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  o o o o o o #
254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
ING SHOWS
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UPCOMING EVENTS
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FOR ADVANCE TICKETS AND MUCH MORE
 TABLE of COFITEFITS    "BWi last CClorD
OCTOBER 2018
COVER S ILLUSTRATION BY EVA DOMINELLI.
ifeatutreff
07 - DISCORDER VOTES
find out where the masthead reads election coverage
08 -   CAVE  GOBLIN  NETWORK
the DYI podcast network to keep an eye on
16 -   I   M U  R
local electronic-R&B release THIRTY}} EP
17 -  WRONG WAVE  NO.6
art rock, documentaries, books, oh my!
18 -  VIFF MENTORSHIP
solidifying a tradition at the Vancourer International Film Festiral
19 -  ESSAY:   THE SEAT
Tash King writes on chronic illness, ft. illustrations
by Dana Kearley
Column* + £Dt&er 3>tuff
04 -  Filmstripped:
Sophie  Jarris'
Medical Drama
05 -  Io, Good Humour:
Super! Sick! Podcast!
06 -  Shelf Life:
Rahila's Ghost Press
10 - Real Live Action
comedy,  music
12 -  Art  Project
by Ximena Velazquez
13 - October  2018  Calendar
14 - Under Review
music,   books,   films
20 - On The  Air:
Convictions & Contradictions
21 -  CiTR Program Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 -  September Charts
ADVERTISE: Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To learn how
to get involved with Discorder
contact volunteer@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a
cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133
University Blvd. V6T1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute
Discorder in your business,
email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE: We are part of
CiTR, a registered non-profit,
and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you
love.To donate visit:
citr.ca/donate.
To inform Discorder of an
upcoming album release,
art show or significant
happening, please email all
relevant details 4-6 weeks in
advance to Brit Bachmann,
Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
comments, complaii
corrections via en.™..
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising
Coordinator: Audrey MacDonald // Discorder Student Executive: Fatemeh Ghayedi // Editor-in-Chief:
Brit Bachmann // Under Review Editor: Sydney Ball // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch //
Web Editor: Zoe Power //Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Social Media Coordinator: Sydney
Ball // Accounts Manager: Halla Bertrand // Charts: Myles Black // Production Assistants: Savilla Fu,
Christina Dasom Song//Writers: Joshua Azizi, Brit Bachmann, Sydney Ball, Laura Bee, Alec Christensen,
Jake Clark, Fatemeh Ghayedi, Andrew Ha, Nick Jensen, Samuel Jones, Tash King, Hannah Kruse, Aly
Laube, Erica Leiren, Lucas Lund, Dan Miller, Nathan Pike, Lua Presidio, Brody Rokstad, Judah Schulte,
Elijah Teed, Angela Tian, Hannah Toms, Chris Yee // Photographers & Illustrators: Bryce Aspinall, Sara
Baar, Duncan Cairns-Brenner, Eva Dominelli, Alistair Henning, Dana Kearley, Nicolette Lax, Matthew
Lim, Sunny Nestler, Lua Presidio, Alejandra Sanmaniego, Wurst World, Akhila Varghese, Coltrane Yan //
Proofreaders: Brit Bachmann, Robyn Bowes, Sydney Ball, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Emily Ludington,
Audrey MacDonald, Jasper D. Wrinch.
EDITOR'S NOTE
Ihave never been so nervous and excited about an Editor's Note.
Over the last three years, I have felt so seen. I came to Discorder having had
my passion exploited by independent media organizations and nonprofits for
years. The gift of leading a publication, mentoring contributors and collaborating in good faith has filled my spirit and emboldened me to share this magazine with
other people and communities that have felt excluded or ignored completely. When
considering what will be regarded as my legacy as Editor-in-Chief, I hope that people
will acknowledge the transformation of Discorder Magazine while I've been Editor,
but I believe the credit for that transformation belongs to the entire masthead, which is
the strongest team I have known. I expect that my individual legacy lies somewhere in
these beautiful-weird Editor's Notes.
I've said this before, the purpose of an Editor's Note in Discorder is vague. I've used
this space to comment on issues outside of the magazine that resonate with readers,
to amplify the topics whispered about at shows and parties and in the offices of CiTR
101.9FM. To every person who has ever thanked me for the content of these notes, I
am so honoured and grateful to you for reading them. I wrote these words, but they
were inspired by you. I hope that I've done you justice.
There's a certain symmetry between my arrival and my departure, which in a
lot of ways is long overdue. Three years ago, Discorder was the antidote for
cynicism that resulted from having my passion exploited; today Discorder is the
cause of cynicism from having my work undervalued.
The job posting for Editor-in-Chief is public, so it's no secret that the position pays
$16 per hour for 21 hours per week, no benefits. This is not a starting wage, but the
same wage that I receive now after three years. When I began, I was paid $400 per
issue. An hourly wage is an improvement, but it's far from a liveable wage. In 2015,1
burned for recognition and for the opportunity to prove myself. But now, at 29-years
old and confident in my capabilities as a writer and an artist, glory isn't paying my
fucking rent.
I bring this up because I know that I am not the only person in this position. I know
that most readers are young professionals and creatives working precarious jobs that
are often not in their chosen fields, or students uncertain about their futures. Well, you
deserve better and I deserve better and the next Editor-in-Chief deserves better.
To CiTR's credit, the workplace culture is one that encourages critique and the
constant reevaluation of priorities. As an organization, it's fluid and responsive to its
community. A remarkable example is the development of the Sexual Violence, Bullying
and Harassment Policy over this past year, voted into existence last month. Like a lot
of smaller nonprofit arts organizations and campus-community radio station, CiTR
does the best that it can to support members and staff.
If you're feeling undervalued, it is not exclusively the fault of your employer, but
a flaw with the society we live in — where people will pay $300 to see Beyonce
and Jay-Z at BC Place but they won't pay $20 to see lesser-known bands at a
local venue; where some promoters / gallerists / publishers / boards will put women,
non-binary people, people of colour and Indigenous people on lineups / in exhibitions
/ on mastheads / on committees for the sole purpose of ensuring that they're not called
out for continuing to favour white men; where people will tolerate alleged sexual
predators in positions of influence because it's easier than dealing with the privilege
that put them there. It's all part of the same puzzle of misguided values and corrupt
reward systems.
It may seem overly ambitious, but I believe that every one of us can work to effect
change on a grassroots and larger scale. You may not be in a position to speak up for
yourself, but you can speak up for others, especially for those who produce the cultural
content that entertains you. You can ask questions and choose to engage in conversations around wage and compensation. Artists and cultural workers literally cannot
afford to keep these topics taboo any longer.
At the time I write this, a new Editor-in-Chief hasn't been hired yet and CiTR has
extended the deadline because there are so few applicants. I wish the lack of interest
is because my shoes are too big to fill, but I know that it's because the pay is shit.
What I will say is that the opportunity to work with Discorder's Art Director, Ricky
Castanedo-Laredo almost makes up for it. Ricky has shown me so much patience and
trust, and I am incredibly thankful to have been paired up with such a talented artist
and to call him my friend.
Ricky should be paid more, though, along with everyone else who make this
magazine possible.
I hope you like this issue as much as I do.
A+ always
BB
©Discorder 2018 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR.
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemihem speaking Musqueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM.
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500-6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
_
 Discorder magazine | OCTOBER 201?
FILIHSTRIPPED
SOPHIE JARVIS' MEDICAL DRAMA
words by Alec Christenseo
illustrations by Wurst World
photo by Alejandra Saamaaiego
44
How do you live up to your
own definition of yourself?"
This is a question at the
heart of Medical Drama, the latest short
from Vancouver-based filmmaker, Sophie
Jarvis. No stranger to the Vancouver
International Film Festival, Jarvis's shorts
The Worst Day Ever, Penny's For Tea and
Homesick have all been screened in recent
years. Medical Drama is set to premiere at
this year's festival as a part of "The Curtain
Calls," a collection of Canadian shorts.
Medical Drama follows a struggling
actor (Meredith Hama-Brown) who, after
finding an unconscious stranger in her
building's laundry room, begrudgingly
sacrifices her night to help him. Shot on
16mm, it deals with themes of isolation
and the longing for recognition. Through
this work, Jarvis explains that she sought
to explore "what it means to do a good
thing and why we need to be awarded for
doing a good thing." The protagonist, who
is accustomed to being overlooked, realizes
that her motivation for helping a stranger in
need is more selfish than altruistic.
