
6 PM
RECORDS MANAGEMENT
YOUR NEW SHOW
SPENCER LATU SHOW
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
NASHA VOLNA
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
6 PM
7 PM
EXPLODING HEAD
"^'HE
MEDICINE
SHOW
SAMSQUANCH'S
HIDE-AWAY
YOUR NEW SHOW
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
8 PM
MOVIES
MIX CASSETTE
CI RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SOCA STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
NINTH WAVE
LIVE FROM
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
HELL
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
COPY / PASTE
CI RADIO
THE AFTN SOCCER
11PM
12AM
SHOW
12AM
1AM
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
CiTR GHOST MIX
1M AB?flLTO YALVE
1AM
2AM
OF INSOMNIA
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
D
pc-hey, this kind of cell means this show is hosted by students
They are also highlighted in the spot colour on the guide,
you can't miss it.
 ■ monti/iy
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
3AM-11AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththebrowns
@h otmail.com
• FEELING SOUNDS
11AM-12PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
A show about indie music and
emotion as well as building a
community by featuring local
and student musicians!
Contact: sara.y.carbone@alumni.
ubc.ca Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/
saracarbon espotify
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B in spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• CITR CHARTS WITH
KAILA FEWSTER
3PM-4PM, MUSIC
Find out what we're pumped on
Contact:programming@citr. ca
SHOES ON AWIRE
4PM-5PM, rock/pop/indie
Music + Stories, by and
for Women + Queers.
Insta: @shoesonawirepod
Tweeter: @Shoesonawire
• DELIBERATE NOISE
2PM-3PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Love rocking out to live music,
but don't feel like paying
cover? Tune in for the latest
and greatest punk, garage
rock, local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
contact: programming@citr.ca
■ RECORDS MANAGEMENT
10AM-11AM, ROCK/ROOTS/FOLK
A show for Canadian Rock,
Indie, Folk, Country, and other
Canadiana! Curated for you by
your hosts, Nathalie and Adrian.
contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TltEStiay
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
3AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the LGBTQ +
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmail.com
Twitter | @recordsmgmtyvr
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM,  ROCK / POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY/
DISABILITY
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communitylivingradio@gmail.com
ich
• 120BPM HOSTED BY
AARON SCHMIDKE
2PM-3PM, MUSIC
120BPM hosted weekly
by Aaron Schmidke!
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
• DIALECTIC
3PM-4PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Defined as "The way in which
two different forces or factors
work together", Dialectic bring
the distinct music tastes of
hosts Chase and Dan together.
Each episode showcases
a variety of indie rock and
beyond, bound together by
the week's unique theme.
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
■ TEACHABLE MOMENTS
TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/POP
a show with music
about being uncool
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• INTO THE WOODS
TUES 5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope,
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES &TREASONS
3PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
Malik, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
rrogramming@citr. ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room.
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK / POP	
Jayden targets audiences in the
Korean community in Vancouver
to introduce the News on
Korea, Korean Culture while
comparing other Asian Cultures,
playing all kinds of Korean
Music(K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie,
R&B,etc),talking about popular
trends in the industries of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows,
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave
or Hallyu), the news about
Korean Entertainment Industry,
what's going on in the Korean
Society here in Vancouver and
conversations with c
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
ALTERNATING WEDNESDAYS
2PM-3PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
POLITICS
We talk about equity, inclusion,
and accessibility for people with
diverse abilities, on campus
and beyond. Tune in every
second Wednesday from 2-3pm
for interviews, music, news,
events, and awesome dialogue.
Contact: Twitter | @access_citr
C-POP CONNECTION
C-POP Connection brings you
some of the most popular songs
in the Chinese music industry!
The show also talks about
Chinese culture to connect you
to the Chinese society. Tune in
every Wednesday from 3-4 PM
with your host DJ Sab to get
updated on the hottest singles,
album, and news in C-POP!
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
4:30-5PM, TALK/SPORTS
CiTR Sports treat you to
interviews with UBC's top
athletes and Olympians,
off-field stories of the
accomplished sportspeople.
T-Bird Eye is your weekly
roundup of UBC Thunderbirds
sports action with hosts Eric
Thompson, Jake McGrail,
Liz Wang, and Jacob Aere.
