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  254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
UPCOMING SHOWS
TRIATHALON & THE MARIAS
KEVIN KRAUTER
DEC
AT LANALOU'S:
SKATING POLLY & POTTY
MOUTH THE FURNITURE
THE DUDES
SKYEWALLACE
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WVAL
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DEC
JOHNMAUS
2
ACTORS
DEC
ARMYOFSASS:
7
DANCE SHOWCASE
THE BROKEN ISLANDS VIDEO
RELEASE PARTY
DEC
DEATHMAS FESTIVIUSII
PROCEEDS GOING TO THE FOOD
BANK THE HALLOWED
CATHARSIS, GROSS MISCONDUCT,
RESURGENCE, EXTERMINATUS,
OBSIDIAN, TRUENT,& MORE
LUCITERRA STUDENT
SHOWCASE:
WHITE RAVEN REVUE
THE SLACKERS
LOS FURIOS, BREHDREN, YOUNG
BOWIE BALL 2019
AN ANNUAL FUNDRAISER
CELEBRATING THE LIFE AND
^ MUSIC OF DAVID BOWIE WITH
PROCEEDS GOING TO THE
CANADIAN CANCER SOCIETY.
THIS YEAR'S LINEUP FEATURES
THE POINTED STICKS, LA
~ CHINGA AND 16 OTHER BANDS.
DEC
ROYAL
DEC
KEITHMASIX AN ANNUAL
FOOD BANK FUNDRAGER FEAT.
RICH HOPE, LA CHINGA, LITTLE
DESTROYER, SORE POINTS,
? OSWALD, CHRIS & CORA, THE
( RENTALMEN, ELLIOT WAY &
i WILD NORTH, FORD PIER
■% VENGENCE TRIO, WAR BABY
w
m
Y:
mm
nS
\
STORY PARTY VANCOUVER:
TRUE DATING STORIES
ENSIFERUM & SEPTICFLESH
WITH GUESTS
1          THE GATEWAY COMEDY
HOSTED BY BILLY ANDERSON
JAN
PETER MURPHY 40 YEARS OF
BAUHAUS, RUBY CELEBRATION
FEATURING DAVID J
Lfc-J
SILVERSTEIN
HAWTHORNE HEIGHTS, AS
CITIES BURN, CAPSTAN
ZIMMERSHOLE
SCRAPE RECORDS'THE LABEL
LAUNCH SHOW
iVAV
itional show listings, ticket info, videos & m
W.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.C
«r
blueprint
UPCOMING EVENTS
Dec 06
Dec 14
Dec 15
Dec 19
Jan 05
Jan 18
Jan 24
Jan 31
Jan 31
Feb 07
Feb0?*
Feb 08
Feb%
Feb 21
Feb 21
Mar 08
MarlO
GODFLESH
FREDDIE GIBBS
PREOCCUPATIONS
PROTOMARTYR
JAZZ CARTIER
MICK JENKINS
TAGGART & TORRENS
MADEINTYO
(ALL AGES)
CHROME SPARKS
KING TUFF
MONSTER TRUCK
HIPPIE SABOTAGE
LIL MOSEY
(ALL AGES)
SHAD
DAVID AUGUST
MANSIONAIR
BRYCE VINE
VENUE
FORTUNE
VENUE
VENUE
FORTUNE
FORTUNE
VENUE
ORPHEUM
FORTUNE
FORTUNE
VENUE
COMMODORE
VENUE
FORTUNE
IMPERIAL
IMPERIAL
VENUE
PLEASE CHECK OUT BPLIVE.CA
FOR ADVANCE TICKETS AND MUCH MORE
 TABLE Of CORTEIITS
WINTER 2018-19
COVER:
MARIA-MARGARETTA BY JAKE KIMBLE.
JFeature*
05 -  TELEPRESCENCE
Reinventing VR and the Individual Experience
06 -  RUBY  SMITH-DiAZ
Upon the  body
08  -  MARIA-MARGARETTA
Do racists go to art galleries
17 -  JULIAN HOU
Residency at the Western Front
18 -  WRITERLY ASIANS & ALLIES
AGAINST #RACISMINCANLIT
2Lob*ter* fiatoe £>ij?
spttrtrte JFmger*
EDITOR'S   NOTE
WE [ ... ] SURVIVE.
In this issue, you'll learn that creativity can thrive in the face of adversity; that
compassion is a form of agency and resilience; that when we subvert racism, we gain
collective cultural strength; that top-down hierarchies are redundant, outdated; that
political complacency and sexism are no longer tolerated; and that voices will find a
way to speak through censorship.
19 - ALL
AND
Yours,
M'aritime N'8V
Column* + flDt&er 3>ttiff
10 - Real Live Action
Music,   mostly
12 - Art Project
by Priscilla Yu
13 - December 2018 Calendar
14 - Under Review
just music  this time
16 - Art Review:
Marisa Kriangwiwat
Holmes at Artspeak
20 - On The Air
120 BPM
21 -  CiTR Program Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 - November Charts & Top 100
of the  2018 CiTR Charts
ADVERTISE: Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To learn how
to get involved with Discorder
contact volunteer@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a
cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133
University Blvd. V6T1Z1,
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DISTRIBUTE: To distribute
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email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE: We are part of
CiTR, a registered non-profit,
and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you
love.To donate visit:
citr.ca/donate.
nform Discorder of an
ominq album release,
all relevant details 4-6
weeks in a '
Mallory Amirault,
Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
comments, complaints
FONDATIOIM
SOCAN
.
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising
Coordinator: Alex Henderson // Discorder Student Executive: Fatemeh Ghayedi // Editor-in-Chief:
Mallory Amirault // Under Review Editor: Sydney Ball // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch
// Web Editor: Zoe Power //Art Director: Ricky Castanedo Laredo // Social Media Coordinator: Avril
Hwang // Accounts Manager: Halla Bertrand // Charts: Myles Black // Production Assistants: Savilla
Fu, Christina Dasom Song // Writers: Hari Alluri, Mallory Amirault, Fiorela Argueta, Matthew Budden,
Jake Clark, Esmee Colbourne, Amber Goulet, Tate Kaufman, Hannah Kruse, Jamie Loh, Lucas Lund,
Alex Smyth, Elaine Woo, Chris Yee // Photographers & Illustrators: Karla Decoran, Emmanuel Etti, Tate
Kaufman, Jake Kimble, DennisHa, Rachel Lau, Jasmine Leung, Lucas Lund, Andi Icaza-Largaespada,
Megan Pereira, Ashley Sandhu, Hayley Schmidt, Elaine Woo // Proofreaders: Mallory Amirault, Fiorela
Argueta, Sydney Ball, Ricky Castanedo Laredo, Dora Dubber, Allison Gacad (A.G.), Fatemeh Ghayedi,
Zoe Power, Jasper D Wrinch.
©Discorder 2018 -19 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by
CiTR, located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiriem speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9
FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager©citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada
CORRECTION ON THE
NOVEMBER 2.018 MASTHEAD:
We would like to amend an error in the
Masthead section of this page(the blurb
of words below the table of contents) in
the November 2018 issue of Discorder
Magazine.
The November 2018 issue of Discorder
reads:
Editor-in-Chief: Mallory Amirault
When it should actually read:
Outgoing Editor-in-Chief: Brit Bachmann
Incoming Editor-in-Chief: Mallory Amirault
I That was my mistake. This is why I
proofreading is so important.    ■
Credit where credit is due, now
back to that magazine.
I
L
rcl.
illustration by
Megan Pereira.
 - @ FREDDIE WOOD 	
PRINCE
HAMLET
Shakespeare's classic gets the
update it needs in Ravi Jain's
@ RUSSIAN HALL
KEYBOARDS
Sound artist ASUNA takes battery-
powered, analogue keyboards
and uses them to create waves of
- @ PERFORMANCE WORKS —
RINGO
The wildly inventive Tetsuya Umeda
uses tin cans, dry ice, bowls, hot
plates, and more to create an
experience so beguiling and unigue
as to redefine those very objects.
@ PERFORMANCE WORKS-
MARGINAL
CONSORT
hor three nours, tour musicians
come together with enough
instruments for an orchestra.
The improvise ambient, heavily
manipulated music, neither fully i
harmony nor fully independent of
each other.
- @ PERFORMANCE WORKS —
KIINALIK:
THESE SHARP
TOOLS
A concert, a conversation and a
multimedia performance Kiinalik:
These Sharp Tools is the
meeting pointfortwo people—
Inuk artist Laakkuluk Williamson
Bathoryand gueer theatre-maker
Evalyn Parry—and two places:
Canada's North and South.
■=*—i**"**
UJJUA1MUA
f you're between the ages of 16-24, you can rush PuSh shows for only $5! details at PUSHFESTIVAL.CA
 61-8102    H3THIW|   9nJ50eDm I9b-I032ia
EflUfAH
PUTTING ON A HEADSET AND
EXPERIENCING VIRTUAL REALITY
(VR) for the first time could be discombobu-
lating, terrifying, exciting or all of the above.
Telepresence embraces all the emotions and sensations that
come with this generally individualistic experience, but
pushes it into a new realm where VR can be experienced
collectively. As a performance that transcends a single
dimension of physicality, Telepresence is an amalgamation
of a live trumpet performance by musician JP Carter,
sound design and composition by Kiran Bhumber, virtual
environment design by Nancy Lee, while the audience
choreographs the piece by moving their bodies in response to
both the sounds in the room and the visuals in their headset.
The space of the performance can be described as a merging
of two physicalities — the performative space of the room
where participants can roam while exploring the virtual space
that they're immersed in.
We sat down with interdisciplinary media artists Nancy,
a filmmaker, culture producer and curator, and Kiran, an
interdisciplinary media artist, sound designer, curator and
educator, to learn more about Telepresence and how it all
came together.
"Usually in VR, it's a very individualistic experience.
You have your headset on and you're kind of in your zone
and your own world," says Kiran, "we wanted to create an
environment where people are witnessing and experiencing
the same thing, they're still in their own environment and
their own world, but they're all united through the sound
world."
Just like going to a concert or movie together with
friends, Telepresence proves that VR is no different from
a live performance. Nancy believes that experiencing VR
collectively, instead of separately, encourages a sociality that
extends beyond the piece by bringing people together and
encouraging conversations about their own unique experiences with the piece. "It's not just interacting with the piece
per say, but it's the interaction that people have with each
other before and after seeing the piece. That's what makes a
live performance different from an individualistic witnessing
of a VR experience."
In breaking away from the traditional stage of
performance and performer-audience dynamic, Nancy
and Kiran invert this hierarchy and give agency to
the audience as the creator of their own experience. The
audience chooses how to interact with the piece and in
effect, choreographs the performance through their gaze
and physical movements. "Because we come from a
choreographic lens, we really center the body. It's really
ELEPRESENCE
Reinuenting UR and the Indiuidual Experience
words by Jamie Loh & Alex Smyth // Illustration by Rachel Lau // photography by Ashley Sandhu, styling Chris Reed,
Make-up Kelsey Tressel and lighting byAndie Lloyd
important for us to understand
how physical bodies respond
to these virtual environments,
the sound and to the live
performance," Nancy explains.
"We want to be mindful that
when people come into a space,
our bodies are not neutral, we
have previous lived experiences,
we carry certain traumas,
memories. When we come into
a live performance, we are not
a blank slate." By embracing
the diversity of backgrounds,
experiences and traditions our bodies
carry, Telepresence allows each
performance to take shape differently
with each audience member. "There
are traditions involved in these
technologies," Kiran adds, "[We must
consider] how these technologies
are presented, how [we] work in
these traditions, but also [that we]
come from tradition." Through a
collaborative viewing experience, each
audience member is involved, where
their individual experience contributes
to and enhances a collective one. This
strong sense of agency and individualism in a collaborative, collective
context not only lies at the core of
Telepresence, but also Nancy and
Kiran's approach to working in a team.
Nancy and Kiran work hard to
facilitate a work environment that
values creative collaboration and mentorships between team
members to uplift each other. By breaking a traditional
top-down hierarchy that often comes with working within a
large agency or company, Nancy and Kiran make an effort
to keep their ten-person team close knit. They create a space
that isn't just about them and their vision, but involves
the entire team through their individual skills, goals and
experiences. With this open and nurturing environment, the
piece is not constrained to a fixed vision, but organically
takes form through the process of collaboration."Coming
from a feminist way of working, we want to value our team
and we want to be to develop a strong creative relationship
with them," Nancy expresses. "The most important part [is]
for them to feel validated and feel like they're also getting
just as much as we are from the project."