Jarvis has an interest in "extrapolating
meaning from words," something of a
common thread through her work.
She offers the words "waiting room" as
an example, explaining, "The idea of
waiting for someone and not knowing
how they are going to be [is terrifying]."
This concept culminates in a suspenseful
and horrifying sequence in which the
protagonist's perception of reality is
overcome by fear and paranoia. In this
way, Jarvis plays with the expectations of
the viewer.
In speaking with Jarvis, she emphasizes the importance of portraying
women as fully-dimensional characters
on-screen, noting that "it's rare to see
the ugly side of being a person." This
is true of many on-screen characters,
but more so with depictions of women.
"Women should be allowed to make
mistakes on-screen," she continues, noting
that Medical Drama's protagonist makes
many. The filmmaker hopes that audiences
will relate to the protagonist, despite her
instinct to place herself at the centre of a
stranger's misfortune.
Behind Jarvis is an impressive filmography,
having written and directed numerous shorts,
commercials and music videos. In 2012,
she received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film
Production from Simon Fraser University.
Her graduate film, The Worst Day Ever,
screened at both VIFF and the Toronto
International Film Festival. Reflecting on her
time at SFU, Jarvis notes, "It was very much
a time where you learn what you don't like
to do and what you do like to do." At SFU,
Jarvis found her aesthetic.
ftmong her influences include Alex
McDowell, who she mentored
with at the 2012 Berlinale Talents.
This is where she was also introduced to
concepts to come out of the World Building
Institute in San Francisco. The Institute
promotes a major paradigm shift in the
way that films are produced, encouraging
filmmakers to assemble a production team
before writing even begins as opposed to
bringing them into the project later. This,
Jarvis explains, is in order "to build a space
that will make sense to everyone who's
involved with it." This is a process that
Jarvis has adopted, which allows for better
planning, collaboration and cohesion.
With regards to the future, Jarvis has
a lot to look forward to. She is currently
working on Zeb's Spider, a stop-motion
animated short film developed with
National Film Board of Canada, as well as
the script of Invasions, her first feature-
length project. Described as a psychological drama, Invasions follows a woman
working in a fruit-processing plant. When
she discovers a bug that she believes to
be invasive, she works to convince an
unmoved town of her discovery. Although
she is still in the development phase of
this project, Jarvis is enthusiastic about
working on her own larger-scale project,
having worked on the sets of several
acclaimed independent features.
In many ways, the characters and
themes in Invasions mirror those in
Medical Drama — that is, strong
characters that are accustomed to being
ignored and humans' capacity for dark
thoughts. "[Medical Drama] is definitely
more in line with the kind of work I want
to be making in the longer form," says
Jarvis. "It's fun to explore what it means
to be a woman who is often on her own."
Between her distinctive and captivating
style and effective exploration of the
human psyche, Jarvis is one of several
emerging filmmakers reimagining the genre
of suspense in Canadian cinema.
Jarvis, along with a number of filmmakers,
will be presenting at PechaKucha Night at
the Vancouver Playhouse on October 18.
Medical Drama screens as part of "The
Curtain Calls" VIFF shorts program at
International Village 8 on October 1 and
October 8. More information at viff.org
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FILMSTRIPPED | Sophie   Jarvis"   Medical   Drama
APPLY + LEARN MORE AT     creativebC.COITI      OO0 creativebcs
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III GOOD HUIHOUR
SUPER! SICK! PODCAST!
words  by Brody Rokstad //   illustrations  by  Sunny  Nestler
//  photos  by Duncan Cairns-Brenner
Illness isn't easy to talk about. Many
people don't even know how to
approach the subject, let alone
discuss it at length. That's why what local
comedians Alicia Tobin and Kevin Lee are
up to is so cool. They host Super! Sick!
Podcast! in which they discuss chronic
health conditions — both their own and
their guests' — and they can make you
laugh while they do it.
Tobin and Lee are longtime friends *-?
\ through the Vancouver comedy scene and
were looking for a new project. Tobin
has hypothyroidism, in which the
thyroid gland does not produce
enough hormones, and Lee has
atrial fibrillation, a serious form
of heart arrhythmia. Somewhere
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along the way, it dawned on them that their
health issues could become a conduit to
create something positive that could help
rteople with similar experiences.
"I think people suffer in silence - well,
we certainly don't," Tobin says, laughing.
"But fundamentally, we wanted to get to
know people, not just other comedians. We
want to meet people who are experiencing
a diagnosis and to learn about what that's
like." Often, people with a health crisis
or experiencing chronic illness can feel
alone and misunderstood. "The
anxiety and stress of it all can be
isolating and overwhelming," «'
says Lee. "So then even just
earing people on a podcast
discussing something
similar, you connect to that
as well. Hopefully, as the
podcast goes on, we'll see a
community spring up."
t's apparent while listening to
the podcast that the comics
know each other well. They're
both very clever and have a playful sense
of humour, and they're not afraid to throw
some toilet humour in the mix, either. "We
make a lot of poop jokes," laughs Tobin.
Understandably, using comedy to approach
these issues carries some inherent risk if not
applied skillfully. "Are we going to be too
dour?" Lee ponders when considering how
to approach the podcast content. "Or, are
we going to be cracking jokes so much that
it will seem, like, 'is this about being sick
or is this just about cum jokes?'" Arguably,
they've struck a perfect balance, with the
assistance of their producer, Jay Hosking.
In addition to being naturally funny, Tobin
and Lee are intelligent and kind, allowing
them to approach difficult subject matter
with tact and compassion. The podcast is
sweet without being saccharine, and funny
without being flippant.
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There's something about humour that
makes it a powerful tool for dealing
with the darker realities of life. "Certain
tragedies or situations feel absurd and
exactly opposite to the way life needs to
be," Lee explains. "Humour is the way to
bridge that absurdist gap between what is
expected and what you actually get." Tobin
agrees: "Humour is a really great way to
communicate bigger ideas and to build
trust." She continues, "It's a way that I'm
open with people." There's a simple and
powerful beauty in humour. It can help
create an environment where people feel
seen and heard. "After humour can often
come lots of listening, empathy and sincere
connection," adds Lee.
This sincerity and authenticity comes
through strongly on the podcast.
Combined with the hosts' wit, it all
helps to educate and encourage empathy
through the candid sharing of experiences.
"It's laughing to help people understand
their own illness. Or, if someone has a
friend going through a medical problem of
some kind and doesn't know how to deal
with it, hopefully this podcast can offer
some sort of insight into how to connect
with them and make them feel like it's
alright and they're okay," says Lee.
"Something we're doing on this podcast
seems - not bigger than us, but in a way...
better than us. I hadn't anticipated that
feeling," says Tobin. "I get goosebumps
thinking about the podcast and the
potential it has."
When you listen to the podcast you just
may get that tingly feeling deep down, too.
Or, it might be that you laughed too hard
and peed your pants.
Follow Super! Sick! Podcast!
wherever you subscribe to podcasts
and visitsupersickpodcast.tumblr.com
for archived shows and updates.
Canada
Canada Council
Fxp/meit-      vM^ujigfr        ■vffni,iM,i,i,m      H325jlI°TJuL=
IN GOOD HUMOUR|Super! Sick! Podcast!
5
_
 Discorder magazine | OCTOBER 201?
SHELF LIFE
RAHILA'S GHOST PRESS
words  by Judah Schulte
illustrations  by Matthew Lin
photo  Coltrane Yan
Since its conception in May
2017, Rahila's Ghost Press
has published six chapbooks.
The Vancouver-based press
publishes poetry exclusively, taking
submissions from emerging or
established writers, and strongly
encouraging women, writers of
colour, LGBTQIA2S+ writers,
Indigenous writers and writers
with disabilities to submit.
Founder and publisher,
Mallory Tater, got the name of
the press from her great-great
grandmother. Curious about
her heritage, Tater and with
her fiance, who is also RGP's
Managing Editor, Curtis Leblanc, made a
trip out to Saskatewan to investigate her
family's beginning in Canada. As RGP's
website states, they learned that "Rahila
Corches [was a] mother of three, [who]
immigrated from Campeni, Romania with
her husband Samson." Rahila's interest in
reading and her untimely death made an
impression on Tater. It seemed a fateful
coincidence that at the time she learned
this information, Tater had been planning
on starting a press. It wasn't only homage
that inspired the name, but its ties to the
concept of family. "I'm a firm believer in
chosen family,"
says Mallory, "and
looking backwards
to forwards on the
relationships in my
life links the idea
of chosen family to
the press." And a
family she made.
