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  0@®@®@®
254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
UPCOMING SHOWS
APR
SOLD OUT
PROTEST THE HERO
CLOSURE IN MOSCOW, THANK YOU
SCIENTIST, NO PARENTS, NEEDS
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THE BRONX
NO PARENTS, NEEDS
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SAQI
APPLECAT, JOSHUA JAMES
M i]
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LIFE'S STRANGE DREAM
p»7| J DAS MORTAL, FM ATTACK,
GALACTIC HOBOS
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Ol
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THE GATEWAY SHOW
IVAN DECKER, MAGGIE MAYE,
MYLES WEBER, SOPHIE BUDDLE,
HOST ERIN INGLE
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COMEDY SHOCKER XVI:
SWEET 16 SIMON KING,
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COLIN LAMB, SAM TONNING,
HOST MARK HUGHES
ELECTRIC SIX northern
FACES, SMALL TOWN ARTILLERY
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^Jvl BORG QUEEN, GARRETT
MAY
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HYPERSPACE METAL
FESTIVAL 2018 NIGHT 1
IRON KINGDOM odinfist,
ARKENFIRE, MEDEVIL, APPRENTICE |
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HELION PRIME scythia,
RAVENOUS: ETERNAL HUNGER,
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AT THE WISE HALL:
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AT THE WISE HALL:
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IKlDMIte MSEH1LLC1
p| M WISE HALL
YLA It
EAST VAN SHOWCASE
SHORT FILM FESTIVAL
TRICKY
WITH GUESTS
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UPCOMING EVENTS
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 TABLE of COFITEFITS
APRIL 2018
COVER: COBALT HOTEL EXTERIOR BY PAT VALADE
iFeaturess
06
\
VANCOUVER  VENUES
So your favourite hangouts are closing...
but is it a renue crisis?
07   -   CENTRE A
Making friends in Sun Wah Centre
18 -  NICO DE  TORRES
Multidisciplinary artist, producer, cultivator
19 -  HOW  TO  GET A RADIO  SHOW
Want a show on CiTR 101.9FM? Here's how to get started
Column* + iDt&er £>t«ff
04  -  Hot Head:
Mostly rants
04 - Unceded:
A Prairie  Feminist  Future
for Cindy and Tina
05 - Discorder Revisited:
Cup Racing,   Cambridge
and Stephen Hawking
05  - Filmstripped:
Reel 2 Real Festival,
April 8-14
09  - Real Live Action
Live music, comedy,
film screening
-  A MAP OF  RECORD STORES!!!
by Cian Hogan.
12  -  Art  Project
Steele Duncan
ADVERTISE:Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words
to Discorder, please contact the
editor at editor.discorder@citr.ca.
To submit images, contact the art
director at artcoordinator@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE:Sendina
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DISTRIBUTED distribute
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DONATE:We are part of CiTR,
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accept donations so we can
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you love.To donate visit
www.citr.ca/donate.
13
15
- April Events Calendar
Under Review
Music, podcasts, books
20 -
21 -
22 -
23 -
The  Air:
Melanie Woods +  Into The Woods
CiTR Program Schedule
CiTR Program Guide
March  Charts
To inform Discorder of an
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art show or significant
Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
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SOCAN
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Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Outgoing Station Manager: Eleanor Wearing // Incoming
Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising Coordinator: Audrey MacDonald // Discorder
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Erica Leiren, Alex Lenz, Lucas Lund, Lexi Mellish Mingo, Zoe Power, Maddy Rafter, Jeremy Rawkins, Emily
Riddle, Judah Schulte, Elizabeth Schwab, Esther Sun, Elijah Teed, Angela Tian, Hannah Toms, Douglas
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©Discorder 2018 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR.
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiherh speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM.
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager©citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Change, etc*
EDITOR'S NOTE
fgrew up in Kelowna, which is a source of embarrassment for me these days. In October
2017, they created the Good Neighbour Bylaw that restricts panhandling and public
noise. Last month, Kelowna City Council was looking to add additional restrictions,
which includes making it a ticketable offense to give money to people on the street.
Council received significant community pushback because of how it might impact buskers, and
that's what media has focused on. "What about the buskers?" Nevermind that Kelowna City
Council lacks empathy towards their low-income and homeless communities, that they are
perpetuating the stigmatization and marginalization of these people, lef s worry about supporting
the dude who plays acoustic Oasis covers outside Starbucks every weekend. The Good Neighbour
Bylaw is a shameful knee-jerk reaction that prioritizes policing over compassion, that pins one
neighbour against the other.
Kelowna's poor bashing isn't really intended to be the focus of this Editor's Note, but it
illustrates a point: Cities, circumstances, people, everything changes, but it's how we react
and adapt to change that determines the nature of the outcome. In the case of Kelowna, the
shameful actions of their City Council in response to broader issue of unaffordability and
increased homelessness is a stain on that town.
CiTR/Discorder has gone through a lot of changes recently, but our mission is still the same
- to get people on radio, to get people in the magazine, and to have a damn fun time doing it.
Every year we welcome a new group of Student Executives to provide vision for the station.
Over the 2018/19 school year, Kelli Stenson is replacing Halla Bertrand as President, and
Danielle Andriulaitis is replacing Dora Dubber as Vice President.
We are also welcoming new staff members, and saying goodbye to others. Ana Rose Carrico
is our new Station Manager. She is replacing Eleanor Wearing, who has been the Interim
Station Manager since Hugo Noriega's departure in February. Myles Black is replacing
Andy Resto as Music Department Manager, though Andy will continue hosting Shindig,
CiTR's annual battle-of-the-bands competition. CiTR/Discorder is also on the hunt for a new
Volunteer Manager this month to replace Eleanor Wearing, who is leaving the station to
summer hard and travel.
This issue of Discorder critically examines changing cultural landscapes, and seeks to
explore alternatives. Elijah Teed investigates the recent and impending closures of Vancouver
music venues; Chris Yee talks to Centre A about their move to the Sun Wah Centre; Emily
Riddle questions The National Inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women
and Girls in prairie Indigenous communities; and Real Live Action ventures into reviewing
film screenings. On page 19, Discorder talks to Madeline Taylor of CiTR's Programming
Department, and offers a step-by-step guide to making radio.
Cheers to endings and new possibilities.
BB
PS. Pull out the April Event Calendar and flip it over for a map of record stores in the Lower
Mainland, illustrated by Cian Hogan. Don't forget to check out the Spring Record Convention at
the Croatian Cultural Centre on April 15, and Record Store Day on April 211
fcW
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HOT HEAD
SEND US YOUR GRIEF TO EDITOR.DISCORDER@CITR.CA
PAY YOUR
TOKEN PO!
I   have complicated feelings about
being tokenized. At first, when
everyone started getting "woke"
and realized that all white bills are not
only perpetuating white supremacy,
but supremely boring, I was getting
hit up left right and centre to be the
token brown chick on the bill. Not
ignorant to the fact that I was being
asked to perform or contribute not
based on the merit of my work but
based on my identity, I still welcomed
the opportunity to cash in on white
guilt. But you know what I have
realized... there was no "cashing" in for
me. At the end of the day, the people
benefiting from having me on a bill or
on a contributors' list are the people
who already were in those positions of
power pre-wokeness. Capitalism doesn't
recognize tokenism; it is designed by and
for white people and everything else is
just a tool for white people to get paid.
That, though, was in the early
days of tokenism. And by early
days, I mean a couple years ago -
things move fast in the world of
identity politics. Now, I see the
same white people and people
in positions of power, adopting
foreign sounding middle names,
aligning themselves with the right
feminist movement, and saying the
right jumble of trans-queer-poc-
femme words to align themselves
with an oppressed identity, and
thereby exploiting it for their own
monetary gain. Let me tell you as
someone who has a handful of the
trendiest oppressions under my
belt: being oppressed is not cool or
fun. My whole life I wanted to be
white, to not be poor, to not be an
immigrant, to have a normal ass
name, for things to be easy. So now
when I see people adopting oppressions like hairstyles, I get upset.
When a POC person gets upset,
they are not described as passionate
about injustice, they are seen as
angry, dangerous, violent - and
white people are so good at victimizing themselves, that I am painted
as an aggressor. So I keep my mouth
shut, occasionally writing (not so)
anonymous letters to publications
in which I'm sure I've been a token
for before.
UI1CEDED
A PRAIRIE FEMINIST FUTURE FOR CINDY AND TINA
words  by Emily Riddle  //
illustrations  by Dana Kearley
Last month, three years after
Bradley Barton was not guilty
of the first-degree in the death
of Cindy Gladue, who was found
dead in a bathtub in an Edmonton
motel after spending a night with
Barton, The Supreme Court of Canada
agreed to hear an appeal. Cindy was a
36-year-old Cree woman, a mother of
three, and a sex worker who deserved
safe working conditions in her chosen
field. It has been a difficult few months
to be an Indigenous person from the
prairies, but I am reminded that is
has been a difficult and beautiful few
hundred years.
I am a Treaty 6 Cree woman who
grew up in Edmonton. I remember
attending a rally in 2014 demanding
justice for Cindy in a trial that
continued to dehumanize her after her
violent death. I am not sharing those
graphic details here. You can find them
elsewhere. I remember standing there
surrounded by other Cree women. I
remember feeling that specific love,
admiration, and mutual recognition
I feel when surrounded by other
I have thought long and hard
about how I can tackle this situation
personally.
My first instinct has always been to
try and educate people, but my seething
anger and empty wallet has driven me to
a new solution: every time my identity
gets exploited to benefit someone other
than me, I want $100. For example: my
photo has been used before, without
my consent, in a publication run by
misogynists for an article about women
DJs in Vancouver. I am not a DJ. I
was doing sound at the event. Right
underneath my picture, there was a
line saying (paraphrasing here) "often
times POC people get tokenized in this
community". They get tokenized in
every community, honey. I want my
paycheque.
-I'll give  you 1 guess
HIRINf
It's not recognized often enough just
how difficult it is to get a job.
I've been looking all over major
cities, applying to anything remotely
similar to what I'm studying, and I've
hardly hear back from anyone. I know
that many of my friends have had a
similar experience, and I can't think
of anyone in my program that has a
relevant summer job lined up.
It's hard to find a iob in eeneral.
wisj
MKI81B
'MWtVSPio
op
Indigenous people from the prairies,
as we stand solidly in our homelands
despite many attempts to thwart our
present.
In The Globe and Mail in May 2015,
Kathryn Blaze Carlson wrote an article
about Cindy Gladue's life with one
paragraph that strikes me each time I
read it:
".Ms Gladue had big hair and big
dreams. She wanted to beat the odds in
her family and go to university. She
didn't know what she wanted to study,
but she knew she wanted the school to
be somewhere beautiful. She wanted
to become a mother, and she knew,
even then, what she hoped to call her
children, having jotted down a list
of her favourite names while nestled
with a friend under a tree along the
North Saskatchewan River." (1)
I studied in a beautiful place and
shared many secrets with friends along
the North Saskatchewan River, which
flows from the Rocky Mountains
through our territory, an important
vein. We need to talk about the legal
and political structures that result in
Indigenous death, but let us not lose
Cindy and Tina's vibrancy in this move.
I write these words from Winnipeg,
Treaty 1 territory and the homeland
of the Metis Nation after driving
across the prairies from the West Coast
with my Anishinaabe friend, who is
moving back to her territory from
Vancouver. In February, the Indigenous
community in this city reeled as
Raymond Cormier was found not guilty
in the second-degree murder of Tina
Fontaine, an Anishinaabe teenager
from Sagkeeng First Nation whose body
was found wrapped in a duvet cover
in the Red River in August 2014. Tina
had suffered immense trauma in her
short life; her father was murdered in
2011 and Tina was in the care of the
Manitoba Child and Family Services.
It was Tina's death that is credited
with prompting The National Inquiry
into Murdered and Missing Indigenous
Women and Girls that began in 2017.
The Federal Government is currently
but my experience makes me familiar
with how difficult it is to get a job as an
undergraduate student. No matter how
senior you are in your studies, it seems
employers view you no better than a
high school senior until you've finished
your degree. I've heard it doesn't get
much better once you've recently
finished your degree either.
Students' limited availability is
another factor that bars them from
getting a significant job. Whereas
people not in school could work an,
honestly, shitty job for a fair amount of
pay, those types of jobs don't hire people
with limited availability that school
inflicts upon you.
All of this is made even harder
when you're looking for a creative job.
Jobs in fields like writing, radio, and
illustrating are far and few between, and
often don't pay a liveable wage.
Unpaid internships are criminal. If
you know anyone making use of them,
implore them to stop their exploitation.
The competition of creative jobs is
frankly heartbreaking. I'm friends with
near everyone in my small program,
and we care about each other a lot,
but how can we not wish them ill-will
if they've applied for one of the few
creative positions that we have also
applied for? And who could blame any
one of us from refraining from telling
the others about a job, so as to not have
to compete?
The solution is one out of reach of
individuals, creatives, and students. The
solution that I've long propositioned
for is a basic income for every citizen.
Automation has already reached levels
that make human labor essentially
unnecessary. Our current economy isn't
built for that circumstance. What has
happened throughout history is that
when there are major technological
shifts, and labor supply/demand shifts, a
new economic model surfaces. However,
many of these new modes have been
transitioned by revolutions, so be
prepared to rise.
