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  ttfOCSttAW
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254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
PCOMING SHOWS
JUN
C0C0JAFR0&CAMAR067
DOUBLE CD RELEASE PARTY
JUN
GBH
WITH GUESTS
INSOMNIUM oceans of
SLUMBER, GROSS MISCONDUCT
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ABORTED
PSYCROPTIC, INGESTED,
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PRISON, VALE OF PNATH
JUN
COVENANT FESTIVAL IV
(NIGHT 1): PROFANATICA
SLUTVOMIT.AUROCH,
GRAVEOLENCE, HUMAN AGONY
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COVENANT FESTIVAL IV
I (NIGHT 2): INCANTATION
WITCHES HAMMER, WITCHVOMIT,
HELLFIREDEATHCULT,AHNA,
SORGUINAZIA
JUN
SUBHUMANS
THE VICIOUS CYCLES, REAL
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AT THE RICKSHAW:
*1 COVENANT FESTIVAL IV
(NIGHT 3): BLASPHEMY
HACAVITZ, ANTICHRIST,
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ATTHEWISEHALL:
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PET BLESSINGS, POOR BABY
(ALBUM RELEASE), RUSSIAN TIM
& PAVELBURES
blueprint
UPCOMING EVENTS
)un02
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UPON A BURNING BODY
VOLUMES
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DEAD SOFT
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i EP RELEASE douse, club sofa,
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D.O.A.-FIRST ANNUAL
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IM *t
JUL
If*
RICKSHAW 9 YEAR
ANNIVERSARY PARTY
\ MAD ALCHEMY, ART D'ECCO,
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SERVICE, CARTOON LIZARD
[s«p
27
wm t i'
Oct 06
m
ditional show listings, ticket info, videos & mi
W.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.C
Nov 08
Nov 17
MELVINS
LET'S EAT GRANDMA
POOLSIDE
THE EXPLOITED
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GALLANT
ALL AGES
YOUNG FATHERS
VENUE
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ADVANCE TICKETS FOR ALL EVENTS AT BPLIVE.CA
7>wrTT?**zfi
 TABLE Of COHTEHTS
JUNE 2018
COVER:
RUDE NALA, PHOTO BY EMMANUEL
.features
06 -  LET'S TALK TOXIC  MASCULINITY
An interview with WAVAW on what men and boys can do
07 -  RUDE NALA
From Metrotown Mall to underground hip hop shows,
Nala shines bright
15 -  DIM CINEMA
10 years later, DIM proves moving-image art
is in abundance
16 -  VIRAGO NATION
Indigenous burlesque might just shatter your patriarchy
17 - DUPLEX
What it means to run a DIY artist-run space and keep it that way
Columns + £Dt&er £>tuff
ADVERTISE:Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca.
Rates available upon request.
POP ALLIANCE  VOL.2i
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — J
statement  and apology
05  -  Shelf Life:
Moniker Press
08  -  Real Live Action
Art,   music
ro~7?Io"- "music"waste" schedule!
b — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — d
June  07-10
12 - Art Project
by Cults Media
13 -  June Events  Calendar
18 - Under Review
Music,   films,   books
20 - On The Air:
The Absolute Value of Insomnia
21 -  CiTR Program Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 - May Charts
CONTRIBUTE: If you want to
contribute to Discorder please
visit citr.ca/discorder/contribute
SUBSCRIBE:Sendina
cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133
University Blvd. V6T1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTED distribute
Discorder in your business,
email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
D0NATE:We are part of CiTR,
a registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content
you love.To donate visit
www.citr.ca/donate.
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC//Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico//Advertising Coordinator:
Audrey MacDonald // Discorder Student Executive: Fatemeh Ghayedi // Editor-in-Chief: Brit Bachmann //
Under Review Editor: Sydney Ball // Guest Real Live Action Editor: Alex Lenz // Web Editor: Zoe Power
//Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Social Media Coordinator: Sydney Ball // Accounts Manager:
Halla Bertrand // Charts: Myles Black // Production Assistants: Savilla Fu, Muni Gholamipour, Christina
Dasom Song // Writers: Joshua Azizi, Sydney Ball, Tom Barker, Katherine Chambers, Esmee Colbourne,
Clara Dubber, Dora Dubber, Jonathan Kew, Alex Lenz, Dan Miller, Nathan Pike, Dannielle Piper, Judah
Schulte, Angela Tian, Hannah Toms // Photographers & Illustrators: Maxwell Babiuk, Javiera Bassi de
la Barrera, August Bramhoff, Evan Buggle, Duncan Cairns-Brenner, Neetu Dha, Emmanuel Etti, Alistair
Henning, Cian Hogan,Tifanie Lamiel, David Wakeham // Proofreaders: Brit Bachmann, Neil Cameron,
Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Clara Dubber, Fatameh Ghayedi, Alex Lenz, Audrey MacDonald, Chris Yee
©Discorder 2018 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR,
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiherh speaking Musqueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM,
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager® citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
fop Alliance tMoI.2 ant)
Cultural Appropriation
EDITOR'S NOTE
^^ZBI  nyone who has kept up with my Editor's Notes will know that I love
ffl I  nostalgia. I love revisiting old Discorder features and CiTRisms, and
W       I  sneaking them into my writing like the chewy bit in a Tootsie Pop. But,
\J I  nostalgia isn't always sweet.
As I write this Editor's Note, I am listening to CiTR / Mint Records' Pop Alliance Vol. 2
from 2011. It takes me back to that era of Vancouver pop music — lazy-romantic song
lyrics that lean hard on the quotidian; an unresolved tension between classic guitar-
driven pop and electronic dance pop; and more than anything, the artists' ambitions to
become that band that defines West Coast sound. Though I hear Vancouver in the music
and I love it, I don't have the same fondness for the art.
The original cover art for Pop Alliance Vol. 2 is a totem pole with the likenesses of local
musicians in place of traditional figures and spirits. Although the artist wrote a statement
(included in the record sleeves), there is no justification for cultural appropriation. The
cover art is harmful in its trivialization of Northwest Coast Indigenous culture. It is
my personal view that not only is the cover art a gross misrepresentation of the vinyl,
but it also contradicts the values of decolonization that both CiTR / Discorder and
Mint Records strive towards. Our organizations are making a renewed commitment to
educating ourselves on Indigenous cultural appropriation, and holding workshops that
will be open to CiTR / Discorder members and our community at large. You can find our
statement and apology online, and on page 4 of this issue.
Why now? Over the past year, CiTR / Discorder have been working on how to address
the harm of this cover art, and also an instance of artistic cultural appropriation that
Discorder published in the April 2017 issue. Discorder is complicit is the creation and
dissemination of an illustration that appropriated the work of an Anishinaabe artist. As a
magazine and media organization, we take responsibility for the ways we have failed our
contributors and community, and we want to keep this conversation open.
June is National Indigenous History Month, culminating in celebrations on the
Summer Solstice, June 21.1 encourage Discorder readers to take some time to
reflect on the land you occupy and the people for whom the land means life. Seek
out education on local Indigenous issues, and show up where you can.
In this issue of Discorder, you'll read about the Indigenous burlesque group, Virago
Nation; emerging hip hop artist, Rude Nala; DIY artist-run space, Duplex; Dim Cinema's
experimental moving-art programs; Moniker Press' experimental risograph printing;
toxic masculinity as defined by WAVAW, and so much more. Pull out the June event
calendar and flip it over for the Music Waste Festival schedule (June 7-10).
I would also like to welcome Sydney Ball as the new Under Review Editor, and extend
a thank you to Alex Lenz for guest editing Real Live Action.
BB
PwDVERT/Se
Rst,
Talk to:
ADVERTISING@CITR.CA
 A STATEMENT REGARDING POP ALLIANCE COMPILATION VOL. 2
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following statement will be included online, anywhere the Pop Alliance Compilation Vol. 2 is streamed or distributed. The original
artwork for the record, which was released in April 2011, has been removed and replaced with CiTR/Discorder and Mint Records' logos. For a more extensive
explanation of why this statement is being made now, please read the June Issue Editor's Note on the previous page. -BB
Pop Alliance  Compilation Vol*   2
The CiTR/Mint Pop Alliance Compilation Vol. 2 is a snapshot of our rainy city's music community on a Friday night in 2011. It features eleven
prominent local bands including: No Kids, Kellarissa, Fine Mist, Slam Dunk, Apollo Ghosts, and many more. Only 300 copies have been pressed
on 180g vinyl, and hand-numbered with care. The songs, labour, mastering and artwork were donated, and proceeds from the record will benefit
CiTR 101.9FM, the campus radio station where Mint Records began.
Concerning The  Cover Art
You may notice that the original 2011 artwork has been removed from our website; this was a deliberate act due to the harmful nature of the
image. Included in the 300 physical copies of the record is a statement made by the artist that explains the intention behind the artwork, which
featured a representation of a Northwest Coast-style totem pole. Regardless of intent, the original artwork is cultural appropriation and as such,
it has been removed. For those who wish to read the artist's statement, it may be found online at citr.ca or by emailing stationmanager@citr.ca.
CiTR/Discorder and Mint Records would like to extend a sincere apology for being complicit in the appropriation of Indigenous imagery and
culture in the original artwork for this record, and for the offence and harm the artwork has caused. We are sorry. The purpose of this statement
is to bring these issues to light and thus create further dialogue on the harm caused by cultural appropriation. However, we have decided to
remove the original artwork, not to erase what happened, but to minimize further harm.
Going forward, we will continue to engage in conversations and learning on this topic. In early 2018, CiTR/Discorder held their first workshop
on Artistic Cultural Appropriation. We are committed to holding future workshops at the station to address how Indigenous people and culture
is represented. We invite respectful participation and feedback from all our members.
&&:£•
;"■..-> ■_    .V ■
PwlR
m3% i
ALBUM RELEASE PARTY
SATURDAY JUNE 16 - NRG ZONE
FAITH HEALER W GUESTS ANEMONE! JUNE 27! FOX CABARET!
ALBUM RELEASE PARTY
SUNDAY JUNE 24 - IMPERIAL
WITH CHERRY GLAZERR
 8I0S   3JIUL i   9niSD9Dfn 19010321*0
SHELF LIFE
MONIKER PRESS
words by Clara Dubber//
illustrations by David Wakeham//
photos by Evan Buggle
moniker Press is a Vancouver-based
risograph print shop started by
Erica Wilk in 2014. Wilk uses it
to print both her own work and collaborative
projects with local and international artists.
Moniker's first project was a book called
Duality, in collaboration with photographer
Shannyn Higgins. Since then, Moniker has
grown to develop a mandate that emphasizes
print as a collaborative and experimental
platform. Wilk is constantly looking for
ways to bring out new and interesting
risograph aesthetic from what has once been
considered to be a limiting process. With her
project, Mobile Moniker, Wilk has travelled
to Eastern Canada, Europe and Mexico to
meet, collaborate and experiment with
risograph printers around the world.