The RGP team
is made up of
seven editors, all of them decorated with
published work of their own and awards or
nominations. Tater met her team through
university and the Vancouver poetry scene.
Together the group reads submissions,
fundraises and attends book launches. As a
family performs labours of love, the team
(Tater included) labours for free; only the
contributors receive honorariums. "One
of the nice things about having such a big
group is that we can pair the writer with an
editor that fits them properly — in terms of
interest, personality and aesthetic," explains
Tater. This intentonal pairing is indicative
of the passion with which
the press is run and the
identity that it maintains.
For the cover of each
chapbook, Rahila's Ghost
solicits a different local
artist and converses at
length with the poets to
make certain they feel their
work is accurately represented. Tater cites the time
this back and forth takes as
one of the greatest hurdles
in the process of publishing,
but one that is worth the
struggle. "When writers
are submitting and want their work to
be taken care of, I take that seriously,"
says Mallory. "It's such a privilege and an
honour to take on that role."
Having published a collection of poems
and signed a novel with major Canadian
publisher, HarperCollins, Tater is versed in
the challenges of the industry. With poetry
not being as lucrative as some other forms
of writing, it can be a trial for poets find
platforms for their work. And Vancouver,
with its high cost of living and a younger
art scene than major city centres, can
add to that difficulty. Inspired by other
chapbook presses like Metatron, Tater saw
a way of leveraging these problems into
opportunity. "I had the time and energy
to provide a platform for the voices in my
community and across the country."
The poetry in their list of published
titles is clear and contemporary. Much like
the press itself, Rahila's Ghost seeks out
work that is accessible and thoughtful. "To
me personally, the best poetry is the kind
that takes the internal into the external
smoothly and in a way that everyone can
connect to," Tater explains. Submissions
go through the hands of all the editors for
consideration. The ones that resonate with
the most members of the team get accepted.
"I don't like doing the rejection part, but
that process needs to exist. If we could
publish 40 manuscripts a year, we would
do it."
RGP is a press that views itself as a
home for poetry. It was founded by a local
poet who saw a need and is maintained by
local poets who see the same. Projecting
the voices of emerging artists, Rahilias
Ghosts understands as well as anyone that
any community is a family and family
sticks together.
For a list of releases and submission
information, visit rahilasghostpress.com
and follow Rahila's Ghost Press on social
media for upcoming events.
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Premier Partner
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Premier Supporters
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creativeBc
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DISCORDER VOTES
WCQUWER MUMSCIPAL ELECTSOM COVERAGE
SO,
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compiled by the Masthead
illustrations by Era Dominelli
CAMBIE   REPORT
YOU'VE JUST SEEN THE COVER OF DISCORDER'S OCTOBER ISSUE and you're decided to
rote in the municipal election on October 20, but you don't know who to cast your
ballot for. To be honest, we haven't decided either and there are a lot of hot issues still
unfolding that will influence our selection. Lucky for Vancourerites, there is great local
coverage to inform our decision.
The following is an alphabetical list of some of the most reliable reporting, opinions and
resources that we're seen, which can hopefully help guide your decision-making.
ONE FINAL PIECE OF ADVICE: Vote based on the issues that affect you personally, that you
feel passionate about, not because some publication or individual tries to tell you what's
up. It's your rote.
■^'Tancouver politics podcast hosted by Ian Bushfield, Patrick
w  Meehan and Matthew Naylor. In addition to their podcast, which
features discussions with candidates, journalists and academics,
they have published helpful resources at cambiereport.ca, including
a spreadsheet of all municipal election candidates and another
mapping out municipal parties by economic, social and urbanist
issues. As with most podcasts, Gamble Report has a Patreon, which
grants supporters access to longer versions of mayor candidate
interviews, if you're keen on that sort of thing.
THE GEORGIA STRAIGHT
staple or mumcit
They report on v
o's saying what, a
s including the
and debates.
especially straif
THE   STAR  VANCOUVER
STpfihe Star publishes some good updates on the
Ji, municipal election, but nothing too compre-
insive. The best way to read The Star is in print,
Mailable daily at your closest big public transit hub.
SEEKING  OFFICE
THE  MAINLANDER
CITY   OF   VANCOUVER
.,,,,jheir website isn't as exciting as these other suggestions, but
Ji, it's the definitive source of who is running for what, and
how and where to vote. Voters aren't just choosing a mayor
and councillors; they're also choosing commissioners for the
Parks Board and trustees for the School Board. On the City's
website, there are profiles of all candidates, which include their
biographies, priority issues, platforms, party affiliations and
links to personal social media, rancourer. ca
flTpfihe Mainlander is "Vancouver's Place for
Ji, Progressive Politics," an online publication
dedicated to political and social issues. They don't
publish articles that often, but when they do, their
pieces are in-depth and well researched, often
based on interviews with community members and
rooted in historical context. The editorial collective
includes Sydney Ball, Nathan Crompton, Steffanij
Ling, Andrei Mihailiuk, Caitlin Shane and V'mce/A
Tao. They've promised at least a couple article-
leading up to the October 20 election day.
METRO  MATTERS
iletter by mumc
aching Office is the municipal election podcast
. by CiTR's News Collective, produced by Podcast
Coordinator and emerging journalist, Alex de Boer. (You
can read an interview with de Boer in the September issue oi
Discorder) Seeking Office doesn't have a standard format,
which adds to its enjoyability, you never know what you're
going to hear! The News Collective has conducted some
truly feisty interviews with council and mayor candidates,
and have also researched the history of specific political
parties and electoral processes. Every episode of Seeking
Office has also aired on the News Collective's weekly radio
show Democracy Watch, Thursdays from 5-6pm. You can
subscribe to Seeking Office wherever you get your podcasts,
or listen to archived episodes of Democracy Watch at
citr.ca/radio/democracy-watch.
Seeking Office is hosting an election party at the Lido on
Saturday, October 20 beginning at 7pm.
ELECTION  CYCLE"
A segment on Stephen Quinn's The Early Edition, where he
takes a bike ride with a different mayor candidates each
week until October 20. The Early Edition airs weekdays
on CBC Radio from 5-8:30AM, but all their episodes are
archived at cbc.ca/earlyedition. On his own Twitter, Quinn
retweets local journalists and responds to many articles
about candidates and issues. Follow @CBCStephenQuinn.
1 Justin McElroy and social media editor
lamara Baluja, emailed out every Thursday. Its
focus spans the Lower Mainland, meaning that
topics aren't Vancouver-centric, but they're all
really interesting. Metro Matters is by no means
comprehensive, but its headlines provide a good
relevant election issues. To sign up visit
THE  TYEE
An independent online media organization that does
a lot of reporting on the environment, climate
change, affordability and electoral reform. Through
their Tyee Builders crowdfunding program, they hired
journalist Geoff Dembicki to cover the municipal
election. If you sign up for their newsletter, you can get
daily or weekly headlines by email, or visit thetyee.ca to
browse their sections.
VANCOUVER  TENANTS   UNION
FRANCES   BULA
st with an extensive
llv for covering city
election since
politics
an incredible source ot intormation, ai
interviewed by Seeking Office and Cat
She blogs on "State of Vancouver" at
nd seen the sharp
:ipal parties, Bula is
PRICE   TAGS
Price Tags was created by Gordon Price, an urban planner
and former city councillor with the NPA. It began as a
newsletter for friends and colleagues, and has expanded into
a website that publishes perspectives on Metro Vancouver
issues, including this upcoming election. The way opinions are
categorized are very true to what you would expect from an
urban planner, divided into the following headers: Urbanism,
The Liveable Region, Transportation. Read Price Tags with a
critical eye at pricetags.ca
'Discorder Uotes'
his may seem like an unlikely addition. The Renters Report
*', Card is a working group of the VTU, struck by members who
participated in the Dolores Huerta Foundation's tenant organizer
training this past summer. Tenant-centred policies became the basis
through which the Report Card working group developed four
questions for municipal parties and independent mayoral
candidates. On September 15, over 30 members volunteered to
help grade candidate responses to the questions to encourage
renters to vote for pro-tenant candidates. Find updates and the
candidates answers at vancouvertenantsumon.ca
1
_
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine j OCTOBER 2018
i-L-Ji urnj _ij—i_i-ii ' -*~—~*—■ ■ - » »■
CAVE GOBLIN NETWORK
DOWN UMBER
words by Fatemeh Ghayedi // illustrations by Bryce Aspinall
photos by Alistair Henning
8
*7 *7 M   HY CAVE GOBLIN?