Contact: Twitter | @CiTRSports
• ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC,
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco uvermedicinesho w@gmaii. com
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too) and relished in the merging
of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-10PM, HIP HOP/ R&b/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook \ NinthWaveRadio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
10PM-11PM, TALK
Listen to your favorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSSay
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• CONVICTIONS* CONTRADICTIONS
THURS, 8AM-9AM, TALK/COMEDY/
SOCIAL OBESERVATIONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society, shown through social
observational comedy. To boot,
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
• COMEDY ZEITGEIST
9:30AM-iopm, talk	
Each week, Doug Vandelay
interviews a current comedian
about their comedic
influences, their careers and
whatever else comes up
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr(3>gmaii. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Roc ke t From Russia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
• K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners an
introduction to music &
entertainment in Asian Cultures,
especially, Korean, Japanese
and Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
tnd rep CiTR's playlist. Get
t us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
• DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS	
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
• THE SPENCER LATU SHOW
6pm-7:30PM, talk/ political
commentary	
The Spencer Latu Show is a
progressive politics show that
speaks truth to power. We
provide much needed coverage,
and media criticism of stories
at the municipal, provincial,
national and international
level from the perspective of
two progressive working class
students; Spencer Latu and
Ajeetpal Gill. We are based
out of UBC in Vancouver BC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30pm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Best of new and local hip hop
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautonomy, com
■ TRUiay
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraltentacles@hotmail. co m
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse<3>canadaiandshow. com
■ SEEKING OFFICE: AT LARGE
8AM-9AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
Seeking Office is innovative
storytelling and municipal news
coverage from Vancouver and
the Lower Mainland. Join us for
Season 2, At Large.
Subscribe to Seeking Office on
iTunes, Stitcher or Google Play.
Contact: @CiTRNews
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery and a 'IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
whaf s happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@g mail.com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP/SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on each other
and leave mix tapes and love
letters in each other's lockers xo
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA©weirdness.
Contact: Twitter |
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30pm-5pm, music/interviews
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp ://nardwuar. com/rad/con tact/
• WORD ON THE STREET
5PM-6PM, ROCK/INDIE/POP
Hosted by the Music Affairs
Collective, every episode is
packed with up-to-date content
from the Lower Mainland music
communities including news,
new music releases, event
reviews and upcoming events,
interviews with local musicians
and industry professionals and
discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7:30PM, TALK/COMEDY
Every week Jack, Tristan and
a special guest randomly
select a conversation topic
for the entire show; ranging
from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30pm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
imational
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and future.
This includes jazz, soul,
hip-hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
There are also interviews
with local and international
artists. Truly, a radio show
with international flavour.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skaids_Haii
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock:
drone, ambient, experimental:
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
C1 RADIO
FRI 11PM-12:30AM, HIP HOP/R&B/RAP
Repeat of Thursday's show -
Best of new and local hip hop
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ saTURSay
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citrlatenightshow@gmail.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side ofthe spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
Contact:
Facebook | @TooDreamyRadio
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact:
mantraradioshow@g mail, co m
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
SOCASTORM
3PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoN #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
Sbit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
ofthe Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79. We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ sunti/iy
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
3AM-10AM,  ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
A repeat of Tuesday morning's
favourite Bluegrass Show -
Bluegrass, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM, INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
3PM-5PM,COUNTRY
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
5PM-6PM, international/latin
AMERICAN
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
3PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
3PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, DeepTrance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem:
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmileymike @trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ isvam>°f
VOSTTOgS
• STUDENT PROGRAMMING
ECLECTIC
Marks any show that is
produced primarily by students.
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citrca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9 FM APRIL CHARTS
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Seeing Green
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Devours**
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Weyes Blood#
Titanic Rising
Sub Pop               |
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Jock Tears*+#
Bad Boys
Inky                  |
1   *
Milk*+#
Mattress Ranch
Self-Released
1   »
The 427's*#
Stay Gold
Stingray              |
1   •
Kat Danser*#
Goin' Gone
Black Hen
1   »
Alien Boys*+
Night Danger
Desolate              |
1   «
PUP*
Morbid Stuff
Little Dipper
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Terell Safadi*+
Trap Love and $ex
Self-Released
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Julia Holter*#
Aviary
Domino                |
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Self-Released
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Orville Peck
Pony
Royal Mountain         |
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Abigail Lapell*#
Getaway
Coax                 |
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wild/kind*+#
West Ends
Safety Bear           |
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Dilly Dally*#
Heaven
Dine Alone
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Sharon Van Etten#
Remind Me Tomorrow
Jagjaguwar            1
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Our Native Daughters*
Songs of our Native
Daughters
Smithsonian Folkways   |
It.
Homeshake*
Helium
Royal Mountain         |
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GrimSkunk*
Unreason In the Age of
Madness
Indica
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Pale Red*+#
Heavy Petting
Self-Released          |
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Tallies**
Tallies
Hand Drawn Dracula    |
|3
Pharis & Jason Romero*#
Sweet Old Religion
Lula                  |
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Only A Visitor*+#
Technicolour Education
Self-Released
l»
future star*+#
hallelujah i'm alone forever
Self-Released          |
|»
Dilly Dally*#
Heaven
Dine Alone            |
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Snakies*#
Night Lights
Self-Released          |
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Kiwi Jr.*
Football Money
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One Gig Hard Drive
Self-Released          |
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kylie v*+
lotus eater
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April Verch*#
Once a Day
Slab Town             |
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Tanya Tagaq*#
Toothsayer
Six Shooter
l»
Garbage Dreams*+#
Demonstrations
Self-Released          |
|»
Craig Aalders*+
Oceanography
Self-Released
|»
PIQSIQ*#
Altering The Timeline
Coax                 |
|»
Hand Habits
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Saddle Creek
l»
Bedwetters Anonymous**
R.U. Experiencing
Discomfort?