Individual experiences and embodied traditions are
carried into the participation or creation of immersive
environments and the artists hope to put those
embodiments in dialogue with their work. Through a
collaborative, process-driven workflow that reflects unique
and personal traditions and identities, Nancy hopes that
working with these technologies can become open to more
women, non-binary folks and underrepresented people.
Nancy, Kiran and their team are pushing the limits on the
possibilities of VR and as a result, position themselves at
the forefront of an emerging industry. This in itself enables
them to set the tone for how technologies like VR can grow
to become more inclusive and diverse.
"With new, emerging technologies, there isn't really
a protocol," Nancy explains. "Everytime we do a new
project, we're exploring new technologies, but we're
also building new protocol. When you can change the
protocol and the way the power dynamics work in these
new technologies, [you are also offering] a space that will
be more inviting for people that [previously] did not have
access to this workforce."
Nancy and Kiran's unique, process-driven approach
and focus on collaborative work, combined with their
individual capabilities and skills, set them apart as a
powerful team. Together, they are creating work with the
potential to change not just the dynamics of existing artistic
conventions, but also the politics of access and inclusivity,
especially within VR. Their work questions affect inherent
within sound and visuals, but more importantly, questions
how we exist in an immersive environment, what we bring
to it as individuals and how we can share an experience
together — whether it's in a VR environment or in real life.
Telepresence will debut at Western Front on December 14
and 15 and was produced by Western Front New Music in
partnership with Emily Carr University of Art and Design.
The project was also supported by Creative BC Music Fund,
the Province of British Columbia and Canada Council for
the Arts.
'Telepresence'
A
_
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | WINTER 2018-19
"But all our jilirastug-race relations, racial cbasm, racial justice, racial
profiling, uiliite privilege, eueu uiliite supremacy—semes to obscure that
racism is a uisceral experience, that it bislobges brains, blocks airuiays, rips
muscle, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teetb— €be economics, tbe
graphs, tbe cbarts, tbe regressions all lanb, uiitb great uiolence, upon tbe bobjh"
-Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me
It's raining as I write this, but there's a coldness to this city
that runs deeper than the weather. I'm thinking of what it feels
like to walk down the street in my brown body even on those
sunny Coast Salish days that make rain difficult to remember.
^^ AKING TIME TO GREET ME BEFORE
M GOING IN and to offer thanks during our
^^^^  conversation Ruby Smith-Diaz is warm in her
],    approach, the way she reaches out and the way she
seems to warm up a question before responding to it. Our
"interview" took place over text message — she lives in a
wifi-free apartment — about her community-based entrepreneurial work, passions and art.
We conversed between her training clients and working
on getting out the next round of shirts for Autonomy
Personal Training. Between helping plan a fundraiser for the
Tiny House Warriors, taking shifts at a local coffee truck,
and preparing an Afro futurism workshop for local colleges
and universities through Tierra Negra Arts. Between reading
and researching and spending a bit of time with friends and
her partner. Between checking out shows and working on
new musical concepts. Between taking care of self and home
and stopping for a bit to help with banner making for a
Community Not Cops, Anti-Police Power rally in Surrey.
Born to Chilean and Jamaican parents in Edmonton-
amiskwaciwaskahikan (<rnbP< "VAb'), she
graduated from the University of Alberta with
a degree in Education with distinction and, while having
recently returned to teaching, is a multidisciplinary artist.
She has dabbled in screenprinting, poetry, spoken word,
drawing, costume design, visual art, singing and looping
over the last decade. As much as possible, she says, "I'm
trying not to [feel] the need to 'perfect' one specific art. "
Right now, listening to her current project, Eclipse, the
music she makes by looping samples, her voice, banjo and
bass, I feel a certain urgency. Yet, the variations in the
sound and tonality of the songs speak to a steeping of years,
to the tension of finding passion in the city and breath in
breaks outside it and to her breadth of political and musical
influences, a breadth that Smith-Diaz has turned into a gift,
"I'm influenced politically by the works of the late Arthur
Manuel, the works of Sonya Renee Taylor and Stokely
Carmichael, among others. In terms of my own practice,
the influences are from everywhere: Afro Cuban hip hop
band Obsesion, Death (black Detroit punk), Anti Product
(anarchist US POC punk), Dystopia (sludgey crust punk),
Gil Scott Heron, Buffy Sainte-Marie..."
There is danger in the narrative of the black woman
as super-shero, the danger of expectation. In her
communication, Ruby is real about her capacity,
clear, yet gentle. I first met Ruby Smith-Diaz through the
overlaps in our facilitation, activism and artist communities.
Her journey is one I am grateful to be witnessing, sometimes
from afar, sometimes from closer, always implicating herself,
drawing on what she's learned and imagining what has been
denied her and others.
"Whether in organizing spaces, a gym or being out on the
town with friends, we are deeply impacted by how we are
perceived in our bodies, because of the way that our bodies
carry our identities and in the way that we are politicized,
because of our bodies."
It's clear that Ruby Smith-Diaz approaches both life and
work with reflective passion, "This matters to me because
I am one of those bodies that receives harm, because I am
black, because I identify as a woman, because of [my body's]
shape at different points in my life and because of who I'm
attracted to. I've been on the receiving end of violence so
many times that I'm determined to not have a single person
more experience the things that I went through."
She finds deep connections between her personal
training work and her workshop facilitation, both of
which require folks to reflect on themselves and the words
they interact with in deep ways, "I'm seeing more than
ever that the lines of work are so close. This means also
taking a look at how our society and the state in so many
ways replicate harm or as black feminist writer, Sonya
6
"Ruby Smith-Diaz'
 61-8102    H3THIW|   9nJ50eDm I9b-I032ia
EflUfAH
Renee Taylor has expressed, 'body terrorism' upon those
bodies who fall outside the norm."
For Smith-Diaz, too many folks have faced mockery,
violence and exclusion, have stopped going to gyms or
never felt comfortable entering them, let alone seeking out
a personal trainer, "So, I deal with [body terrorism] from
the moment we sit down, speaking to my own journey and
my body, letting them know there won't be any diet talk, no
callipers and scales.
"Rather than reinforcing white supremacist, patriarchal,
cis heteronormative beauty standards, I remind them they
have full agency to tell me how they want their body parts
to be called, the pronouns they'd like for me to use for
them and the goals they would like to work towards.
"Because they haven't seen bodies like theirs represented in the media, doing the things that other bodies
do, people often underestimate their strength. I'm
often finding myself coaching folks to trust themselves,
reminding them that they are strong and that they can
do it. So really, my work is to challenge body terrorism
in all of its realms and help catalyze healing justice for
the communities I work with, especially Indigenous,
racialized and trans, non binary or queer folks."
When she speaks about the shift that Autonomy clients
experience — reduction in body pain, changes to how
they carry themselves, more intimate relationships to
movement at all, she does so with gratefulness, wondering
"how many more people want to move their bodies,
but can't, because of how our society terrorizes those
bodies that don't fit the 'norm.'" Her words remind me
how often I have heard folks close to me express not just
shame in relation to their bodies, but grief as well.
When Ruby responded to my question about patterns
of hurt in her own life, the specific ways that racism
and gender violence operate are all too clear, "It looks
like having cops slow down when I stand anywhere in
public. It looks like getting yelled 'nigger' from passing
cars. Or having my name run to border services after
getting stopped on the street, because I'm black, because I
pronounce my last name like I'm from somewhere else."
When she responded to my question about how she
grounds herself in the daily, I experienced the same
closing of distance as when she spoke of her different
forms of work: "songs of the Orishas, moving my body,
leaving Canada and visiting my families' homelands, visiting
predominantly black cities and seeing shows by black
artists, speaking Spanish with friends when I can, laughing,
talking to old friends who have seen me through the best
and the worst and hold pieces of my brilliance even when I
can't see it." For Ruby, the art and activism she is called to
do is never far from the space and time she is attempting to
move through.
"As black feminist writer and visionary, adrienne
marie brown, speaks in her work, we often come to social
movements seeking justice, because we've often experienced
some sort of hurt ourselves somewhere in the past. But we
don't acknowledge it. And if we don't acknowledge it and
look at the place where we have the most agency in our lives
(our words, our thoughts, our actions), then we are missing
an opportunity to shift things towards justice." She notes
how folks who come to her Tierra Negra workshops are
sometimes surprised to find themselves talking about their
stories or drawing or laughing, "That's the beautiful thing
about art. It's disarming. It opens a door to talk about the
deeper stuff in a more profound way."
Ruby Smith-Diaz believes that radical shifts happen in
the closeness of sitting with ourselves. While the resources
she shares on her Autonomy website clearly show that she
sits with herself and does her research, this also shows up in
the fullness of her being beyond the work she does. I think
of how she connects to the joyous things that pull her, how
the way she took up her own fitness practice reminds me of
how she took up bicycle polo with a crew of fellow women.
"I wanted to for a while and finally just actually got into it."
f
or Smith-Diaz, her commitment to DIY ethic — as
well as her approach to creative practice and her
musical sound with Eclipse — has largely been
informed by being a "recovering punk."
There is tension here, contradiction she finds a way to
carry. "It looks like going to a show by a band I've been
looking forward to for months and then dealing with the
slow creep anxiety of having to look at people's patches
to see if they're NaZi skinheads or SHARPS. Or, finding
out that the band has white nationalist lyrics in their latest
albums.
"I remember being in the 9th grade and coming across
AntiFlag. I didn't have many friends and I just remember
sitting in my social studies class the day after I listened to
them and being angry at all the things we weren't being
taught. And everything made sense to me. The songs —
especially "Angry, Young and Poor" and "Die For Your
Government" — gave me so much fuel to not want to fit
into the status quo. I got so much comfort in that.
"[Punk] was a huge part of my life during my teen years
and early adulthood and it is truly what helped me get
through my feelings of isolation, depression and self hatred
during my teen years. Because I attended predominantly
white and wealthy schools, I found myself often being
the odd one out and being the target of bullying, because
I couldn't afford to wear the latest brands, I didn't have
long straight blond hair and wasn't skinny like the other
popular girls.
"So, when I found punk music, I fell in love. It was like a
long lost love that affirmed so many aspects of my being and
gave me the confidence to say fuck you, and your beauty
standards. I'm gonna wear what I want and the weirder, the
better, I don't even have to try to look like you.
"Punk gave me the impetus to start looking into more
radical politics and gave me a class analysis to make sense
of the world around me. Even though the scenes were often
predominantly white and, at times, openly racist, I still
found a lot of who I am today in punk and created space
for my Afro Latina-ness to be another unique marker that
didn't have to fit into the mainstream."
I V  hen she speaks on her Afro Latina-ness, I think
I I   about how we name ourselves. Also, I have been
^F^r    thinking a lot about naming, especially since
first hearing these words from the title poem of Eritrean
Puerto Rican African American / Black Latinx poet
Aracelis Girmay's The Black Maria: "Naming, however
kind, is always an act of estrangement. (To put / into
language that which can't be / put.) & someone who does
not love you cannot name you right, & even "moon" can't
carry the moon..."
I asked Smith-Diaz about her process of naming
Autonomy Personal Training and Tierra Negra Arts. She
responded, "I'm so intrigued by that quote actually! In
terms of the naming process, I wanted both to evoke a sense
of dignity.
"Tierra Negra in Spanish means black earth,
so Black Earth Arts to me represents the untold,
obscured and misrepresented histories of struggle
and resilience of black communities and, most
importantly, my ancestors.
"We have made survival an art and we have made
it beautiful, though it's emergence has often come at
a very high cost; the learnings, the imaginings, the
visioning into a healing justice world are all things I
wanted to represent in the name, because they are a
part of my work.
"For Autonomy, I wanted a strong name that cited
the body as a site of resistance and self determination.
So many anarchist, Indigenous and anti-authoritarian
communities around the world hold autonomy and
self-determination as founding principles as a means to
fighting colonial and state violence and I really wanted
to bring those concepts into my work, and more
importantly, into the bodies of my clients.
"For so long under white supremacist, capitalist,
patriarchal and ableist systems, we've been told that
our bodies can't exist as they are. We are constantly
told that they must be shaped into 'bigger,"smaller,'
'more feminine', 'not disabled' — and all of this
serves a purpose to not only to demoralize us, but
to also demoralize us to a point of desperation to
buy products so we can become all the things we are
told that we aren't. I don't believe anyone should feel
shame about their bodies, nor that anyone should
hold the power to dictate what our bodies should
look like or do. We all deserve body autonomy.