A   A "I was hoping you would ask," says
^^LV   Douglas Vandelay. "Our last house was
^w^^      advertised as having 6-foot ceilings and I
thought, 'I'm 6 feet, I can handle that.' The ceilings were
5-foot 11-inch and in the lowest points maybe 5-foot
5-inches. It was just like a warren of caves and I felt like a
cave goblin." Doug co-founded Cave Goblin Network for
podcasts 5 months ago with Tahlia Murdoch, and they now
operate out of their new house with much higher ceilings.
Each founder currently has one podcast on the network
that they host from their home studio — on Comedy
Zeitgeist Doug invites Vancouver comedians over for a
discussion, and on Everything Economics Tahlia she uses
her undergraduate education and interest in economics to
analyze everyday issues and answer her own questions.
Cave Goblin has been a long time coming. Both
Australian transplants to Vancouver, Tahlia and
Doug created Cave Goblin out of a lack of existing
social network and the desire to build a platform for their
current and future projects. This isn't to say that they
haven't made friends.
Doug found a foothold in Vancouver as a comedy
journalist through different ventures, including involvement
at CiTR 101.9FM. Doug hosted a radio segment on
Finding the Funny, and conducted interviews for Discorder
Magazine. With Doug's encouragement, Tahlia got trained
for podcasting after wanting to for some time.
The network was realized not because of a gap in the
market, but because they both wanted to start something
for themselves. Being new to Vancouver turned out to be
a benefit.
"I came into this industry completely clean. No one
has any prior judgements [about] who I am. It's like when
you move to a new country and get a new credit score,"
explains Doug. " [We were] making this network completely
fresh. [...] For the most part, I was talking to people I had
never heard of before, and so I didn't have any preconceptions going into interviews either."
The move to Vancouver also meant additional access to
infrastructure and support for podcasting. "I had always
wanted to do something like this, but there's just not a
whole lot of support for it in Perth and it can be a little
demotivating when it comes to creating projects and getting
them going," explains Tahlia. "Being in an environment
that's so inclusive and supportive, where people actually get
out and do things and help each other out, it [made it easier
to] just do it and put it out there," she adds. By creating
Cave Goblin Network themselves, they have a lot more
freedom to pivot the network in whichever direction they
'Caue Goblin network'
see most fit. Being DIY and independent, they don't need
the approval to introduce new things or to rebrand the way
they would from a larger entity.
As far as future plans go, Doug and Tahlia have
a comedy podcast in the works that they've been
workshopping and hope to introduce towards the end of
2018. Once they are more established, they want to invite
other hosts onto the network, but also invite more people
into their home studio. Both Tahlia and Doug encourage
people to reach out to them to get on air to talk about
whatever they're doing, be it comedy or economics.
"We're just hoping to grow it so that we can provide a
platform for [others] and ourselves to succeed," says Doug.
For more information, including archived podcasts and
contact information, visit cavegoblins.com. You can also
follow the network on social media @cavegoblins
^;I»1J
JJDWDRKS
 DOXA
presents
VANCOUVER l^gDCAST FESTIVAL
NOV 8-101
YOU MUST REMEMBER THIS o IN THE DARK
UNCOVER: ESCAPING NXIVM
THEALLUSIONIST o CRIMINALLY FUNNY
From the creators of This is That and This Sounds Serious
SOMEONE KNOWS SOMETHING
RETAIL NIGHTMARES o 2050: DEGREES OF CHANGE
ON DRUGS o POP THIS! o SECRET FEMINIST AGENDA o SEEKING OFFICE o SADCAST
WOW IN THE WORLD o DARKPOUTINE o POTTERLESS o FEAR OF SCIENCE o SOMEBODY SOMEWHERE
WITCH, PLEASE o HEAVY CONTENT o CAMBIE REPORT o FLIPENDO o RAP GODS o and more
NIGHTLY SHOWS AT THE RIO o MASTERCLASSES
FREE DAYTIME PROGRAMMING AT VANCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY
including panels, live shows featuring local podcasters, a podcast fair and more.
For tickets and more information, visit
vanpodfest.ca
H * (D  #vanpodfest
Screen reader support enabled.
Supported by
THE K& LAW
FOUNDATION
Premiere Media Partner        Premiere Partners
WV'*
Vancouver Public Lil
_
 Heal Hue
fiction
SEPTEMBER 2018
MILLENNIAL LINE COMEDY 5 POETRY
W/SOO JEONG / NIMA GHOLAMIPOUR
/ PAM CHOI / RYAN WILLIAMS /
DOMINIQUE WAKELAND / AJA MOORE
SEPTEMBER 13 / RED GATE
I n the violet shadows of the Red Gate Arts Society, a crowd
I formed under the shine of a single disco ball. Though everyone
was enjoying catching up, a definite buzz of anticipation built.
Punctuated by the crack of beer cans, the background pop tunes
faded out as the Millennial Line left the station.
After an introduction by producers Savannah Erasmus and Tin
Lorica, Millennial Line's third instalment began with comedian
Ryan Williams, the first white man in the event's history. Williams
appropriately opened with, "...you come to a show that supports
diverse voices and it's like, 'hah, April Fools!'" Though it was a
deviation from the event's norm, his jokes were well received.
Pam Choi continued the comedy. Her observational and
sometimes devastatingly self-deprecating humour kept the crowd
enthusiastic throughout her set. Whether it was her parents'
expectations, her therapist's advice or her small town's racism, her
jokes landed routinely with the audience.
Next, Dominique Wakeland read their self-described "millennial-introspective" poetry. The audience maintained high energy as
they read passages from their "summer sex journal." Wakeland's set
ended with a spirited call and response poem; the audience echoed
their chorus of "too many, too many, too many, too much for you!"
Both triumphant and forlorn, their words lingered in my head long
after they left the stage.
After an intermission, host Savannah Erasmus warmed up the
audience with jokes about being an Indigenous comedian at her
boyfriend's house of white doctors, and her plan to wear Axe Body
Spray to subvert the patriarchy.
Soo Jeong followed with a polished set. Despite being the only
performer outside of the millennial generation, Soo had no trouble
connecting with the audience; her bits on racism in Vancouver and
coming out to her traditional parents landed effortlessly.
The final comedian of the evening was Nima Gholamipour.
After introducing himself as an improv comic, actor and writer, he
quipped, "What I'm saying is I'm experienced in being poor." By the
end of his set, his energetic demeanour and sweet delivery captured
the audience's heart.
Poet and astrology memer Aja Moore closed the event. As footage
of Vancouver's Millennium Line train played on repeat, we heard
her musings on desire and grief. The audience sat in reverie as she
ed us through smoke-filled late summer days. Her debut poetry
collection, Hotwheel, will be released this month by Metatron Press.
Perhaps what made Millennial Line so special was the audience.
Soo Jeong, admitting she had just missed the age cut-off, gushed
over the crowd's "fresh faces." But more than just age bound the
audience — during the sets, the crowd remained hungry for both the
highs and the lows, navigating the shadowy distance between the
dark and the light. —Hannah Kruse
RECORDS AND READINGS IV W/
BARBARA ADLER /SYDNEY THORNE/
RIDLEY BISHOP/ DAN GEDDES
SEPTEMBER 15 / TOAST COLLECTIVE
or close to a year, the Toast Collective has been home to
Vancouver's worst-kept secret in musically-related spoken
word and performance art — Records and Readings.
Host Andy Resto — current host of CiTR's Shindig battle of the
bands — says Records and Readings grew out of an idea he and a
friend had of starting a discussion group about records, beginning
with Scott Walker's album Tilt. Taking a slight turn from the original
idea, the Records and Readings series began in January with
prose and poetry performances reflexively responding to the
accompanying music. Since then, it has grown into something of an
"interdisciplinary performance night."