If you have access to influence
anyone that is a gatekeeper of jobs,
especially relevant creative jobs
students could undergo, implore
them to HIRE STUDENTS. Or, at the
very least, have them offer to mentor,
providing proper payment when labor
is expended by the mentee.
It's really sad when jobs meant
to provide career-helping jobs leave
students behind.—Pat  Po 11
considering extending the inquiry, which
is supposed to examine the systemic
reasons Indigenous women face high
levels of violence. Whatever concrete
outcomes result from the Murder and
Missing Indigenous Women and Girls
Inquiry, the Crown in Manitoba will not
appeal Raymond Cormier's acquittal,
and Tina's killer remains free.
Ofew weeks ago I went out for
dinner with an friend who is
also from Treaty 6, and we
talked about what life would be like
on the prairies had our treaty been
honoured and upheld for the last 141
years. People in British Columbia often
associate historic numbered treaties
with swindle and surrender, but we
have deep understandings of the treaty
process as an act of love and visioning
for future descendants. I know deeply
that the ancestors had different lives in
mind for Tina and Cindy.
Rarely do we get the space to envision
a prairie Indigenous feminist future. We
are caught reacting to an ongoing cycle
of violence, but whispers of that world
exist in 3AM text message check-ins
and the Saskatoon berries in my mom's
basement freezer. I come back to these
words from my friend Erica often:
"Always remember where you came
from, iskwesis: you are made of poverty
and abundance; forged from nothing but
a legacy of absolutely everything." (2)
Emily Riddle: nehiyaw iskwew. treaty
feminist, reality tv devotee.
On Twitter @emilyjaneriddle.
Works Referenced
1. Carlson, Kathryn Blaze. "More than a tragic
headline: Cindy Gladue dreamt of a happy life."
Globe and Mail. 15 May 2015.
2. Lee, Erica. "In Defence of the Wastelands:
Survival Guide." Guts Magazine.
30 November 2016.
k
HOT HEAD|UNCEDED | A Prairie Feminist Future for Cindy and Tina
 8I0S    IIHIA!   9rti5DpDlTI 19bl00jia
DISCORDER REUISITED
CUP RACING, CAM BRIDGE AND STEPHEN HAWKING
words  by Erica Leiren //   illustration by  Sunny  Nestler
//  photo  courtesy  of Erica Leiren
You could say it was thanks to
rowing, that I met Stephen
Hawking.
Rowing was the reason I was in
Cambridge that Spring of 1994.1 was
stopping off in London to race as the
international entrant in the Putney
Town Regatta women's novice sculls at
the Thames Rowing Club.
Big picture: I was on my way to Norway
to meet up with my dad and sister to
celebrate 17 Mai in Voss. For Norwegians,
May 17 is a really big deal. I would get to
wear my cousin's traditional folk dress for
the parade, which was extra special.
I had discovered rowing in third
year at UBC, and raced in 8's and 4's
for two years under our fantastic, hard
driving coach, Drew Harrison. I was a
natural lightweight in a heavyweight
world, but only the Men's Crew fielded
a Lightweight Crew, so I rowed with the
heavies. Coach sent me to the Women's
National Lightweight training camp
when I graduated in 1984, and at Elk
Lake in Victoria, I got a taste of the
pairs seat-racing style of team selection
that really serious rowers experience.
After graduating, I took up sculling for
fun. My rowing partner, Jeannine and I raced
doubles, so competing in a single, on the
choppy, unfamiliar waters of the Thames
in '94, was something new. I departed
Vancouver with good luck wishes, as well
as some teasing from our Burnaby Lake
"boatman," the legendary former Olympian
and National Team talent-spotter, Dick
McClure, for entering what he called "just
a cup race." No matter, I was always in it to
win it.
I loved stopping over in London
anytime I was en route to Norway
because I could visit Alison, my good
friend and the bow woman from our
1982 / 83 novice year UBC Crew. (She
would later coach a winning Cambridge
Women's Lightweight 8's Crew at
Henley.) Plus, it was a great way to get
over jet lag before hitting the relatives in
Norway.
This trip had the bonus of seeing
my cousin, Greg, who was studying
for his PhD in Philosophy of Science
at Cambridge. I had never visited
Cambridge before, and the chance to
see him, his wife and new baby, plus my
aunt and uncle visiting from Vancouver,
was too good to pass up.
When I arrived on the train from
London, my relatives were at Cambridge
Station to meet me. We walked back to
the house in the perfect May weather,
as nature hummed with the kind of
English Spring you read about, but
rarely experience. The fragrance of
green plants and new blossoms wafted
around us as we followed the path, and
my aunt pointed out fresh nettles and
the antidote plant that grows alongside.
Greg told me that he often encountered Professor Hawking along the path
he took between home and school, but
that the general agreement on campus
was not to disturb his private time and
thoughts. Also, he travelled quickly.
When it was dark all that could be
seen was his light, jolting at bumps and
zipping along like some ground-level
shooting star. Nonetheless, the aura
of his magnificent intellect and spirit
was everywhere, and imbued the great
university with special pride and a sense
of protectiveness towards him.
After a visit with the new baby, a
peek into the hallowed King's College
Chapel, and a tour of the university's
historic and intimate laneways, we
emerged into a quadrangle illuminated
gold by the afternoon light. My eye
was drawn around the perimeter by the
riotous lilacs that festooned it.
Not far from there, at the corner of
a building, just outside the entrance (to
his residence as my cousin later told
me,) was the familiar figure of Professor
Hawking, taking his ease in the sun,
alone, and apparently lost in thought.
This was a chance I could not miss.
My relatives stood back aghast, while I
walk-ran over, and with Canadian lack
of formality, introduced myself:
"Hello Mr. Hawking," I began,
forgetting to use the correct Dr. or
Professor, "My name is Erica. I'm
visiting from Vancouver. Canada." I
paused for what I hoped was a respectful
moment and then continued, "May I
take a picture with you?"
My aunt, seeing me hold out my
camera, approached cautiously. The
few moments I waited for his answer
seemed both ephemeral and timeless.
I had to lean in close to see what he
typed, just one perfect word: "Yes."
Time sped up again. My aunt
snapped the picture.
"Goodbye, thank you very much, Sir!"
I said, and skipped excitedly back to my
relatives. They couldn't believe what I
had just done, and congratulated me with
undisguised delight.
Back to that singles race on the
Thames — Alison beat me, and she still
has the cup to prove it.
FILITISTRIPPED
R2R INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL FOR YOUTH
words  by Alex Lenz  //   illustration by Emma Ng
// photo by Jamie Loh
The first few months of
2018 have been marked
by youth-led political
mobilization at an unprecedented
scale. In the United States, students
have been leading a campaign against
gun violence, which saw thousands
participate in March for Our Lives on
March 24, including a demonstration
in downtown Vancouver. At the
provincial level, Green Party Leader
Andrew Weaver has tabled a proposal
to lower the voting age to 16, arguing
that it would be an effective way of
increasing civic engagement and
voter turnout. Given the wide-scale
political actions of youth across the
globe, it only seems fitting that 2018
marks the 20th anniversary of Reel 2
Real Festival (R2R), a local non-profit
film festival for youth. With a focus
on youth empowerment, R2R aims to
equip young people with the tools they
need to give their voices a platform,
and film is one of the most effective
platforms in the current age.
The festival runs from April 8 to
14 at the Roundhouse Community
Centre and VIFF Vancity Theatre,
and sees a lineup that speak to
issues facing youth today. While
the films are selected for a younger
audience, Tammy Bannister, the
Director of Programming at R2R,
says that the selection are all "films
in their own right," and have themes
that appeal to all ages. This year's
program includes the acclaimed
BBC's nature documentary Earth:
One Amazing Day and High Fantasy,
a South African film about a group
of teenagers grappling with identity
within a post-apartheid context.
R2R also features a cutting-edge
display of virtual reality films, with
the penultima being theblu: Whale
Experience. Additionally, R2R shows
a roster of short films made by youth
across British Columbia in the Youth
Filmmakers Showcase, an opportunity
to show work and receive feedback
from industry professionals.
The medium of film has never ceased
to be influential since its invention.
In the present day, with social media
platforms like Snapchat and histogram
innovating the moving image, video is
leveraged more and more by advertisers
seeking to target younger demographics
attracted to social media networks.
Tammy points out that advertisers are
increasingly employing the cinematic
devices of film in their adverts. Given
the power of social media and its
ever-evolving presence in our daily
lives, digital literacy is more important
than ever, and R2R seeks to educate
youth to adopt a healthy suspicion of
the content they consume online.
"Social media has democratized
access for young people in a way we've
never seen. Every bit of information
is at our fingertips online. Now, it
just becomes a matter of how you
sift through all of that. And with the
proliferation of'fake news' entering
this realm, how do you determine
what's real or not, when your leaders
are telling you that the people who are
lying are not lying? It's such a crazy
world to grow up in, there are so many
complexities [...] Young people are not
tuning out. They want to contribute,
they want to be engaged, they want to
have themselves heard. They just might
not know how to do that, or they might
not have the language to be able to do
that," explains Tammy.
Beyond strengthening digital
literacy, R2R gives youth opportunities
for creativity. AUi McKay, a current
student at Emily Carr University of Art +
Design, is an independent animator and
filmmaker who debuted at R2R in 2014
with their short film Air Pressure, when
they were just 16-years-old. Now a young
adult, McKay's short animated film Flash
Flood, which explores non-binary identity,
will be showing this year. In a phone
interview, AUi speaks to her appreciation
of R2R: "It was one of the first times that
I genuinely felt like I had a voice that
people wanted to hear, and it gave me the
motivation to keep going with my career."
In addition to the Youth Filmmakers
Showcase, R2R has separate adult and
youth juries to select winners for the
feature films and provide filmmaker
critiques. This grants the Youth Jury
autonomy over their selection and
allows them the rare experience of
judging a film festival, which is usually
regarded as an exclusive privilege in the
film industry.
While R2R is a youth-oriented
festival, the values fostered within the
festival apply beyond the experiences of
young people. At its core, R2R aims to
bring the reel to reality by demystifying
an industry that can seem exclusive
to people of all ages. Given the mass
mobilization of youth across the world,
R2R is meeting a demand for digital
literacy that will give young people the
tools to join political dialogues. 2018 is
the Year of Youth.
Reel to Real Film Festival runs
from April 4-18 at the Roundhouse
Community Centre and VIFF
Vancity Theatre. Tickets and festival
passes can be purchased online at
r2rfestival.org
DISCORDER REVISITED] Cup  Racing,   Cambridge   and   Stephen  Hawking   !   FILMSTRIPPED! Reel
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | APRIL  201E
what
VANCOUVER VENUES
WORDS BY ELIJAH TEED
PHOTOS BY PAT VALADE
ILLUSTRATIONS BY EMMA CLARK
£  RISES ARE EXCITING, IN A
HARROWING SORT OF WAY, and if
you've spent any time in Vancouver, you'll know
we're pretty good at them. Opioids, housing, losing
a hockey game — you've got plenty of options to get your
blood-boiling and your temper flared. But there's a new crisis
in town that has locals buzzing, drawing the ire of creatives,
concertgoers, and business owners alike: the music venue crisis.
The only problem is that we don't have one.
To be fair, Vancouver has experienced some tumult recently
in regards to live music spaces, and is still experiencing closures
and displacement currently. The much-beloved Red Gate Arts
Society is being shut down at the end of May, at the behest
of perennial bogeyman and building-owner Chip Wilson
(Lululemon, Low Tide Properties). So too is the Cobalt closing
its doors, as the 108-year-old building has been deemed unsafe
to operate by the City, and the extensive repairs needed to save
the space have been consistently delayed by its owners, the
Sahota family. But even combined with all the other rehearsal,
performance and studio spaces that have been bricked up and
bulldozed over the past decade, is this enough to consider what
the city is experiencing as a crisis'? The answer, per scholars and
venue owners, is a cautious "No."
Ryan McCormick is a Master of Public Policy, and a co-founder
of the non-profit Safe Amplification Site Society that advocates
for all-ages and grassroots art spaces in Vancouver.
"This is big money," he says of the issues facing many local
music venues today. "This is all very connected to the housing
crisis and the gentrification of the city [...] So you can't just
look at music venues on their own."
McCormick isn't the only one to feel this way.
The Rickshaw Theatre's manager and proprietor, Mo
Tarmohamed, expresses similar concerns over the rising costs
of running concert spaces today.
"Now that land values have become so lucrative, no venue
can create enough revenue compared to what you might get
if you develop that property for its best use," Tarmohamed
explains.
However, neither McCormick nor Tarmohamed see
what Vancouver is experiencing today as unusual, or even
unhealthy, for musicians and concertgoers. While each
sees issues and room for improvement within the overall
ecosystem of Vancouver's venues, neither feel that we are in a
particularly dark time.
As Tarmohamed opines, "I really don't want to characterize
what's happening now as a dearth of venues, because frankly,
there are lots of venues around. People get fixated on the usual
suspects: Richards On Richards, the Town Pump, the 'Back in
the day we had so many' attitude [...] Venues open and venues
close; it's just the reality of the way things are."
011110^11 McCormick and Tarmohamed find common
ground on the effects that unaffordability have had on
the city's music scene, and carefully cashier the notion
that we're in the midst of a venue crisis, both express distinct
opinions on what the City of Vancouver should be doing to
prevent a crisis from truly happening.