Self-Released          |
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Joni Void*
Mise En Abyme
Constellation
1 *
Jessica Moss*#
Entanglement
Constellation          |
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Karin Plato*+#
This Could Be The One
Stikjazz
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Ian William Craig*+
Thresholder
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Trampoline**
Happy Crimes
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Stuffed & Ready
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The Peptides**
Galapagos, Vol. 1
Self-Released          |
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Watermelon Slim
Church of the Blues
Northern Blues        |
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Future Me Hates Me
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THEATRE
1660 EAST BROADWAY
I        MAY       I
MAY
3
May the Fourth be With You!
The Geekenders present
A NUDE HOPE:
A SCI-FI BURLESQUE ADVENTURE
AkoMay4&5
TALKING HEADS: STOP MAKING SENSE 1
Friday Late Night Movie
MAY
~4
Oscar-winner
GREEN BOOK
Additional dates www.riotheatre.ca
Japanimation Classic!
PERFECT BLUE
20th Anniversary Remaster
MAY
~5
FREE SOLO
Final Screening
UWE Boll Live for Q& A!!
F**KY0U ALL THE UWE BOLLSTORYI
MAY
6
Ethan Hawke & Noomi Rapace
STOCKHOLM
#CDNFilm
MAY
7
Filmmakers in Attendance!
ONCE UPON A SUPERHERO |
MAY
¥
STORY STORY LIE
Fight Club
The Gentlemen Hecklers Present
TOP GUN
MAY
To
La Maison Lust Presents
WET Also May 11
John Waters'
SERIAL MOM
Friday Late Night Movie
MAY
12
Happy Mother's Day!
CatVideoFest2019
MAMMA MIA!
The Yes Men's
MIKE BONNANO
Live!
MAY
T3
COCO MONTOYA
Live!
MAY
15
The Fidionals Comedy Co. Presents 1
IMPROV AGAINST HUMANITY 1
#IAHatRio
MAY
17
Double Feature!
Keanu Reeves
JOHN WICK 1 & 2
David Cronenberg's
A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE
Friday Late Night Movie
MAY
18
The Geekenders Present
DUNGEONS & DRAGLESQUEl
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW |
MAY
24
Sing-a-long!
GREASE
Also June 22
AMERICAN HISTORY X
Friday Late Night Movie
MAY
27
THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW 1
A #DNDLive Improv Comedy Adventure 1
JUNE
"5"
Paul Anthony's
TALENT TIME
First Thursday of Every Month!
*www.riotheatre.ca for additional times
COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA
 Nick
Bea
Miller
s
Jorjav Smith
& Kali Uchis
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
May 9
SHANNON SHAW
Fox Cabaret
May 9
THE JAPANESE HOUSE
Fortune
May   11
JOSEPH
St.   James  Hall
May  15
LOCAL NATIVES
Commodore
May 16
AMERICAN FOOTBALL
Imperial
May  17
WEYES BLOOD
Wise  Hall
May  18
BEA MILLER
Venue
May  18
THE LEMONHEADS
Rickshaw
May 19 May 22 May 24
ORVILLE PECK   JORJA SMITH & KALI UCHIS    THE TWILIGHT SAD
Wise Hall
Malkin Bowl
Wise Hall
May 26
SWINGIN' UTTERS
Wise  Hall
June   1
SEBADOH
Fox  Cabaret
June  7
GREAT GOOD FINE OK
Fox Cabaeret
June 6
AMANDA PALMER
Chan Centre
June 6
ROYAL TRUX
Rickshaw
June 7
ROLLING BLACKOUTS COASTAL FEVER
Rickshaw Theatre
June 8 & 9 June 9 June 12
NICK MURPHY FKA CHET FAKER I MATTIEL I CONNAN MOCKASIN
Commodore Ballroom       Wise Hall   Rickshaw Theatre
June 12
L7 SCATTER THE RATS TOUR
Commodore Ballroom
June 14
BAILEN
Wise Hall
June 15
COSMO'S MIDNIGHT
Fox Cabaret
Saturday June 15 & Sunday June 16
A$AP ROCKY, RAE SREMMURD, LIL BABY, GUNNA, RICH THE KID, LIL SKIES
Breakout Festival 2019 @ PNE Amphitheatre *Includes Playland!*
June 21
OKKERVIL RIVER
Wise Hall
June 23
ALEJANDRO ESC0VED0
Wise Hall
June 25
GRAPET00TH
Fox  Cabaret
June  25
YEASAYER
Rickshaw Theatre
Tickets  & more  shows at

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