I'm outside in a rain softened by city's evening fall, looking
back through my conversation with Ruby Smith-Diaz,
hearing her typed words as if spoken, remembering a poem
by Lucille Clifton, a poem I have often needed through the
years. What follows is not quite a poem, but the poetics that
I believe follows when I reflect on Ruby's approach:
May you find yourself in relation to your own
body, actirating the morement, the work you lore,
free from the gazes that try to place you caught.
May you find the music you need, the energy
you need. Your community is one you build, and
one that reaches you from beyond the memory and
future of this realm.
And may you real ize your strength, your capac ity
is higher than you think. And may you know you
get to say when you hare reached it.
May what you desire to grow also find you: in
lyrics and vision,   in breathable air and lore.
May they lire in your body, helping you dislodge
the sources of your doubt, release the terrorisms
eren now trying to seep back in.
Here, your body, with which you imagine: it is
yours to call, it is finally and always was yours.
— after Ruby Smith-Diaz, after Lucille Clifton's
"blessing the boats"
'Ruby Smith-Diaz'
A
_
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | WINTER 2018-1'
Maria-Margaretta
MISTAKES of
RESURGENCE
words by Mallory Amirault
photos by Jake Kimble
eVERYDAY POLICIES AND INSTITUTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH WHITE
SOCIETY render a scrutinized measurement
of what constitutes 'indian-ness' for Indigenous
people. These colonial constituents of indigeneity are system-
ically pervasive, contributing to an overwhelming amount
of shame and disconnection that perforate our Indigenous
cultures and evoke an equally pervasive lateral violence. This
shame, paired with our contemporary political climate, also
create an interference to establishing any foundation for
Indigenous and settler people to engage with one another in a
healing and politically generative way. Creatively negotiating
her shared ancestry of the settler and the settled, Metis
visual artist, Maria-Margaretta from Treaty 6 territory in
Saskatchewan, understands these opposing cultural tensions
at her core.
When I met Maria three years ago, she was carrying
around questions like how to rationalize seeing part
of herself as the oppressor to another part and how to
identify as Native socially, while her skin is assumed white,
therefore bringing her into white privilege. Instead of
needing to answer these questions, Maria makes work that
presents them as they are, which is what makes her work so
heartbreaking in the best possible way: it's honest.
native identity and experience is not solely an
Indigenous story, but one shared by this land's
settlers, where we all inhabit a colonized
topography and political system. Margaretta understands
that cultural hybridity is not something to reconcile and
instead, embodies the simultaneity of her identity in a way
that allows her to deconstruct and inherently decolonize the
part of her which oppresses another: the colonial mindset.
In her work, Margaretta highlights how Native re-presentation of identity can build and change eurocentric systems
of knowledge production and in so doing, redefine both an
Indigenous and colonial gaze within this context. Actively
engaging with the term metissage, Margaretta takes up the
notion of cultural hybridity as a contemporary synthesis,
where the expectations of the colonizer/white-settler and
Indigenous relationship begin to unravel.
Margaretta describes her work as "making mistakes of
resurgence." "I'm working conceptually with cultural resurgence and Metis identity, showing what my experience with
this is, a lot of which lives in the mistakes." In her piece, I
Learn my Culture From the Internet, she takes up western
tropes associated with Metis identity and re-presents them
by performing them in a familiar, but unexpected and
carefully curated context. For this performance, Maria
sits at a table in the gallery, following YouTube tutorial
videos about beading. She has a little metal contraption
that I remember looking at with Native envy (I want to
be authentic and make bead stuff, too), that assists in
making tightly formed, freestanding beaded lines. Despite
the tutorial video and the assistant metal contraption, her
beads are never perfect, but the length of the beaded rope
continues to grow, with visible mistakes showing themselves
against the white gallery surfaces.
"Beading is fucking hard and you make a lot of mistakes.
I think there is a point where you can snip the thread and
let the beads fall and start again or you can take that as a
part of your learning. For me, these little mistakes are what
makes the piece, it's me investing in a cultural practice of
resurgence. It's this wild possibility of two things coming
together, how different all these patterns are and these little
mistakes or twists or tying of knots end up being a bigger
project. These little imperfections are what I love about my
work. These imperfections are growth."
I asked Maria how these mistakes influence the way she
negotiates making work that subverts colonial rhetorics of
indigeneity at the risk of perpetuating them. "I think it's a
big risk. I think my work is going to be met with criticism
or at least, resistance. I don't want my work to seem like a
rejection or acceptance of either side of my identity." In her
work, Elbows off the Table, Margaretta uses readymade
british colonial signifiers (doilies, tea cups and saucers) and
Indigenous signifers (beading) and subtly subverts their
inherent meaning by re-presenting them through a blended
engagement with one another. This is a moment where I
worry choices like this could be polarizing, with a potential
to perpetuate oppressive colonial narratives; but while each
readymade signifier can be understood singularly, when
presented as a metissage, meaning is not readily located and
an enriched understanding begins to unfold as the colonial
gaze is forced to shift.
T
here is an immediate unease that Margaretta creates
with her beads, as their presence illuminates the
Metis reality hidden in the materiality of the british
doily and tea cup. The doily is sewn material made up of
two sections: designs of solid white flowers, while the rest
is open space with thin lines of material connecting each
flower. As the beads indiscriminately travel each section, the
division of solid white against sinews of open space reveals
the materiality as a hidden narrative of cultural hybridity,
turning the british doily in on itself as a means to its own
colonial end.
Offering to somehow remove colonial strategies of
erasure and racist structures of domination by 'othering'
her white privilege, Margaretta uses an Indigenous strategy
developed by Gerald Vizenor, where the "post-Indian" uses
humour and wit as tactics to gain cultural and political
autonomy. Something called survivance. "I've always felt
that I've had an underlining satirical element in my work,
but I want to bring the satire and humour that we have as
Indigenous people, that we need to have in order to survive,
and utilize it more within my work."
I see this humour unfold where the beads meet the cup
and saucer, as the red rose tea bag limply, but fully extends
out of the cup, red trying to escape. With the presence of
the beads, the saucer is unable to sit flush against the table
and the british items are unable to perform their function
without Native disruption (finally, a shift in a narrative that
has been the opposite since european contact). As the tea
'maria-TTlargaretta'
 61-8102    H3THIW|   9nJ50eDm I9b-I032ia
3 fl U T A a •?
Earrings by Emma-Love Cabana
(opposing page)
cup is destabilized by the beads, so is the
associated coloniality of Metis identity. And
it's fucking funny.
We survive.
Challenging the colonial rhetoric
that has been incised into our
Indigenous consciousness, the
provocative, yet subtle subversions within
Margaretta's work outline the everyday
struggle of confronting misrepresentation
and the internal process of self-representation associated with Metis identity. By
isolating each expectation of coloniality
and western tropes of indigeneity, it allows
us to have control over them, which we
can then manipulate to ultimately regain
an autonomous identity. In doing this,
Margaretta's art offers a space to re-think
colonial constructions of representation
and creates an opportunity to reduce and
reconcile the tensions between these two
opposing cultural identities.
Looking ahead, Margaretta will be
spending a year working in Vancouver
with her mentor, Catherine Blackburn,
a prolific artist of Dene and european
ancestry and member of English River First
Nation, where they will be decolonizing
the politics of visuality versus visibility and
challenging the expectations of private and
public spheres as they relate to cultural
practice and expression. When I asked
how her heart doesn't break each time
she encounters the colonial rhetorics of
indigeneity, she said that "art is a place to
dedicate elements of tradition in a way that
generates reclamation of identity. I believe
Elbows Off The Table (above)
Maria-Margaretta | 2018
Beads, lace, cloth, ceramic, red
rose tea, seed.
that sustaining a connection to ancestral
ways of making is directly connected to
creative expression through revitalization
and Indigenous sovereignty."
Before running off to Rebecca Belmore's
artist talk, I ask who her audience is. "How
my work is understood is really up to the
viewer," she says, "I think my work is
supposed to be confrontational. If you look
at it and say 'haha, I get that' or look at it
and say 'oh shit, either way... ' she trails off,
asking herself what she wants to say about
how her work is received, resigning with, "I
don't know, do racists go to art galleries?"
I think it's a great question and is exactly
what Margaretta's work asks of us all. As
she reveals the hidden metissage of identity,
she asks us what hidden blending of subtle
racisms quietly exist in a colonized mindset.
Os Margaretta continues to share
her Metis identity with us through
her art and daily life, perhaps
we can learn to embrace that our stories
are shared, hybrid and nuanced. Perhaps
if we can learn this, both white-settler
and Indigenous identities would have an
expressive opportunity they otherwise have
not. Through examples of re-presentation,
like the ones Maria-Margaretta offers, we
can begin transforming colonial constructions of representation and lift ourselves up
from a place of systemic racism and lateral
violence to a place of cultural strength and
understanding, of possibility.
'ITlaria margaretta'
9
_
 Heal Hue
fiction
NOVEMBER 2018
POP ALLIANCE APPRECIATION PARTY
W/ SWIM TEAM / SHITLORD SHITLORD
FUCKERMAN /KELLARISSA /AARON
READ
NOVEMBER 2 / RED GATE ARTS SOCIETY
The Pop Alliance Appreciation Party wasn't the first
Friday night I found myself at Red Gate, but it was
certainly among the most memorable. The event celebrated
the success of the Pop Alliance compilations: periodical LPs
of local bops, curated by the hosts, Mint Records and CiTR/
Discorder. Though the crowd was meager as the sets began,
I held out hope for the event and as a pop music fiend with
a flourishing admiration for the Vancouver music scene, I'm
glad I did.
Aaron Read opened the evening with an acoustic guitar
and a wickedly self-deprecating sense of humour. Though
his songs were carefully crafted, his nervous banter with
the crowd revealed that he was more comfortable in his
role as a stand-up comedian.With crooning lyrics like "You
light a cigarette / Literally killing time," Read demonstrates
his attentive balance between somber subjects and cheeky
delivery.
The mood picked up with synth-wave extraordinaire,
Kellarissa. Like a pendulum swung between atmospheric
electro-opera and pulsating dance beats, her expansive
sound was a departure from Read's humble set. The
textured soundscapes created from her layered vocals
crashed in waves around the room. Although the crowd
was still sparse, one couple danced along animatedly. The
audience curiously looked on, as if Kellarissa had beamed
down a few aliens from her midi-board mothership.
Continuing the down synth stream, shitlord shitlord
fuckerman took the stage. The absolute absurdity of the
set captivated the audience from start to finish. When not
commandeering the glitch-pop, shitlord fuckerman danced
chaotically through the audience in a spacesuit and rubber
mask. Between the haunted-house-meets-Nintendo tracks,
Shitlord fuckerman constantly engaged the audience,
muttering queries like "Has anyone seen Matrix Reloaded?"
In some bizarre sort of social experiment, shitlord fuckerman
demanded that everyone lay down and wave their arms and
legs in the air. The crowd complied unquestioningly, while
shitlord fuckerman darted through the forest of limbs. When
the set ended, the audience seemed slightly shocked, but
amused nonetheless.
Departing from the electronic realm, the party continued
with Swim Team. The three-piece art-punk group was a
crowd favourite; the now full dancefloor thrashed around
under the lazy disco ball. Swim Team's potent mix of urgent
melodies, surf-rock basslines and dynamic guitar hooks
proved a strong finish for the evening. When their set
ended around 1 AM, the sweaty crowd lingered in the violet
shadows before descending upon Main Street.
Despite impending November gloom, the Pop Alliance
Appreciation Party managed to create the atmosphere of
a small music festival while maintaining the intimacy of a
private party. After each set, the various artists joined the
audience to mingle with old friends and new fans. Like the
compilations they had so carefully curated, Mint Records and
CiTR/Discorder's event was an unadulterated celebration of
local pop music. —Hannah Kruse
THINGS RESOUNDING THINGS
NOVEMBER 3 / EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART AND DESIGN
Presented by ECUAD's Basically Good Media Lab,
Things Resounding Things was an installation by
Vancouver sound artist and percussionist John Brennan,
to explore the "agency and memory of musical instruments
and other sounding objects." Occupying ECUAD's Integrated
Motion Studio for three days, the installation consisted of a
variety of acoustic instruments placed throughout the space
— cymbals hung from the ceiling, an oil drum outfitted with
the neck, strings and bridge of an upright bass sat in the
corner and the innards of an upright piano occupied the
centre of the room. On each of these sounding objects,
Brennan installed resonators, pickups or solenoids, from
which a maze of wires ran to a
central computer that controlled them
all. After the performance, Brennan
explained that he had recorded the
sounds of each object beforehand,
then played those recordings through
the respective instruments. Each
object resonated with its own sound
— almost, in my mind, an equivalent
to lip-syncing for the objects.