"A lot of the regulations that have caused venues to close
in the past are ostensibly geared towards increasing safety,
or decreasing unsafe conditions," says McCormick, citing
both his own research and personal experience. "But I think
the problem with that approach, without encouraging a safer
alternative, is people are just going to go into hiding more
and more [...] So the regulations that are intended to promote
safety end up promoting riskier behaviour."
McCormick points to the significant turnaround in the
City's attitude towards skateboarding since the 1990s as a
reference point, going from a heavily policed act of delinquency to a protected and publicly supported activity. What's
more, he notes the need to empower underground and
t
grassroots venues to keep them safe and accessible to all-ages,
rather than simply fining and foreclosing them.
"In the wintertime, the City gives out free salt," he says,
making a comparison that the same should be done with
music venues and safety equipment. "No one is like, 'Let me
see what angle your sidewalk is built at,' [...] It's no-questions-asked, 'You need this for safety, here you go.'"
While Tarmohamed agrees that less-than-official spaces
need more consideration from municipal government, his
position as a venue operator outside of the underground
naturally shifts his focus.
"The perception of venue owners is that there's distrust from
[the City] that owners are not responsible enough to conduct their
business in a responsible manner," he says. "So, they impose a
whole bunch of rules they wouldn't on other businesses."
In particular, Tarmohamed expresses frustration with
hosting all-ages shows at venues like the Rickshaw. The lack of
legal all-ages concerts in Vancouver is in no small part rooted
in prohibitive liquor laws that restrict venues' ability to allow
under-nineteens into shows with alcohol present. With more
and more Vancouverites being driven out of the city due to
"uancouuer Uenues"
unaffordability, all-ages shows are one possible solution that
Tarmohamed sees to help expand the Rickshaw's audience and
keep their lights on.
"I'd love to have more shows that are all-ages, because, in
essence, [young people] are the next generation of concertgoers," he says. "They're perfectly welcome to go see the Lions,
or the Whitecaps, or the Canucks, where drinks are served, and
yet for some reason live music has this negative perception
[...] because we don't trust venue owners to police the rules."
■ 4 hile the City of Vancouver did respond to our
I I      request for comment, the statement they provided
^^F   is limp to say the least. Per Communications
Manager Lauren Stasila: "A variety of challenges facing
musicians in the city, and suggestions for how the City can
better work with the music industry, have been brought up
throughout the engagement process for the Vancouver Music
Strategy and will be a consideration as part of the recommendations provided to council this summer."
Not much is known about the Vancouver Music Strategy,
other than information provided in a recent press release.
It's expressed purpose "is to increase the integration and
awareness for the music industry by the City," but details of
how the City will better address the needs of the industry and
its members are fuzzy. What's more, a glance at the Strategy's
steering committee leaves much to be desired. Included
are the co-chair of Music BC, the Executive Vice President
of Music Canada, and two members of the symphony and
opera orchestras, among others. What the committee lacks,
however, is any meaningful representation from independent
and underground voices in Vancouver's music scene, opting
instead for the guidance of figures either tied to government
directly, or artists among the upper echelon. Though the
steering committee will be advised by "individual artists,
grassroots organizations, [and] youth, across a wide intersection of genres and ages," it remains to be seen what the
overall impact these groups will have on the final Strategy
presented to City Council.
Though it feels rash to call what Vancouver is experiencing
a genuine crisis of venues, that doesn't mean that more work
isn't necessary. Between the concerns of McCormick and
Tarmohamed, and the mounting issues of unaffordability
and displacement felt city-wide, the municipal government
has their work cut out for them with their shiny new Music
Strategy, and whatever it truly entails.
 8I0S    IIHIA!   9rti5DpDlTI 19bl00jia
HUTAH
^^ O VISIT THE NEW HOME OF
/ CENTRE A IN CHINATOWN IS
^^ TO PUT ONESELF INTO THE
^^  MIDDLE OF THINGS: namely,
the second floor of the Sun Wah Centre, located
a block away from the focal point of Chinatown's
struggle against gentrification and displacement,
the controversial (and cancelled) 105 Keefer Street
condo project. The move from its previous location
at 229 East Georgia Street to the Sun Wah Centre
happened in December, and I was fortunate to sit
down with Curator of Public Programmes, Shizen
Jambor, to discuss it.
Centre A was founded as a non-profit artist-run
centre in 1999 by Hank Bull Zheng Shengtian and
Stephanie Holmquist in response to what they saw
as a gap in the representation of Asian art and artists
in the Vancouver art scene. As Jambor puts it, the
founders had an interest in "carving out space for
[Asian and Asian diasporic artists], especially given
that how much of Vancouver's population over the
years has consisted of Asian people." Centre A hosts
art exhibitions and has a public reading space — it
houses "one of the best collections of Asian art books
in the country," according to its website.
This is Centre A's third major move in its 19-year
history, but Sun Wah is by far its largest and most
stable home, having secured a 10+10+10-year lease on
3,300 square feet of space. Plans for the new space include
a media room, a more accessible reading room, and an
expanded gallery space, capable of serving as one large or two
smaller exhibition spaces.
Even in the midst of moving and ongoing renovations,
Centre A has maintained an active events schedule. In
March, Centre A presented a pair of film screenings and
talks in partnership with The Cinematheque (Surname Viet
Given Name Nam [1989] and Forgetting Vietnam [2015] by
Vietnamese-born experimental documentarian Trinh T.
Minh-ha), and hosted the closing party for Cinevolution
Media Arts Society's DocuAsia Forum, which included
Christian Abi Abboud's documentary, Ubuntu (2017).
However, the relocation to Sun Wah wasn't always smooth.
Centre A initially entered into negotiations to sublet a space
in BC Artscape's portion of the Sun Wah Centre. When these
discussions proved inconclusive, the gallery entered into a
direct lease with the owners of the Sun Wah Centre.
Artscape is a point of contention in art scenes across the
country. Though technically separate organizations, BC
Artscape is affiliated with the Toronto-based Artscape, a
self-identified "not-for-profit urban development organization." Both organizations operate in a similar way
according to a July 2017 article by Andrei Mihailuk for
The Mainlander. that being the conversion of "underused
properties," bought or leased with private and public capital,
into spaces for "professional artists and registered not-for-
profits," to be rented out at below-market rates.
However, as Mihailuk's piece attests, Artscape is an
organization that is not without controversy in its hometown.
Moreover, close involvement in large-scale redevelopment
projects has become a core part of Artscape's model of
"creative placemaking." Mihailuk gives as an example the
role Artscape's Daniels Spectrum cultural hub played in the
Daniels Corporation's redevelopment and gentrification of
Regent Park in Toronto.
This is a concern that Jambor says Centre A recognizes,
and seeks to address through its programming in Sun Wah
Centre. "I think as an organization we're definitely interested
in trying to make an effort to not be instrumentalized in the
way that, say, [urbanist and author of The Rise of the Creative
Class] Richard Florida's theories suggest that art spaces always
are," she says.
Jambor continues, "I think that being here, we definitely
want to try to figure out ways to not make the other people
in the building feel that we don't care about them, or that we
don't care about what they want or their interests, that we're
not trying to push them away."
To wit, Centre A has always made a point of interacting
with their neighbours, even if the experience is a little
uncomfortable at first. "So far we've had a pretty good
relationship with Alfred, who's one of the people who runs
the flea market. We go and buy supplies there sometimes,
and we've developed a rapport. But definitely coming in here,
initially, there was a sense that people were maybe wary of us,"
she says.
Most of Centre A's signage and materials are translated into
Cantonese, and some of Centre A's programming in the past
few years has directly responded to the immediate Chinatown
neighbourhood, including 2014's M'goi/Do J eh: Sites, Rites
and Gratitude, which featured Cantonese language classes and
neighbourhood tours.
This commitment to responding to the people surrounding
them is something that Centre A has learned over time.
Jambor explains, "In our old space, we had Cantonese text
saying 'All Are Welcome,' and that was in response to one of
the elderly neighbourhood locals saying that, as a space, our
signage wasn't very welcoming to Cantonese speakers because
there was no way of knowing what was going on in [inside]."
Above all Centre A seeks to "not aggressively assert [itself]
as a sterile, clean space," explains Jambor. "I think that's often
a thing art spaces can end up doing, even if they try to position
themselves as 'oh no, we're attentive to those things.' At the end
of the day, a sterile white box is still a sterile white box."
Jambor trusts that Centre A won't lose sight of its mandate
and its responsiveness to its community as it grows as an
organization. "A lot of our stuff is expansion and institutionalization, and making ourselves a stronger voice in the city,
but I'm also interested in retaining attentiveness to things on
a more local scale," Jambor concludes.
Upcoming exhibitions at Centre A include an installation by
Brooklyn-based sound artist C. Spencer Yeh in partnership with
the Deep Blue collective late this spring, and the fifth annual
recent graduates' exhibition in June. Centre A will also take part
in the Pacific Association of Artist Run Centre's SWARM19
in September, and will have a table at the 2018 Vancouver Art/
Book Fair in October. For all upcoming programming and
updates, visit centrea.org and follow them on social media.
'Centre A'
A
 SASC SAFE SPACE TENT
@ Block Party
Come by and
say"Hi"
Come by and
say"Help"
Sexual Assault Support Centre
The AMS Sexual Assault Support Centre is by
and for students of all genders to get support
with all issues of unwanted sexualized conduct
from unwanted communication to rape.
// ^ ii ^ w% // ^ a :
// // ^ a   'I __;    // // ^ //
.\ // ,i   _ ^ ~~ -\ // ,i   __
>me by because yoi
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// * *  w    -~,   // * *  \\
//
...or come by because you
are under the influence
* // //
//
ixfl
We're here for survivors
and their supporters
7 days/week from 8am-1 Opm
at Rm 3127 in the Nest
or by calling 604 827 5180
«^Hkl^
h 1 i-fli
out meeting up with someon
.or come by because you are nervous
about what they are doing
Supporting survivors to explore their options in an anonymous and confidential space since 2002
www.r2rfestival.org
CELEBRATING 20 YEARS
Reel 2 Real International Film Festival
April 8-14,2018
Vancity Theatre, 1181 Seymour Street
Regular admission:   Tickets: r2rfestival.org
$7 child/youth/senior;    Message line: 604-224-6162
10 adult
SPEAK UP
A vo/'x haute - La force de la parole
DIRS Stephane de Freitas, Ladj Ly | France | 201 7
95 min
/n French with English subtitles
In this moving, funny, and tightly edited documentary,
the students of Saint-Denis are encouraged to find their
voice. With the help of coaches, poets, and educators,
they discover that language is one of the most powerful
weapons anyone can have. Public speaking allows the
speaker to make a stand for all.
FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 3:30 PM, VIFF's VANCITY THEATRE
A SILENT VOICE
Koe no katachi
DIR Naoko Yamada | Japan | 201 7 |  1 30 min
In Japanese with English subtitles
Shoko is the first deaf person Shoya has ever met.
Shoya's bullying forces Shoko to transfer to another
school. Now in high school, and remorseful, Shoya
seeks redemption for his shameful past. Yamada's work
is an exceptional form of anime. This personal,
intricate, and intensely realistic film dares us to
empathize with the unfortunate behavior of a struggling
teenager.
THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 6:30 PM, VIFF's VANCITY THEATRE
FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 12:00 PM, VIFF's VANCITY THEATRE
X^^^Z
VILLAGE ROCKSTARS
DIR Rima Das | India | 201 7 | 87 min
In Assamese with English subtitles
Dhunu is an observant and precocious girl who longs to
play the guitar. V/7/age Rockstars is a portrait of a young
girl who is struggling to find her place in a world made
for boys and men. Rima Das' exceptional storytelling
instinct, effortlessly employs a language all her own. As
writer, director, cinematographer, editor, and producer,
she is much like Dhunu: a force which cannot be
ignored.
FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 5:30 PM, VIFF's VANCITY THEATRE
SATURDAY, APRIL 14,4:00 PM, VIFF's VANCITY THEATRE
HIGH FANTASY
CLOSING NIGHT FILM
DIRJenna Bass | South Africa | 2017 | 74 min
Though apartheid formally ended in 1 991, the weight
of South Africa's colonial roots persist today. On a road
trip to Lexi's farm, it's revealed that generations ago her
white family stole swaths of land from black South
Africans. After an uncomfortable night in the tent, they
awake to learn that they've mysteriously switched
bodies. Literally and figuratively inhabiting the
discomfort of the unfamiliar, each person learns about
the other's experience.
SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 7:00 PM, VIFF's VANCITY THEATRE
Telefilm | City of Vancouver | BC Arts Council |   Province of British Columbia | Canada Council for the Arts | Department of Canadian Heritage | Business
for the Arts | The Edith Lando Charitable Foundation   | NFB | Global TV | The Georgia Straight | Holiday Inn
 Heal Hue
fiction
MARCH 2018
SCRIVENER'S MONTHLY: SHARON
LOCKHART / JAMES BENNING
MARCH 1 / WESTERN FRONT
**     r hanks everyone for coming to Scrivener's Monthly, though if
I   you know anything about us, you'll know it's not monthly, but
anytime we feel like it," began Pablo de Ocampo, Exhibitions Curator at
the Western Front. And for anyone who has been to a previous Scrivener's
Monthly, you'll also know that attendance varies. For this instalment,
featuring filmmakers Sharon Lockhart and James Benning, the Grand Luxe
Hall was full.
Though busy, the room went silent when Scrivener's Monthly started.