Wilk is a self-proclaimed problem-solver,
which drives her experimentation with
risograph: "One thing I enjoy is pushing the
limits within the restrictions of risograph
printing and bookmaking."
What also excites her is the interactivity
between projects. Moniker's latest release,
100 Days of Bulimia, is a book based off
Janet Ford's Instagram series by the same
name, combining online and print media.
Another innovative project is the
poster, i. ii. Hi.: Trio, a collaboration between Wilk and the artist
Sylvie Ringer, which invites the
viewer to cut out shapes to create
a three-dimensional piece. Wilk
also likes to invite collaborators
who aren't familiar with print: "I'm
interested in working with artists
and writers, and whoever wants
to make a book but maybe hasn't
made books before."
mobile Moniker began
in 2016 as a way to
continue printing with
risograph while travelling, and for
Wilk to make her own work again
after "feeling very disconnected
from creating art." Wilk explains,
"[I was] aiming to find a more clear
direction for Moniker's mandate."
At first, Wilk didn't know if the
presses she had contacted would
be receptive to her ideas. Their
responsiveness and hospitality has
given the project an air of excited
uncertainty. Wilk explains, "Some
of the collaborations we did, they're
very playful, and we did them in an
hour. You meet a stranger and then
all of a sudden you have to make
something together."
Seeing how other presses work
around the same restrictions has taught
Wilk different ways of using risograph, not
to mention troubleshooting: a large aspect
of printing riso is learning to fix machines,
working around paper jams, printer errors,
etc. Wilk has seen how other presses operate
as businesses. Through Mobile Moniker, she
discovered what she did and did not want to
do with her platform. "I'm not interested in
publishing mass quantities of prints or, for
example, paperback novels. There's so much
to be explored with risograph techniques
that I would rather focus on smaller editions
and experimentation," she says.
Keeping Moniker's publishing
practice non-commercial is
emblematic of Wilk's broader
push towards a more politically conscious
mandate. In Mexico, Wilk was around
presses that print riso "less for the actual
medium and more as a method to distribute
ideas, often relating to resistance [or]
counter-information," including Gato Negro
Ediciones, Casa de El Hijo del Ahuizote
and Red de Reproduccion y Distribucion.
They inspired her to produce political
content here in Vancouver: "While I want
to continue experimenting and pushing
the medium of riso and collaboration with
everything that I'm printing, I am also
starting to intentionally focus on work that
might have a more political and inclusive
nature - such as 100 Days of Bulimia."
Wilk feels that print is for "getting ideas
to a larger audience, creating discussions and
community." She says, "I would be amiss as
a publisher if I wasn't striving to contribute
to those movements." By inserting herself
into each project, Wilk brings her passion
for strong aesthetics to collaborative
work, explaining that she is "interested in
connecting the content with the format."
Moniker also seeks to grow a community
around print by hosting open studios
every few months. Wilk hopes that future
workshops will make risograph a more accessible medium. "I love collaborating with
people, so wherever I can do that is ideal. And
if people want to learn from me and then do
their own collaborations, that's even better."
Moniker Press is a platform founded in
experimentation and collaboration that is
moving towards the collective and political.
Wilk is expanding not only Moniker's
mandate, but its facilities as well, with a new
printer and ink colour on the way. If you
want to see Moniker's work, look forward to
their upcoming release, Suburbanatomy by Adi
Hadzismajlovic, a collection of short stories.
For more information on Moniker Press, visit
monikerpress.ca and keep an eye out for the
Moniker table at your next art book fair.
shelf life i Moniker  Press
5
 FEATURE
LETS TALK
Discorder magazine | JUNE 2018
«>:i [i
MASCULINITY
AN INTERVIEW WITH WAVAW
words by Hannah Toms
illustrations by Cian Hogan
ll
7^ ■   E NEED YOU TO COME TO
fl   A THE TABLE," is the message that
m^LP   Dalya Israel, Manager of Victim Services
^W^r       and Outreach Programs at WAVAW, has
for men and boys. In a room where survivors of sexual assault
can access counselling, legal assistance and other support
services, Discorder sits with Dalya and Sonmin Bong, Volunteer
and Educational Outreach Coordinator, to discuss the role
that men should hold in today's movement to end sexualized
violence. "We know that the majority of perpetrators [of sexual
assault] are men," says Sonmin. "Yes, they're a part of the
problem, but they can be part of the solution, [which] leads us
to the natural conclusion that it is absolutely necessary to work
with them and educate them."
According to Dalya and Sonmin, one of the major factors
in the frequency of sexual assault is the encouragement
of "toxic masculinity," an exaggerated form of masculinity with excess arrogance, aggressiveness, stoicism and
hypersexuality. Toxic masculinity glorifies sex and ego. It
prompts men to value the conquest of a sexual encounter
over the consent of the individual with whom they are
having sex. To many perpetrators, the conquest is justification for a sexual assault.
Dalya and Sonmin emphasize, however, that toxic
masculinity not only harms the targets of men, but
also the men themselves. "We know that [traits of toxic
masculinity] don't even feel authentic to so many people,"
says Sonmin. "They're like, 'Actually these are not really
parts of myself that I want to embrace.'" Yet, Sonmin
explains that patriarchy "continues to reinforce the idea
that if you're not living up to these ideals of toxic masculinity, then you are [...] the opposite, which is feminine."
What Sonmin refers to as the "hatred of femininity"
in our patriarchal society means that in certain circles,
there are social consequences for men who are perceived
to display femininity by refusing to engage in toxic
masculinity. Thus, toxic masculinity can manifest from
deep insecurity and fear.
The most damaging trait of toxic masculinity is
when men adopt emotional detachment. By designating
emotional sensitivity as a feminine trait, Sonmin
explains that toxic masculinity makes men feel that
they "can't access their own emotions." Dalya believes
the fact that "young men are experiencing depression
and anxiety at ridiculous rates" can be attributed to the
suppression of their emotions.
It is evident that toxic masculinity needs to end before
any significant progress can be made in reducing acts
of sexual assault perpetrated by men. An alternative
masculinity has come to be known in feminist circles as
"healthier masculinity." However, Dalya and Sonmin, even
as experts on feminism, refuse to comment on what they
think the traits of healthier masculinity should be. "We
want to give that back to men to figure out," Dalya says.
"The feminist movement has done so much already to bring
awareness to how toxic masculinity plays out in our society,"
comments Sonmin, and Dalya adds, "Now it's [men's] turn."
Aside from the distribution of emotional labour, Sonmin
and Dalya believe that women and non-binary people should
keep out of defining healthier masculinity as a matter of
principle. "Let us not be the people who flip the script and
say [to men], fNow we're going to tell you how you need to
behave,"' Dalya says.
D
alya and Sonmin admit that the task of eradicating
toxic masculinity is a difficult one, as toxic
masculine traits are often subtle and difficult to
detect. "Sometimes I don't know if we can really separate
healthy masculinity and toxic masculinity, or distinguish
masculinity from toxic masculinity like that," explains
Sonmin. They suggest that instead of focusing on the specific
traits through which toxic masculinity is expressed, men
should take a more macro approach, searching for and
addressing the thought patterns from which those traits
stem. Sonmin gives an example: "Feeling entitled to people's
bodies. [...] Like, where's that [feeling] coming from?"
Men must also learn to intervene when they find
themselves in toxic situations, especially in circumstances
where they witness sexual assault or harassment. "We have
such a huge influence on each other," says Sonmin. She
explains that a comment from one man to another, such
as "fHey, the way you touched your friend at the party, you
really should not do that,"' can be effective in prompting
someone to rethink their sexual conduct, thereby dissuading
future assaults.
Since 2018, WAVAW has offered support services to
sexual assault survivors of marginalized genders,
for whom sexual assault is an impact of systemic,
gendered oppression. This includes all women, Two Spirit,
trans (including trans men), non-binary and gender-diverse
survivors. For men seeking more information on how to
disengage from toxic masculinity, WAVAW's website offers
an ideal starting point. The page "What Men and Boys Can
Do" contains videos and links to blog posts addressing how
toxic masculinity harms men and perpetuates rape culture,
as well as links to the websites of men's organizations that
address healthier masculinity.
Dalya and Sonmin are confident that men are willing and
able to eliminate toxic masculinity, but they are realistic
in predicting that a mainstream healthier masculinity
movement and a commitment to end sexual assault will not
pop up overnight. "We all have to dedicate ourselves to the
reality that men are not perfect," says Dalya. She explains
that before our presently patriarchal society can adopt
feminist causes, men will have to "heal [...] and to want restoration." This will take time, self-reflection and hard work on
their part, as well as "a lot of courage," Dalya adds.
ft
Visit wavaw.ca for more information about WAVAW
services and links to additional resources. If you frequent
UBC-Vancouver, the AMS Sexual Assault Support Centre
(SASC) also offers resources and workshops related to sexual
violence, along with a Healthier Masculinity program. Visit
amssasc.ca for more information.
k
"Let's Talh Toxic masculinity'
 8I0S   3JIUL i   9rtiXD|)DflI 19bl032i0
.  3HUTAH
RUDE NALA
learning to take ttiljat pu tuant
WORDS BY DORA DUBBER // ILLUSTRATIONS BY TIFANIE LAMIEL // PHOTOS EMMANUEL ETTI
IN PERSON, NALA'S SMILE IS NATURAL BUT CAUTIOUS, making Rude
Nala the perfect stage name because it's exactly what her performance persona is: the rude
version of herself. Nala is a local R&B hip hop artist dropping her first mixtape on June
13. Even though she's fresh, Nala has a strong sense of her brand, and her social media and
performance presence is cooly curated to match it — a very Aquarius approach. "Do you know a lot
about Aquariuses?" she asks, "We're not inconsiderate, but sometimes I just don't think about other
people." Nala follows this up with an easy laugh, leaning back in her chair. "I'm just focused on my
work, I don't go out of my way."
1 TOE DIE
Ml
m
nala has been performing and releasing music in and
around Vancouver since 2015. What started out as
a little kid routine running around Metrotown Mall
singing into a toy microphone has grown into a practice
of absolute care and focus. "I realized music was a form of
expression when something really messed up happened to me
and at that point I was like, fOkay, I need to take this music
thing seriously because people need to hear what I'm going
through.' Sometimes the only way to get through it is to
listen to music," Nala explains.
This tape is the first milestone of Nala's career, and
something she is eager to eclipse: "I feel like I'm at a breaking
point. For me, this tape is the beginning. I'm branding myself
with this tape. It's an official start to everything for me."
Nala is totally committed to music and equally ambitious.
"No matter what struggles or conflicts I might run into in
the industry, nothing's gonna get in the way of me getting
far with this music [...] This is what I'm gonna do and I'm
gonna keep doing it forever." As her first major release, Nala's
not taking any chances with this tape and is taking notes
from other artists to roll the project out, she explains: "I'm
not sharing the cover or the name. I'm putting little hints
here and there so a lot of people are like, fNala's cooking
something up,' but they don't know what."