Perhaps more so than previous installments of the series,
Records and Readings IV saw a diversity of performance genres
and topics showcased that night. Dan Geddes, poet and erstwhile
member of the band Peace, opened the night with his characteristically meandering prose poetry. Reminiscent in form and content
of the lyrics he has written for Peace and his solo project Lt. Frank
Dickens, his poetry explored lovesickness, the quotidian, the liminal
space between languor and contentment, often set in a specifically
West Coast backdrop.
Noted local saxophonist Ridley Bishop came soon afterwards.
Telling the audience about how his abortive attempts at writing
fiction led him to Toshimaru Nakamura's No-Input Mixing Board,
Bishop explained his new-found appreciation of noise music. Then,
Bishop treated everyone to a piece that he had made in the style of
Nakamura, on his very own no-input mixing board and pedals.
Following Bishop's inspiring workshop on noise music and the
creative process was a monologue by Sydney Thorne on Chuck
Mangione's '70s jazz-pop hit "Feels So Good." It touched on young
ove in the early days of social media, the fragility of expectation
and opinions on certain works by Mike Judge, namely King of
the Hill. Its emotional peaks and troughs were set to Mangione's
• album of the same name, making it a light-hearted but moving
performance.
Closing off the night in a more impressionistic vein was
a multimedia piece loosely based on Lana Del Rey's "Ride."
• Musician and slam poetry champion Barbara Adler was joined
• by bassist James Meger, who worked on the video piece
accompanying Adler's readings. Adler and Meger's performance
was also based on Mermaid Spring, a musical Adler is currently
f writing with Kyla Gardiner. Whatever your thoughts on Lana De
• Rey, this piece was certainly a fitting bookend to the night, and
perhaps the series itself.
Along with fine, at the Lido and other similar events, Records
and Readings is quickly filling a niche in the spaces between
Vancouver's musical, literary and other creative communities —
and, at least for the time being, it's here to stay. —Chris Yee
CANDACE /BB/ PALE RED
SEPTEMBER 15 / RED GATE
The event description on this show's Facebook page wasn't
kidding when it specified the start time as "9PM sharp."
When I arrived at 10-minutes past 9, BB was already rocking the
room with their upbeat indie pop. Over a foundation of fast-paced
and skillful drumming, jumpy bass and melodic guitar, bassist
Megan Magdalena and guitarist Bella Bebe harmonized flawlessly
in a way that reflected both their close personal friendship and
connectedness as musicians. The two frontpeople spent their
breaks from vocal duties dancing around each other or hopping
offstage to play in the crowd. Their energy was so infectious that
the audience, which was very sparse at that point of the night, made
up for its size with enthusiastic grooving and head bobbing.
Next up was another indie pop trio, Candace, on tour from
Portland, Oregon. The style of their music, as well as their
comparatively tranquil onstage behaviour starkly contrasted BB,
but was no less enjoyable. Candace's tunes were slow tempo and
shoegazey, with echoing guitar and bass melodies that blended
together, along with the lead singer's ethereal voice, to produce
a very dreamy atmosphere. The group successfully recreated the
beautifully mellow, romantic sound on their recordings in a
ive setting.
As much as I enjoyed getting to see BB and Candace — I would
recommend catching both of them live, provided Candace make a
return to Vancouver in the future — the highlight of the show was
definitely closers, Pale Red. Continuing the night's three-piece
theme, the final band, made up of Charlotte Coleman on bass,
Myles Black on guitar and Portia Boehm on drums, played a brand
of art rock like nothing I had ever heard. Their songs were very
melodic, with twangy guitar and snaking bass lines over drum
beats played with felt mallets, and vocals layered and harmonized
between all three of them. Their talent was huge, creating a sound
that was at once simplistic, totally original and very pleasant to
isten to. The set was delivered, particularly from Boehm, with
a very ironic and funny theatricality by way of melodramatic
expression in their faces and voices. The theatrics peaked during
their performance of "I Am the Meter" as they shouted its chorus,
"Someone call the doctor!" together like they were in an episode of
Days of Our Lives.
Evidently I was not alone in my admiration for Pale Red, as the
majority of the crowd chanted for an encore when their set came to
a close. The group responded with a slow number in which Coleman
sang about kissing the person you love, prompting many couples in
the crowd to start doing so. It was a fittingly heartwarming note on
which to end a night of positive energy shared all around.
—Hannah Toms
KITTY & THE ROOSTER [ALBUM
RELEASE]/SHIRLEY GNOME
SEPTEMBER 22/ANZA CLUB
The ANZA Club was sold out to see hometowners Kitty & The
Rooster play their debut album One Gig Hard Drive. Older
folks in evening-wear stood next to younger punk rockers in festival
attire and piercings. The disco ball sent a field of white light spots
across the room while upbeat jazz played overhead. Tables and
chairs were arranged in the centre of the room with a bar to the left
of the stage and booths to the right. The many who couldn't find
space to sit stood towards the back.
Shirley Gnome walked on stage wearing a pink cowboy hat and
a vibrant blue and pink dress. Setting her wine down to pick up
her guitar, Gnome began to strum and tell us about her murderous
desires towards her neighbour's yappy dog before playing the song
10
REAL   LIVE  ACTION
Discorder magazine | OCTOBER  201E
 "Mercy," featuring her own amazingly accurate yaps. From there,
her boisterous and unsanctimonious act never ceased to entertain,
drawing endless laughter from the crowd as she wove her comedic
routine into song. Gnome's truly raunchy lyrics complemented her
clever wordplay and incredible voice.
After a brief intermission, Kitty & The Rooster and their backup
singers, The Cockettes approached the stage clothed in dark robes
and animal masks and bearing prayer candles as droning, cultish
music anticipated them. After disrobing, they kicked off the show
with their theme song "Kitty & The Rooster's Official Bio," driving
people to the dance floor. The dynamic duo deserved every bit of
the enthusiasm that their sold out show brought, and provided all
the brash rock their new album promises.
Jodie Ponto brought out a whole lot of rhythm from her stand-up
cocktail drumset, while Noah Walker provided gnarly electric guitar.
Their voices combined with those of The Cockettes to produce an
upbeat, bouncy surf rock that drowned out the pulsing bass of the
club below. Kitty & The Rooster's sound draws from The B-52's,
including their use of loose, almost voice-cracky vocals and their
strong, repeating choruses. Kitty & The Rooster has veins of
blues as well as moments of Beastie Boys-esque hip hop. It goes
without saying that their repertoire is diverse, but they don't take
themselves too seriously, singing in their theme song, "This whole
band is a joke!"
Both Shirley Gnome and Kitty & The Rooster expressed a lot of
honesty about their lives through humour. With songs like Shirley
Gnome's "Vegan Semen" and "Shine Bright Like Vagina" (about her
time partying with burlesque performers) and Kitty & The Rooster's
"Sexercise" and "Lousy Lover," they gave us a transparency so
unlike the curated images of performers we see so often. At a time
when social media dominates, we could all use a little more unself-
conscious silliness in our lives. —Nick Jensen
BUFFY SAINTE-MARIE: THE AUTHORIZED
BIOGRAPHY BOOK LAUNCH
SEPTEMBER 24 / FOX CABARET
I
walked into a listening party of Buffy Sainte-Marie's debut 1964
album, It's My Way!, an essential intro to the woman whose
activist efforts and biting lyrics brought attention to Indigenous
issues long before there were talks of reconciliation or political
apologies. Gail Sparrow, former chief of the Musqueam First Nation,
opened the night with a traditional welcome and provided us with
an important history lesson about the Musqueam peoples and the
support that Sainte-Marie has shown them.
JB the First Lady, the emcee for the night — as well as
recording artist and activist — hyped up the crowd with her warm
and charming personality. She welcomed Andrea Warner to the
stage. Reading the prologue from her newly-released book, Buffy
Sainte-Marie: The Authorized Biography. Warner wove her humour
into the story of Sainte-Marie. I was convinced that I needed this
book. I needed to learn more about Sainte-Marie, a Cree musical
egend, famously ousted from mainstream music for her lyrical
activism and outspokenness against the mistreatment of Indigenous
peoples. It was clear from these brief readings that Sainte-Marie
would have been as huge as Joni Mitchell (who wrote the foreword
to the book) and Leonard Cohen, her contemporaries and close
friends, if not for her uninhibited activism.