After a short land acknowledgement, de Ocampo invited Lockhart and
Benning to introduce their films. Benning, whose L. Cohen (2018) screened
first, opened with the line, "I was very influenced by a young poet who wore a
suit." He explained meeting Leonard Cohen, and perceiving him as someone
who was always seeking a "spiritual window" through his music and poetry.
Lockhart kept the introduction of Rudzienko (2016) short, explaining
that it was the second film she had made in Poland, and that it was
"about resilience."
L Cohen is 48 minutes of a single shot of a farm field in Oregon. Ahead is
what looks like a large stretch of green hay or alfalfa. To the left of the frame,
perhaps 10 metres away, are a couple rusting barrels with some rubber tires
leaning up against them, and a bright yellow plastic container next to it. To
the right of the frame is some tractor equipment. A fence and telephone lines
trail off to the right, with the faintest suggestion of a barn and a road in the
distance. Directly ahead, many kilometres away, is a large mountain — Mount
Jefferson — whose snowy peak is only barely visible through thin grey clouds.
A bit of wind rustles the grasses. A microphone picks up the sounds of birds,
flies, and what seems like the hum of airplanes overhead.
In his introduction, Benning had admitted, "You think nothing's happening,
and then something's happening." It isn't a spoiler to say this film was shot
during last year's full eclipse, but I won't describe what that looks like, only
that it is surreal. And Leonard Cohen is there, sort of.
The audience had been warned that Rudzienko would begin shortly after
L Cohen and when the lights came on, people rushed to refill their wine
glasses and fight for better seats.
Rudzienko opens with a black screen and the voice of a woman speaking
Polish, words of a poem that we would later see translated into English in
white letters. The first scene is a landscape with crossroad where two flat bike
paths meet. There is a large tree in the centre of the frame, being whipped by
strong wind. Cumulonimbus clouds, textured like scoops of hard ice cream,
float quickly by. A couple cyclists pass, and some girls emerge from the tree.
A cloud blocks the sun, the sky goes dark, and the scene changes.
Now there is white text dialogue on the black screen, a back-and-forth
conversation between two young women, about God and loneliness and
people leaving. The next scene is a pine forest with some sunlight passing
through. Two women are lying on the forest floor, one woman horizontal to
the camera, with the other woman's head resting on her hip. The setting is
calm. They speak to each other in Polish, and it becomes apparent that the
dialogue from before is the translation of them speaking to each other.
And so Rudzienko continues like this, with young women interacting in
scenic landscapes, broken by text dialogue. During the talk that followed
the screenings, Lockhart explained that it was important to her to have the
English text be separate from the Polish speaking, that she wanted the
women featured in her film to "share their voices," and for the viewer to
experience the sound of their speech without distracting subtitles. It creates
for a beautiful, intentional viewing and listening experience.
The question / answer period with Lockhart and Benning was more like
a skit, interrupted by the occasional question. The filmmakers are longtime
friends, colleagues and collaborators, and they teased each other at the front
of the room.
As the evening concluded, people lingered in the Hall and the lobby
downstairs, chatting up Lockhard and Benning, and savouring the last
seconds of their charm. We left the Western Front a little more observant
than before. —Leigh Empress
HIP.BANG! AT HOME: HIP.BANG! / HUNKS
MARCH 2 / IMPROVCENTRE
Having grown up religiously watching Saturday Night Live, I thought
I knew what to expect from a live sketch comedy show as I settled
into my seat at the Improv Centre. Turns out, I did not — what I saw was way
cooler. Hip.Bang! At Home featured two sketch comedy groups, HUNKS, a
group from Winnipeg, and Hip.Bang!, a comedy duo based in Vancouver.
HUNKS took to the stage to kick off the show.
Consisting of Tim Gray, Quinn Greene, Matt Nightingale and Dana Smith,
HUNKS' set was a whirlwind of joyful, playful and silly sketches that fully
warmed my insides. The group expertly constructed scenarios that managed
to tread the line between dark and light-hearted humour, by approaching
dark or taboo subjects with childlike playfulness and enthusiasm. One sketch
for example, featured a superhero called "Familyman," a dad who failed
pitifully as a hero during a bank robbery, but nevertheless was 'super' in that
he'd be "cool with it if his son were gay," and was always game to try out
some "new slang."
What made HUNKS such a pleasure to watch was the amount of fun
they were clearly having while performing. Their aptitude towards silliness
was very charming, and yet, I felt that each absurd or cartoonish move had
been very carefully crafted and strategically placed, as the set was never
confusing or too outlandish to be relatable. The audience was able to relax
and enjoy the show knowing the next laugh was never far off.
Hip.Bangl's set featured remarkably different themes from the first,
which allowed for variety and a change of pace within the show. Consisting
of Tom Hill and Devin Mackenzie, Hip.Bangl's set took the audience on a
total trip. The duo tackled the topic of surveillance and provided a hilarious
and slightly eerie commentary on privacy (or lack thereof) in connection
to our smart devices and reliance on social media. The duo used an
ambitious amount of technology, creatively involving music, live video
from multiple sources and several interactions with a Google Home smart
speaker to produce countless shocking and hilarious moments where
audience members discovered they themselves had become featured in
the show, through various means of surveillance.
The show was underscored by some heart, as a rift formed in Tom and
Devin's relationship, in the midst of the technological chaos that surrounded
them, only to be brought together again by the end of the set. The creative
ways that Hip.Bang! made use of technology in this half of the show were
very impressive and totally shattered my expectations of what sketch comedy
is capable of producing.
The performances in this show were truly creative and unlike any
other comedy show I have seen in Vancouver. Hip.Bang! At Home was an
absolute blast. —Maddy Rafter
STRONG WOMEN, STRONG MUSIC
MARCH 6 / FRANKIE'S JAZZ CLUB
I I hen my friend and I arrived at the first night of Strong Women,
^^r   Strong Music just before start time, Frankie's Jazz Club was so
packed that we were seated at the table furthest from the stage, sharing
it with a parent and their teenaged child. Put on annually in celebration of
International Women's Day, this concert series features some of Vancouver's
most prominent women jazz musicians.
Karin Plato, a co-founder and original performer of the series — who also
programmed this year's three concerts on March 6, 7 and 8 — soon took
to the stage to introduce the night's performers. Along with Laura Crema
and Jennifer Scott, Plato established Strong Women, Strong Music twelve
years ago to raise money for Atira, an organization that provides housing,
counselling and other support services to Greater Vancouver women who
have survived or are currently experiencing violence.
The first few songs of the night were instrumentals, performed by Brenda
Baird on piano, Jen Hodge on bass and Ingrid Stitt on saxophone. The
confidence and expertise with which these seasoned and accomplished
musicians played, and the chemistry they displayed while doing so, made
you see why Plato had thought them an ideal combination for this year's
series. The audience was clearly very impressed, applauding enthusiastically each time one of the three finished a solo.
Vancouver-based Laura Crema, who studied music at Simon Fraser
University, Vancouver Community College and the Banff Centre for the Arts,
was the first vocalist to perform. Crema sang with a strong vibrato perfectly
suited to jazz. My favourite song of her set was a rendition of "Feeling Good,"
although a version of "How About You" in which she changed the lines "I
ike New York in June / How about you?" to "I like Vancouver in March / How
about you?" was also a stand-out.
At the end of her set, Crema passed the mic on to Christie Grace, a solo
artist who has collaborated with some of today's most notable Canadian and
American jazz musicians. Her light voice gave the set a dream-like feel, and
the performance of "Let's Do It (Let's Fall In Love)" was especially romantic.
I think it was during this song that the parent at our table started grooving in
their seat, much to the visible embarrassment of their child.
The final vocal set was Candus Churchill's, a soulful singer originally
from Louisville, Kentucky, who has toured across Canada and co-founded
the Vancouver group, Gospel Experience. She created a real feel-good
atmosphere in the restaurant through nonchalant banter and upbeat
numbers like, "Orange Colored Sky." You could tell how much fun she was
having and it sure was infectious.
After Churchill's set, the three vocalists took turns coming back on to
sing duets, and then ended the concert by performing one final song as a
trio. During the scatting portion of this number, the mic was passed around
between Crema, Grace and Churchill and then on to Hodge and Stitt, who
were also talented vocalists in addition to their proficiencies on bass and sax.
When the last song was finished, the concert had gone 40 minutes over
its estimated end time, but my friend and I agreed that an extra forty minutes
of witnessing such a gifted and acclaimed ensemble was well worth it.
—Hannah Toms
FUTURE STAR/STRANGE BREED
/ CLUB SOFA
MARCH 8 / THE AVANT-GARDEN
Bussing in the wrong direction for 20 minutes meant that I arrived at The
Avant-Garden's International Women's Day show halfway through the
first set of the night. Since I had never been to the venue, and was not familiar
with any of the artists on the bill, I had no idea what to expect as I climbed the
staircase to the club's second floor. What I found was a dimly lit room packed
with people sitting cross-legged on the wooden floor facing future star, who
knelt in front of a keyboard before a backdrop of red curtains.
future star's set was very in keeping with the laid-back atmosphere in
the room. Through the repeating synth melodies, soft, ranging vocals and
quirky lyrics, they played a very unique and inventive sort of indie pop that
proved that simplicity can produce remarkable music. They kept up a friendly
banter with the crowd throughout their set, jokingly complaining about how
their knees hurt and improvising their setlist out loud as they went along. It
took future star a couple tries before they nailed the synth intra to their song
"i don't want you to look back and decide this was some kind of experience,"
during which the crowd sat patiently and shouted out encouragements.
The mood in the space changed as people stood up in anticipation
of Strange Breed's set. These self-identified queer feminist rockers were
incredible, even more so considering that they have only been playing
together since June 2017. Their songs combined complex drum beats,
strong shout-singing reminiscent of Corin Tucker and both melodic and
heavy guitar to produce powerful, upbeat grunge punk. The whole band
played with plenty of positive energy, which they transmitted into their dancy
audience. The positive atmosphere they created did not, however, disguise
the seriousness of the issues addressed in some of their songs — "The
C Word," an homage to consent, and "Gun Control," a challenge to the
hypocrisy of the NRA. I must admit that my favourite moment of Strange
Breed's set was when they covered feminist punk classic "Rebel Girl," which
turned into a giant sing-along with the crowd.
The third and final artist on the bill was indie group club sofa. They began
their set with chill, down-tempo, distinctly surfy songs that featured jangly
guitar melodies, slow yet inventive drum beats and beautifully bitter-sweet,
almost haunting vocals. A notable shift was made after about the third
song to a much punkier sound, when their drummer suddenly cranked up
the tempo and started playing heavy beats and rolls. The rest of the band
followed that energy, especially their frontperson who began jumping around
and kicking the air and gesturing passionately along to their lyrics. During
one of the pauses between songs, the group's drummer took the mic and
expressed to us club sofa's stance that International Women's Day is for
all women regardless of any of their other identities, to which the crowd
fervently voiced agreement.
I strongly suggest that any fan of live music jump on an opportunity to
attend a future star, Strange Breed, or club sofa show. The organizers,
Hannah Sefidpour and Zoe Kompst, donated over 170 dollars of the night's
ticket revenue to the Downtown Eastside Women's Shelter. A night of getting
to see some of the Vancouver independent music scene's most stand-out
artists, while also supporting a small venue and a good cause left me feeling
pretty good. —Hannah Toms
8I0S    IIH1A!   9rti5DpDlTI 19bl00jia
REAL   LIVE   ACTION
A
 CARMELAHHH COMEDY: WHERE ARE
THEY NOW?
MARCH 9 /STUDIO 1398
nt the time of writing, the answer to the titular question of this article
would be Studio 1398 on Granville Island. On March 9, I had
the pleasure of attending the 1 year anniversary of sketch comedy duo,
Carmelahhh, comprised of Carla Mah and Racquel Belmonte.
Joined by performers, Brett Skillen, Rae Lynn Carson and Maarten
Bayliss, who have appeared in other Carmelahhh productions, Where
Are They Now? was a loosely connected production of comedy sketches,
celebrating the past year's worth of Carmelahhh productions.
The show featured original sketches with a largely improvisational quality
which included callbacks to other Carmelahhh productions, such as Lifetime
of Damage, Birthday Night Live and Blockbuster World.
Where Are They Now?, as a celebration of the young but promising
career of the Carmelahhh duo, was so far their most ambitious production to
date. Hosted in Studio 1398, the show had a much larger audience than their
usual venue, Little Mountain Gallery. The change of venue was not without
growing pains in the form of some minor technical hiccups at the beginning
of the show. This can largely be attributed to communication issues between
the venue and the production during the busy JFL Northwest Festival.
Those hiccups were overcome and soon forgotten due to the charismatic
improvisational skills and crowd work of the performers. Before learning the
reasons behind the technical issues after the show, I and other audience
members were unaware of whether the missing sound cues were even a
mistake at all and not just a well rehearsed skit.
Mah and Belmonte possess the rare mix of similarity and opposition of
style that make for a compelling comedy duo. Their undeniable chemistry
on the stage is offset perfectly by the duality of their respective performative
personalities; Mah playing the gentle, wide eyed optimist to Belmonte's world
weary cynic.
The sketches were well rounded out by supporting performers Skillen,
Carson and Bayliss, whose adept character work complemented each scene
without stealing the show. I'll be keeping my ear to the ground for any spin off
comedy trios featuring the three.
Carmelahhh have announced that they will be performing a sketch
comedy show every month this year. I recommend following them for details
on the next show. You won't be disappointed. —Douglas Vandelay
SKIM MILK / PLASTEROID
MARCH 15 / PLANETARIUM
I  sat back in the darkness, watching the night sky slowly rotate above me.