Over the course of the twenty-five
minute experience, sounds emerged
from each of the instruments slowly
and with intention. Each time a new
instrument sounded, it was given
ample sonic space to draw in the
listeners, resonate with itself and
allow the audience to get in, get close
and experience the sound thoroughly.
Only after what seemed like ten to
fifteen minutes did the sounds of
each instrument begin to overlap, to play overtop and with
each other. The room rattled, buzzed and droned with the
symphony of instruments all resonating with themselves and
each other.
Everything about the installation invited exploration and
interaction: the physical layout of the room, with ample space
around each sounding object welcomed movement; the
unpredictability of every noises' entrance and departure kept
the audience's attention constantly in flux; the incongruity
between acoustic instruments making sound and the lack of
any apparent source of that sound induced people to try to
discover how it all worked.
While I was in the room, there was only one person who
seemed to be fully engaged in the installation. Their head
snapped around to locate the newest hiss and crackle to
emerge across the room. They moved to stand directly
beneath the shimmering cymbal overhead, showering
themselves in a new sonic world. Bringing their face within
millimetres of resonators, vibrating strings or rumbling drum
skins, they explored each new sound with the curiosity the
installation was designed to instil. They strove not only, it
seemed, to discover how it worked, but how it felt.
For the rest of us — there were ten or so — our
participation was active in only the barest sense of the word.
We moved through the space, but tentatively, with slow and
restrained steps, cautious and calculated in our movements.
I did make an effort to be unfiltered in my response to the
■  installation, to be unrestrained in my exploration of the
sound and space, but the mood of the room was a hard thing
9  to shake. In addition to the dark, almost clinical feel of the
• space, the stillness of the other feet in the room effectively
• grounded my own. —Lucas Lund
10
REAL   LIVE  ACTION
FLAVOURCEL PRESENTS SLOPPY
'SECONDS: A NIGHT OF MUSIC AND
ANIMATION W/ NON LA / DEVOURS /
TOMMY TONE /BORED DECOR
»   NOVEMBER 9 /RED GATE
Pblue pastel mouth lets its sloppy, sedated tongue roll in
and out on the video screen; a strange Wiseau-esque
creature hunches over a computer and drum-pad, microphone
pressed tightly to lips: "We regret to inform you this is
Tommy Tone." I have to wonder if, with a long black wig
and absurd composure (not to mention a shared name), the
intent is indeed to explore an alternate universe, where the
aforementioned film auteur instead takes a musical route.
As he parts the sea of people to create a catwalk for
himself, Tommy Tone presents a strangely coalescent
mix of irony and sincerity. While a loneliness underlies
the songs, especially in the final track of the set, "God's
Mistake," the presentation is taken to absurd heights. The
new wave mainstay of a vocal echo-filter creates such an
overpowering effect, that Tommy Tone's lyrics often become
an indecipherable mesh of the past and the present — an
apt description for the sound as a whole. The last thing I jot
down in my notebook is that despite Tommy Tone consisting
of a single member (who seems to be rolling around on
the floor at the moment), he still carries a fully fleshed-out
sound, so much so that, having listened to his studio work
beforehand, I was taken aback by this fact.
With Non La coming up next, the graphic backdrops
(all provided by the Flavourcel Animation collective)
become significantly more mesmerising. Here, we have an
ever-rotating cube-like shape of nth-dimensional inception,
slowly shifting its faces from one entrancing animation
to the next. Non La is another solo effort (as a matter of
fact, the final band is the only one with multiple members
tonight), and the singer / guitarist lets us in on the fact that
he had a stand-up gig the night before, revealing that he
has not practiced for tonight. Luckily, it doesn't show, as
his cheery guitar driven sound (which carries the youthful
yearning of a band like Grouplove) and well executed
solos fill the room with energy. Sausages are now dancing
across the cube-like shape, and are soon replaced by
swimming book-squids. Psychedelic visions such as these
dominate the backdrops of the night and create a dreamlike
technicolor atmosphere, which is heightened by the fact
that these animations are being projected not only onto the
wall, but onto the bands themselves, creating a cohesive
whole of both sound and animation.
Now, with sparkly and hyperbolized eyebrows, Devours
takes the stage, serving up dark electronica with a side
of ironic sampling (making perhaps the most creative use
of b4-4's "Get Down" I'll ever see). As swirling oceanic
peppermints melt into a green vortex and surging arteries
drift across the void, Devours busts out a tambourine. As the
tempo accelerates, the set builds to a triumph and the crowd
convulsively hops along. Devours chooses his samples
wisely and each one adds a deeper layer to the song it
weaves through.
Finally, Bored Decor start their performance on a peculiar
note: the lead singer close-pins his nose shut, which, while
making for an entertaining Pinocchio visual, fails on an aural
level. Nonetheless, the band is tight and once the close-pin
is discarded, the lyricism and singing shine through,
especially on "I, the Luddite," which since my first hearing it,
has become a new favourite of mine.
As a night of entertainment, you couldn't have done much
better than Flavourcel's Sloppy Seconds. However, I can't
quite say that this was the best way to display the animation
talents of the Flavourcel collective. However remarkable,
their animation seemed to take a back seat to the music. It
Discorder magazine | WINTER 2018-19
 would be nice to see the animations in a setting where they
themselves are the focus, perhaps with a more ambient
music backdrop in some way that would best display their
fully seductive and hypnotic power. —Tate Kaufman
SODA FOUNTAIN SKETCH COMEDY
NOVEMBER 10 / LITTLE MOUNTAIN GALLERY
P night so marred by technical difficulties shouldn't
have been so funny, but the November installment of
Nathan Hare and Graeme Achurch's monthly sketch comedy
show, Soda Fountain, somehow managed to pull off the
impossible.
Right from the beginning, things went off track. As
the crowd settled into the seats and the lights dimmed,
an announcer's voice came over the PA: "Ladies
and gentlemen, please welcome to the stage, the
Chainsmokers!" Hare and Achurch stormed onstage as the
music came back on.
"No, pause the iTunes. Wrong song. Turn off the iTunes,"
said Hare, as the person sitting at the tech booth scrambled.
With the wrong music off, they decided to start the sketch
over. With a Chainsmokers' style video projected behind
them, Hare and Achurch began again, singing in unison
about their religious fervour and abstinence, until the
projections disappeared unexpectedly. As they turned to see
what the disruption was, the screen lit up again with a blown
up image of Lola Bunny from Space Jam, with the text "I
WANT TO FUCK LOLA BUNNY" sitting boldly overtop.
"Well that kinda takes the surprise out of it," said Achurch,
before explaining the entire sketch to the audience as the
song and projections were reset, "I guess we'll just do it,
anyway." They launched back into the already spoiled bit,
which was somehow funnier than it would've been had it
gone smoothly.
With that mangled intro, the tone was set for the evening.
UBC Improv members, Aidan Parker and Noa Kozulin, came
next with the only technical mishap-free sketch of the evening.
While their 'students getting in trouble with the principal'
scenario could've been great, compared to the spontaneous-
ness of the other sketches of the night, this one fell short.
A fully committed Rae Lynn Carson was up next with her
sketch, "Dog and Order." Dressed all in brown, with dog
ears and a toy in her mouth, Carson entered the stage on
all fours to a modified Law & Order theme song, before
launching into a courtroom monologue — done entirely in
an exaggerated dog voice — about being framed for the
theft of "some chicken nuggos." While the absurdity of the
performance was enough to keep the audience laughing,
the seemingly random Law & Order "chung-chungs" really
made the sketch.
The last sketch before the intermission was a guided
meditation, led by Mark Chavez and Kevin Lee, who
introduced themselves as Lysander and Lysander. Struggling
to get the lights sufficiently low for their spiritual experience,
the Lysanders embarked on a truly uncomfortable journey,
SI-8I0S  H3THIWI 9nixDBDffl I9bi03z\a
complete with amplified mouth sounds, metaphors
about the knees being the "Grand Central Station of
the leg" and sporadic coughing fits.
After a brief break, the crowd settled in for the final
act. Hare and Achurch were back with a lightning
fast barrage of sketches, each one funnier than the
last. The Soda Fountain duo ended the night on a
high note, from a "cool boss" ridiculing an intern with
increasingly troubling insults, to a Tip Top Tailors
commercial trying to liquidate their large stock of
Riddler suits. While all the sketches of the night were
top notch, Hare and Achurch showed that they were
on their A-game, even if almost everything around
them went totally off the rails. —Lucas Lund
MUSIC FOR AUGMENTED PIPE
ORGAN
NOVEMBER 23 / PACIFIC SPIRIT CHURCH
w
hen I think of contemporary music, I visualize
an old man in circular glasses listening to
a polyrhythmic oboe piece. So, walking into the Pacific
Spirit Church, I was prepared to be alienated by an older
audience. Instead, the familiar smell of wood and books hit
me. Older people sat in their down jackets ready at 8 PM,
while the younger ones milled outside smoking cigarettes.
Contexts and generations mixed, but we were all there to
see the same thing: George Rahi play a digitally controlled
74 stop Casavant organ.
Separated by silence into four movements, the organ
music that Rahi produced was an intelligent mixture of
improvisation and well thought out compositions. Each
movement (too many stops, anonymous atmosphere,
improvisation with Robyn Jacob and controlled feedback,
and polyrhythmia in C major) was thematically similar,
but stood in contrast with each other depending on loops
with the help of Jacob and the enigmatic thought process
of ad-libbed music. The drone-like quality of the church's
organ easily threw us into a meditative state. The expansive
quiet that resulted from the organ's thunderous and slightly
dissonant tones was overwhelming. Highlights of Rahi's
performance were the melancholic elements and arpeggios
of his pieces, complemented by an undercurrent of resolving
chords in the bass clef — the last movement even made
me laugh, because of the quirky joyousness of its intro,
reminding me of a malfunctioning merry-go-round.
Accompanying Rahi were the equally important visuals
of Johnty Wang. His two projectors stood by either side of
the rows of pews, casting light onto the organ pipes — the
projections brought emotional resonance to the music. The
church's arching architecture was perfect, creating deep
cavernous shadows that looked like two big, black eyes.
Throughout the movements of Rahi's organ suite, pastel
multi-coloured storyboards made the pipes multidimensional,
with vacillating images of white-hot mountains, moving cities
and veering roads. I found it hard to blink in case I missed a
new transition or scene.
Overall, this was a show for people that were respectful
and musically curious. Even though there are many people
that would not be comfortable being in a denominational
space, even in a non-religious context, I appreciated Rahi's
familial and accessible approach to organ and contemporary
music. Religion aside, the church's acoustics made the
performance even more special and the recently renovated
organ console was small, but mighty. I ended the concert with
a rounded sense of having experienced the primary colours
of emotions and learned just what an organ could do. I can't
wait to hear what comes next from Rahi and hope that he
maintains the positive energy we all felt during this recital.
— Esmee Colbourne
To have a live show considered tor review in Discorder Magazine and
online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences.
Feel tree to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
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MUSIC
NICHOLAS KRGOVICH
"OUCH"
(Tin Angel Records)
October 26, 2018
•♦ lip until last year I'd never fallen in love or
V experienced a broken heart," Nicholas Krgovich
confides in the liner notes on the Bandcamp page of his
latest album, "OUCH"— he describes this as his "breakup
album," the first he's written in his sixteen-year career. "Not
even close really. I can't believe heartbreak is a thing that
happens to pretty much everybody! It's so wild! Maybe the
wildest thing besides having a baby or death! No wonder I
managed to avoid it for so long. I don't think I could have
handled it."
Krgovich's essay summarizes the mood of the twelve
songs on "OUCH" as wry, bittersweet and honest. Much like
the rest of Krgovich's discography, it's a relaxing listen, but
hides depths both emotional and musical.
These are understated, homey songs that occasionally
swell with electric organ and/or sax, interspersed with songs
that strum along like a Jonathan Richman joint, possibily
due to Adrian Teacher, one of Krgovich's many collaborators
on "OUCH" and a noted Richman fan. At first, the songs
seem to make an attempt to push through the breakup pain
Krgovich talks about with dry humor. We hear him sing
about regifting presents he never managed to present to his
ex-lover in "Hinoki," while the following track, "Spa," closes
with a voicemail message from a friend: "You are thinking
about this too much."