In the Q&A between Warner and CBC's Angela Sterritt, Warner
reiterated this point, by saying that white journalism shapes
the music industry and has contributed to the erasure of Buffy
Sainte-Marie and her music.
The evening continued with a musical performance by JB
the First Lady and guest DJ Rex Smallboy, formerly of the Cree
hip-hop group War Party. After performing some of her own songs,
as well a few collaborations with Buffy Sainte-Marie herself, JB
and guest dancer Madelaine McCallum hit my emotions hard as
they performed a song called "Unprotected Girl." With McCallum
performing in the role of the unprotected girl, she became stronger
and prouder as she put on each piece of her cultural regalia. In the
spirit of activism, the lyrics spoke to the vulnerability of Indigenous
women and girls, the piece ending with both McCallum and JB
wearing the regalia representing their native cultures.
Ending the inspiring and emotional event, Warner read another
chapter which was followed by a book signing. Warner had the
room enraptured with the story of Sainte-Marie, but I also attribute
this to her complete confidence in reading her work to a room full
of people. I think the secret to a good storyteller is that you fee
ike you can tell them anything and did Warnerjust that, taking her
time with each person in the autograph lineup that came to see her.
Some of us came for Buffy, but it is clear that Warner had won us all
over by the end of the night. —Laura Bee
SAWDUST COLLECTOR PRESENTS KATIE
DUCK /BEN BROWN /KAI BASANTA/
LISA CAY MILLER/ RON SAMWORTH
SEPTEMBER 25 / GOLD SAUCER
Sitting facing one another, behind their respective drum kits,
littered with percussive odds and ends, Ben Brown and
Kai Basanta start off the second set of the night together. With the
conversation and house music still humming, Ben begins to toll a
handful of bells as Kai's drumsticks flitter across the kit. Gradually,
they build up a base of percussion, never settling into any particular
groove, but growing in volume, intensity and intricacy The whole
room swoops in to pay attention, the duelling drummers feeding
off one another, playing anything and everything within their reach.
Katie Duck, emerging from her seat in the far corner of the room,
makes her way over to drummers. In a moment of respite from the
percussive torrent, Katie leans over to Kai's ear and speaks, so the
whole room can hear: "You should be ashamed of yourself. Your
father was a liar." Pointing over to Ben, "His too." The drummers
pick up on the antagonism Katie deals out, fuelling their playing
to an apex of ferocity as Katie circles around Kai, speaking only
to him, as if she were the nagging voice in the back of his mind,
egging him on, pushing and taunting him. Ron Samworth's textural
guitar effortlessly seeps into the sonic landscape of the room,
plucking bent notes out of alligator-clipped strings; swoops of
feedback shearing off in points; tapping and brushing across the
face of his instrument, as if he could no longer remember how
it worked. Sinking beneath the keyboard, Lisa Cay Miller sits on
the floor, scraping and banging on the exposed bass strings of
her upright piano. The deep, guttural echoes reverberate around
the space, filling out the low end of the room like a storm. With
wooden spoons wedged between, modelling clay pressed into,
and metal bowls resting against the exposed innards of the piano,
Lisa transforms the piano into an otherworldly machine, amidst the
improvised chaos of her collaborators. Climbing up with one foot
onto a windowsill, another on an exposed pipe in the wall, Katie
massages Kai's shoulders, lifts his hood over his head, and pushes
the ensemble further into the delirium of the moment.
This was just one fragment of the evening. Hosted by Sawdust
Collector, an experimental and interdisciplinary weekly performance
series in the Gold Saucer Studio, the improvised performance was
just one of the many events and workshops Amsterdam-based
improvisational dancer Katie Duck took part in during her week-long
tenure in the city.
It's nearly impossible to put into words the events of the night.
Each of the five performers went through a multitude of styles and
techniques — Brown rolling his floor torn around the room; Basanta
sporadically pounding his cymbal and kick; Miller percussively
typing out a melody on her prepared piano; Samworth dragging a
bow across the fretboard of his guitar; Duck explaining her dream,
of which every member of the audience was a part — but any given
moment was far from encapsulating the spirit of it all.
What became clear, however, was that the show wasn't about
Duck. Make no mistake: she was a force in the room, grabbing the
attention of the audience at will. But over the course of the night,
Duck acted primarily as a catalyst for her collaborators to improvise.
More than anything, she was the inciting incident — wherever she
stepped, Katie Duck stirred up a cloud of art. —Lucas Lund
III
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and
online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences.
Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
CiTR 1B1.3FM+DI5C0RDER
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HERD TO HERD TO HERD
7:30 OH THURSDAYS at the
HASTINGS HILL BREWING CO.
OCTOBER 11
OCTOBER 18
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REAL   LIVE   ACTION
11
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MUSIC
MOONDLE
Moondle
(self-released)
April   7,   2016
I    umbling, where are we going / I know we've been here
I    before"
The lyrics that open jazz-alternative band Moondle's eponymous
album recall the monotony of the day-to-day. Luckily, the group's
most recent release serves as a welcome distraction, with its lush,
mystical instrumentation matched with ethereal, sweeping vocals.
"Water Guides," the first song on the record, immediately
intrigues with vocalist Emma Post! slipping in and out of their upper
register. Their vocals softly introduce a swaying drum beat from Mili
Hong, whose agile percussion fuels the rest of the album. As we
head further in with laid-back track "Song," I can't help but close
my eyes and take in the track's calming bass and pared-down feel.
The track highlights Moondle's ability to deliver a powerful yet
understated performance, with pure vocals complementing one of
the jazzier grooves on the record.
The album takes a noisier turn as we get to "I Forget Your
Name," one of the more energetic tracks on the release. The folky
guitar commingles with lyrics pondering the fleeting nature of love,
followed by a grungy interlude of distorted chords and cymbal
crashes. All the while, Postl's lofty voice buoys above, bringing the
song to its mellow end.
Entering the final leg of the record, Moondle brings foggy forest
mystique with the aptly titled "From The Tree." The lyrics muse
about seeking respite from feeling overwhelmed: "My tangled
thoughts finally have some space." Punchy bass gives the song a
darker tone as it charges through the track, with gentle drumming
ramping up to the finish. The last song, "Destroyer" is a downtempo
track that stands out from the rest of the album's songs. With Postl's
utilizing the lower end of her range, the song is a soft space lullaby
with a hint of a jazz beat.
Moondle takes listeners' minds on a drive, stopping by rock and
jazz on its way to create a calming, introspective journey. Although
the record can meander at times, Hong's incredibly smooth
drumming coupled with comfy vocals give direction and purpose to
the album. It's fluid, magical, refreshingly soothing and reinforces
Moondle's spot in Vancouver's alternative community. — Andrew Ha
WALLGRIN
Bird/Alien
(Heavy Lark)
July   6,    2016
Uancouver-based composer, vocalist and violinist, Tegan
Wahlgren, offers an art-pop gem with their debut LP,
Bird/Alien. In its 11 tracks of soaring vocals, powerful violin
arrangements and textured rhythms, Wallgrin paints a visceral
picture of a paradoxical world— one that nods to the past and
sounds like the future.
The remarkable scope of the record is referenced by its name.
"Bird" represents the natural and familiar, while on the other side
of the slash sits "Alien," a symbol of the unknown. Wallgrin marries
these two seemingly separate ideas with sound. The strings
of their violin weeps and strains while an electronic drum beat
reverbates underneath and choral singing rings out over grainy
bass lines. Through thoughtful composition, Wallgrin plays with
these two extremes in a way that, though sometimes unnerving, is
consistently graceful.
The album leads with "O Harpy," an apt introduction to what's
ahead. The song fades into an ominous chant that swells with
strings while a chorus of vocals descend upon a beat made from
the sounds of deep breathing. The tracklist progresses as a journey.
It reaches a high with "Ae'aea," a pop epic that uses a repeated
vocal sample as a foundation on which a huge crescendo amasses.
Wallgrin offers breaks from the intensity of the voyage with
interludes at either end of the record. As a goodbye, "Exosphere"
ends the adventure softly with gentle singing left almost bare save
for a few delicate notes on the violin.