With every other seat in the Planetarium at the H.R. MacMillan Space
Centre occupied with other stargazers, a natural hush fell over the room.
The sky dissolved into the vaulted ceiling of the round room and the four
members of Plasteroid stepped up to the stage.
With a few words of welcome from Owen Connell, multi-instrumentalist
and leader of the project, Plasteroid launched the room into the expanse of
the universe. Projections careened across the venue, filling the space with
undulating neutron stars, streams of inter-dimensional light and ominous
shadows cast by unknown planets. As the audience took a trip through the
cosmos, Plasteroid's ambient grooves soundtracked the journey. Connell's
synth and keyboard lines blended perfectly with Craig Aalders' atmospheric
guitar work; Nick Bermudez's ever-gratifying bass parts filled out the low
end and found a home with Graham Serl's airtight drum beats. Channeling
Moon Safari-era Air, Plasteroid brought together a perfect balance of groove
and atmosphere, keeping the melodic and rhythmic elements of the music
engaging enough to hold the attention of the room while still leaving space to
get lost in the visuals overhead.
After a brief respite from the interstellar journey, Plasteroid cleared off
the stage, and made way for Skim Milk, the ever changing solo project of
clarinetist and composer Sam Davidson. In this iteration, Davidson was
joined by guitarist Tom Wherrett, bassist James Meger and trombonist Ellen
Marple. Without a rhythm section, Skim Milk was far less groove-oriented
than the first act, but they kept the spacey ambience in the room maxed out.
Navigating an anachronistic set of jazz-inflected instrumentals, adaptations
of 17th Century flute works and futuristic synth-based compositions, the
quartet held it all together with ease. While some of the projections from the
Plasteroid set were repeated during Skim Milk, the room was transported to
more terrestrial locations, including 360 degree forest and beach panoramas.
Near the end of the night, the projections faded away, replaced once
again by the night sky almost imperceptibly rotating across the ceiling.
Davidson took this moment to address the room to explain the shift of the
music listening experience over the millenia— how hearing music was an
intrinsically communal and interpersonal event all the way up to the advent
of recording technologies in the early 20th Century. Unplugging his clarinet,
he stepped offstage and began to play, moving around the room. With the
sound of his unamplified clarinet weaving through the seats in the room, the
night's trip through the expanse of space seemed to fully have landed back
on earth, back home. —Lucas Lund
KELLARISSA (ALBUM RELEASE) /
DEVOURS/HELLO, BLUE ROSES
MARCH 22 / RED GATE REVUE STAGE
Some shows are best served with spilled beers, tacky floors and
a neighbour's moshing ponytail whipping sweat into your eyes.
Sometimes you want to settle into a plush red seat, drink in hand, and sit
back to take in the artistry.
The latter was the case at the Red Gate Revue on Thursday as Kellarissa
took to the stage for the triumphant launch of Ocean Electric, the third album
(and first in seven years) from Larissa Loyva's solo project. The launch was
supported by a diverse mix of local talent which stood testament to Loyva's
long-term and varied involvement in Vancouver's music scene.
Sydney Hermant opened the evening with a solo Hello, Blue Roses set.
Hermant is one half of this project, alongside partner Dan Bejar, but alone
she capably embodied their sound through dexterous juggling of guitar, flute
and vocal loops. Hermant's soaring folk voice, though, took centre stage,
toeing the line between familiarity and heartbreak, and wedding offbeat
iterary phrasing with the shape and tone of ballad form.
The second opener was a dramatic change of pace. Devours is the
solo project of Jeff Cancade, who approached his synth-laden beat-making
station in a sequined jacket and thick, fierce, glittered brows, teamed with
football shorts and sneakers - this was an artist who was not here to stand
still. Although camp samples and heavy disco beats seemed an unlikely
match for the theatre-style venue, Cancade skilfully built his set to showcase
candid lyrics and earnest vocals in equal measure with euphoric, glitchy
hooks. By closing track "Late Bloomer," he had half the audience enrolled
in his percussion section, and had built ample energy and anticipation for
Kellarissa's set.
And, from the moment Lovya took the stage - resplendent in a structured
snakeskin jumpsuit, flanked by a quartet of backup singers in neck-to-wrist
golden capes - it was clear that this set would not hold back on bells and
whistles. The format was a stark departure from the one-person shows
on which Kellarissa has built her reputation: not a loop pedal in sight, the
orchestration relied on backing tracks and the choral (also shimmying)
coordination of her fellow vocalists.
This meant the set followed not just the track listing, but also the
acoustic palate of Ocean Electro very precisely - until, that is, the addition
of unwelcome bells and whistles five songs in, when the stage's smoke
machines progressed from setting ambience to triggering a full-blown
evacuation alarm. As the bells kept ringing, the track kept playing, and for
a moment it seemed as though the whole spectacle could fall apart. But
Kellarissa rose to the occasion: voices swelled and they saw out the song
with renewed vigour, finishing "Mirabel" to a standing ovation that continued
out onto the sidewalk.
When the show returned after a half hour
interlude featuring a requisite appearance
from the City of Vancouver's fine emergency
professionals, the strength of voice Lovya
had summoned to drown out the fire bells
didn't fade away. Instead, she stepped more
assuredly into her role as lead vocalist. In
the penultimate song, "Hey Hey Rose," the
ensemble reached their full potential as
Lovya's soaring lead converged with deftly
layered backing in a choral totality powerful
beyond the sum of its parts. If Kellarissa
envisioned 'ocean electro' as a genre defined
by lemme psych electronica' - this was surely
it. —Zoe Power
set with droning vocal echoes before launching into an exhilarating burst of
thrashing noise, which earned them plenty of cheers from the audience.
They treated the venue to 30 minutes of blistering, nihilistic no-wave
punk that was as uncompromising as it was, at times, oddly danceable.
Their strongest moments came when they found themselves locked in a
groove, recalling the twisted pop-hardcore of Brainiac but with a heavier,
monochromatic sound palette. In contrast, their slower songs tended to
drone on with few hooks to captivate.
U.S. Girls' set mostly consisted of songs from their new record, In a Poem
Unlimited, in which Remy collaborated with twenty musicians to twist the
pop music of the twentieth century — particularly disco, soul, new wave and
even hip hop — into something sharp, lively and original. With seven other
musicians on stage, Remy gave these songs the dynamic live treatment they
deserve. Guitar solos blared, a saxophone player stole the show more than
once and the interplay between Remy and the backing vocalists perfectly
embodied the drama and emotions contained in these songs.
While the music of U.S. Girls is rooted in the past, their lyrics are a
direct comment on the ills of the present, abuse, harassment and political
anger are at the forefront of these songs — the backing band is just a sugar
coating. In one of the night's most striking moments, Remy and a backing
vocalist stood side by side in silence with their hands folded and their eyes
looking down, much like how one would stand at a funeral. It was a brief
moment of silence for the women in Remy's songs, who've suffered nothing
less than trauma and pain from the actions of men.
Highlights included the R&B shuffle of "L-Over" and the vaporous disco
of "Window Shades," but nothing else towered over the show as much as
"Time" did. An extended new wave-funk workout a la Talking Heads' Remain
in Light, the song threw the crowd into a frenzy before slowly dissolving into
a cacophony of noise and feedback that blared while the band walked off
stage. As concertgoers screamed for an encore, the feedback faded and the
soft, synth-driven theme from Twin Peaks began to play from the speakers.
For most other artists, this reference would've been yet another wink to a
TV show that's been name-dropped to the point of cliche — but when Remy
used it, it felt more like a tribute to Laura Palmer, the teenage protagonists
whose murder and sexual abuse is the focus of the show.
Eventually Remy and a backing vocalist returned to perform a solo-guitar
rendition of "Poem," a beautiful song that pleads the world to do what's right
and learn to change for the better. As the only song on In a Poem Unlimited
that's driven more by hope than anger, it ended the night on a bittersweet,
optimistic note. —Joshua Azizi
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and online;
please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live
Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
1
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live
experiences. Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail abovt
I
APRItl3
THE WALDORF/3
U.S. GIRLS /GROUP
VISION
MARCH 25 / BILTMORE CABARET
meg Remy's long-running U.S. Girls
project is far away from its noisy
lo-fi pop beginnings, but anyone interested
in getting their ears blown out got their fix
from opener Group Vision. They began their
k
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MUSIC
OUGHT
Room Inside The World
(Royal Mountain)
16   /   02   /   2018
I I ith their third LP, Montreal's brightest post-punk group explores
^^r   the reaches of the genre. Polished and tightly packed at a tidy 40
minutes, it proves to be their most accessible release to date. Wandering
between droning guitar, upbeat rhythms and ballad-flavoured grandiose,
the band seems to be displaying their flexibility. But along with this sonic
diversity is a softening of the bite that has defined Ought's sound. Through
a strong execution, this shift comes across as less of a loss and more of a
change of direction.
They waste no time in getting into it. The opening track, "Into The Sea,"
does what its title suggests, plunging you right into the depths with heavy
piano chords and the characteristic poetry of frontperson, Tim Darcy.
Gradually, the song trades the piano for guitar, melancholy for aggression,
and it builds into an electric tension.
Although Darcy's vocal and verbal stylings draw obvious inspirations
from David Byrne and The Fall's Mark E. Smith, he brings his own charm.
Abrupt, fluctuant, and at times soft as cotton, the singer evokes a whole
spectrum of feeling. Sometimes he screeches, sometimes he whispers.
In only nine songs, there is enough lyrical substance to glut even the
most literary listeners. Take the track "Brief Shield," for instance, in which
Darcy comments on the false securities of life and love, saying, "Hold my
hand / I'll be your someday / The shadow on the land, it creeps on patient /
The ugly years of violent men too creep on."
While the instrumentation wanders varied soundscapes, one follows
willingingly because Ought knows the direction. On "These 3 Things," the
listener is introduced to a funky, glitchy beat that just asks us to dance. And
directly after, "Desire" is a five minute rise to new heights with a chorus
of choir singers backing the vocals, and wrapping the song in a gospel
sentiment.
Through highs and lows, Room Inside The World leaves the listener with
a knowledge that much can be experienced on one record and even more
encapsulated in a room. —Judah Schulte
LEATHAN MILNE
There is the Ground Beneath Us
(Self-Released)
23   /   03   /   2018
In March, Vancouver-based singer-songwriter, Leathan Milne, released
his second album, There is the Ground Beneath Us. Lush, moody
harmonies and folk fundamentals create a sound comparable to that of the
Milk Carton Kids. However, the ambient undertones separate it from other
folk albums.
In the text that accompanied the video premiere of "Now I Say Goodnight"
on Various Small Flames, a U.K.-based indie music blog, Milne describes
There is the Ground Beneath Us as having an unintentional "underlying
theme of death and the passage of time." This idea is emphasized by the
atmospheric quality of the music, as it adds a lethargy and blurs the time
signature of the background accompaniment. A message of optimism,
however, equalizes the darker undertones. For example, in the song "That's
What I Was Thinking," the lyrics, "But I just turned and waved goodbye / And
then I'd get to wondering / If in the sea below / The siren's song was hiding
in the undertow / That's what I was thinking when the water she went dry"
are tinged with helplessness, but followed by "Then I heard you / Somehow
beauty finds a way to never die," where hope is reinstated.
The progression of the album follows peaks and valleys, characterized by
uplifting string compositions that push the listener out of the melancholy of
8I0S    IIHIA!   9rti5DpDlTI 19bl00jia
the vocal harmonies. Milne's talent, however, is demonstrated by his ability to
tie the melancholy with the hopeful in both sound and message. —Elizabeth
Schwab
VI
blackwater
(Self-Released)
16   /   02   /   2018
Carrying a dark intensity that mirrors the complexion of her
self-released singles, Vi's latest work, blackwater, carves itself a
place in an accusingly poignant wasteland of failed love.
A striking contrast to the fluffiness of a typical pop song, "blackwater" —
the eponymous song of the EP — transcribes into sound the faults of a past
manipulative lover "[Who was] an anchor / Pulling [them] deep down into,"
a corruption eloquently described by the obscure titular term, 'blackwater.'
While the song's subject matter is certainly not the most original in its
characterization of a high-risk smooth-operator who masquerades passion,
"blackwater" distinguishes itself through its unique intertwining of musical
elements. Spanning a diverse range, the song ultimately manifests an
impressively well-rounded sound with a captivating flow.
A voice, smoky with obscured passion, smoothly fluctuates to accompany
haunting instrumentals in the ethereally brooding wonder that is "blackwater."
Leading in with a dreamily detached tone that gradually gains character
through Vi's soulful vocals, the poignant chorus wilfully submerges the
istener into an affecting mixture of melody and bass. By the end, the listener
finds themself leisurely traversing a canal of sound that gives off the illusion
of turbulence, which stands contrary to the tranquil balance that lends the
song power.
blackwater is what you would listen to alone in a room lit subtly with the
shadows of faceless people, as their silhouettes sway against the walls in
time with the bass and you close your eyes, letting the idealistic resonance
engulf you. Sustained by a slow tempo, it's full of small bits and pieces
that don't particularly stand out on their own — but when meshed together,
manufacture a sound that is singular. —Angela Van
SETH KAY
Attention
(Northside Records)
01  /  12 /  2017
nfter your first listen of Seth Kay's debut album, Attention, you could
be forgiven for thinking that the Vancouver artist has at least a dozen
releases under his belt. Though it may be his first album, Seth executes this
project with a certain level of confidence and sophistication often absent
in Vancouver hip hop. Clocking in at a fitting 35 minutes, Attention is an
auditory vessel that fuses elements of hip hop, R&B and dancehall, held
together by a cohesive set of comforting and moody instrumentals.