44
T
he industry" came up a lot in conversation
with Nala. As an artist learning about herself
and her sound, she is strikingly conscious of
the various hurdles for creators, and what needs to be done
in order to "make it." The mixtape is the culmination of
"every experience women have in this industry," from having
just one song on Soundcloud to where she is now. It is a
celebration of femininity in a masculine-dominated space,
something that empowers Nala: "It's really uplifting to see
other women coming up in the industry and doing what they
love. It's hard to be in an industry run by men. People try to
take advantage of us all the time." But it's a structure that
Nala works within to make opportunities for herself. "I'm just
trying to hustle, hustle, hustle right now, just trying to grind,
grind, grind because I want it to be perfect."
Everything leading up to this tape release has been a
process of learning for Nala, and she's still figuring out
how her music plays into her personality. "The closer I
get to my sound, the closer I get to realizing myself, and
little pieces pull everything together to complement the
music overall. It has actually made me mature a lot. I'm
blossoming." Nala continues, "I feel like the music has
helped me tune in to people."
'Rude nala"
nala is coming up alongside local femme, R&B and
hip hop artists like Prado and softieshan, but also
international performers like SZA, Cardi B and
Janelle Monae. "So many women are getting hyped and
clout from these cool projects, and it's setting the bar higher
and higher for me, but I love that. I love a challenge. I love
having something to work towards. I like knowing and
seeing where I can improve because I'm only trying to get
better," she explains.
Finally, it seems that Vancouver is becoming a place
where R&B and hip hop artists can launch and maintain
mainstream music careers. It's definitely been a long time
coming with East Coast artists dominating international
limelight, but local artists have been carving this space piece
by piece for years; each gig and release making a foothold for
emerging artists to build themselves up.
It is in this context that Nala is making opportunities
for herself and strategically building an audience. She is
completely fearless in her career. Nala knows what she's
doing, it's just a matter of doing it. In a fairly vicious
industry, she recognizes her softness: "I think it's a good
thing for people to boss up. That's something that I need
to work on because people like seeing where you're coming
from." While Nala's manners are polite for now, she's getting
ruder every day.
ft
Rude Nala is self-releasing her tape (still untitled) on June 13.
Check out soundcloud.com/rudenanaa for the release. Follow
Rude Nala on Instagram @rudenala.
A
 Btal tine
Action
MAY 2018
JUXTAPOSITION VOL. II: ART EXHIBITION
MAY 4 / AVANT-GARDEN
Juxtaposition is a series of independent art shows that feature
artists and musicians from Vancouver and Victoria at different
venues across Vancouver. The second installment, Juxtaposition Vol. II:
Art Exhibition took place on May 4 at Avant-Garden, one of Vancouver's
newest niche venues run by two friends, Sam and James, who founded the
space in response to the lack of inclusive arts-based venues in Vancouver.
Juxtaposition Vol. II showcased three musicians with a range of styles,
including synth pop, ambient house music and hip hop, in addition to the
array of visual art.
Walking up the stairs to Avant-Garden feels like entering a friends'
house party, since the space has a totally chilled-out living room vibe.
The venue is tiny (about the size of a living room, actually), adorned with
couches and a filing cabinet covered with a fantastic sticker collection.
Attendees were packed into the venue, conversing around cans of beer and
liquor bottles in paper bags. The crowd was young, stylish and easy-going,
making for a friendly atmosphere.
Kicking off the night was a synth pop set by Stefan Johnson. Johnson
has a beautiful voice, so much so that when he started his set, I was
convinced that he was lip-synching. It wasn't until he played an acoustic
ukulele song (the first of a few throughout the night), that I realized he
just has a really strong voice. Donning an all-white outfit to complement
his white hair, Johnson had the appearance of an indie pop star. Despite
his obvious talents, Johnson seemed modest about his set, even making
self-deprecating comments at times. It's a shame, because he delivered a
really great performance that was deserving of his utmost self-confidence.
The audience was grooving to his beats. It was really unique to see a
mash-up of danceable pop and quirky ukulele strumming.
Next up was ZYLITE, who played mellow, ambient music. His set was
simple musically and stylistically, and ZYLITE stood peacefully in front of
the crowd playing his tunes. He put the audience in a meditative trance,
offering the ideal background music for exploring the art on display.
Speaking of art, there was a solid range of visual works on display,
including photography, embroidery and paintings. There were a few
standouts, including Shae Anthony whose
piece "Sundance End" was a powerful ode
to the Indigenous women affected by the
residential school system. Jen Brawley
displayed their film photography that was
characterized by red overtones, enticing the
eye with its mystery and subtle sexuality.
The most unique piece of the evening was
Carmelle Leigh's "Primary Self-Portrait," an
embroidered self-portrait that stood out for its
colour and texture.
Closing the evening was Andrew Mulat,
a stylish hip hop artist from Port Moody.
Mulat's set was the perfect end to the
evening, as he got the crowd dancing
with his energetic beats, creating a great
transition into the night. (Due to city noise
regulations, the show ended around 10PM.)
With his '90s look and groovy dance moves,
Mulat was reminiscent of Will Smith from The
Fresh Prince of Bel Air, and the audience
ate up his energy. He exuded confidence
with ease, which was a feat considering that
this was his first-ever performance. Mulat's
mixtape was released on May 19, and based
on his performance, I'll definitely be giving it
a listen.
Juxtaposition Vol II: Art Exhibition was a great opportunity to experience
a range of art and support local talent. Hopefully we'll be seeing more
editions of this series around the city, as these events provide a space for
emerging artists and musicians to showcase their work. —Alex Lenz
WIRE SPINE/ CHAMPION LAWNMOWER
/ SMOKER / BEDWETTERS
ANONYMOUS/ CELINE
MAY 10/RED GATE
The crowd who came to see a show raising funds for the
Tsleil-Waututh Nation's Sacred Trust Fund and the Secwepemc
Nation's Tiny House Warriors — two Indigenous organizations fighting
against the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion — was sparse, with maybe
only 20 people standing in front of the venue's small stage. However, the
audience's size did not diminish its enthusiasm for the five standout bands
on the stacked bill.
New band, Celine, featuring Tom "Tommy Tone" Whalen on drums and
Sonya Rez from Necking on bass, began the show with their first ever set.
They seemed to be having a lot of fun on stage, playing an upbeat punk
with confident vocals and powerful drumming. Their energy set the tone for
the following performances.
Hardcore punks, Bedwetters Anonymous played next, but not before
screening horrendously corny commercials for The Gap and Cadillac
from the early 2000s on the screen behind the stage. The send-up of
consumerism and excessive capitalism reminded the audience of the
show's purpose: to help stop big oil companies from exploiting Indigenous
lands for profit. Bedwetters followed this interlude with a set of very fast and
short songs consisting of snaking guitar leads and wildly skillful drumming.
All three members performed in their socks.
k.
REAL LIVE ACTION
Tom Whalen came back for the
next set as one half of Smoker, an
ironic '80s synth pop duo whose
shtick is promoting cigarettes. The
two sang over pre-recorded tracks
including "Smokin' in the Streets" and
"Teach Your Baby to Smoke" while
flexing their '80s dance moves with
completely deadpan expressions.
The hilarity of the performance aside,
Smoker displayed substantial talent
for pop songs.
Continuing Bedwetters
Anonymous' use of commercials
to satirize capitalism, Champion
Lawnmower performed with aptly
chosen lawnmower infomercials
playing behind them. Although I've
seen them live countless times, the
group's melodic guitar and bass
riffs, well-timed song breaks and
humorous lyrics make for the kind of
music you don't get tired of.
Closing the show with a significant
change in tone was industrial dark-wave duo, Wire Spine, joined on
guitar by one of the members of Bedwetters Anonymous. With Redgate's
sound system turned way up, the drum machine beats of their backtracks
practically shook the venue as the group performed. Frontperson Jesi
grooved wildly to the almost sinister sounding synth melodies.
As I left Redgate's East Hastings location for perhaps the last time (it
closes at the end of May), I walked out with a sense of empowerment,
fuelled by social justice and anti-capitalist themes. The show was a
reminder of the importance of supporting Indigenous issues and the role
that local artists can play in this process. Here's hoping for more politically-charged shows at Redgate's new location, with a better turnout next time.
—Hannah Toms
RED HAVEN ALBUM RELEASE PARTY/
KITTY & THE ROOSTER/ LOS DUENDES
MAY 16/FOX CABARET
I ■ ith a wall of explosive noise, a grand cinematic entrance and
^^r  two carefully ordained masks to their name, Kitty & The Rooster
kicked off the night with their musical self-introduction song, "Official Bio." "We're like
Bonnie and Clyde / We're like Romeo and
Juliet started a band," they sang as catchy
guitar hooks rang through the red-lit Fox
Cabaret.
As the sun was setting and more
concert-goers began to arrive, the local
Vancouver duo drummed and sang, enticing
the audience with songs about modern
trends, bad band names, love, sex and
getting evicted in the Vancouver housing
market. Bridging their songs with well paced
jokes and quips, like "What do you call it
when you drive from Vancouver to Calgary
to play one show? A one gig hard drive"
(the punchline also happens to be the name
of their upcoming album), the pair got the
energy going and the crowd engaged for the
rest of the night.
It was Red Haven's turn next.
Announcing that they would be performing
every song from their newest release
Funhouse Mirror, Red Haven was greeted
with a tremendously warm welcome by the
evening crowd. Jen Charters, Nathan Turner,
Brendan Steele and Max Ley treated the audience to an album-length live
show of well harmonized vocals, groovy saxophone, smooth notes of the
double bass and energetic drums to boast. The tracks on the album, like
the catchy single "People's Medicine," were undeniably danceable, and I
found myself in the crowd, moving and swaying happily on the floor. It was
incredibly fun being lost in the moment of Red Haven's unique brand of jazz
and soul music. In between songs, Charters' jokes and song descriptions
kept the audience engaged.
Discorder magazine i JUNE 2018
 VANCOUVER KPOP
CON
MAY 18-19/HARD ROCK
CASINO
Rounding out the set with a backdrop of thunderous clapping and
cheers, Red Haven reappeared on stage for an encore, but not before
taking a moment to put on sunglasses in matching, charismatic style. A few
of Red Haven's members reached out to the audience, borrowing pairs of
sunglasses from enthusiastic attendees. With lots of laughter all around,
Red Haven concluded their set on a high note.
Well past midnight, Vancouver locals Los Duendes took the stage.Their
upbeat, psychedelic Latin-fusion filled the Fox from corner to corner, and
the audience took their last opportunity to dance and groove before the
night's end. A rapid combination of conga, drums, guitar and occasional
vocals, Los Duendes held back no enthusiasm. Playing a mix of covers
and original music, they gave an enjoyable and vibrant end to a great night.
—aristhought
Hs I walked into Vancouver
Kpop Con, it was unlike
any event I had ever attended in
the Lower Mainland. The Hard
Rock Casino was full of booths
with different themes like K-Beauty
Make-up, Korean Language
Program, Kpop Program and more.