Lyrically, Wallgrin draws from the past to comment on matters
of the present, employing figures of folklore to explain how magical
and frightening life can be. With the haunting lines, "Daylight / Cold
as the day you left," in "Banshee's Keen," Wallgrin writes their own
mourning song for the Irish mythological creature, a female spirit
who was said to herald or "keen" the death of a family member.
Utilizing the new and the old, touching on love and loss, Bird/
Alien is a powerful exploration of sound that challenges genre. Not
totally strange, nor wholly harmonious, but full to the brim of both,
it exists in a space of its own. —Judah Schulte
DAKK'ONE
14
The Storm Is Coming EP
(self-released)
July   2.4,    2018
The Storm Is Coming, is the latest EP by Dakk'One (or Dakota
Bear), a Vancouver-based rapper from Saskatoon. This EP
is a follow up to Fame Or Destruction, released in the summer of
2017. While his last EP's focus was on personal growth, his latest
offers the Cree rapper's take on the many challenges Indigenous
people face within the confines of Canada.
Dakk'One's technical skill is impressive, making him very much
a rapper's rapper. His flow is spot on, synching seamlessly to the
EP's production. His rhymes are consistently strong, warranting a
few "OH, SHIT!" moments.
In a recent interview with Discorder Magazine. Dakota Bear
spoke about taking inspiration from the film Eight Mile and seems
to be keeping in a similar vein by telling his own underdog story.
Lines like "I'm never the horse that they bet on," and "I speak for the
people who only got rations," illustrate this. Comparisons to Eminem
could be made in terms of speed, but Dakk'One doesn't water down
the message. Instead of using speed as a spectacle, he utilizes it to
build discernible intensity leading to hard-hitting choruses that carry
the energy of each song's message.
The music rapped over is down to earth, like Dakota Bear
himself. The production is a mix of keyboard and hard-hitting
percussion and electronics and remains a simple backing for the
entirety of the EP, with the exception of the title track where it builds
in intensity alongside his rapping. At times the production can
sound similar and overly simple across the stanzas of each song,
especially in contrast to the memorable choruses.
Police brutality, substance abuse, profiling and discrimination are
central themes relating to Dakk'One's experiences as an Indigenous
youth growing up in Saskatoon, but that's not all he raps about. He
should be commended for the scope of the subjects explored in
this EP, including personal issues such as fake friends, insecurity
and cutting out toxic people. This EP brims with self-awareness,
impressive flow and well-earned anger. Dakk'Ones rapping and
technical skill shine throughout, creating an engaging experience
that demands close listening. —Samuel Jones
GHOST THOUGHTS
makes it fresh again. The title of this record, No Chill, alludes to
the album's lyrical subject matter — making out with someone at a
party to make an ex jealous, fantasizing about someone who has
moved on, and asking, "Can I love you if I hate myself?" — rather
than its sound.
No Chill's tracklist is sprinkled with voice memos like "Hannah
Talking" and "Anne Reads the Letter," and as a result, the album
feels like thumbing through a journal full of entries about love,
anger and miscommunication. Many of the tracks are drenched in
echo and reverb, giving an (aptly) ghostly dissonance to otherwise
sugary hooks.
"It's So Easy, It Makes Me Queasy" is the first song on
the record that gives you the opportunity to really dance. The
ine "Take me away / Save me from myself" is sung with both
tenderness and power throughout the first verse, and with dreamy
guitars and warm bass at the forefront of the track, it's easy to
sway along. This comes as a pleasant surprise when you realize
that "It's So Easy, It Makes Me Queasy" is the longest song on
the 13-track record. At nearly five minutes in run time, it offers
a structure and style that's a little more challenging than what's
explored on the rest of the album.
The comparison to Frankie Cosmos comes naturally thanks to No
Chill's uplifting vocal harmonies and confessional lyrics like, "Even
though you don't call me / I still think about you when I cum." Still,
Ghost Thoughts remain distinct from other bands by way of their
tongue-and-cheek lyrical direction and all-around realness. Where
Frankie Cosmos gets lost in fantasy, Ghost Thoughts is grounded
in very real social and interpersonal issues, and this is reflected in
their sound. All things considered, their music is both melancholy
and mature.
No Chill is a relatable, accessible and comfortable collection —
the kind of record you play in your bedroom on a rainy day, perhaps
while you write furiously in your diary, re-read your favourite book or
take a long overdue shower cry. —Aly Laube
ELISAPIE
The Ballad of the Runaway Girl
No Chill
(self-released)
September   1,   2016
I've always found it difficult to get all the way through a Frankie
Cosmos album. As endearing as her vocal style can be, I have
to be in the mood to really enjoy it, and oftentimes find the sound
growing repetitive by the third or fourth song.
Ghost Thoughts takes that same sweet, colloquial approach and
(bonsound)
September   14,   2.018
Folk music and baroque pop have an interestingly harmonious
history, in every sense of the adjective. From Death of a
Ladies Man to Poses, Canadians have been at the forefront of its
fusion. Most recently, this meeting has been embodied by Elisapie
Isaac's latest release, The Ballad of the Runaway Girl.
Isaac's musical roots are in northern Quebec, including
fiddle-driven Quebecois dance songs, Inuk ballads and a stint
touring with the cult band Sugluk as a preteen. Her previous two
releases, There Will be Stars and Travelling Love, featured songs in
French and Inukitut as well as English. The Ballad of the Runaway
Girl unites these aspects, combining the sounds of her youth and
heritage with polyglot pop arrangements.
In addition to four songs in Inukitut, the album includes a cover
of Inuit singer Willie Thrasher's "Wolves Don't Live by the Rules,"
the titular chorus line featuring Isaac's tender singing accompanied
by the more forlorn vocals of Joe Grass. The song's driving pace
is a persistent feature of the album, most notably with "Call of the
Moose," which contrasts human domination with natural authority,
all around a strident acoustic guitar and thudding drumline.
"Darkness Bring the Light" builds more gently into a plaintive
harmony, sounding something like a Kate Bush arrangement of
"Across the Universe." Conversely, the eponymous "Ballad of the
Runaway Girl" combines fingerpicked guitar with a chilling reverb
effect to create an atmosphere of eerie dissonance.
Isaac, whose music stands alongside a parallel career as an
activist and broadcaster, recorded The Ballad of the Runaway Girl
after a period of intense personal questioning, and this is reflected
in the album's depth and emotional range. The building energy of
many of the songs makes for a deeply satisfying listen, and if you're
in the market for lush emotionality, you would do well to bend an ear
to Elisapie's latest. —Jake Clark
UNDER REVIEW
Discorder magazine | OCTOBER 2018
 BOOKS
KATHY    PAGE
Kathy Page
DEAR EVELYN
(Biblioasis)
September   7,   2016
Kathy Page's latest novel Dear Evelyn explores a 70-year
marriage between two seemingly incompatible individuals at a
time of social upheaval and change. Loosely based on actual letters
sent from Page's father to her mother during the Second World War,
Dear Evelyn paints a portrait of how love can endure and be tested,
told in a way that is tender and sometimes difficult to bear.
Harry Miles is a kind, mild mannered young man from a working
class family who has a deep love of poetry and knowledge but an
unknown future ahead of him. Evelyn Hill is a tenacious girl with
a good heart but sometimes harsh tongue, and a clear picture
of the life ahead of her. From their first meeting on the steps of
the Battersea Library in London, it is clear that Harry and Evelyn
are meant to be because, despite their obvious differences, the
magnetism between them is palpable, even when they can only
connect with each other via writing. Their brief courtship leads to
a lifetime together that is at times wonderfully caring and at other
times challenging, most notably during Harry's service during the
war. It is their correspondence during this time in the form of letters
and small gifts that offer a glimpse into Harry's intense love for
Evelyn, even amid the grisly facts of war and as Evelyn's growing
resentments are taken out on him.
Dear Evelyn reads so vividly that I found myself feeling the
characters every frustration and moment of bliss as if they were
sharing themselves. I could envision the homes they built and the
gardens tended to with love. I felt the grief when friends passed
away and the challenges of raising their children.