It is remarkably effortless to glide through the entire project in one sitting.
The listener is never jolted by any tacky beat changes or overwhelmed by a
roster of unnecessary and scattered guest features. In fact, the features of
Zoey Dollaz and SIDE flow so well with the hypnotic foundation of the album
that they go almost unnoticed.
As a result of this trance-like glide, Seth Kay's vocals lead the way.
Attention relies on Kay's haunting and catchy hooks. Not to detract from
his rapping skills, as he demonstrates his talent of integrating clever bars
and diverse flows, but his R&B-inspired hooks on this project, such as on
"Nobody New" and "Mine," prove captivating.
The glue that holds together the LP, however, remains the instrumentals,
and fortunately, they also deliver. The beats are booming yet subtle, and they
are generally ambiguous enough to fit Kay's versatile style. The two standouts
have to be "No. 5 Orange" and "6 AM." The artist evidently recognized this
fact, as they were both released as singles. "6 AM" starts with mesmerizing
strings, continues to drift with bouncy hi-hats and snares, and concludes
with the captivating intra melody fading out into silence. It also features an
incredibly suave and dark hook, cementing it as the album's strongest track.
Repping his city with pride, Kay delivers one of the most cohesive and
memorable albums to emerge from Vancouver's hip hop scene over the past
few years. Though he could benefit from some more lyrical variety, at this
rate, he is poised to continue delivering rich and magnetic music in the years
to come. —Borna Atrchian
BASIC INSTINCT
Equinox
(Self-Released)
12   I   01   I   2017
If you're a fan of getting lost in sludgy, wall-of-sound metal, Basic
Instinct's debut album is for you. At least, that's the impression that
Equinox gives with its opening track, an epic that starts softly and arcs into a
classic, doom-and-gloomy riff that fails to fully satisfy.
Basic Instinct is good at doing what they do best: delivering dark, unfussy,
slightly melodramatic heaviness. This is their strength, and it comes through
on Equinox. But when it comes to crafting dynamic songs that keep you
engaged from start to finish, there's still much to be desired.
The most impressive moments on Equinox come when the band
juxtaposes softness and sludginess. The front person's growl adds a power
to the refrain in "Sleep" that sets it apart from the other five items on the
tracklist, and when they croon hypnotically on "Turn," the listener is given
a break from the first two, very in-your-face songs. The same goes for the
beginning of the closing track, the relaxed-but-still-grim, "Saturn Returns."
Here, Basic Instinct displays delicate composition in a collection that's often
exorbitantly heavy.
Of all the songs, I can't help but wonder why the band chose the second
song as the title track for the EP. With its muddy guitars and predictable
progression, it is easily the most generic song on Equinox, offering no more
and no less than what you might expect from a sludge metal group. Other
songs on the album seem to give much more attention to structure and style,
and those are the songs that will keep Equinox fresh after a handful of listens.
Basic Instinct remains original with its frontperson's monotone, shouty
vocals. For its vocalist, moments of individuality, and dynamic, smooth
production, Equinox is worth the listen.
As far as Vancouver's metal scene goes, comprised of predominantly
all-male groups headbanging and screaming with their hands cupped around
the microphone, Basic Instinct stands out favourably. Assuming that the
two-piece is still pinning down where its talents lie — which, in my opinion, is
in its variety and experimentation with vocals and instrumentation — Equinox
is an exciting and promising start. —AlyLaube
UNKNOWN MOBILE
Sharon & Vida
(Normals Welcome)
09   /   02   /   2018
Uancouver / Montreal producer, Unknown Mobile first came on the
radar in 2016 with the aptly titled No Motion EP on local label ASL
Singles Club. Two atmospheric ambient tracks of calming harmonics, nature
sounds and light percussion were followed with a mildly dance-friendly house
track, making the release primarily a domestic listen. Last year's Mixed Use
had a more DJ-friendly approach than its predecessor, with the standout
"Four Sided Pebble" being well played by at least a few local selectors.
Sharon & Vida pushes in a similar direction as his previous release,
combining elements of post-disco with '90s ambient house and hints of a
new age influence. One of the standouts here, the title track "Sharon & Vida,"
layers a memorable melody over '90s synths and prominent tribal hand
percussion, providing a distinct post-disco vibe. The strongest of the four
tracks is "Action Aguirre." Acid techno leads are combined with washes of
ambient synth which fade in and out over a pulsing upbeat bassline. Both of
these tracks take elements from early electronic music akin to those reissued
on labels like Music From Memory or RVNG. The first song of the B-side
"Rain Game," however, is more closely aligned with the sound of No Motion,
focusing on a more laid-back, low tempo approach.
Like Unknown Mobile's earlier work, Sharon & Vida provides a unique
combination of stylistic influences, successfully melding dance-floor
elements with some of the best aspects of ambient. —Jeremy Rawkins
UNDER REVIEW
15
 PODCASTS
m
A VERY FATAL MURDER
(The Onion)
Podcast Series
2018-Present
I I ould you listen to a comedic podcast if you are the main butt of the
^^r  joke? How about if it specifically makes fun of you for listening to
podcasts like itself? Had I known that A Very Fatal Murder — the inaugural
parody podcast series from Onion Public Radio (OPR) —would be doing
exactly that, I might have passed on reviewing this podcast. Luckily, I dove
into the six micro-episodes blindly, and I gladly chuckled at my own expense
as the writers took buckshots at my moral values as a true-crimes podcast
consumer.
AVFM features a fictional podcast host / investigative journalist, David
Pascal!, who travels from his beloved New York City to Bluff Springs,
Nebraska, a stereotypical model for a predominantly white, working-class
town. In his unabashedly, self-important pursuit of the unsolved murder
of Hayley Price, a story which he hopes to shamelessly exploit for cultural
relevance, the listeners are confronted with implicit moral and ethical
issues regarding the nature of true crimes podcasts. The fun part is that
these issues are cleverly wrapped in a flurry of jokes. For example, whilst
interviewing Hayley's crying mother, David asks her to read an ad for
"BoxBox," a subscription for monthly goods that listeners can get a discount
on if they use the promo code "Hayley." In one simple joke, AVFM brilliantly
synthesizes the exploitation of interviewees, the apathetic spectaculariza-
tion of gruesome crimes and the looming commercial interests involved in
narrative journalism.
On its surface, AVFN and its patronizing host are an explicit parody
of serialized crime podcasts. The clunky piano keys of the intra and the
journalist's emotional attachment to his subjects are elements straight out of
Sarah Koenig's Serial. However, what elevates this show beyond a simple
satire are the socio-political undertones of the story. From the outset David
establishes himself as what's been caricatured in the American media as a
"coastal elite." He gloats of New York City's superiority and appoints himself
a saviour, capable of solving this mystery for the working-class folks of
Nebraska. Whilst laughing at David's aloofness, I eventually had to question
how different I was from this caricature. As the host later realizes, most
podcast listeners (like myself) don't think twice about news stories revolving
inner city violence. Yet, we exoticize murders and crimes happening in
non-metropolitan settings, a common backdrop for true-crime podcasts. To
hide a subtle message like that within a rapid-fire sequence of auditory gags
is a feat worth celebrating.
On the other hand, these refined critiques often get lost in a flurry of
action. Plot lines involving a looney billionaire, the exploitation of interns,
and an increasingly intelligent Al sidekick collectively overwhelm the listener.
Stylistically, this spoof has the potential to be Get Out. But with its ceaseless
punchlines and rapid pace within each sub-fifteen-minute episode, they end
up feeling more like the Scary Movie franchise. Regardless, each episode
is still funny as hell, and truthfully, that's probably just the coastal elite in me
talking. —Jong Lee
BOOKS
Beth A. Robertson
I SCIENCE OF THE SEANCE:
™ Transnational Networks and Gendered Bodies
in the Study of Psychic Phenomena, 1918-40
(UBC Press)
2016
I don't know how many people who pick up this book are reading it for
the intended reason. I, like others I'm sure, was attracted by its promise
of the occult. You could say that the title, Science of the Seance is a bit of a
tease, as this book's emphasis is really on the science over the seance. That
being said, Beth A. Robertson's balance of an academic and more relaxed
writing is an easy read.
The introduction, aptly named "Groping in the Dark," sets the context
for the book. In the opening sentence, Robertson writes, "the subject of
this study remains wedged between discourses of science and religion,
matter and mind, materialism and metaphysics." Robertson maps interest
16
in spiritualism, picking up at the end of the First World War. This post-war
period, which saw mass grieving for soldiers and civilians, and which
simultaneously saw advances in scientific method and more interest
in psychology, marked an end of innocence. Although spirits had been
summoned into salons for entertainment since the Victorian age, the seance
became more interactive, more visceral and more urgent. Over the 20+ years
that Robertson documents, the format of the seance changed dramatically.
The mediums and the messages that passed through them reflected issues
of the day that deeply divided and challenged society norms around gender,
class and body politics.
The first medium the reader is introduced to is "Margery," or Mina Stinson
Crandon, who became internationally renown after her husband, a surgeon,
recognized her talent for communicating with spirits in the early '20s. She
channeled the spirit of her brother, Walter, who himself became a figure of
note. Walter would appear through other mediums as well, including William
Cartheuser, who famously channeled the voices of spirits through a trumpet.
The surge of interest in communicating with the dead led to the founding of
spiritualist retreats and research centres across North America and Britain.
Dedicated researchers came together as the American Society for Psychical
Research (ASPR), and circulated publications to share their findings.
Some psychical researchers invented machines they believed could record
empirical data to verify the seance, but they always had their skeptics.
Simply put, Science of the Seance is a study of the methods employed
to measure spiritual activity, and the way these methods scrutinized,
oppressed, and at times tortured the bodies of spirit hosts. Robertson does
not question the validity of the seance itself, but the validity of the research
around it, and the motivations of the researchers. The gender divide between
mediums and scientists becomes increasingly apparent and increasingly
relevant as this book progresses.
In the chapter, "Fragments of a Spectral Self," Robertson writes, "much as
the medium's mind seemed in constant danger of pathological illness, so too
did her body. Both required close monitoring by trained and predominantly
male professionals. Through this lens of sickness and medical expertise,
psychical investigators in turn justified their access to and close examination
of the medium." In graphic detail, Robertson describes the examination
methods of researcher T Glen Hamilton, and reprints his observations of an
unconscious medium: "Jaw rigidly fixed. Eyeball is insensitive. No twingings of
the eyelids. No sign of respiration. Pulse about 78. Rigidity at pelvis and knees
absolute. Arms now more limp. Chin still set... Completely insensible."
I would like to add to my earlier statement. While this book is an easy
read, it is not a light read. I put Science of the Seance down angry, less
consumed by spectral manifestations than the eternal manifestations of
patriarchy and misogyny. While the content of this study is frustrating at
times, this book is an invaluable critique of a scientific approach to the
paranormal during an era that is often celebrated for its technological and
medical advancements. For those interested in gender studies and all things
supernatural, Science of the Seance is a must-read.—Esther Sun
III
To submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please email
Under Review Editor Maximilian Anderson-Baier at ur.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review at
CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1.
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63149
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | APRIL  201E
TORRTS
CULTIVATING COLLABORATION
words by Lexi Mellish Mingo
illustration by Alejandro Sanmaniego
photos by Kai de Torres
SITTING DIRECTLY ACROSS THE
STREET FROM HASTINGS URBAN
FARM, it occurred to me that Nico de Torres
was not just simply a multi-disciplinary artist, but
a unique manifestation of an urban gardener. When asked
how he describes his work, Nico expresses slight frustration at
the question. "I actually absolutely hate this part because, it's
funny, people always act weird when you tell them that you
do more than one thing, especially when they're extremely
different, like photography and music. [...] People just don't
take you seriously."
Despite this, Nico has cultivated a space where community
and collaboration have allowed him to create a multi-faceted
artistic role for himself, beyond labeled confines. As an art
director, producer and photographer, Nico's diverse capabilities offer a variety of services to his clients and friends. "I
guess art direction is a big thing that I do. So for some artists,
I'll produce their record and then they'll be like, 'hey, can you
do my album artwork,'" he beams.
In the realm of music production, Nico has been focusing
on the second EP of local R&B artist and actor, Hayleau,
alongside a number of collaborations with artists such
as DaamCP, ACDATYOUNGNIGGA, Illyminiachi, and
Withinroots. As for photography, Nico has recently shot
for Playboy Magazine (featuring Hayleau), and is currently
collaborating with 1017 shop, photographing editorials. From
a range of work at both local and international levels, not just
one but multiple projects are in bloom.
Os the world moves at different speeds around us, there
is a transcendent buzz that emanates from Nico as he
talks about his work. With projects happening simultaneously, I was curious to hear about how he does it. "Some
days I have a studio session at a certain time, but I might have
a shoot at a different time on the same day. So, I'll have to put
on a different hat and switch my brain up," says Nico.