There was a crowd lining up for
each of these booths, but I was
lucky enough to have a small talk
with Peter, who was promoting
language and Kpop programs. His
booth was representing Kyung Hee
University and Sejong University for
the language program where fans
can join to take classes to study
Korean. As well, they are running a Kpop Program in Seoul to provide fans
with opportunities to meet up with famous Kpop celebrities, aiming to open
up environments for people to experience Korean culture. Seeing this booth
full of interested people, I could really feel how far Kpop has come into
the global market not only to promote the music itself, but also the Korean
culture as a whole.
As I walked around, there were multiple booths selling Hallyu (tt
^: "Korean Wave") goods, posters and t-shirts with pictures of popular
boy bands, including GOT7 (2MI£), BTS (^EM^Eh), Wanna One (?-IM
S), Monsta X (^^Er ^) and EXO m±). At some of the other booths,
vendors were selling albums with brand-new music and some relatively
older albums from popular groups. I was happy to see the album 1 +1 =0 I
PROMISE U by Wanna One, which I have played multiple times on my own
Kpop radio show on CiTR 101.9 FM, K-Pop Cafe.
I went up to the theatre to see the performance by A.C.E., a relatively
new group who made their debut last year. I could see some fans
searching for A.C.E. on the internet and listening to their music before
the performance began, in anticipation of the live show. When it was time
for the performance to start, the lights in the theatre went off and a short
promotional video for the group played on the screen that included some
footage of their performance from the day before in Toronto for Toronto
KPop Con. At the end of the video clip, the countdown began and A.C.E.
emerged onstage. As they started singing and dancing, many audience
members were screaming and cheering out of excitement for the group.
One of their standout performances was when A.C.E. danced to the song
"Gashina" (?W-r), a cover by the popular Korean singer Sunmi (£]n|).
As I was sitting in the audience, I could hear various languages
being spoken, including Korean, Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, English,
Vietnamese and others. It struck me that the variety of these spoken
languages could symbolize the diversity of the fandom culture of K-Pop,
as it can be enjoyed by many people of different cultural and linguistic
backgrounds.
Vancouver Kpop Con was an opportunity to experience how Kpop fits
in to the larger Vancouver society. As this city is greatly diverse with people
from all over the world, speaking different languages and engaging with
many cultures, there is great promise for the expanded success of Kpop in
Vancouver. —Jayden Hwang
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and
online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences.
Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
GALLERY
PATIO & LOUNGE
MON TO FRI
-IOPM
6133 UNIVERSITY BLVD
VANCOUVER, BC V6TIZI
THE SUMMER
DRINKS LINE-UP
8I0S 3HUT, | snisogofll I6bio93i0
REAL LIVE ACTION
9
 Transfixed! Media Art Program | June 18 | 7pm with VIMAF
Discourses within Queered-lndigenous experience and its intersections.
Camera ObsCUra (hungry ghosts) PREVIEW June 19 | 7pm
June 20-23 | 7pm | June 23 | 2pm with the frank theatre company
The premiere of LESLEY EWEN's fantastic imaging of trail-blazing
multi-media provocateur PAUL WONG's early years.
Skin & Metal | June 24   7pm
Homoerotic Music Theatre Work by BARRY TRUAX, 30 year retrospective.
Everything | June 26   8:30pm
Dancer LEE SU-FEH negotiates an environment of smoke, numbers,
and flying objects.
Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa
(MALISEET SONGS) | June 27 | 7pm
Operatic tenor JEREMY DUTCHER performs traditional songs of his
Wolastoqiyik ancestors.
...and more
TICKETS AND FLEX PASSES
AVAILABLE NOW!
^   CITY OF
VANCOUVER
Vancouver
foundation
/$$&.  BRITISH   I   Al   British Columb
LT_J COLUMBIA | fCS^ j^TS COUNCIL
We Acknowledge the Financial support
of the Province of British Columbia
Conseil des Arts
du Canada
^TELUS
M     Canadian     Patrimoine
Heritage      canadien
This project has been supported by the Building
Communities Through Arts and Heritage Program,
Department of Canadian Heritage.
^|ik    straight
Dare to be challenged
Risk being changed
queerartsfestival.com
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DIM CINEMA
Traditional WEAJRi fy<fylfk}itfAGE art
words by Jonathan Kew// illustrations by Cian Hogan
m»
WEEKNIGHT SCREENING of Michael
Snow's La Region central, 180 minutes of
footage from a single camera abreast the
mountains of Northern Quebec, spun autonomously by a pre-programmed robot: how did we all get here?
For Michele Smith, one of the fundamental pleasures of
film is the moment after the credits, when everyone looks
around to see who else has shared the experience. Since
2014, Smith has been able to give this feeling to others
through her role as curator of DIM Cinema, a monthly
program of moving-image art at The Cinematheque now
entering its tenth year.
DIM has a basic criteria: in the context of a traditional movie theatre, you will see experimental works
in dialogue with the structure of cinema. This is to say,
the films that are screened seek to question and subvert
social and material practices, along with traditional film
production and consumption. Go into a screening and you
may experience a series of micro-shorts or an experiment
in outstretched time. The film could draw attention to
the circumstances of its own creation, prickling against
the bare materials of film with distressed reels. Or, it
could be more conventional. The upcoming June 6 DIM
Cinema screening features The 3 Rooms of Melancholia, a
quiet piece by Pirjo Honkasalo documenting the lives of
children caught in the Chechen-Russian conflict.
Smith cites the pleasures of film that arise in diffuse
responses, surprising reactions, the "lacunae and potential
roads" that one viewer and one viewing cannot encompass.
DIM's breadth speaks to a kind of freedom, with guest
curators and collaborators as a constant, it has the luxury
to go in new directions.
Mm
WEm
most potent form: one cinema, an audience and a shared
sense of commitment.
Smith took over from Kazymerchyk in 2014. Having
returned to Vancouver after a spate of roles in Europe
(including at the Tate Modern and Museum of Natural
History in London), Smith remains in-touch with transnational networks of film curation. She also emphasizes the
impact of local curators, mentioning in part: Kazymerchyk,
currently at the Audain Gallery; Pablo de Ocampo and
Allison Collins at Western Front; Steffanie Ling, Sungpil
Yoon and Casey Wei at VIVO Media Arts Centre; Jem Noble
at Cineworks; and the Iris Film Collective.
~ k ollaboration is imperative in a local art world
|       where money and screen-space are scarce. Smith
describes a peculiar context in Vancouver, where
most of the large-scale institutions — the Vancouver Art
Gallery and Polygon Gallery for instance — lack cinemas.
These institutions have the resources to transport artists
from across the world for their programming, yet they
must partner with venues like The Cinematheque, as do
some of the smaller public and commercial galleries and
artist-run centres. A network of community becomes
coherent.
For all the fanfare larger organizations muster, DIM
screens at an unassuming, focused pace. Half-jokingly,
Smith suggests that DIM Cinema should get t-shirts for the
tenth anniversary, designed to model typical band merch,
but featuring the names of past collaborators.
mith doesn t like to insert herself so obviously into
DIM's public persona. The project is on-rent, always
in a state of becoming, and will continue with new
curators after she has moved on.
But she's also open with her personal experiences and
illustrative towards the question of accessibility. As a
teenager, she got into cinema alongside repertory theatre
and the music associated with film. "My friends were in
bands and they'd make films about what was going on.
And they were looking at Stan Brakhage. We didn't have
the means to put this into words, it's just what we were
seeing."
Smith shared a concept she would love to program. In
the UK, she made acquaintances with a man who would
smuggle films from the London Filmmakers Co-Op and
screen them deep in Eastern Europe.
"In those days, after the Wall came down, Soviet
companies took back their theatre equipment. The projectionists had nothing to do. He'd go to these villages and
show structuralist film, Kenneth Anger, all this stuff. And
he didn't speak the language. People would show up and
they'd have no background. But I'm sure he had an effect."
I en years ago, DIM provided the rare opportunity
to see moving-image art in Vancouver. Now, these
opportunities are flourishing. In another ten years,
it is impossible to know what the Vancouver scenario
will look like. But so long as those physical spaces persist,
there'll be the demand and desire to see something new.
For newcomers, DIM Cinema may not be a question of
how, but when.
DIM Cinema takes place at The Cinematheque, and
upcoming screenings can be found in The Cinematheque's
Program Guides, distributed across Vancouver. For news and
updates, along with a list of previous screenings and
collaborations, visit dimcinema.ca.
his was not always the case. When I sit down with
Smith on the eve of DIM's anniversary, she, flanked
by a notebook and laptop, points me towards a rare
article on the project: a 2009 Georgia Straight interview
with DIM's founder, Amy Kazymerchyk. Then, DIM had
an urgent purpose: to carve out space in a city bereft of the
infrastructure to see moving-image art.
Smith is thoughtful, reflexive throughout our conversation. "The whole scene has changed so much in those
years. It's interesting going back to Amy's interview, where
she talks about this lack. I don't think there's this lack
anymore."
If many of the art scenes featured in Discorder are
under siege, Smith describes a kind of fortification in
Vancouver's cineaste milieu. There are now many opportunities to see moving-image art and experimental film in its
' xperimental art is often filtered through
——   abstruse codes. Much of my conversation with
^H Smith revolved around the difficulty that DIM
Cinema screenings may entail, and the tension between
explanation and obscurity. Smith insists that the
experience, the "shock to your system," speaks more than
any Q&A can.
Collaboration provides another boon for DIM. Different
scenes bring different audiences. A screening of Jeremy
Deller's Our Hobby is Depeche Mode in 2014 brought
together cinephiles, post-punk followers and fans of the
celebrated British artist.
"The thing is, there's so much art. If you're honest, you
can only work from a position of ignorance. Your approach
needs to have humility and curiosity. Be ready to have
people walk out. I'm very lucky in that the people who
work here are constantly teaching me things. Hopefully I
do the same. In that way, it's a conversation."
yfr^ma^Tw^-
'Dim Cinema"
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | JUNE 2018
words by Dannielle Piper
photos by Javier a Bassi de la Barrera
ii
ITS REALLY NOT UP TO ME TO
DECIDE WHETHER OR NOT
PEOPLE WILL ACCEPT WHAT I DO.
But it is my personal belief that if they don't
accept what I do, I don't want them in my life."
It's a confident, self-assured response to one of the many
probing, invasive questions that I asked Shane Sable.
Shane is one of six Indigenous women in the burlesque
group called Virago Nation. Since their formation two years
ago, they have performed at the Vancouver International
Burlesque Festival, the Calgary International Burlesque
Festival, The Talking Stick Festival and the Burlesque Hall of
Fame Weekend. A testament to how popular they've become
in such a short time.