Soon enough, Krgovich's true feelings come out, as such
feelings do. On "Goofy," which is arguably the emotional
linchpin of "OUCH," we hear Krgovich plainly lament the
breakdown of what he describes in the album's liner note/
essay as a "brief but potent relationship," singing "I feel
duped and robbed / And it's at odds with the vibrancy of
spring."
Of course, by the time "October" comes around, Krgovich
seems to have gotten through the worst of things, while
reaching the album's closing song "Field," he is reflective
on his whole experience, intoning that though he will carry it
with him, he also knows that he is "safe."
Here, there are parallels to be drawn with another local
songwriter on what is, in many respects, a very different
album: Devours' Late Bloomer. While Late Bloomer is
brash and concerned with beginnings where "OUCH" is
wistful and about a singular ending, both albums deal with
attaining self-knowledge in relationships, especially as their
respective authors are both gay men who, by their own word,
came out and/or entered relationships relatively late in life.
Even as "OUCH" deals entirely in "specificity" (as Krgovich
admits in the album's liner notes), there's a plainspoken
quality to its songwriting that makes it universally relatable.
Who among us hasn't had an experience with an ex or
unrequited love like the one Krgovich sings about in
"OUCH"s penultimate song, "Lido." The album leaves us
sighing with some degree of nostalgia or resignation, just
as he does, "If it is, I'm dying / If it is, I'm alright," Krgovich
repeats at the end of the song, joined by a chorus of looped
sighs and backup vocals.
Put simply, when you listen to "OUCH" you know you're
not alone, no matter how you came to feel that way.
—Chris Yee
14
KINNIE STARR
Feed the Fire
(Aporia Records)
October   19,   2018
If there's one quality one can attribute to Kinnie
Starr, it's versatility. She's performed with Cirque
Du Soleil, produced a Juno-winning record for Digging
Roots and contributed to the soundtrack of the haunting,
Haida-language film Edge of the Knife. And while she's
accomplished all this, Starr has recorded a series of albums
equal parts alt rock, dance, and hip-hop. Her latest album,
Feed the Fire, lives up to her reputation as an iconic artist.
The album benefits from allowing Starr to shift from
tenderness to confrontation within a track, as heard on the
title track's blasted-out thud dropping into a light drumbeat
or the confidently aggressive rap flow and soft vocals on
I'm a Ghost." This dexterity is mirrored in Starr's image of
herself, as sung in the lyrics of "The Cold Sea," where she
lists the dichotomies that constitute her personhood: "I'm
half-warrior, half-intellect/ Half-love, lots of regret."
The corruptive influence of technology and the pollution
of Canadian waters are pronounced themes across Starr's
work, both appearing in "Vendetta" which asks a partner (or
a public) whether love or vengeance is their goal, as she is
unable to discern the truth in the "bluff" of good intentions.
Her sex-positive feminism also comes through on several
tracks, most notably a cover of her own song, "Kiss It,"
which turns the cheerful love jam into a snarky, dubstep-in-
fluenced assertion.
While many of the album's cuts do well by this hard-hitting
sound, Starr also makes excellent use of blissed-out
pop arrangements on two tracks—"I'm Ready" (featuring
Vancouver rapper and ex-Dream Warrior Spek) and the
closer "We Are Sky." "I'm Ready" is a solid single, with a
wavering, harsh bass at the bottom of the track being offset
by an ebullient synth riff. Although a song of departure,
it is full of optimism and confidence, with a self-assured
cheekiness in Spek's bridge. "We Are Sky" starts with
a low-key rap verse about late capitalist futility, before
blooming into the kind of grand chorus that brings the album
to a resounding finish.
Elisapie might be the closest contemporary of Starr's
(whose Ballad of the Runaway Girl was reviewed a couple
of issues ago) in that both artists are polymaths, whose
creation is equal part self-examination and cultural melange.
Elisapie's most recent work pursues the sounds of her roots,
while Starr's is thoroughly contemporary, keeping step with
the hip-hop and dance scene while retaining her singular
song craft. Feed the Fire stands as a solid introduction to
and continuation of Starr's many styles. —Jake Clark
To submit music, podcasts, books or films tor review consideration, please
email Under Review Editor at ur.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1.
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ART REUIEW
MARISA KRIANGWIWAT HOLMES AT ARTSPEAK
words  by Matthew Budden //   installation photos  courtesy  of Dennis Ha
Prius/ddmmyyyy
(detail) Prius/ddmmyyyy)
Inkjet print, oak, steel, cement,
resin, molding clay
2018 | 159x66x14cm
VEARS AGO, I HAD A JOB IN THE
BOWELS OF THE VANCOUVER
MUSEUM helping to rearrange a cavernous
artifact storage room. Magnificent potlatch
feast bowls, rows of old Vancouver street and phone
directories, toxic taxidermied bears and mountain goats,
E. Pauline Johnson's death mask. Immersive stuff, artifacts
that vibrated history and becoming. One thing I could not
relate to was a homely collection of scrapbooks made by
Vancouverites early in the last century. Seemingly arbitrary
pictures someone had cut from a catalogue and pasted on
oatmeal construction paper. I could not see the value in
them and commented on how artless they were. The curator
angrily chastised me for missing the point. "That's what
people did on a dreary Vancouver night a hundred years
ago! They cut out pictures. They pasted them in a book."
Then I started to get it, it was about people making these
pictures their own with what they had on hand. It was
about people taking images that could have come from
anywhere and been made by anyone and making a concrete
place for them in their lives, there and then.
Here and now, the question of making the pictures we see
resonate with the life we live could not be more pressing.
This seems to be the problem Marisa Kriangwiwat Holmes
takes up in ddmmyyyy, her new photography installation at
Artspeak. Even if Holmes doesn't quite give us a solution,
the exhibit suggests that she is happy to take the task of
image management quite literally and see where it leads.
A Prius next to a desert bush, the hand of a driver on
the wheel of a Lexus, a single bell ringing and a collage of
bells echoing through multiple images, a laser cutter, dry
grass growing over a metal fence, the hands of someone
taking a photo, a spray of blossoms. Holmes doesn't appear
to be presenting these photos as sacrosanct documents so
much as negotiating with them. These negotiations involve
presenting and displaying images in ways that might give
her and her viewers real space to distill their potential
meaning or decide if they hold meaning at all.
The show is made up of eight sets of images presented
on four two-sided stands. The stands are modelled after
the free-standing chrome sign holders we see when walking
into any store. With this referent, it's as if Holmes has taken
the role that photographs play in reproducing the conditions for commodity fetishism and asks us to reconsider
our navigation of image production and dissemination.
We're going to start working out the meaning and value
of a picture either by association or disassociation with
commodification.
This is where Holmes starts to play, linking her "itinerant
images" to customized displays that bear her personal
stamp. The vertical chrome bars are set in hand-cast blocks
of dyed concrete and attached to picture frames made of
strips of stained oak. The more elaborate framing constructions lead the work away from the store display motif into
contexts more readily associated with sculptural installations, conjuring associations to alter pieces and reliquary
displays. In particular, the clay knobs and flame capping the
chrome bars of two pieces suggest funny quasi-art historical
referents that may or may not be bum steers. It's details like
these that free us up to take in the image in a different light.
Holmes' panels could be seen as a proxy for the pictures
and graphic ephemera she encounters every day: images
with no obvious author, history or provenance, images
often seen with no obvious meaning beyond appearance,
Bell Tower/Laser Cutter Machine
xerox print, oak, cement, molding clay
2018 | 185x37x20cm
images that may or may not have crawled out of the sea
of stock photos. Even though she took all but two of the
photos here, there's a sense that Holmes has given up on
the struggle for authorship of the photographic images
themselves, but tries to recover it by crafting the sites where
they are displayed.
If this is the case, I have mixed feelings about the tactic,
however well it works for this particular show. Some of
the "stock photos" here are too aesthetically idiosyncratic
and inventive to be relegated to anonymity. Holmes' photo
of a computer terminal, in what appears to be an office at
Hastings Racecourse, is particularly striking and begs for its
due in a more conventional setting.
But the show makes its point well - creative tactics are
always at hand for negotiating with the roving images
that swamp our lives. The more creative we can be about
managing these visual encounters, the more breathing
space we give ourselves to recognize if they belong in our
personal orbit.
"ddmmyyyy" by Marisa Kriangwiwat Holmes at Artspeak,
233 Carrall Street, Vancouver. November 3 to December 8,
2018. http:llartspeak.cal
(detail) Fence / Lexus
Inkjet print, oak, steel, cement
2018|185x25x13cm
K>
ART REVIEW!MARISA KRIANGWIWAT HOLMES AT ARTSPEAK
 8ios HaaMavon | snixogDm ™ino38i<i
EflUfAH
JULIAN      HOU
WORDS BY FIORELA ARGUETA
PHOTOS BY EMMANUEL ETTI
ILLUSTRATIONS BY JASMINE LEUNG
IN MID-NOVEMBER, VANCOUVER
ARTIST, musician and architect, Julian Hou, and
I had a coffee on Main Street, close to where he is
currently doing a residency at the Western Front, to
discuss the body of his past and current work. Hou's work
encompasses textile, sound, music and performance. Adding
to this list is an impressive academic background including a
BA in Art and Culture Studies from Simon Fraser University,
followed by a MA in Architecture from the University of
British Columbia.
Before taking the leap to pursue art, Hou recalls working
freelance in architecture and contractually with an interior
design company. "There was a moment around 2012
where I was working in architecture and involved in music
and felt really uncertain about my future, so I returned to
being fully committed to art." The artist recalls a few times
where he would experience artworks that would have a
lasting impression on him, particularly an exhibition at
the Contemporary Art Gallery by Rachael Harrison and
Scott Lyall, When Hangover Becomes Form. Hou further
elaborates that, "Strangely enough, I think that art actually
brought me back to architecture and music. In my opinion,
it's much more difficult to pursue artistic ideas in music and
in architecture than vice-versa." Hou now finds himself
exploring idiosyncratic spaces in Vancouver as he recognizes the narratives within and outside architectural and
systematic structures.
FIORELA   ARGUETA: Do you think your current
location in Vancouver has greatly influenced which artistic
themes you are prioritizing at the moment?
JULIAN   HOU: The themes I'm interested in are not
specific to Vancouver - although, through time here, I've
inherited a resistance to certain values that uphold traditional hierarchies and/or reaffirm conservatism. I feel like
class and privilege is something Vancouver is very slow to
acknowledge, but I feel that I'm part of a new conversation
around that.
FA:How do you go about your research process? Since
your work is quite sound-based, do you first begin with
exploring sounds in nature and/or those from contemporary
life (music, busy urban sounds, etc) ?
JH:I like to probe into various subjects that I'm intuitively
drawn to and then try to understand what reasons these
different things have been brought together. So, the making of
a work is often a process of my own clarification or synthesis
about certain intuitions. I use writing and spatial modelling
as a way to understand these relationships - to build bridges
between ideas. Usually, there is simultaneously a narrative
and a spatial/formal rationale that conditions the experience
for the viewer. This approach has been described to me as
being musical in nature, which I wouldn't disagree with; there
is a degree of adaptation to basic impulses that happens with
music that is similar in structure to how I work.
FA: Your work intersects various media with musical
sounds and digital formats, often culminating in an enveloping sonic environment or even textile work demanding
tactile curiosity from visitors. These media have the capacity
to elicit sensorial fascination - to what extent are you interested in having visitors physically engage with your works?
JH: I see the bodies of visitors simply being present with the
works in a space as physically engaging the work enough.
However, the performative dimension is something I'm
developing, as many textile works will form into costume. I
think of my work relating more to affect rather than sensory
perception, so the enveloping quality is maybe part of the
way of manipulating experience toward a feeling.
'Julian Hou'
Hou is currently doing a residency at the Western
Front that started mid-October and will run until
Jan 01, 2019. His time at the artist-run centre has
allowed him access to digital technologies he otherwise
would not have, although he has been as equally fascinated
by the instruments in their collection. As of recently,
Hou has immersed himself in studying the space of the
Western Front and acquainting himself with the space and
what it has to offer. Describing the artist-run centre, Hou
commented how it is a peculiar collage: about three people
live in the building; there is a dance and music program;
an exhibition and performance space; and an office for
staff members. Reflecting on these differing uses of the
building, Hou comments how the space itself has adapted
throughout time and the objects, such as a grand piano
and its markings, act as remnants of having been used.