"I guess my strength is putting all the pieces together and
finding out what the glue is for whatever artist [I am working
with], and pushing that," Nico explains. It's this glue-like
quality that has enabled him to contribute to the converging
of communities, and creating opportunities between sectors
that often exist in isolation. "[There's] this newer generation
of artists — like the skate crew, the underground rap scene, the
fashion crew, then there's 017/ — and everyone's talking now,
sharing ideas and collaborating" says Nico, "I think maybe
like ten years ago, the skate world, the high-fashion world
and music world weren't even, like, aware of each other in
Vancouver."
"Sis J start bain stuff
far me again, that's Uiljen J build tlje
inspiration anb energjj to be able to bo
stuff for other people/'
*
"[Through] working with local artists, I've become friends
with the people first, then creation is like a natural byproduct
of us just being together in the same room — whether it's
music, photo, art direction or graphic design." It is clear
through Nico's work, that collaborating with other artists is
also a point of self-fulfillment: "I think that what I love about
collaborating is that you're able to make something that
you've never made before. You're always going to be pushed
by other artists."
011110^11 collaboration has proved fruitful for Nico,
he admits that the need for more solo projects is
critical. "As I start doing stuff for me again, that's
when I build the inspiration and energy to be able to do
stuff for other people." As for solo-projects, Nico has been
focusing on songwriting for placements with other artists,
as well as for film and television. He produced and co-wrote
Hayleau's second EP (featuring additional local artists Prado
and DaamCP), and will be releasing
a single from the EP sometime in
April. Nico admits it might be his
favourite song he's ever worked on.
When asked what's next for him,
without any hesitation Nico replies,
"I really want to like start taking
[my] music and art to an international stage. I think from the very
beginning that's been my goal. [...]
My whole thing now is to get my
work to that level, as well as other
artists in Vancouver, too — pushing
them to see that they can produce
the best possible shit, and be stoked
about it."
Nico derives momentum from
exposure. He recalls the six months
he spent in Los Angeles about two
years ago. Nico received positive feedback from the music
community there, which, he explains, brought a sense of
validation: "I didn't really realize where I was at skill-level
wise, in terms of production specifically. [...] People were kinda
shocked that we were making the music that we were making. I
had never really gotten that attention. It was love, really."
And it's that desire to transcend love that pushes Nico to
continue producing spaces for self-growth and collaboration —
not only for himself, but for Vancouver artists within his circle.
A gardener nurtures and cultivates new life and through that
they produce a space for themselves.
You can find Nico De Torres on Instagram @n.d.t.sound, or
at soundcloud.com/nicodt.
"nico de Torres'
art rock? nt^ 31
FINALE (9 rob son square
^T  hazy
strawberry
gretchensnakes
JSN
friday 04/27 7pm
art rock? no. 31 FINALE is a public project by casey wei with the support of ecuad living labs,  citystudio, &
the city of Vancouver public art program,  taking place on unceded Coast Salish territories.    #popularesoteric
 8I0S    IIH1A!   9rti5DpDlTI 19bl00jia
HUTAH
HOW TO GET A RADIO SHOW
Words byJatemeh Ghayedi // Illustrations by I^t £)ombsky // Photo by Jacob HacJCellan
'  VBI   S THE SUMMER ROLLS AROUND
£.11  AND THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH
wH    I   COLUMBIA CAMPUS BECOMES
sj        I  QUIETER, the airwaves never stop broadcasting at CiTR 101.9FM, our own volunteer and student-run,
campus and community radio station. It's a hub through
which you can hear different types of music, opinions, news
and interviews, where you and others can freely make radio
and have your voices broadcasted across the Lower Mainland.
Discorder recently sat down with Madeline Taylor, CiTR's
Programming Manager, to talk about the station and how you
can get involved.
In addition to managing the grid, Madeline has been
involved in radio since 2013: she coordinated the Women's
Collective at CJSF 90.1FM and was on their Board of Directors
until 2016, and was CiTR's Spoken Word Coordinator in
2015 before becoming Programming Manager in 2016. If
you tune into CiTR on Thursdays from 4-5PM, and you
can hear Madeline's own show, Shoes On A Wire. Suffice to
say, campus-community radio is more than just a job for
Madeline, but a passion.
CiTR represents voices that may not traditionally be
heard in mainstream media, and empowers students and
community members alike to become those voices. This is
achieved through volunteering, contributing to Discorder,
taking radio training and workshops, participating at events,
or producing your own radio. It's a place you can always go to
be recognized and have your voice heard, regardless of how
you choose to do so. The steps to getting your own show are
pretty straightforward, and open to anyone who's interested,
with each step building off the last.
BECOME A MEMBER
Tours of CiTR / Discorder happen weekdays at 12PM
during the school year, or by appointment with the
Volunteer Manager (volunteer@citr.ca). Come to the
station and have a look around and learn about the different
things we do. At the end of a tour, you can sign up to become a
member. A yearly membership is $10 for UBC students or $3 5
for community members, but money is never an obstacle to
getting on air.
TRAINING SESSIONS
There are only three mandatory radio training sessions
to learn radio, which cover everything from how to use
the equipment and basic sound mixing, to all the rules
and regulations of broadcasting.
PRACTICE
Ofter training, you're going to need to hone the things
you've learnt so far. There are a few ways you can do so
through the station:
You can sit in on a live radio show to experience what it's
really like in the booth. As Madeline explains, "It's just like
finding a mentor, finding someone that you're comfortable
with asking questions of, and seeing what their flow is because
we can train you as much as we want, but ultimately, everyone
figures out their own system."
A final practice step is doing a fill-in show. Here, you'll get
to channel all of the skills you have learned into an open slot
on air. You get to think about the specifics of what you want
to do with your show — how you want to organize things, how
you want your voice to sound, the mood you want to set. As
a member, you also have access to the audio booths, and can
book them out for some solo, hands-on practice.
PUT TOGETHER YOUR DEMO
By this stage, you should be able to visualize your
hypothetical show enough to produce a small demo
of what it might sound like. This is your pitch to
the CiTR Programming Committee. How is your program
different from what is currently on air? How does it fit in with
CiTR standards and CiTR / Discordefs mandate? Madeline's
advice leading up to making your demo is: "Do lots of
research. Do poking around in the things you're not familiar
with, but also don't be afraid of showing us your personality
because, ultimately, you're selling your taste. We care about
your taste and what you think is cool, and that's what we want
to showcase."
If you aren't really sure you want your own show, or are
a bit intimidated, there are radio collectives you can join.
"The collectives came out of a really careful look at who was
represented on CiTR's airwaves and realizing that there's a
really big reason why more of a certain kind of person is represented. So we wanted to try and make clear, comfortable space
for underrepresented people. [...] The intention behind the
collectives is just to open up space for people," says Madeline.
Within these groups, contributors can take on smaller
roles, such as doing research for an episode, or working the
boards, or hosting. Speaking about the collectives with Dezy
Nair, Coordinator of the Accessibility Collective, she says,
"They're a really great way to take baby steps, especially if
you don't know where those baby steps are. Since you have a
coordinator, there's also someone there that is watching your
progress. [...] It's a really good way to get involved and there's a
sense of community to it."
The great thing about CiTR is that you have a lot of room to
play around with to create a show that relates to your interests
and what you want to share, but there's also a great team and
community behind it that is there to support and help you get
there. Madeline explains, "There is the traditional, 'I'm going
to get a music show' approach, but there are also things like
getting involved with a collective, or coming in and writing for
Discorder, or being a music department volunteer and helping
decide what goes on our playlist. That's important, too. Having
different people with different tastes is going to mean that more
of other music is represented. There is so much more out there
that needs representation and is excellent."
Campus-community radio, Madeline says, isn't just about
expressing oneself, but sharing knowledge: "We're just trying
to figure out different ways to change that culture so that it's
not so homogenous. There's so much about arts, and politics,
and music that I don't know about and that I want to learn
about from new programmers who are going to make radio,
and share with our listenership."
For more information, contact CiTR Programming Manager,
Madeline Taylor: programming@citr.ca
"How to Get a Radio Show'
A
 Discorder magazine | MARCH 201E
Oil THE AIR
MELANIE WOODS' INTO THE WOODS
words  by Rachel  Lau  //
illustrations  by Alison Sadler  //
photo  by Josh Gabert-Doyon
Tucked away in Studio C at CiTR, I
meet with Melanie Woods for a quick
chat about her show, Into the Woods,
a weekly exploration of music by women and
LGBTQ+ artists, Tuesdays on CiTR 101.9FM.
We chat about her wild schedule and her
passion for community radio — before she
runs off to another meeting, of course.
Despite the busy day ahead of her, Woods
is collected and relaxed. She sports a denim
jacket plastered with vintage CBC Radio pins
and buttons. One bright yellow button reads
"CBC Radio Can" — this optimistic quote is
reflective of Woods' attitude towards leading
a busy life. "I like to be able to do as much as I
can, and contribute as much as I can, where I
can," she says, "That's one of the reasons why
I really throw myself into community radio. I
have skills! I want to use them."
I've come to know Woods through the
Gender Empowerment Collective at CiTR In
addition to her role as collective coordinator,
Woods is many things: a full-time UBC
journalism student, a freelance writer, the
host of Into the Woods, and a server at Yuk
Yuk's Comedy Club. What she is not, is an
amateur at work-life-radio balance. Hearing
Woods describe the many roles she juggles, I
think someone needs to get her a button that
reads, "Melanie Woods Can."
Reflecting on her secret to maintaining
balance in her life, Woods' explains that it
centres around one principle, "I've learned
a lot of management mechanisms over the
years, of how not to make everything the end
of the world."
As much as Woods pushes to make things
happen, there are certain aspects of her life she
will not sacrifice: "I will always prioritize sleep. I
love all the different things that I do, but I need
an average of seven to eight hours a night and if
Fm not getting that, then that's bad," she asserts.
In this precarious balancing act between
radio, work and school, sleep is not the only
thing Woods prioritizes. "I prioritize social
stuff too. I do consciously make an effort to
prioritize things outside of work-related things
because I know it's important," she says.
■ 4 hile Woods has crafted some tried-
I I       and-true balancing mechanisms
^^F   for her life, she is no stranger to
the challenges of leading a bustling lifestyle.
"I like to do stuff and be busy and have fun —
sometimes to my own detriment and I need
to learn to balance things out better, but so
far so good." savs Woods, laughing. "I haven't
broken yet. Come close. But not yet."
Not every moment of Woods' busy life is
glamorous. Much of what she does enables
her to continue surviving in Vancouver.
"The jobs are a big part of that. I don't think
I would work at Yuk Yuk's purely for the
passion. No disgrace to Yuk Yuk's, but it helps
me pay my rent," she admits, chuckling as
she continues, "Vancouver is not the cheapest
place in the world to live, and going to grad
school is not the cheapest activity in the
world, so that's a big factor of it."
Busy schedule considered, there is one
thing that Woods consistently makes room
in her life for. "Community radio for me has
always been a place of intense warmth and
community and love. I think that's a really
important environment to prioritize having
in your life. Whether it was back in Calgary
and now here, it's a warm place to come to,"
she says.
When asked about what community radio
means to her, she explains how her passion
grew during her time at CJSW 90.9FM — the
University of Calgary's independent radio
station. "I knew it would always be — not
necessarily an escape — because I don't want
to say that my schoolwork and my work-work
is something I need to escape from because
I really enjoy it, but something that is just a
different vibe, and a tone, and a community.
Community radio is important. Tattoo that
on my face," Woods jokes.
Woods is a fountain of wisdom and
one-liners. She speaks at a pace as fast as she
moves through the world. And as our brief
conversation comes to a close, she offers
some advice to those who also lead busy
lives: "Doing what's fun is important. Just
because something is fun, doesn't mean it's
not useful."
Into The Woods airs Tuesdays 3-4PM on
CiTR 101.9FM or citr.ca. Archived episodes
are available at citr.ca/radio/into-the-woods. To
listen to the Gender Empowerment Collective's
show, Intersections, tune in early, airing
Tuesdays 2-3PM. You can also follow Melanie
Woods on Twitter @mel_a_woods
OF
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
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ON THE AIRlMelanie   Woods"   Into   The   Woods
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m a®a^[Fi m@
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B
sponfcap
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
T'RANCENDANCE
GHOST MIX
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
YOUR NEW SHOW
SYNCHRONICITY
PARTS UNKNOWN
YOUR  NEW  SHOW
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PACIFIC PICKIN'
QUEER FM
YOUR NEW SHOW
MORNING AFTER SHOW
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
INTERSECTIONS
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CITR GHOST MIX
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
POP DRONES
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
INTO THE WOODS
DOUBLE
SPACE
YOUR NEW
SHOW
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
Cfmratmp
CITR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
YOUR NEW SHOW
CULT!