0^0^^ to their website, the members of Virago
Nation, Shane (Gitxsan), Ruthe Ordare (Mohawk),
Sparkle Plenty (Cree, Metis), Scarlet Delirium
(Kwakitul), Manda Stroyer (Dakota, Sioux) and Rainbow Glitz
(Haida, Squamish, Musqueam), perform burlesque "to reclaim
Indigenous sexuality from the toxic effects of colonization."
When I asked Shane in what ways colonization poisoned
perspectives of Indigenous sexuality, she tells me frankly
that it was "the imposition of shame on the body" that was
introduced upon the arrival of colonizers. Shane maintained
that colonial influence perpetuated cultural degradation and
an enduring "culture of silence" that made it difficult for
Indigenous people to feel ownership of their own bodies.
With the stigma that constantly surrounds the art of
burlesque, the idea of body sovereignty is a recurring
theme throughout our interview. Too often have I heard of
women who have wanted to take part in burlesque, but are
too fearful of backlash. Shane, however, seemed to take a
different approach.
She decided that as part of her activism, she would be open
and honest about her participation in the art form to friends
and family. She says it's her attempt to "destigmatize the entire
spectrum of sex work in which [she] believes burlesque falls."
"The greatest myth that I sort of get exhausted by
speaking about — but also because I think it's really boring
and unnecessary — is the conversation about the difference
between burlesque and stripping."
Shane explained that this is a discussion in which she
refuses to partake because it falls within the realm of respectability politics and attempts to make burlesque look superior
to other forms of sex work. It's a false dichotomy.
o me, any discussion
of burlesque and
feminism ultimately
hinges on the fundamental premise
that you either respect a woman's
agency and body sovereignty or
you don't. And if you don't, I'm
probably not going to be interested
in having a discussion with
you because you cannot accept
something that I believe to be a
fundamental right."
Another strong and self assured stance. So, curiously, I
questioned how Shane maintains a balance between her
professional and personal life with family and friends. After a
moment of hesitation, she admits that although she has had
some challenges, she still feels supported by those who matter.
That being said, Shane told me that the group feels a lot
of support from the Vancouver art community. As part
of their work, Virago Nation contributes to the ongoing
discussions about inclusion and representation. Shane used
their relationship with the Queer Arts Festival as an example.
"Many of our group members identify along the queer
spectrum and so not only are we able to bring conversations
of sexuality, but with the added intersections of racialized,
queer sexual identity."
Shane noted that it is important to give space to these
intersections as they are often overlooked, and also emphasized that the opportunities for Virago Nation to speak to
audiences about these issues is of equal importance.
I  wondered aloud to Shane how Burlesque and these
conversations have sparked newer or more vibrant
perspectives of herself. After some discussion, Shane
answered with her piece "Mother of Bilaa," a current act that
debuted at Talking Stick Festival.
Gitxsan is Shane's ancestral tongue, and she has been
learning new words and using that as inspiration. "Bilaa" is
the word for abalone, or a type of sea snail. The piece that
Shane choreographed is a conceptualization of the characteristics that the abalone shell represents in her culture,
namely strength and protection.
"While there's nothing directly referential to traditional
Gitxsan life, it is an expression of my own cultural reclamation," Shane said.
There was a hint of pride in her voice so I asked how the
group's work has affected their Indigenous audience. Has
it changed perspectives? More importantly, how well has
Virago Nation been received in their communities?
"We braced ourselves initially for our work to be received
negatively. We were so scared," Shane told me. But the
unexpected happened.
"We've even had elders who have said how much they've
appreciated what we're doing, and how now is the right time
for the conversation we're having. That couldn't be more
meaningful to us."
This type of reaction really resonated with the group.
Collectively, they agreed that their debut at the 2017 Talking
Stick Festival is their career highlight thus far. The Talking
Stick Festival is an Indigenous performing arts festival and it
was the audience for whom the group wanted to impact.
"To be embraced almost immediately by the Indigenous
art community has been really meaningful for us and very
validating for us. And that demonstration [of] faith in our
projects, we really hold that in our hearts."
I  asked Shane what's next for Virago Nation and she told
me that they are working on developing a full show that
only uses Indigenous music. The group also wants to do
their own shows instead of just contracted ones.
Their most recent performance was for an all-women
audience in Fort Saint James. To visit remote communities and
perform for the Indigenous women who live there has been a
dream of Shane's since the group started performing together.
Looking into future opportunities, Virago Nation is still
planning it out. When I pushed Shane for details, all she told
me is this:
"Every moment of growth that has unfolded has been so
unexpected and beautiful that I wouldn't want to over-define
where I want us to go. I'm just happy to see what takes root as
we go."
ft
Visit viragonation.ca to learn more about the group, and follow
Virago Nation on Facebook for upcoming events.
is
"Uirago nation'
 8I0S   3JIUL i   9rtiXD|)DflI 19bl032i0
SflUTAH
UPLEX IS A BIT ELUSIVE TO AN
TSIDER. Located on Fraser Street in an
Llknown as Little Manila to some, it would
rtiMmpossible to locate without direction
unless you knew what their tiny duplex sign meant.
Luckily, Ipa&Aetjwith smiles from a group of studio artists
huddled beneath a grocery store awning. Discorder met with
Gabi Dao, Kata Hansen, Liam Johnstone, Scott Kemp and
Jordan Milner to discuss Duplex, their collective and the
ecology of DD^trp^aces.
The main gallery space had already been installed for Clues,
a show in collaboration with artists from Winnipeg that runs
until June 7. It smelled of paint and the space was surprisingly
small. I was struck by the blue glass installation in the centre of
the white floor. It called me to crouch down and touch it.
In contrast to the gallery, the studio
catacombs are large and modular, each room
easily housing multiple artists individually
while still allowing for easy access and
collaboration. The only interruption is noise
from above, footsteps and dragging sounds.
On this Sunday, it was possible to hear
hymns, high heels and what sounded like
marbles falling.
Water and electrical are the main issues
of building maintenance. Slowly, the
Duplex collective has been making repairs,
but there are still problems with water leaks.
"We have leaks on the backside of the wall,
so whenever it rains heavily or someone
pees on the side of the building, it goes right
into our studios. [...] It's stuff like that we
talk to [the landlords about], and they say
it's the City's job [to fix]," explained Milner.
Although in this circumstance it would be
a landlord's responsibility to repair leaks,
in general, the City of Vancouver has little
interest in supporting small studio spaces
like Duplex. Lacking mass public interest,
the City's cultural plan from 2008 to present
day has consistently failed independent
artists working outside of the commercial or
mainstream sectors, for whom funding can be
life- and career-changing, whose work benefits
Vancouver's creative and cultural industries.
The fate of Vancouver's studio spaces are
cyclical, with affordable spaces purchased by
wealthy business owners and redeveloped. As
land value increases and landlords sell or set
sights on condo redevelopment, places like
Duplex are unprotected. Recently, Duplex's
landowners have been appraising the property
and soil sampling. Johnstone explained, "We
are on marsh land, effectively, [and] they
have to test how deep they would have to
dig if they wanted to get to solid foundation,
especially if they want 6 storeys." But this
foreshadowing is good, said Johnstone.
"The fact that they are doing it now is a red
flag for us [for] a few years from now." When
the collective renew their lease, they will be looking for
demolition clauses and any other signs that the owners were
gearing up to redevelop the land.
Though Duplex is aware of its own mortality, immediate
development does not scare the collective. They all
believe that they have had a good stretch in the studio.
They moved into the space during the summer of 2015, after
having to leave their former studio, Avenue, due to health
concerns — the artists no longer felt physically safe at Avenue
after a few dangerous incidents regarding roof leaks and
building neglect. Duplex, having previously been vacant for
six years, is 3000+ square feet and has served the needs of its
artists well over the last few yeajrs.;The collective hopes that
they can keep it going for at least a couple more.
Operating through collaboration and consensus,
sometimes programming can be off-the-cuff or inconsistent.
Although Dao, Hansen, Johnstone, Kemp and Milner
currently share programming and logistical duties, a
complete list of the current and former founders, studio-
mates and programmers includes Susanna Browne, Patrick
Campbell, Julia Feyrer, Maddison Killough, Brodie Kitchen,
Monique Levesque, Jonathan Middleton, Katrina Niebergal,
Alex Pichler, Tom Richardson, Kathleen Taylor, Michelle
Weinstein, Stephan Wright and Setarah Yasan. This group
represents about half of the artists at Duplex. Before the
space was known as Duplex, there were artists running a
portion of the building exclusively as artist studios, founded
by Steve Hubert and Scott Lewis.
This collective effort is why on their website or in show
programs, Duplex never posts individual names, instead
attributing activities as "from the collective."
The strength of Duplex is that it has found a way of
functioning as a DIY, artist-run space, and that its operations are not dictated by strict administration. If Duplex's
operations were funded by larger institutions or government
grants, it could radically affect their work flow because
labour would be focused elsewhere, in grant-writing and
managing grant requirements. This administrative structure
is not attractive to all artist-run spaces, and it can be argued
that an artist-run facility should not have to conform to a
certain model to acquire funding.
6
uilding accessibility is still an issue for Duplex, as it
is for many DIY spaces around Vancouver. People
in wheelchairs would have a hard time accessing the
gallery and studios. Because Duplex is not clearly identified
from the street, a lot of shows do not reach the
usual art patron.
This being said, Duplex has been successful
hh at attracting different groups of people because
fH the artists' individual practices are so diverse
C and multi-media. An example of a dynamic
H ongoing series is Leftovers, which Hansen
^ explained, "doesn't focus on the exhibition of
i art, but rather proposes environments where
O artists and non-artists can produce or bring
^5 snacks, decor, music, lighting, etc." Last summer,
& Duplex hosted a party with a bouncy castle as a
* fundraiser for a vacuum.
The goal behind adopting an unconven-
& tional gallery format and wanting more inter-
^ active art exhibitions is to attract more people
W to art. "The [social] architecture of gallery and
F* physical spaces are not meant for human bodies,
W and not always inclusive of different kinds
of bodies," explained Dao, pointing out that
galleries in general can seem quite exclusive.
Milner agreed, "It's a magnifying glass." Duplex
encourages people to get in contact and request
viewings, not just of the gallery but of the
studios as well.
The challenges that Duplex face reflect the
nature of many DIY art spaces; coordinating
studios requires the commitment of many
people, all with different strengths and lengths
of time they can put in, questioning how to
sustain the space and themselves and not burn
out. Duplex's rhetoric is easy to understand.
They believe that as artists, it is important
l-H
X
o
H
o
W
*!
O
n
>
O for people who do not have the vernacular,
^ confidence and connections to ask for visibility
and access. People should be able to find ways
05 of becoming part of art communities outside
W of commercial galleries, more established
fxj artist-run galleries, independent or civic insti-
5 tutions. As artists and organizers, they hope to
HOLE  IN THE WALL
"Applying [ourselves] takes a lot of time, and we are all
[working on] our individual practices," Milner continued,
"[Managing Duplex means] constantly splitting yourself.