Furthermore, his interest permeates into the operation of
the Western Front: how the building has evolved through
organizational structures, that is, how the building itself
functions with those who run it.
Considering his background in architecture, it is not
surprising how he considers the architecture and the
building as a character with different fictional narratives due
to the people and objects that inhabit it. These are concepts
Hou is currently immersed in, but when I asked regarding
more detailed works he is making for his residency and
what the staff members at theWestern Front think, he
responded: "I tend to be private about my ideas," followed
by a small chuckle, he clarified, "I try not to be too predetermined early on in a project's development, I like trying
things out and seeing what works."
H
_
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | WINTER 2018-19
Dear Reader,
The following is an apology to Yilin Wang and her fellow interviewer, Elaine Woo and interviewees, Shazia Hafiz Ramji and
Jane Shi, the contributors of "Writerly Asians & Allies Against #racismcanlit."
In this article, you will notice a redaction replaced with ellipsis and as a byproduct, has censored information that was originally a part of this article and therefore does not represent Yilin's complete interview responses. This redaction was done last
minute without dialogue with Yilin or her collaborators. I feel the weight of my editorial decision and take full accountability
for not being more rigorous in questioning my actions as an editor. I am regretful for not taking a moment to say "we're not
going to meet this publication deadline, and that's okay."
My actions, though not fully informed, not fully rigorous, were not made in an effort to harm a community that I belong to.
While I am fully aware that my actions are akin to the censorship Yilin has experienced from actions of racism and prejudice,
actions that served to intentionally cause harm, mine, though misplaced and lacking in professional experience, came from
empathetic care and I feel pain for failing someone whose side I am on.
In moments when one is facing multiple layers of responsibility, it becomes difficult to discern everything that is at stake. I've
been asking myself how does one work to preserve and validate their personal experiences while simultaneously holding and
validating another's?
The holding of oneself, while holding another is nothing short of a feat and perhaps it's illogical to assume that we can
do it with any amount of grace, but that's not to say there isn't a beauty in the effort, a beauty in the curve of learning. It's
daunting to think about, let alone begin the task of holding more than just ourselves, but to actively engage with holding a
community, especially after living through one invalidating experience after another as marginalized people. There's not a
lot of space on this periphery we've been forced into. Having this ominous and powerful centre that has pushed us to these
edges, that has for so long dictated how to engage with each other, it's difficult to imagine another way of being, to trust there
is a different direction to look toward that isn't the centre.
But I'm trying. I'm looking and listening and I want to thank Yilin and her fellow collaborators for showing me aspects of
this process I have yet to learn. Thank you for reminding that I am still vulnerable to overlooking my own internalization
of oppressive mechanisms and for reminding me that regardless of the communities we belong to, regardless of our shared
experiences that bring those communities together, to maintain the ethic of speaking nearby and not for.
There are many hesitations that come up when realizing how we unintentionally engage with the toxicity of colonialism and
systemic oppression. Hesitations aside, I think this an opportunity to address some of the bigger problems that led us here.
Despite being new to Discorder and new to editing at this capacity, I understand that I am in a position to advocate the
urgency in our need for opportunities to creatively address and ethically grow new sets of working conditions. It is imperative that the community at our station begin laying some needed groundwork in professional development for all volunteers
and employees at CiTYUDiscorder. In addition to our annual training sessions on creating safer spaces and the impacts of
sexual violence and workplace bullying and harassment, in the new year, we plan to host an anti-oppression workshop for
all CiTR and Discorder staff members and volunteers. If you're on our email server list (DjLand), you will receive any emails
with further workshop and RSVP details. If you have any questions or would like to join our CiTYUDiscorder listserv, please
contact myself (editor.discorder@citr.ca) or Dora Dubber volunteer@citr.ca.
While I am regretful that Yilin has decided to no longer partner her event with Discorder, we will continue to show support
for the event, her creative work and are grateful to her for magnifying the issues of racism that permeate many of our creative
spaces, like CanLit.
I am proud of the content comprised in this issue. I see the potential to illuminate these mistakes in a way that amplifies the
urgency in needing to subvert internalized systemic oppression; this issue is strong and necessary and I am grateful to Yilin
and her fellow team for indicating what has been alack. I believe in maintaining the willingness to work together in a effort
to learn how to better be together. I believe in the building of our peripheral communities and I believe in trusting the labour
required to lay that foundation.
Sincerely,
Mallory Amirault, Editor-in-Chief, Discorder Magazine
that uninvited magazine on Coast Salish territory of the hsnqsminsm speaking Musqueam peoples from CiTR 101.9FM
18
'UUriterly Asians & fillies Against #RacismlnCanLit'
 61-8102    H3THIW|   9nJ50eDm I9b-I032ia
"All these Treaty
Rights and still not
treated right. Honour
our Treaties"
words by Amber Goulet
a fl u t a a •?
Que mic-drops The highest court
of Canada has ruled in its
sovereigns' favour, affirming that
lawmakers of Canada are not required
to consult with Indigenous people
prior to tabling legislation that
could constitutionally affect their
Treaty Rights. Canada continues to
flaunt its ability to assert absolute
authority by excluding Indigenous
voices in the lawmaking process.
|)*'he argument brought forth by
*li> the Mikisew Cree Nation to the
Supreme Court of Canada proposed
that Cabinet Ministers should
consult with Indigenous communities
PRIOR to green-lighting projects
where Indigenous Treaty rights would
be effected. This logical approach
and solution attempted to resolve
infringement of Treaty Rights at the
BEGINNING of the lawmaking process.
This forward-thinking concept
would better establish genuine
and meaningful two-way dialogue
consultations between Indigenous
communities and the state. It is
extremely difficult not to feel
suspicious of the time frame of
this ruling - with the latest Trans
Mountain pipeline decisions and
the Site C Dam in Treaty 8 Territory
- where Indigenous communities
have challenged the state regarding
their consultation practices. The
timing of this ruling is eerie in
light of the Liberal government's
"Recognition and Implementation of
Rights Framework" that is currently
being rushed through legislation,
which to many, lacks transparency
and is a continued top-down approach
to policy making. Despite the recent
ruling from the Supreme Court, the
Mikisew case stands to demonstrate
that Indigenous people continue to
threaten Canada's sovereignty by
challenging colonial law-making
procedures.
The title of this piece, "All these
Treaty Rights and still not Treated
Rights Honour our Treaties" reflects
one of my favorite political t-shirts
designed by Indigenous clothing
line Section 55. As an Indigenous
student on campus, majoring in First
Nations Indigenous Studies and
Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social
Justice, I worry what this recent
decision will mean for the future of
law-making. My concerns are based
on the Supreme Court's prejudicial
ruling that will continue to force
Indigenous communities to dispute
harmful legislations that violate
Treaty Rights through the court
system only AFTER legislation has
been enacted. Placing the ominous
task of challenging disputes through
legal systems onto small communities
is unethical. This devious tactic
undermines and by-passes responsibilities set out in the Treaties,
which are still in effect today. In
light of this ruling, the Supreme
Court also acknowledges that the
government still has an obligation
to act respectfully by "honourlingl
the Crown" when drafting legislation
affecting Indigenous people, but why
do they "honour the Crown" and not
our Treaties?
Placing the
ominous task
of challenging
disputes through
legal systems
onto small
communities
is unethical
Regarding the issue of consultation,
this case also prompts us to critique
Trudeau's alleged commitment to the
United Nations Declaration on the
Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP).
Specifically, Article 19 outlines
the expectation of consultation with
Indigenous people to "obtain their
free, prior and informed consent
before adopting and implementing
legislative or administrative
measures that may affect them."
Supporting UNDRIP while refusing
to adjust law-making policies is
contradictory. So, which is its
does the government want to commit
to UNDRIP or do they just want a
shiny global image as a benevolent
leader? Treaty agreements and acts
of reconciliation are not a dance of
hokey pokey - you cannot choose to
put your foot in or out when it suits
your government best. Our Treaty
Rights have been in place long before
the government set their sights on
mountain pipelines or energy dams
and we will continue to fight any
government that tries to bypass
those rights with continued colonial
legislation.
The importance of Treaty agreements
continue to be an essential element
in current day policy making.   Prior
to contact, Treaties were used as
frameworks for trade alliances,
relationship negotiations and access
to shared resources on ancestral
lands. In a colonial context, the
Numbered Treaties (1-11) signed
post-Confederation, were created
to work-around the terra nullius
doctrine and were foundational
to the development of Canada as a
country.   The Treaties established
nation-to-nation relationships
between Indigenous people and the
British Crown.   They are directly
tied to Canada's claim to sovereign
power, as it was through the
TREATIES that land was partitioned
for settlers to settle.   Thus, the
Treaties cannot simply be absolved
in a current, modern-day context
as it would directly threaten and
challenge Canada's claim to land
that was already occupied.   Although
Treaties have been restructured
and violated many times by the
government, Indigenous activism
continues to confront these
infringements to assert self-determination as sovereign NATIONS.
Although the outcome did not rule
in their favour, the Mikisew
Cree Nation and other Indigenous
communities across Canada will
continue to find new ways to
challenge governance structures that
affect Indigenous Treaty Rights.   I
raise my hands in solidarity with
the Mikisew Cree Nation, located
in Treaty 8 territory in Northern
Alberta, for all the energy and effort
they put into this court appeal and
their continued perseverance to
push forward despite this recent
Supreme Court ruling.   I would also
encourage everyone to learn more
about Treaty Rights - both in a
historical and current context -
and what they hold for us in 2019
onward.Indigenous people will not
be pushed to surrender our Treaty
Rights and sovereignty. There needs
to be respect and reciprocity as it
was originally intended. We've upheld
our end of the bargain - it's about
time Canada did too.
"Honour Our Treaties'
_
 Otl THE AIR
120 BPM: IS THIS THING ON?
words by Alex Smyth //   illustration by Hayley Schmidt
Discorder magazine | WINTER 2018-19
tfllEN0£
OF
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
madeline Taylor, CiTR's
programming manager, has been
involved in student radio for
fiveish years now, three of which have been
here at the CiTR radio station. When I sat
down to talk to her, I could tell she knows
a lot about radio. As programing manager,
she has to know about everything that's
going on air, but she wasn't always the
radio expert that she is now. She was new
to it once, too.
"Where you start at a campus and
community radio, there are so many people
that you meet really quickly, a lot of them
are older than you or have a lot more
experience," she said, "you might not know
who to go to with certain questions or
you might not feel comfortable asking any
questions, because it feels like you should
know things, even though there's no reason
why you would know how to be a radio
producer."
That's where 120 BPM comes in. 120
BPM is a two-hour block of airtime that
runs every week from Monday to Thursday,
between 3-5pm at CiTR. It's a block of time
that's open to any new programmers who
want to get involved. Madeline pushed 120
BPM forward in an effort to get more new
programmers started in a comfortable, low
pressure environment. "BPM" stands for
"Beginners Playing Music," a fitting name
for a space to try something new, play some
good tunes and be okay with messing up
and moving on.
To be involved with 120 BPM, you
don't have to be a DJ, have the
perfect radio voice or feel the pressure
of pitching a show idea. Maybe you've
never thought about doing radio before
or aren't sure where to start with it, but
this is a space to do just that — to start.
Alec Christensen, student executive of
programming at CiTR and host of the radio
show FLASHBACK, is also involved in
running 120 BPM. To Alec, the two-hour
block has the potential to be a kind of daily
music show, run by the station as a whole
rather than any individual programmer.
He hopes that by mid-January of 2019,
the
ere will be new programmers involved
in 120 BPM everyday. "The beauty of it
is that you're going to have people here,
like me and Madeline. It's not like you're
doing your own show where you're thrown
into it," Alec remarks, "there's more of a
support system."
Trying new things can be scary. Trying
new things on air can be even scarier. As
someone pretty new to CiTR and still
learning the ropes of running a show — I
get it. I'm still not sure exactly how to
turn things on and I'm always a little
sweaty before every show. It took me
a while to even get to the point of
stepping into the station. I'd walk by
CiTR, trying to force myself to sign
up for training, but I'd get nervous every
time. It can be intimidating and challenging
in ways that make you feel vulnerable, but
just taking one step forward can often melt
those fears away. Even just meeting one
person can make it that much easier. It can
feel like everyone knows each other already
and understands how to do everything, but
really, we all gotta start somewhere.
t
n
So, if you've been waiting for a sign, this
is it. 120 BPM is a program that invites you
to try something new. Even though maybe
it'll be a little terrifying, there are people
who've got your back. "We're here to be
here, to teach people and give people space
to make mistakes, so the intention with this
is to give people a slightly easier way of
getting involved," shares Madeline, "we're
trying to make it as low-barrier as possible
[...] and to figure out ways to get people
J'      engaged in a way that works for
_.   them."