FROM THE
UBYSSEY
CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
YOUR NEW
SHOW
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
U DO U RADIO
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
KEW IT UP
ALL ACCESS PASS
K-POP   CAFE
ASTROTALK
JFrifcap
AURAL TENTACLES
CANADALAND
CITED
MIXTAPES WITH
MC & MAC
THE REEL WHIRLED
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
YOUR NEW SHOW
THUNDERBIRD EYE
SHOES ON A WIRE
YOUR NEW SHOW
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
&>aturt>ap
Ui'i'K UHUST MIX
THE SATURDAY EDGE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
POWER   CHORD
CODE  BLUE
$>unftap
CITR GHOST MIX
YOUR NEW SHOW
SHOOKSHOOKTA
THE ROCKERS SHOW
LA  FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
5 PM
THE  LEO  RAMIREZ
SHOW
WORD ON   THE  STREET
ARTS REPORT
DEMOCRACY WATCH
THE UBC HAPPY HOUR
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6 PM
FINDING THE FUNNY
YOUR NEW SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
FLEX YOUR HEAD
7 PM
YOUR NEW
SHOW
EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
YOUR NEW
SHOW
SAMS
QUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
NO DEAD
AIR
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
8 PM
CRIMES & TREASONS
9 PM
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
MIX CASSETTE
THE NEW ERA
NINTH WAVE
YOUR NEW SHOW
CI RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
TRANCENDANCE
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
COPY   /   PASTE
11PM
THE MEDICINE SHOW
RANDOPHONIC
THE AFTN SOCCER
SHOW
1AM
CITR GHOST MIX
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
CITR  GHOST  MIX
YOUR NEW SHOW
CITR GHOST MIX
12AM
AURAL TENTACLES
1AM
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
OF INSOMNIA
CITR GHOST MIX
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAM MANAGER AT PROGRAMMINGQCITR.CA TO LEARN HOW
"DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERY DAY."
 ■ A\ON»AV
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
BAM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththebrowns
@hotmail.com
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm-6:30pm, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TUESDAV
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
8am-ioam, talk/politics
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmaii.com
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM, rock/ pop /indie
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY/
DISABILITY
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communityiivingradio@gmaii. com
INTERSECTIONS
2-3PM, talk/feminism/gender
EMPOWERMENT
The Gender Empowerment
Collective's goal is to center
the voices, issues, concerns:
and experiences of women:
transgender, intersex, Two-
Spirit, genderqueer, gender
non-conforming, non-binary:
and gender fluid folks and allies.
Tune in weekly for interviews:
commentary, stories and news
from YOUR communities.
Contact:
genderempowerment@citr.ca
INTO THE WOODS
TUES 3PM-4PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope:
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DOUBLE SPACE
ALTERNATING TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK /
DESIGN / FEMINISM
Investigating interactions with our
surroundings and society. Every
week we discuss our experiences
with these interactions, how
they emerge and the impacts
of these invisible forces.
Twitter | @doubiespaceshow
WORD ON THE STREET
5pm-6pm, rock/indie/pop.
Hosted by the Music Affairs Collective, every episode is packed with
up-to-date content from the Lower
Mainland music communities including news, new music releases:
event reviews and upcoming events:
interviews with local musicians and
industry professionals and discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
8PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room:
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK / POP
Jayden targets the audience
in the Korean community in
Vancouver to introduce the
News on Korea, Korean Culture
while comparing other Asian
Cultures, plays all kinds of
Korean Music(K-POP, Hip Hop:
Indie, R&B,etc),talk about the
popular trend in the industry of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
[aka K-Drama), TV Shows:
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, what's
going on in Korean Society here
in Vancouver, Talk with Guests.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
2PM-3PM, talk/cultural
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
third season! This team of
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
folks produce a weekly show
on Indigenous issues, current
affairs, entertainment, culture
and news - all centering
Native voices. Come make
Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Foiiow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves
KEWIT UP
3PM-4PM, experimental/talk
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica:
Post-Punk, Industrial.
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
4PM-5PM, talk/ accessibility
POLITICS
CiTR Accessibility Collective's
new radio show. We talk
about equity, inclusion, and
accessibility for people with
diverse abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every week
for interviews, music, news:
events, and awesome dialogue.
Contact:
accessibiiitycoiiective@citr.ca
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC:
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves
on CiTR Radiol 01.9FM:
Wednesdays from 5-6pm.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE NEW ERA
9PM-10PM, hip hop/ r&b/ soul
A showcase of up n' coming artists
who are considered "underdogs'
in the music industry. We provide
a platform for new artists who are
looking for radio play. Bringing
you different styles of Hip Hop
music from all across the Earth
and interviews with music industry
professionals. It's the NEW ERA...
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM, hip hop/ r&b/ soul
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk, and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook \ NinthWaveRadio
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSDAV
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM,TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture:
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CONVICTIONS & CONTRADICTIONS
ALTERNATING THURS, 9AM"9:30AM:
talk/comedy/social OBESERVATIONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society; shown through social
observational comedy. To boot
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
CULT! FROM THE UBYSSEY
CULT! is a bi-weekly radio show/
podcast about culture at the University of British Columbia (UBC). From
The Ubyssey— UBC's independent
newspaper and a definitive source
of campus/community news — the
show will feature the rag's brightest
minds discussing the happenings
and issues in the arts and culture
scene as well as interviews with the
creators and creatives involved in
the various projects around town.
Hosted and produced by Ubyssey
staff writer Olamide Olaniyan
Contact: Twitter \ @UbyssseyCuiture
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumbir.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr(3>gmail. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/RocketFromR ussia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean:
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B.
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
3:30pm-4pm, talk/sports
Your weekly roundup of UBC
Thunderbird sports action from
both on and off campus with
your hosts Eric Thompson
Jake McGrail, and Jacob Aere
Contact: sports@citr.ca
SHOES ON AWIRE
4PM-5PM, rock/pop/indie
Reworked as a music show
with the occasional sprinkle of
commentary, Shoes On A Wire
is back. As always, stories:
interviews, and hot takes will
make an appearance, but
mostly you'll hear sweet tunes.
Contact:
Twitter | @shoesonawirepod
Instgram | @Staunchjitters
DEMOCRACYWATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this
is CiTR's brand new Current
Affairs show! Tune in weekly
for commentary, interviews,
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
NO DEAD AIR
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
JAZZ FUSION / POST ROCK
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion:
experimental electronic, and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook \ NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30PM-gpM, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ FR1DAV
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraitentacies@hotmaii.com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
87AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Con tact: jesse<3>canadalandsho w.com
CITED
8AM-9AM, talk/academia
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact:
facebook.com/citedpodcast
Twitter | @citedpodcast
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM, rock/pop/indie
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether ifs contemporary:
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion:
mastery, and a 'IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiop odcast@gmaii.com
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30pm-5pm, music/interviews
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp ://nardwuar. com/rad/con tact/
THE UBCHAPPYHOUR
5pm-6pm, talk/news/current
AFFAIRS
The UBC Happy Hour is
produced by the UBC Affairs
Collective, and made by
students, for students! The
show is all about whafs
happening on UBC's campus.
Tune in for updates on
campus news, clubs outreach
and just about everything
else you can find at UBC!
Contact: ubcaffairs@citr.ca
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6pm - 7:30PM, talk/comedy
6pm-7pm,  Every week Jack:
Tristan and a special guest
randomly select a conversation
topic for the entire show;
ranging from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure.Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-gpM, r&b/soul/inter-
IMATIONAL
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop:
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock remains committed to the
best in post-rock, drone, ambient
experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can
put the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco uvermedicinesho w@gmail. com
■ SATURDAV
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citriatenightshow@gmaii.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music thafs on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codebiue@pauinorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary:
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmaii.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavoina@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy:
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmaii.com
SOCA STORM
8PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
Papayo!!#SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
8bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ SUNDAV
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM,  INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmaii.com,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmaii.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
gPM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, DeepTrance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Antherrr
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmiieymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS:
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ ISLAND OF
LOST TOVS
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citrca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9FM MARCH CHARTS
#rttet          8Xbum          llabei
«
Freak Heat Waves*
Beyond XXXL
Telephone Explosion    ^
I   2
U.S. Girls*#
In A Poem Unlimited
Royal Mountain         |
I   I
Rio By Night*#+
Yet The World
Self-Released          |
I   4
Frigs*#
Basic Behaviour
Arts & Crafts          |
I   3
Kellarissa*#+
Ocean Electro
Mint                  |
I   *
Ought*
Room Inside the World
Royal Mountain         |
I   J
Shitlord Fuckerman*+
Hot Blood & A House For
A Head
Self-Released          |
I   •
Tough Customer*#+
Rockgasm
Self-Released          |
I   »
Nap Eyes*
I'm Bad Now
You've Changed        |
1   «
Basic lnstinct*#+
Equinox
Self-Released          |
l«
Charlotte Day Wilson*#
Stone Woman
Self-Released          |
h
Black Wizard*+
Livin' Oblivion
Self-Released          |
I»
Shrouded Amps*#+
World Well Lost
Self-Released          |
I   M
Holzkopf*+
House ofAud
Self-Released          |
1   «
Buffy Sainte-Marie*#
Medicine Songs
True North            |
l«
Milk & Bone*#
Deception Bay
Bonsound             |
li
In Mirrors*+
Escape From Berlin
Italians Do It Better    |
|M
Hollow Twin*#+
The River Saw Everything
Self-Released          |
|U
Russian Tim And Pavel
Bures*#+
SuperHit & The Other Song
Self-Released          |
|l«
Wooing#
Daydream Time Machine
Ba Da Bing!            |
la
Various**
Tenderly Industrial Vol. 1: A
Compilation of West Coast Guitar
Self-Released          |
|g
The Lonesome Ace
Stringband*
When The Sun Comes Up
Self-Released          |
1^
Faith Healer*#
Try:-)
Mint                  |
N
The Breeders*
All Nerve
4AD                   |
l»
Kristi Lane Sinclair**
The Ability To Judge
Distance
Coax                 |
Ib
Puzzlehead*#+
(artless)
Agony Klub            |
l»
Bjork#
Utopia
One Little Indian        |
N
Kristian North*
The Last Rock N Roll
Record
Lone Hand             |
h
Laila Biali*#
Laila Biali
Chronograph          |
l»
Chris-A-Riffic*+
Post-Season
Self-Released          |
la,
No Museums*
It All Begins to Feel
Self-Released          |
In
Champion Lawnmower*#+
Babies
Self-Released          |
1*
Be Afraid*+
One More Year
Self-Released          |
I »
Necking*#+
Meditation Tape
Self-Released          |
1*
Jonathan Kawchuk*
North
Paper Bag             |
I"
Palm#
Rock Island
Carpark               |
N
Parkland*+
Affiliates 2
Offseason             |
|»
Suss
Ghost Box
Self-Released          |
l«
Rowen Porter*#+
Everything at Once
Self-Released          |
!*»
Raine Hamilton**
Night Sky
Self-Released          |
N
Ivy. The Pulse*#+
Chameleon
Self-Released          |
1®
Suuns*
Felt
Secret City            |
1*
Superchunk#
What A Time To Be Alive
Merge                |
I «
ACTORS*#+
It Will Come To You
Artoffact             1
I *
Soccer Mommy#
Clean
Fat Possum            |
1*
Shoppings
The Official Body
FatCat Records        |
l«
Johnny Jewel
Digital Rain
Italians Do It Better    |
1*
Sarah Cripps*#
Sarah Cripps
Self-Released          |
1*
Holy Motors*
Slow Sundown
Wharf Cat             |
f  Si)
Pale Red*#+
Heavy Petting
Self-Released          4
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C3     B
OUT SOON!
Release Show: Friday, April 13th
The Astoria (769 E. Hastings)
w/ Swim Team,
Tough Customer, Devours
+ Chris-a-riffic
Available for Record Store Day!
Peach Kelli Pop
Which Witch
Limited edition
6 song 7 inch EP
cose//r* <&/\£.&/r
cffi£//Y6>
I-
(h
Out June 22: LP/CD/CASS/Digital
KELLARISSA
W ELECTA
LP/CD/DIGITAL OUT NOW
mint records M* fac
•      ■ ^-v        •      ■ ■ Canada's private radio broadcasters. Ceprojet est
www. mintrecs.com (s>mintrecoras     ■ m—1« uD««-**n
 I
HltfDS
JOEY  BADA$$
1981
/H*
CONCERTS
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
April   4
KATE NASH
Imperial
April   6
SURE SURE
Fox Cabaret
April   6
GRIEVES
Fortune
April   8
THE SOFT MOON
The Biltmore
April   11
THE BREEDERS
Commodore Ballroom
April 14
DR JOHN COOPER CLARKE
Biltmore Cabaret
April 15      April 16
L0M00N    ANDREA GIBSON
The Cobalt  St. James Hall
April 17
CARPENTER BRUT
Imperial
April  21
MANU CROOKS
Fortune
April  24
PHOEBE BRID6ERS
The  Cobalt
April  27
FLATBUSH ZOMBIES
Vogue Theatre
May  8
EZRA FURMAN
Fox Cabaret
May  9
HORSE FEATHERS
Fox Cabaret
April 26
WILD CHILD
Fox Cabaret
May 1
INJURY RESERVE
Fortune
April  27
CHARLOTTE CARDIN
Biltmore Cabaret
May 4
RAINBOW KITTEN SURPRISE
Vogue Theatre
May 8
UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA
Commodore Ballroom
May  12
JOEY BADA$$
Vogue  Theatre
May  14
THE GLITCH MOB
Commodore Ballroom
May  9
PREOCCUPATIONS
The Astoria
May  12
DESERT DAZE ADfFf   DfXIIf
CARAVANII A1ULL rlNA
Commodore Ballroom
May 17
MOUNT KIMBIE
Imperial
May  20
SMALLP00LS AND GREAT GOOD FINE OK
Imperial
May  13
WASHED OUT
Commodore Ballroom
May  20
P0PT0NE
Rickshaw Theatre
May 21
HINDS
Biltmore Cabaret
May 21 May 29
THE BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE I LAKE STREET DIVE
Vogue Theatre Commodore Ballroom
June 4
DAMIEN JURADO
Biltmore
at   timbreconcerts.com

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