I think you can only do so much of what you are good at,
which makes it a little more chaotic and unbalanced, but
for some reason we are able to work that way instead of a
hierarchical structure."
The Duplex collective admitted thst they are still learning
how to operate and keep their space running. They can only
compensate artists with what they earn through bar sales and
tips, and through the gift of their own labour as organizers.
Professionalizing has never felt right to them, however, and
Duplex has remained a non-profit. Kemp expressed that they
are generally comfortable with inconsistency and although
they are "not ideologically opposed" to institutional funding,
they don't want to have to rely on it.
'Duplex"
facilitate dialogue, and insert themselves in the
diverse ecology of Vancouver's art scene.
In order to sustain an independant art scene
in Vancouver, artists should feel empowered to
demand space and make connections. Art patrons
are encouraged to attend small openings, and support their
neighbourhood studio spaces. You never know what you
could find on the other side oft
Duplex is located at 4257 + 4277 Fraser Street. Their next
show is The Influencers with Shizen Jambor and Olga
Abeleva, and will run June 14 to July 12. Viewing hours by
appointment by emailing hello@projectduplex.com. You can
follow Duplex on Facebook, on Instagram @duplexduplex_
or visit duplexduplex.c
 Unfctt
tttimtD
• • • • •
MUSIC
COREY GULKIN
All the Things I'll Forget
(Self-Released)
January  26,   2018
Imagine getting a ride home late one evening, letting your head rest on
the windowpane. You allow the the darkness behind closed eyelids to
isolate you with the sounds of Corey Gulkin's All the Things I'll Forget — the
softness of her voice and the haunting simplicity of instrumentals nudging
you along the edge of consciousness.
Emerging with a new name from the Montreal music scene, Gulkin
(formerly Corinna Rose) establishes herself once more as an intricate
songwriter with a talent for incorporating stories into her lyrics. Delving into
the memory of sexual coercion in an abusive relationship, the pure poetry
of the album serves to guide Gulkin in her aim to transform the remnants
of trauma into something tangible for survivors and something real for
listeners to think deeper about.
Her gentle voice is the raw center of each song, engaging occasionally
in harmonies with backing vocals like on the gradual crescendo of "Under
the Covers." All the Things I'll Forget is at turns dark and dream-like as
Gulkin crafts a multifaceted collection of eight songs that skillfully merge the
sounds of guitar, violin, harp with synth textures and electronic resonance to
colour her introspective lyrics.
Both hypnotizing and heartbreaking, the songs take a step forward from
traditional indie folk and mix together jazz, folk and electronic. All the Things
I'll Forget is a raw and artfully constructed album of bold arrangements and
eclectic sounds, in which Gulkin creates a world inhabited solely by her
voice and words that linger in the listener's memory long after the album's
conclusion. Listening to her powerful creation, All the Things I'll Forgets
beautiful music is an invitation to its listeners to explore truth alongside the
implications of forgiveness. —Angela Tian
ERICCHENAUX
Slowly Paradise
(Constellation Records)
March  9,   2018
folk legend Nick Drake opened his 1972 record, Pink Moon with the
album's titular satellite being "on its way" to "get ye all." A seemingly
apocalyptic prophecy, yet Drake never expanded on his vision beyond
these lines, with any lingering fears dispelled with a sumptuous piano solo.
The Pink Moon hangs above Drake's album, as something beautiful but
impenetrable. While Slowly Paradise, Paris-based Eric Chenaux's sixth
solo album, features folk of a whole different kind to Drake's solely acoustic
finger-picking, it acts as a spiritual successor to Pink Moon's lunar musings.
Half of Slowly Paradise's six tracks mention the moon, yet it remains a
deliberately ambiguous symbol. Chenaux speaks at turns of the moon as
framing the warmest night, as something he holds through his love or as if
he embodies a troubadour in "Wild Moon." Slowly Paradise's sound reflects
its lyrics' lack of easy answers, featuring an idiosyncratic style of space-age
folk with songs that, like the moon, are at once picturesque, lofty, imposing
and perhaps slightly ominous, yet are also made bewitching through their
apparent contradictions.
Pink Moon comparisons do not end with Chenaux's lyrics. Like Drake's
stripped-down final album, Chenaux's spotless voice, a brilliant falsetto a
few shades shy of peak Bon Iver, is undeniably the album's focus. The
vocals are projected onto a relatively sparse backdrop, one that eschews
folk's trusty guitar for the less traveled terrain of "various electronics."
Chenaux's guitar-playing is often at odds with what is occurring around it,
existing only as a dissonant counterpoint - such as the drifting, seemingly
aimless solo which concludes "Bird & Moon" and "Abandoned Rose's"
18
off-kilter guitar line that tries to pull in several directions at once. The shiny
and synthetic textures of lengthy pieces "Bird & Moon," "There's Our Love"
and "Wild Moon" similarly steer clear of harmonious contemplation, as they
are frequently pierced by electronic emittances, like communicative signals
from another galaxy.
In both lyrical form and musical content, Slowly Paradise remains a
lunar puzzle box. Fortunately, the album's sheer beauty and grace saves
it from being merely esoteric ramblings from some folksy space station in
the woods. Highlight "Wild Moon" seems to actively confront the listener,
with its overlong wah-wah solo evoking an anemic Jimi Hendrix, and the
discordant bleeps interspersed throughout suggesting Birdo from Super
Mario Bros. Yet beneath these convoluted aspects the song mesmerizes
through its shimmering central beat, paired with Chenaux's soulful pleas to
"come away with me." Slowly Paradise revels in these contrasting moments
of musical trickery and unassuming beauty, like the light and dark sides of
the moon forming an uneasy, but incredibly absorbing, alliance.
— Tom Barker
PALE RED
Heavy Petting
(Self-Released)
March  17,   2018
-PALE RED
■JTr
§8k.
PETTING
MJeavy Petting, the second offering from Vancouver three-piece
m m Pale Red, is easily one of the most delicious albums I have heard
in recent years. Recorded in just two days, this album sounds far from
rushed as the band creates a perfect storm of indie rock, melancholy,
cheekiness and razor sharp songwriting. Pale Red plays in a slightly
sloppy or "rough around the edges" style, but this makes the songs on
Heavy Petting feel warm and immediate, each track digging its tendrils
deeper with repeated listens.
Kicking off strong with "Leave Any Room," an acidic tune I interpret as a
final send off to to a troublesome ex turned stalker with a restraining order
from lead songwriter, bass player and vocalist Charlotte Coleman. I really
dig the lines, "The law is keeping us apart / And I don't like the law / But I
don't like you more." Album highlight, "International Waters" sees guitarist
Myles Black take the lead with his elevated baritone vocals and lyrical play
that hearken back to days of youth when the mind, loins and ego were still
under construction. It's a syrupy, beautiful song that descends into chaos
before tightening back into its pretty guitar strum.
The album closes perfectly with "Glass Bottom Boat." The song has an
old fashioned sound that brings to mind the end scene of a '50s teen movie,
where the leather clad rebel is speeding his car down a winding road,
cigarette hanging off his bottom lip and a bottle of bourbon riding shotgun.
Listening to Heavy Petting brings me back to my puppy years, navigating
through the raw emotional rollercoaster, thinking that I had it all figured out
and then realizing that me and my mess were no different than the rest.
But from that self-absorption comes a deeper wisdom later realized. Heavy
Petting speaks of that wisdom, and it appears that these musicians wear
their wisdom and vulnerability like fading red welts across the heart.
Having read that Coleman, Black and drummer, Portia Boehm went to
high school together and have been playing music under various names
for several years explains a lot about the loose comfort they bring to their
style. These aren't just personal, emotive songs spewed out for the simple
sake of making music. They come from the collaboration of friendship,
experience and trust, and that to me creates a deep anchor of music I can
sink into. — Nathan Pike
FREAK HEAT WAVES
Beyond XXXL
(Telephone Explosion)
April  6,   2018
In this post-modern life, so much is derivative. Just like the globe itself,
there is little to no territory in the world of music that the map of genres
or sub-genres can't identify. But with their latest LP, the Victoria-born,
Montreal-residing Freak Heat Waves stake their flag in a no man's land of
sound. Weaving a rich mixture of synthetic and analog percussion, dial-tone
sythwork, droning bass riffs and twisted guitar, Beyond XXXL takes the
post-punk identity that the band built with their two previous LPs and warps
it until it is altogether a new thing.
"Self Vortex" introduces both the record and its defining features. The
track delivers quick punch of sound, saturating an infectious groove in
fuzzy tones and a low, garbled vocal effect. Despite sustaining the vocal
tone and heavy synthesizers through the entire album, XXXL doesn't
feel repetitive. The snappy beats in instrumental tracks "Prime Time
Slime" and "Toxic Talk Show," song three and ten of the 11-song lineup,
balancing the album at both ends with a heightened energy. The record
takes ambient detours in "Subliminal Appeal" and "In the Dip of the Night,"
adding another dimension to Freak Heat Waves' sound. These ambient
cuts are spacious and littered with delay, Brian Eno-esque oddities echo
off the walls of these drawn out moments.
The super-textured instrumentation works alongside the lyrics to express
the album's central theme. Songs on XXXL act as a commentary on the
state of things; we hear mumbled words on the clamour of modern life: the
gorging of the senses, the excess. Made murky by the vocal effect, the
lyrics seldom come clear through the sludge, but when they do, they are
cutting and inspired. In "Soothing Limbo," a confession is groaned from the
perspective of the greedy, "I can't wait to transcend / To your island /1 want
it all to myself."
With XXXL, Freak Heat Waves manipulate their twisted sounds into
a coherent whole. The result is a record that feels strange, new and
important, like an intercepted broadcast from some dystopian future.
— Judah Schulte
BLACK DRESSES
WASTEISOLATION
(Self-Released)
April   13,   2018
UNDER REVIEW
Chaotic, confrontational and downright cathartic, Black Dresses'
debut, WASTEISOLATION is an electronic noise-pop gem.
Consisting of Canadian musicians Dizzy (AKA Girls Rituals) and Rook,
they create a fascinating sprawl of industrial beats, catchy melodies and
terrifying lyrical content that explores the fears, violence and alienation that
come with life as a transgender woman. And yet WASTEISOLATION is as
humorous as it is horrifying.
Opener "Doorway" sets the tone and then some. Over thunderous bass
squelches, Dizzy's slurred, deadpan voice contrasts perfectly against the
beat as it fragments and explodes in rapturous intensity. It's an utterly jarring
opening that grabs you from the start and drags you down its rabbit hole —
thankfully, many of the following 12 songs are just as menacing. "Eternal
Nausea" gleefully juxtaposes joyless lyrics with a danceable hook in the
chorus, while "Thoughts and Prayers" — arguably the record's finest moment
— is an absolute rampage of a track that relentlessly bashes transphobes
who utter those meaningless three words whenever tragedy strikes. These
songs are ugly and chaotic, but what makes them so captivating is how their
catchy melodies and simplistic verse-chorus-verse structures streamline their
intensity into something assessable and immediately affecting.