You get discounts at these
FRIENDS OF CiTR + DISCORDER locations.
Cinematheque
presents
ESSENTIAL BIG SCREEN!
HAPPY HOLIDAYS!
DEC 20 - JAN 2
THE MYSTERY OF PICASSO ©
FRENCH CANCAN ©
FANNY AND ALEXANDER ■ THE COMPLETE VERSIO
THE MAGIC FLUTE ©
PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK E
WINGS OF DESIRE IS
Student Pricing!
20
mmn
THE BILTMORE CABARET
10% off at the bar
AUDIOPILE RECORDS
10% off
STORM CROW TAVERN
10% off
DOUPIKFOUPn
BEAT STREET RECORDS
10% off used records
THE CINEMATHEQUE
One small bag of
popcorn per person
per evening.
DEVIL MAY WEAR
10% off
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
S ART EMPORIUM
10% off
VINYL RECORDS
10% of New and Used
AUSTRALIAN
BOOT COMPANY
15% off Blundstone and
& R.M.  Williams Boots
THE BIKE KITCHEN
10% off new parts &
accessories
BANYEN BOOKS fi SOUND
10% off
RUFUS GUITAR SHOP
10% new instruments
and accessories.
RUFUS DRUM SHOP
10% new instruments
and accessories.
STORM CROW ALEHOUSE
10% off
BOOKWAREHOUSE
10% off
(VISIT:
CiTR
. C a /friends
for more  info. )
ON THE AIRl 120   BPM
www.theCinematheque.ca | 1131 Howe Street | 604.688.8202 | Straight
 o
\>
ilS
(D
O
mmm
Cr^
"DISCORDER MAGAZINE RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERY DAY!"
gpotrtap
Cuetfrnp
&UIctmc6tiap
Cfmrgftap
JFri&ap
£>aturt>ap
&>unftap
6AM
TRANCENDANCE
CiTR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
6AM
7AM
GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICON'
CiTR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CANADALAND
^^^r^^BB^^^^^^
CiTR GHOST MIX
7AM
8AM
CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
AT LARGE
8AM
9AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
GOODIE
MIXTAPES WITH
YOUR NEW SHOW
9AM
COMEDY ZEITGEIST
10 AM
RECORDS MANAGEMENT
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
MC & MAC
10 AM
11AM
YOUR NEW SHOW
MORNING AFTER SHOW
U DO U RADIO
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM
12 PM
SYNCHRONICITY
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
12 PM
1PM
THE COMMUNITY       KOREAN WAVE:
LIVING SHOW       ARIRANG HALLYU
K-POP CAFE
TOO DREAMY
THE ROCKERS SHOW
1PM
2 PM
DELIBERATE NOISE
UNCEDED   AALFLqq
AIRWAVES   pASS
ASTROTALK
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
2 PM
.„. 1
120BPM
120BPM
120BPM
BLOOD
3 PM
120BPM
INTERSECTIONS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
CODE BLUE
SADDLE
4 PM
THUNDERBIRD EYE
5 PM
YOUR NEW SHOW
INTO THE WOODS
ARTS REPORT      DEMOCRACY WATCH
WORD ON THE STREET
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6 PM
YOUR NEW SHOW
NASHA VOLNA
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
6 PM
w/ alec   wyatr    RADIO PIZZA PARTY
7 PM
EXPLODING HEAD
"t^'HE
MEDICINE
SHOW
SAMSQUANCH'S
HIDE-AWAY
1
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
8 PM
MOVIES
MIX CASSETTE
Cl RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SOCA STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
NINTH WAVE
LIVE FROM
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
THE SPENCER    IaNDYLAND RADIO WITH
LATU SHOW        ANDREW WILLIS
HELL
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
COPY / PASTE
YOUR NEW SHOW
THE AFTN SOCCER
11PM
12AM
SHOW
12AM
1AM
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
CiTR GHOST MIX
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
1AM
2AM
OF INSOMNIA
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOWTO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
a
[<-hey, this kind of cell means this show is hosted by students
They are also highlighted in the spot colour on the guide,
you can't miss it.
_
 ■ monti/iy
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
3AM-11AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththebrowns
@h otmail.com
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B in spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming @citr. ca
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TltEStiay
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
3AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the LGBTQ +
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmaii.com
RECORDS MANAGEMENT
1OAM-11AM, rock/roots/folk
A show for Canadian Rock
Indie, Folk, Country, and other
Canadiana! Curated for you by
your hosts, Nathalie and Adrian.
Twitter | @recordsmgmtyvr
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM,  ROCK / POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY/
DISABILITY
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communityiivingradio@gmaii.com
• DELIBERATE NOISE
2PM-3PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Love rocking out to live music,
but don't feel like paying
cover? Tune in for the latest
and greatest punk, garage
rock, local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
contact: programming@citr.ca
• INTERSECTIONS
4PM-5PM - TALK/FEMINIST NEWS
Tune in every two weeks
for intersectional feminist
news, opinion, music
and more, brought to
you by CiTR's Gender
Empowerment Collective!
contact: programming@citr.ca
■ 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
• INTO THE WOODS
TUES 5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope,
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES &TREASONS
3PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
Malik, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
• THE SPENCER LATU SHOW
TUES 10PM-11PM, TALK/ POLITICAL
COMMENTARY
The Spencer Latu Show is a
progressive politics show that
speaks truth to power. We
provide much needed coverage,
and media criticism of stories
at the municipal, provincial,
national and international
level from the perspective of
two progressive working class
students; Spencer Latu and
Ajeetpal Gill. We are based
out of UBC in Vancouver BC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room.
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/POP
Jayden targets audiences in the
Korean community in Vancouver
to introduce the News on
Korea, Korean Culture while
comparing other Asian Cultures,
playing all kinds of Korean
Music(K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie,
R&B,etc),talking about popular
trends in the industries of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows,
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave
or Hallyu), the news about
Korean Entertainment Industry,
what's going on in the Korean
Society here in Vancouver and
conversations with c
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALTERNATING WEDNESDAYS
2PM-3PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
POLITICS
We talk about equity, inclusion,
and accessibility for people with
diverse abilities, on campus
and beyond. Tune in every
second Wednesday from 2-3pm
for interviews, music, news,
events, and awesome dialogue.
Contact: Twitter | @access_citr
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
ALTERNATING WEDNESDAYS
Unceded Airwaves is in its
third season! This team of
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
folks produce a weekly show
on Indigenous issues, current
affairs, entertainment, culture
and news - all centering
Native voices. Come make
Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Foiiow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves
120BPM
3PM-4:30PM, music
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
4I30-5PM, TALK/SPORTS
CiTR Sports treat you to
interviews with UBC's top
athletes and Olympians,
off-field stories of the
accomplished sportspeople.
T-Bird Eye is your weekly
roundup of UBC Thunderbirds
sports action with hosts Eric
Thompson, Jake McGrail,
Liz Wang, and Jacob Aere.
Contact: Twitter | @CiTRSports
• ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC,
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco uvermedicinesho w@gmaii. com
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too) and relished in the merging
of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-10PM, HIP hop/ r&b/ soul
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
10PM-11PM, TALK
Listen to your favorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSSay
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• CONVICTIONS* CONTRADICTIONS
THURS, 8AM-9AM, TALK/COMEDY/
SOCIAL OBESERVATIONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society, shown through social
observational comedy. To boot,
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
■ GOODIE
9AM-g:30AM, talk / interview
Goodie is an interview show
with the do-gooders who are
using business, innovation
and creativity to make positive
change in the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• COMEDY ZEITGEIST
g:30AM-i0PM, talk
Comedy Zeitgeist is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumbir.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr(3>gmaii. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Rocke t From Russia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
• K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners an
introduction to music &
entertainment in Asian Cultures,
especially, Korean, Japanese
and Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
• FLASHBACK WITH
ALEC CHRISTENSEN
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM-7:30.
TALK/MUSIC/ARTS & CULTURE
Each episode, join host Alec
Christensen and friends
as they discuss the pop
culture and politics affecting
Vancouver and beyond.
Contact: Twitter | flashbackaiec
NO DEAD AIR
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
JAZZ FUSION / POST ROCK
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion:
experimental electronic and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook | NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30pm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautonomy, com
■ TRuiay
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraitentacies@hotmaii. co m
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse<3>canadaiandshow. com
■ AT LARGE
8AM-9AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
Contact: @CiTRNews
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery and a 'IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
whaf s happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@g maii.com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP/SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on each other
and leave mix tapes and love
letters in each other's lockers xo
Contact:
Facebook | @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA©weirdness.
Contact: Twitter |
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp ://nardwuar. com/rad/con tact/
• WORD ON THE STREET
5PM-6PM, ROCK/INDIE/POP
Hosted by the Music Affairs
Collective, every episode is
packed with up-to-date content
from the Lower Mainland music
communities including news,
new music releases, event
reviews and upcoming events,
interviews with local musicians
and industry professionals and
discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7:30PM, TALK/COMEDY
Every week Jack, Tristan and
a special guest randomly
select a conversation topic
for the entire show; ranging
from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30pm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
imational
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and future.
This includes jazz, soul:
hip-hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
There are also interviews
with local and international
artists. Truly, a radio show
with international flavour.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skaids_Haii
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock:
drone, ambient, experimental:
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
■ saTURSay
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citriatenightshow@gmaii.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
Contact: codebiue@pauinorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact:
mantraradioshow@gmaii. com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavoina@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy:
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmaii.com
SOCASTORM
3PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoN #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
Sbit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79. We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ sunti/iy
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM,  INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
ALTERNATING SUN. 3PM"5PM:
COUNTRY
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
3PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmaii.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
3PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, DeepTrance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem:
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmiieymike @trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ isvam>°f
VOSTTOgS
• STUDENT PROGRAMMING
ECLECTIC
Marks any show that is
produced primarily by students.
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citr.ca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9FM NOVEMBER
MONTHLY CHARTS
T(
OP 100
<
3F
2018!
#rtfet     ftlbum      llabei
0rtii5t     0ibum      llabei
0rtti5t     0ibum      llabei
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1.1
Jock Tears*+#
Bad Boys
Inky                | |      fl
Kellarissa*+#
Ocean Electro
Mint               ||     ffl
Peach Kelli Pop#
Gentle Leader
Mint
1
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Kat Danser*#
Goin' Gone
Black Hen                        ,V
Dumb*+#
Seeing Green
Mint               11     g;/>
Project Pablo*
There's Always More At
The Store
Technicolour        ^
1 ,
lie*+#
Hounds
M,nt               j j      f
Champion
Lawnmower*+#
Babies
PS
Self-Released       9, §f     W'\
4. i   -AJ
Kele Fleming**
No Static
Self-Released       ^
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Julia Holter#
Aviary
Domino              £ ^      ij
Necking*+#
Meditation Tape
ps
Self-Released       9, p    |)_A
Laila Biali*#
Laila Biali
Chronograph        ^
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Club Sofa*+#
Club Sofa
Self-Released       ^ 4      R
4. 9. Y ii ii
Buffy Sainte-Marie*#
Medicine Songs
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True North          ^ ^    00
Weaves**
Wide Open
Buzz
1 ,
Peach Kelli Pop#
Gentle Leader
M,NT                      j  J         3
Carlo*#
Carlo
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Self-Released       9, p    g fj
The Body & Full Of
Hell
Ascending A Mountain Of
Heavy Light
Thrill Jockey        ^
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Kellarissa*+#
Ocean Electro
MlNT                      J  J        f}
Shrouded Amps*+#
World Well Lost
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Self-Released       9, p    gjj
Christina Vantzou#
No. 4
Kranky
1 .
Dumb*+#
Seeing Green
M,NT                      |  |        3
Tough Age*+#
Shame
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Mint               ||    fg
Charlotte Day
Wilson*#
Stone Woman
Self-Released       ^
! »
Mich Cota*#
Kija/Care
Egg Paper Factory    ^ ^      l\
4.4.    J
Destroyer*+
ken
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Off World*
2
Constellation        ^
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The 427's*#
Stay Gold
Stingray            | |j   j]|)
Adrian Teacher & The
Subs*+#
Anxious Love
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Self-Released       9, |     fj fl
4.*   -Jo1
Gentle Mind*+#
After Earth
Self-Released       ^
I«
Garbage Dreams*+#
Demonstrations
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Self-Released       |S ^     flfl
Sore Points*+
Sore Points
Deranged           11     gjj
Makthaverskan#
III
Run For Cover       ^
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Carlo*#
Carlo
Self-Released        \ 4,     flg
Woolworm*+#
Deserve To Die
Mint               11     '&>
—4. ?„,.„,,.,.