Although WASTEISOLATION covers a lot of ground lyrically, it primarily
documents the brutal realities of being transgender. The fear of violence
runs through many of these songs ("Please don't kill me / I'm so sorry I'm
here," Dizzy frantically pleads on "Wiggle"), but there's plenty of anger
and defiance as well (see the triumphant "STAY THE FUCK AWAY FROM
ME" scream in "Legacy"). Anyone who follows Dizzy and Rook on Twitter
would know that they're both ridiculously funny individuals, and it's through
comically over-the-top lyrics that these two express their thoughts and
emotions. When they want to tell someone off, they won't be coy about it —
they'll outright yell, "Get out of my space you worthless fucking fuck face."
Likewise, a half-slurred line such as "annihilation is my thirst" shows how
they use theatrically dark phrases to express general feelings of melancholy
and alienation. These lyrics aren't exactly sophisticated, but they perfectly
encapsulate the goth splendour and heightened despair loaded throughout
the record. Why write abstract poetry when screaming "FUCK" conveys so
much more?
WASTEISOLATION is still flawed in parts; its schtick works better in some
songs than others, and the band's amateur maximalism inevitably makes for
some uneven moments, particularly the bizarre sex jam "In Your Mouth." But
the record's two closing tracks tie a very powerful bow around all of the chaos
that preceded it. "Wound" documents a terrifying assault and the resulting
trauma, while "Slither" recounts the complicated feelings of a strained
relationship (possibly with a parent) before a heartbreakingly beautiful coda
closes out the album. As these tracks show, WASTEISOLATION is not a light
listen, but it is memorable one. —Joshua Azizi
Discorder magazine i JUNE 2018
 DUMB
Seeing Green
(Mint Records)
June   22,   2018
Pfter practicing many of the songs on Seeing Green over the past
year at shows around Vancouver, Dumb release their first full-length
on Mint Records this June. It's a logical step from a band that clearly works
hard and has boundless energy to deliver tight sets while continuously
mocking the most ostentatious of Vancouver's wealthy.
Seeing Green's songs don't stick around long, but dip their toes into
math-rock, surf and patches of country — kind of like if the Pixies were
interested in being comprehensible. Vocalist Franco Rossino's sardonic
delivery is at turns convincingly self-deprecating and condescending, with
clear contempt for many of the characters that pop up throughout Seeing
Green. Lyrics like "Send an invoice / Call your lawyer / Capital discourse /
Tom Sawyer," have fun at power's expense, proving that Dumb know that a
viable way to be punk is just making capitalists look freaking uncool.
Highlights include the first single "Mint," which packs meandering
guitars and cooing backing vocals into a quick pop punk tune. Perhaps one
reason why Dumb have remained so prolific for the past few years, playing
what seems like a show every weekend, is that they are actually having
fun. Midway through the album, the energetic "Party Whip" smartly aligns
political compromise with loser schmoozing. "Cowboy," another highlight,
includes a mathy bassline interspersed with staccato strumming and a
gravelly vocal delivery that takes a sudden left turn into twang territory
after the two minute mark, making every second of this song delightfully
unexpected.
Production is handled by Jordan Koop and the style could be described
as spartan. His dry treatment allows for each instrument to be easily
distinguished, highlighting Shelby Vredik's basswork and Rossino's lyrics.
But at times, like the lurching "Artfact" or album closer "Roast Beef," there's
a lack of atmosphere to the recordings. Texture is swapped out for clarity
and some of the kinetic energy of these tracks is lost in this transaction.
The 14-track span of Seeing Green covers your party tracks, anxious
outbursts and downer ditties. Dumb write short anthems that see the band
work in sync to make a catchy, surprising and self-assured album.
— Sydney Ball
• •••••••
PODCASTS
Produced by Sandy Hudson
and Nora Loreto
SANDY AND NORA
TALK POLITICS
February 2017-Present
Listening to Sandy and Nora Talk Politics is like eavesdropping on the
dinner table conversation of two passionate activists. Hosts, Sandy
Hudson and Nora Loreto are both involved in community organizing and
are able to bring their own insights and perspectives to topical and urgent
issues. Hudson and Loreto are also able to draw connections to political
issues and movements that the general public might be unaware of,
especially as Hudson is one of the founders of Black Lives Matter Toronto.
They clearly state which topics they are and aren't educated about, so
the podcast has a tone that is knowledgeable but not pedantic. As shown
by recent controversy over a comment Loreto made on Twitter regarding
the role of race and gender in the international response to the Humbolt
tragedy, the pair do not shy away from big questions and issues. They voice
perspectives that are often overlooked, and consider the effects of political
issues on women, Black populations, Indigenous populations and other
underrepresented persons.
Sandy and Nora Talk Politics covers a broad range of political topics and
time-sensitive issues, such as as online abuse, gentrification and their most
recent episode on the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion. Their episode
"Fighting Gentrification" focuses on gentrification in Toronto specifically, but
is relevant to cities across Canada. Hudson and Loreto discuss the impact
of gentrification on racialized and marginalized people, but also critically
analyze the movements resisting it. The episode begins with a general
discussion that defines and depicts gentrification, providing examples
from Hudson and Loreto's own experiences. Although the opening of
the episode is not dissimilar to a conversation that might be heard on a
college campus or in a living room, Hudson and Loreto later turn to the less
mainstream topic of means of resistance to the displacement of low income
communities, including the crucial role of municipal elections, and conclude
the episode on an empowering note.
Hudson and Loreto make trustworthy hosts because they follow their
talk with action; not only are they both activists within their communities,
but they are working to make their podcast more accessible by transcribing
it in both English and French. In each episode, the hosts use clear and
simple language, making the podcast accessible to listeners with any
level of education. Sandy and Nora Talk Politics captures how millennials
experience politics. The podcast is a mix of frustrated rants and
empowering affirmations of movements and resistance.
— Katherine Chambers
Produced by Tyler Mahan Coe
COCAINE AND
RHINESTONES
2017-Present
If a story goes unshared, what becomes of it? Cocaine and
Rhinestones' host Tyler Mahan Coe is highly concerned with this
question. As a fan (or, more accurately, a historian) of 20th Century country
music and the stories behind the songs, Mahan Coe produces a podcast
from his home of Nashville that is rife with his knowledge and passion for
the yarns and lore of country music.
Cocaine and Rhinestones subscribes to the Thomas King definition
of history, as defined in his work The Inconvenient Indian, "[history] is
the stories we tell about the past." To quote Mahan Coe on the podcast's
website: "History matters...[and] this history wasn't being passed on to a new
generation. It was going extinct." Cocaine and Rhinestones' mission then, is
to revive fading history and share it through a modern and digestible medium.
The podcast's devotion to detail is evident in episode five of its first
season, "Breaking Down Merle Haggard's Okie From Muskogee." In
this episode, Mahan Coe delves into the story behind one of the most
iconic country songs to come out of the late 1960's, taking the listener
back to 1927 and the Great Depression in America. From this backdrop,
Mahan Coe tells the story of the term "okie," a derogatory expression
for impoverished migrants who wandered westward during the Great
Depression, and what it came to mean. He includes excerpts of speeches
by President Hoover, songs like Woody Guthrie's "So Long, It's Been Good
To Know Yuh," and other audio-clips from the 1930's. These clips do the
work of presenting an abbreviated history of post-war America, which in
turn provides a political and social backdrop along with lyrical context for
"Okie from Muskogee."
The detail and nuance of each episode of Cocaine and Rhinestones
bathes the listener in a rich history of country music. Far from a dry history
lesson, Mahan Coe commits to bring these stories to life by providing
excerpts of recordings and directly quoting each artist he discusses. As
a result, the listener leaves each episode feeling almost as if they were a
historian themselves, enjoying an informative and captivative experience.
This balance of entertainment with devotion to detail is what defines
Cocaine and Rhinestones; where other shows would be quick to discuss
the marrow of the bone, Mahan Coe takes his time to develop a narrative
for each episode. It's because of this thorough narrative that Cocaine and
Rhinestones stands out from other podcasts. — Dan Miller
III
To submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please
email Under Review Editor, Sydney Ball at
ur.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1.
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COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA
8I0S   3JIUL i   9niXDgDflT 19bl032i(f
 Oil THE AIR
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF INSOMNIA
words by Joshua Azizi //
illustrations by Neetu Dha //
photo by August Bramhoff
44
i
don't know how my mind works
this way."
I'm chatting with Peter
Courtemanche in 49th Parallel on Main
Street, and he's telling me about how he
once turned a vine into an antenna, which
he then used to stream the environment
of a flowering tree filled with bees onto
AM radio. Making an antenna out of a
vine would be an impressive feat on its
own, but Courtemanche didn't stop there.
Using an embedded processor the size of a
toonie, the bee sounds were combined with
"tones and sound artifacts from bio-electric
synthesizer modules" that generated loud
static noise from the plants they were
broadcasted through.
"The result of that is you get all these
weird artifacts and these strange noises in
the radio, mixed with the bees," he says.
Courtemanche calls this piece
"Bio-Electric-Radio," and it's one of the
many sound art pieces you'll find on his
radio show, The Absolute Value of Insomnia,
which airs on Sunday mornings from
2-6AM. Given that time slot, it should
be no surprise that the show is computer-run. However, the music is not a simple
mix of pre-recorded songs — rather, it's
all live-produced through a random
generator that Courtemanche created
himself.
"I'll record sounds from a particular place
or around a particular theme, take the sounds
from that and put them in a group in a folder
somewhere, and [the generator will] write a
little script that animates those sounds and
mixes them all together," he explains.
He estimates that the generator has
around 60 to 70 scripts in it, and that each
script plays through a select number of files
that can vary from eight sounds to over 100.
"It moves through those in a fairly
random way. It tries not to repeat itself too
often, so it has a memory of what it has done
and tries to figure out new ways of working
with sounds."
The result is a fascinating, meditative
four hours of ambient soundscapes that
bounces between peaceful bliss, uncompromising chaos and something in-between. A
great variety of sounds pop up throughout
an episode: static bursts, droning synthesizers, hovering woodwinds, computer glitch
noises, faded vocal samples and all sorts of
Discorder magazine i JUNE 2018
OF
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
You get discounts at these
FRIENDS OF CiTR + DISCORDER locations.
strange noises make muted but memorable
appearances. They stay on for minutes at
a time, but the generative nature of the
program means that the music is slowly but
constantly mutating.
Many of these sounds come from
Courtemanche's thirty-odd years of creating
sound art through unconventional means.
For instance, one of his signature instruments is a magnetic coil that can convert
ELF (Extremely Low Frequency radiation)
waves into a static drone that sounds as
if it's transmitting from inside a power
plant. He has also created a number of
field recordings, including one of Queen
Elizabeth Park during a rainfall.