Black Wizard*+
Livin' Oblivion
Self-Released       ^
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Laverne*+
Yarrow
Self-Released       4, 4,     fljj
lie*+#
Hounds
Mint               ||     fgj
Courtney Barnett#
Tell Me How You Really
Feel
Milk!
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Sore Points*+
Sore Points
Deranged                       fl_A
Devours*+
Late Bloomer
Locksley Tapes                  £j/|
In Mirrors*+
Escape From Berlin
Italians Do It Better  ^
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Bored Decor*+
The Colour Red
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Self-Released       |S ^     fl|J
Jock Tears*+#
Bad Boys
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Inky                ||     gf
St. Vincent*
MASSEDUCTION
Loma Vista
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Energy Slime*+#
Singles
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Self-Released        £ 9.     fl fj
Mitski#
Be The Cowboy
Dead Oceans                    |j|j
The 427's*#
Stay Gold
Stingray
1   0
Phono Pony*+#
Monkey Paw
Self-Released       4, 4,     fl^
ClubSofa*+#
Club Sofa
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Self-Released       9, %     JfiJ
Soccer Mommy#
Clean
Fat Possum
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Senyawa
Sujud
Sublime Frequencies ^         l|fM
4. 4.    IJ-J
Esmerine*#
Mechanics Of Dominion
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Constellation                    fj^j
Peppermoth*
Glimmer Tide
Big Mind
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Missy Raines#
Royal Traveller
Compass            4, £     fIJ]
Lindi Ortega*#
Liberty
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Shadowbox           ^ ^      fj;ij
Kim Beggs*#
Said Little Sparrow
Out Of A Paperbag    ^
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Basement Revolver**
Heavy Eyes
Sonic Unyon                :     T> fl
4. 4.   ^
Ora Cogan*+#
Crickets
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Hand Drawn Dracula ^ ^    7/f]
Hello Blue Roses*#
Trade Winds
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Angel Forrest**
Electric Love
Ad Litteram          4, 4,     gj]
Partner**
In Search Of Lost Time
You've Changed      | ^     ^ffl
Gord Downie*
Introduce Yerself
Arts & Crafts        ^
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Maria Muldaur#
DontYouFeeimyLeg: The
Naughty Bawdy Biues of Blue
LuBarker
The Last Music             ;     .-,.-,
Company            ^ ^     <H
Blue Hawaii**
Tenderness
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Arbutus                       ^
Dilly Dally*#
Heaven
Dine Alone
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Eric Bibb
Global Griot
Stony Plain          4, 4     -)%
4. 4.   ^
Ought*
Room Inside The World
Royal Mountain      ^ ^    ^J
Ivy. The Pulse*+#
Chameleon
Self-Released       ^
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Murray Kinsley &
Wicked Grin*#
Murder Creek
Phoenix              \ 4,     g_A
Bored Decor*+
The Colour Red
Self-Released       9, p    ^
Valiska*
On Pause
Trouble In Utopia     ^
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David Gogo*
17 Vultures
Cordova Bay         ^ ^     3>R
4. 9.    -^
Chris-A-Riffic*+
Post-Season
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Parkland*+
Affiliates 2
Offseason
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Smithy Ramone*+#
Cursed EP
Gary Cassettes             :     3>"fj
4. 9.    '—J
Nicholas Krgovich*+
In An Open Field
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Tin Angel                      Tj^
Andre Ethier*
Under Grape Leaves
Telephone Explosion ^
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Dead Soft*+#
New Emotion (EP)
Arts & Crafts        4, 9,     Jfij
Rio By Night*+#
Yet The World
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Self-Released       9, p    ^fji
Future Star*+#
Who Cursed Me Then
Cured Me
Self-Released       ^
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Fine*
Thanks for Asking
Self-Released              :     %l\
4. 4.   ^~>
Mamarudegyal
MTHC*+#
MRGEP
Self-Released       p p    ^
Land Line*+#
Goodbye Frida
Self-Released       ^
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Exco Levi*
Narrative
Silly Walks Ent      4,4     -)%\
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Always*
Antisocialites
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POLYVINLY                9, P      ^i|J
Sigh*+#
DEMOS
Self-Released       ^
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Cindy Lee*
Model Express
CCQSK Records            I    ^ fl
4. 4.   "'-"'
Jo Passed*+#
Their Prime
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Royal Mountain      ««    ,M M
Kat Danser*#
Goin' Gone
Black Hen
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Lindsay Beaver#
Tough As Love
Alligator           4, 9,     JJfl
Rowen Porter*+#
Everything At Once
Self-Released       | P     ,^fl
Echuta*+
Even If Long-Winded
Waits
Agony Klub
J2
Dilly Dally*#
Heaven
Dine Alone                 :    W)
4. 9.   Jj
La Kasquivana
Rebeldia Radikal
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Self-Released       9, %    rM'?>
Bernice*#
Puff: In The Air Without
A Shape
Arts & Crafts        ^
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Body Lens*#
Body Lens
Terrific Kids        ^ ^    ^J
4. 4.
Tough Customer*+#
Rockgasm
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Self-Released       9, %    ,M%]
4.4.   ^
Faith Healer*#
Try;-)
Mint
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Peppermoth*
Glimmer Tide
Big Mind                   :    ^A
4.9.
Brutal Poodle*+
Long Time No See
Self-Released       9, p    {'^j\
Curtis Salgado & Alan
Hager
Rough Cut
Alligator
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Anybodys*+#
Necessity Of Contrast
Self-Released       4, 4    ^R
4. 9.
Sarah Davachi*#
Gave in Rest
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Ba Da Bing          9, p    ^jg
Odonis Odonis*
No Pop
Telephone Explosion ^
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Claire Mortifee*#
Medicines
Self-Released              i    ^'f!
4. 9.
Freak Heat Waves*
Beyond XXXL
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Telephone Explosion ^^    (^jfj
Palm#
Rock Island
Carpark
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Joshua Redman
Still Dreaming
Nonesuch           ^ 4     Wi
4. 4. Y  mi
John Maus
Screen Memories
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Ribbon Music        9, %    ^Tj
Joani Taylor*+#
In A Sentimental Mood
Cellar Live
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Shhh / Yessica
Woahneil*#
32 Original Drawings / Quiet
Beasts (split cassette)
Self-Released              :    WM
4. 4.   <J-J
Nap Eyes*
I'm Bad Now
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You've Changed      ^ p    (5J(!J
Be Af raid*+
One More Year
Self-Released       ^
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Bootlicker*
Who Do You Serve?
Slow Death          4, 4    %Jl
4.4.   JJ
Raine Hamilton**
Night Sky
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Self-Released       9, p    ^jj)
Kaitlyn Aurelia Smiths
The Kid
Western Vinyl       ^
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Teenage Wedding*
The Sophia Of Teenage
Wedding
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Strange Peace
Royal Mountain      ^
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Deb Rhymer Band*#
Don't Wait Up
Self-Released       4, 4,     /Jfl
Pale Red*+#
Heavy Petting
Self-Released       | P     |Jfl
Peach Pyramid**
Repeating Myself
Oscar St.
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Jennifer Holub*#
The Reckoning
Indiecan              i, fy    ijg
Shitlord Fuckerman*+
Hot Blood & A House For
A Head
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Self-Released       jj p    |J2
Old Soul Rebel*+#
demo
Self-Released       ^
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Thanks for Asking
Self-Released       4, 4     t&,
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Wallgrin*+#
Bird/Alien
Heavy Lark          II    |0
Garbage Dreams*+#
Demonstrations
Self-Released       ^
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Peach Pyramid**
Repeating Myself
Oscar Street         \ 4,     j|/J
U.S. Girls*#
In A Poem Unlimited
Royal Mountain                 ^J/|
Russian Tim and
Pavel Bures*+
Superhit & the Other
Song
Self-Released       ^
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Vivek Shraya and Queer
Song book Orchestra*#
Part-Time Woman
Self-Released       4, 4     AR
4. 9.
Rec Centre*+
Dealer To The Stars
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Self-Released       jj p    |Jg
Sugar Brown*#
It's A Blues World (Calling
All Blues!)
Self-Released       ^
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Qristina Brooke*#
Linger
Self-Released             \     AfJ
4.9.
Dusted*
Blackout Summer
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Polyvinyl                      Uj3
Chain Whip*+
Chain Whip
Self-Released       ^
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Munya*#
Delmano
LUMINELLE                ^  ^      ii^j
Smithy Ramone*+#
Cursed EP
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Gary Cassettes      9, p    Uji
Painted Fruit*
PFII
Self-Released       ^
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Wallgrin*+#
Bird/Alien
Heavy Lark                \     A/M
4. 4.   "y-J
Exco Levi*
Narrative
Silly Walks Ent                 U^
Mauno*#
Tuning
Idee Fixe
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Belle Plaine*#
Malice, Mercy Grief &
Wrath
Self-Released       4, 4     Ajj
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Thanks for Asking
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Self-Released             \    |J|J
Little Miss Higgins*#
My Home, My Heart
Self-Released       ^
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Shitlord Fuckerman*+
Investigate Loud Earth
Self-Released              j    R fl
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Double Negative
Sub Pop            ||   i]|)|)
Shoppings
The Official Body
FatCat Records      «
	
CiTR's   charts   reflect   what's   been   played   on   the   air   by   CiTR's   lovely   DJs.   Artists   marked   (*)   are   Canadian,   (#)   indicates   women-produced,   and   those   marked   ( + )   are   local.   To   submit   music   for   air-play   on   CiTR   101.9FM,   please   send   a   physical   copy   to   the   station   addressed   to   Myles   Black,   Music   Director   at   CiTR   101.9FM,   LL500   6133   University   Blvd.,   Vancouver   BC,   V6T1Z1.   Though   we   prioritize   physical   copies,   feel   free   to   email   download   codes   for   consideration   to   music@citr.ca.
You can follow up with the Music Director 1-2 weeks after submitting by emailing, or calling 604.822.8733.
 UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
Dec  4
JMSN
Fox Cabaret
Dec  8 Dec  8
CONNER Y0UN6BL00D    THE SOFT MOON
Fox Cabaret Fortune  Sound CLub
Dec  9
EZRA FURMAN
Wise Hall
Dec  12
ALLEN STONE
Commodore Ballroom
Dec  12
FUCKED UP
Fox Cabaret
Dec  12
POLO & PAN
Imperial
Dec  16
KURT VILE AND THE VIOLATORS
Commodore Ballroom
Jan 17
CAUTIOUS CLAY
Fox Cabaret
Jan 17
YG
PNE Forum
Jan 16
BAS
Fortune
Dec 14
LIL UZI VERT, PLAYBOI CARTI
KILLY, FLIPP DINERO
VALEE, KILLUMANTII
ILLYMINIACHI, RUDE NALA
Pacific Coliseum
Jan 21 Jan 21
WILD CHILD   WILLIAM FITZSIMMONS
Fox Cabaret Wise Hall
1
Jan 27
SNAIL MAIL
Imperial
Jan 28 Jan  30
OLAFUR ARNALDS I M0
Commodore Ballroom I Commodore Ballroom
Feb 8
HIPPO CAMPUS
Imperial
Feb  8
POST ANIMAL AND RON GALLO
Wise Hall
Commodore Ballroom
Feb 15 *1 Night, 2 Shows!!!*
Feb  12
ELLA MAI
Feb  13
AURORA
Commodore Ball:
Feb  22
ALEX CAMERON & ROY M0LL0Y   MY BRIGHTEST DIAMOND
Wise Hall
Fox Cabaret
Feb 22
SHARON VAN ETTEN
Imperial
Mar  4
JULIA HOLTER
Imperial
Feb  24
WAXAHATCHEE
Wise  Hall
Mar  6
ACTION BR0NS0N
HCC
Feb 26
ROYAL TRUX
Rickshaw Theatre
Mar  2
COEUR DE PIRATE
Commodore  Ballroom
Mar  8
CHERRY GLAZERR
Rickshaw Theatre
Mar  11
NILS FRAHM
Orpheum Theatre
Tickets  & more  shows at \ timbreconcerts.com

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