Plenty of the sounds on The Absolute
Value of Insomnia also come from friends
and collaborators that Courtemanche has
worked with over the years. Peters says
"about a quarter" of them were made by Bill
Mullan, another sound artist who suggested
the show concept for Peter and came up with
the name. Other featured musicians include
Anna Friz, Adam Sloan and Dinah Bird.
Courtemanche himself is a CiTR
veteran. He has previously served
as the station's program director
and engineer, and helped found the annual
24 Hours of Radio Art on January 17.
From 1988 to 1992, his former show - The
Absolute Value of Noise — broadcasted 2.5
hours worth of experimental music every
Friday, with a half-hour break that made
room for Nardwuar The Human Serviette's
show.
"[It was] literally the only time of
day he could schedule the show," says
Courtemanche. "It was actually a really good
way to do a show, to have a half-hour break
in the middle where something semi-crazy
is going on, which creates a lot of energy."
Even if tuning in at 2 AM isn't going to
be on everyone's agenda, it's hard not to be
fascinated by the concept of Courtemanche's
show. It brings to mind an image of someone
aimlessly fiddling with their radio dial late
at night, stumbling across this program
and being astounded by what they hear.
According to Courtemanche, one listener he
knows of had an experience similar to this.
"There was one person who seriously
wanted to know exactly what [sound] had
played in the middle of the show. They were
bugging the station manager over and over
and over, so I had to comb through the thing
and try to figure out what had happened."
The sound, as it turned out, was a
recording of a NASA rocket launch that
Mullan had put together.
"He edited them and put some effects
on all the sounds," explains Courtemanche.
"It's very eerie."
However, there's a certain appeal in the
mystery behind what these sounds are and
where they come from. The Absolute Value
of Insomnia is filled with sounds both lovely
and striking, but it's the show's unpredictable sequencing and ungraspable, alien
nature that turns these compiled sounds
into an otherworldly, transcendental
experience. And it happens every week,
broadcasting through the lonely air of the
night while Vancouver lies fast asleep.
ft
Tune in late Saturday / early Sunday from
2-6AM to hear The Absolute Value of
Insomnia, or listen to show archives at
citr.ca/radio/the-absolute-value-of-insomnia.
20
ON the airiThe Absolute Value of Insomnia
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ARTS REPORT
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CHTHONIC BOOM!
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EXPLODING HEAD
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CRIMES & TREASONS
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DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
 ■ montiAy
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM, ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8AM-11 AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththebrowns
@hotmail.com
ROOM TONE
11AM-12PM, TALK/MOVIES/
SOUNDTRACK
Room Tone is a talk show
focused on Filmmaking that
invites guests weekly to
discuss their slices of reality
on set, tips, past/future
projects and love for the craft!
From Directors/Producers, to
Cinematographers, Production
Designers, Actors, Composers,
Writers, Editors... anyone!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B in spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail. com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CITR DOCS SEASON 3
4PM-5PM, TALK / SOCIAL
COMMENTARY
Tune in for insightful work on
niche topics. For season 3
we keep it local with work on
refugee detention in Vancouver,
housing, sexual assault
policy, the drug war and more.
Subscribe on iTunes & Stitcher!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm-6:30pm, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television, along
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks,
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TUtSHAU
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
8AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver,
Queer FM features music,
current events, human interest
stories and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmail. com
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM, ROCK/ POP / INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music,
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY/
DISABILITY
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communitylivingradio@gmail.com
BB'S DISCO PARTY
TUES 3PM-4PM, MULTIGENRE / SALT
/SNARK
Guaranteed, you've never
been to a disco like this
before. Discorder Magazine's
Editor-in-Chief, Brit Bachmann
plays a hot selection of music
featured in the current issue,
representing every genre
from hip hop to experimental.
Some of it you'll love, some
of it you'll love to hate. To
paraphrase Donna Summer,
"God had to create [Discorder]
so [BB] could be born and be
successful." This is the show
you've been waiting your
whole lives to listen to. | Art by
Ricky Castanedo-Laredo and
theme music by The Misc.
Contact: Twitter\ @DiscorderMag
INTO THE WOODS
TUES 5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope,
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
8PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles,
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels,
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons. com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/ POP
Jayden targets audiences in the
Korean community in Vancouver
to introduce the News on
Korea, Korean Culture while
comparing other Asian Cultures,
playing all kinds of Korean
Music(K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie,
R&B,etc),talking about popular
trends in the industries of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows,
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave
or Hallyu), the news about
Korean Entertainment Industry,
what's going on in the Korean
Society here in Vancouver and
conversations with guests.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
2PM-3PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
third season! This team of
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
folks produce a weekly show
on Indigenous issues, current
affairs, entertainment, culture
and news - all centering
Native voices. Come make
Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Follow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves
KEW IT UP
3PM-4PM, experimental/talk
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica,
Post-Punk, Industrial,
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
4PM-5PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
POLITICS
CiTR Accessibility Collective's
new radio show. We talk
about equity, inclusion, and
accessibility for people with
diverse abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every week
for interviews, music, news,
events and awesome dialogue.
Contact:
accessibilitycollective@citr.ca
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC,
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm,
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins,
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM,
ECLECTIC/LIVE INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vancouvermedicineshow@gmail.com
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, HIP hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too) and relished in the merging
of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM, HIP hop/ r&b/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains,
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes,
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THUKSDAU
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM,TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CONVICTIONS & CONTRADICTIONS
thurs, 8am-8:30am, talk/comedy/
social obeservations
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society, shown through social
observational comedy. To boot,
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new,
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com,
@tima_tzar,
facebook. com/RocketFromRussia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM, ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat,
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners an
introduction to music &
entertainment in Asian Cultures,
especially, Korean, Japanese
and Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, TALK/SCIENCE
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOES ON A WIRE
4PM-5PM, rock/pop/indie
Reworked as a music show
with the occasional sprinkle of
commentary, Shoes On A Wire
is back. As always, stories,
interviews, and hot takes will
make an appearance, but
mostly you'll hear sweet tunes.
Contact:
Twitter \ @shoesonawirepod
Instgram \ @Staunchjitters
DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
FLASHBACK WITH ALEC
CHRISTENSEN
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30,
TALK/MUSIC/ARTS & CULTURE
Each episode, join host Alec
Christensen and friends
as they discuss the pop
culture and politics affecting
Vancouver and beyond.
Contact: Twitter \ flashbackalec
NO DEAD AIR
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30,
JAZZ FUSION / POST ROCK
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion,
experimental electronic and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook \ NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
THURS 7:30PM-9PM, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ TRIHAU
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance,
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
87AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news,
politics and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse@canadalandshow.com
CITED
8AM-9AM, talk/academia
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact:
facebook. com/citedpodcast
Twitter \ @citedpodcast
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery and a 'lil dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@gmail. com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP / SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on each other
and leave mix tapes and love
letters in each other's lockers xo
Contact:
Facebook \ @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CITR'S 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter \ @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
http://nardwuar.com/rad/contact/
WORD ON THE STREET
5PM-6PM, rock/indie/pop
Hosted by the Music Affairs Collective, every episode is packed with
up-to-date content from the Lower
Mainland music communities including news, new music releases,
event reviews and upcoming events,
interviews with local musicians and
industry professionals and discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6pm - 7:30PM, talk/comedy
Every week Jack, Tristan and
a special guest randomly
select a conversation topic
for the entire show; ranging
from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming® citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30pm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
national
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and future.
This includes jazz, soul,
hip-hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
There are also interviews
with local and international
artists. Truly, a radio show
with international flavour.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings,
poetry recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock,
drone, ambient, experimental,
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter \ @pbone
■ SATURtlAy
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
i2:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise,
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citrlatenightsho w@gmail. com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music,
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum,
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena,
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming® citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks,
blues and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, electronic/mantra/
NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats,
music, chants and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact:
mantraradioshow@gmail. com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7PM-8PM, experimental/ambient/
CHILLWAVE
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy,
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker,
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmail.com
SOCA STORM
8PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
Papayo!! #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
8bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79. We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ sunnay
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM, INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
ALTERNATING SUN. 3PM-5PM,
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock,
pop, electronic), as well as
a and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmail.com,
Twitter \ @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM, ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds,
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter \ @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmail. com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, ELECTRONIC/ DEEP HOUSE
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, ELECTRONIC/TRANCE
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver,
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmileymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points,
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ isumtrf
tOSTTOUS
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citr.ca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9FM MAY CHARTS
r
HEXISTENTIAL
S T I V
CiTR101':9FM + DISCORDEOtPANOSPRIA PRESENT
HEXISTENTIAL II
VANCOUVBt
24-25 2018
SV)BSCR/a£-
/ would l/ke an
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION
(that's $20cnd For Canada, $25cnd for U.S.A.)
I WOULD LIKE T© WZ
SUPPORT DIBWRDER  M
WITH A DONATION       ■
\   (hey, thanks.')"	
V*7"07>IZ.;#
J£/V0 THIS FORM WITH SOME COLD HARD CASH OR A CHEQUE TO:
DISCORDER MAGAZINE, LL500- 6133 UNIVERSITY BLVD. VANCOUVER, B.C. V6T 1Z1
 IS
BELLE  AND
SEBASTIAN
par
■w*
SUNFLOWER
BEAN
1981
CONCERTS
June  4
DAMIEN JURADO
Biltmore
June 5
ELISE TROUW
Rio Theatre
June 4
GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR
Vogue  Theatre
June  5
KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD
Malkin Bowl in Stanley Park
June  5
BHAD BHABIE
Venue
June   6
NIGHTMARES ON WAX
Imperial
Saturday June 9
TORY LANEZ, 6LACK
A-BOOGIE WIT DA HOODIE
PRESSA & MORE!
I^^^Bifii
Sunday  June   10
MIGOS, LIL PUMP
SKI MASK THE SLUMP GOD
YBN NAHMIR & MORE!
June  12
June  13                                           June  19
JONATHAN RICHMAN
A PLACE TO BURY STRANGERS 1 SUNFLOWER BEAN 1
Imperial
Fox Cabaret                                 Fox  Cabaret
June  20
June  21
June  22
June  22
M.WARD
BECCA STEVENS
DIRTY PROJECTORS
POST ANIMAL
Imperial
Fox  Cabaret
Vogue  Theatre
Fox  Cabaret
June  24
June  24
June  25
June  26
June  27
SNAIL MAIL
CHERRY GLAZERR
DEERH00F
SONS OF KEMET
KNOWER
Biltmore
Imperial
Imperial
Imperial
Imperial
June  28   &  29
June  29
June  29
BELLE AND SEBASTIAN w/ Japanese breakfast
FOND OF TIGERS
HAUX
Vogue  Theatre
Imperial
Fox  Cabaret
July  7
July  14
July  20
July  28
WE ARE SCIENTISTS
S. CAREY
BLIND PILOT
VACATIONER
Fox  Cabaret
Fox  Cabaret
Imperial
Biltmore
Tickets  & more shows at   timbreconcerts.com

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