Kathy Page has written something beautiful and harrowing with
Dear Evelyn. Her characters are so relatable and their situations
are told in a way that doesn't rely on sweeping story arcs or heavy
detail in order to be effective. It is a fairly simple story of two fairly
normal people who fall in love just like many of us do. What is
special about this tale is that it highlights what we will do for love,
what we sacrifice, and the many small details that can become our
undoing. —Nathan Pike
Andrea Warner
BUFFY SAINTE-MARIE:
THE AUTHORIZED BIOGRAPHY
In Buffy Sainte-Marie: The Authorized Biography, Andrea
Warner builds a framework for Sainte-Marie to tell her own story,
in her own words. In the afterword, Warner explains the process
of collaborating and editing: "Buffy has combed every inch of this
book, every page bears her fingerprints, and I can hear her voice at
every turn." The reader hears her voice, too. Though Sainte-Marie
now calls Hawaii home, she was born in Saskatchewan and raised
by an adoptive family in Massachusetts. The biography begins with
her childhood and teen years, tracing the evolution of her musical
expression and activism, rooted in the healing of trauma and the
rediscovery of her Cree heritage. Sainte-Marie is honest and self-reflective, every chapter more and more suggestive of the deep trust
between her and Warner.
I picked up this biography with an appreciation for Sainte-Marie's
music and activism, a surface knowledge of her technological
p  innovations and her passion for educating children, but I had no
idea how deep Sainte-Marie's influence runs in everyday pop
■ culture. What's more, I couldn't truly appreciate the amount of
adversity Sainte-Marie has faced, and how she has transformed
_  every challenge into opportunity. Perhaps the strongest takeaway
is Sainte-Marie's enduring faith in the capacity for humans to show
§  love and express creativity. Whether it be performing protest songs
■ at rallies or singing lullabies on Sesame Street, in everything she
does, Sainte-Marie shares the belief that everyone is connected and
_  has purpose.
Buffy Sainte-Marie: The Authorized Biography is a window
■ into the life and career of a women who continues to challenge
■ patriarchy and colonialism through her art. The strength of the
interviews conducted for this biography places Warner, an already
_  established music writer and cultural critic, among the greatest
B  contemporary biographers. —Brit Bachmann
best life.
Mori, The Artist's Habitat is a wonderful film mirroring a painter's
untroubled soul, and how to take the greatest joy from the little
things. —Angela Tian
Screening as part of the Vancouver International Film Festival on
September 30 and October 7
FILMS
(Greystone Books)
September   25,   2.018
nrtists don't control how their work is received. In some cases,
they don't even control what work is received. It can be
argued that direct engagement with fans through social media has
given musicians more agency over their creative output. And yet,
the most famous, outspoken and seemingly independent artists
have a team of management and PR monitoring their every post.
The music industry is different now than it once was, but not so
different. Big labels have always been the gatekeepers, finding
musicians who will help leverage political and social movements into
record sales. In the 1960s, before the internet changed how people
discovered new music, labels were all-powerful. They controlled
recording studios, influenced radio stations, and they alone had the
money to send artists on tour. It was this era of the music industry
that swept up Buffy Sainte-Marie, whose groundbreaking album, It's
My Way! was released on Vanguard Records in 1964.
Although, as her biography demonstrates, the contract between
Sainte-Marie and Vanguard was an exploitative one that would come
to influence her professional relationships thereafter, the label gave
the artist her first taste of travel and financial freedom. A series of
crucial decisions, serendipitous encounters, political convictions and
uninhibited creativity had gotten Sainte-Marie to that moment in time.
While it was a turning point for her career, it was just a glimmer on an
ocean of accomplishments that sees Sainte-Marie at the centre of the
twentieth century's most important cultural shifts.
Shuichi Okita (director)
MORI, THE ARTIST'S HABITAT
(Japan)
2.018
mori, The Artist's Habitat is a film that lives from moment to
moment within a world locked away in the backyard of Mori
Kumagai. Kumagai, a painter who hasn't taken a step across the
threshold separating his lush garden from the rest of Japan in many
decades, spends his days taking long walks and observing the
wildlife that co-exists alongside him amidst the greenery.
Brought to audiences by Shuichi Okita, the film focuses on
depicting a day out of the life of Morikazu Kumagai, a celebrated
painter in Japan who lived from 1880 to 1977 — his best-known
works including "Cat" (1965) and "Rain Drop" (1961) — and
who never ventured beyond the confines of his property in the
last thirty years or so of his life. Mori, The Artist's Habitat peers
ightheartedly into Kumagai's peaceful life and is comprised of
beautifully pieced together snapshots of flora and fauna, which in
turn are marked by moments from the visits of the painter's
unique guests.
Slowly paced, the film takes its time in introducing each of the
numerous likable characters, who burst in unexpectedly and prod
at the existence Kumagai has carefully constructed over the years,
scattering comic moments throughout. It is the film's insistence on
portraying the quintessential idyllic life alongside the natural chaos
of humans that makes it really stand out. Kumagai embraces peace
and quiet with all his being, but trouble from an unfamiliar world
still occasionally makes its way through his door. The film skims
the surface of the few tensions Kumagai has with others and with
himself, but his chosen isolation remains unexplained.
With almost no conflict, plot, or other typical characteristics of
a story, the film succeeds beautifully in establishing itself beyond
the constraints of time, such that even when the credits begin
to roll, it doesn't feel as if the story has concluded. How the film
begins is exactly how it ends, but Okita succeeds in embedding
a message within each interaction the man has with strangers to
his world.Regardless of his peculiar circumstances living on the
edge of society, Kumagai always believed that he was living his
Carly Stone (director)
THE NEW ROMANTIC
(Canada)
2.018
Carly Stone may be a fledgeling director, but her debut
film wears its ambitions on its sleeve. The New Romantic
compares itself to classic rom-coms, but deals with complex ideas
of sex work, consent and journalistic ethics. It recalls another
Canadian coming-of-age romance, Juno in its tone, with a cast
of young actors who are sure to follow a similar and successfu
career trajectory and a Special Jury Recognition at SXSW Film
Festival. Something apparently subversive and modern, but
stylized as sweet.
Blake, played by Jessica Barden, is a college undergrad with
a cherub face and earnestness to match. Despite her lack of
experience, she has a willingness to test her own boundaries and
employs this in service of her sex column at the student paper.
Barden is incredibly likable in this role and manages to make
ines that could sound coquettish or ditsy sound grounded and
unpretentious. When the man she is seeing lays it on thick with
his understanding of the difference between vinyl and CDs, she
replies, "I like the covers." Scenes like this set up a clear tension
between Blake being infantilized despite her admirable resolve as
a young person.
The men in the film are, for once, quite typecast. It's nice to
know that I don't need anything beyond a 23 year old boy's fawning
over a VICE expose on ayahuasca or a rich dude listening to
electroswing to understand their characters.
Unfortunately, the main crux of the film isn't handled with as
much finesse. Blake falls into the world of becoming a "sugar baby"
where much time and dialogue is spent on determining whether or
not she is a "prostitute." It's a realistic question for our naive and
relatively affluent lead, but asking it demands further excavation
than The New Romantic is prepared to do. While the film isn't
outright condemning of anyone's choices, it settles on letting Blake
out of her conundrum by way of a traditional romance. The film
never confronts the complex experiences Blake has, but instead
sets up an untrue dichotomy where intimacy is the opposite of sex
work. It takes the easy way out.
The New Romantic seems to fall back into the age old question
"love or money?" without grappling with the issues of agency or, for
that matter, money. Still, with a real charming lead, it's an enjoyable
coming of age film that considers the ways we test ourselves in
youth. —Sydney Ball
Screening as part of the Vancouver International Film Festival on
October 4 and 6.
Ill
To submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please
email Under Review Editor Sydney Ball at ur.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1.
8ios HaaoTooi enixogDm i9b*ro32i(l
UNDER REVIEW
15
_
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | OCTOBER 2018
^ V ■   HEN THE MEMBERS OF I M U R
A   A began to work on their upcoming album, they
^^LV   noticed that the number three was a recurring
^w^^      motif in their lives. Their new EP would be
the third in their catalogue, vocalist / keyboardist Jenny Lea
had just turned 30-years old and the band had added a third
member — Amine Bouzaher, producer, bassist and violinist.
When Lea, Bouzaher and guitarist / producer Mikey J. Blige
went to Montreal to work on the album, 3033 was the door
code for the apartment they rented together.
In tribute, they titled their album THIRTY33.
"The vibe that we got from that was 'this is your entry
code into our heartbreak, our lives,'" says Lea.
Heartbreak is ever-present in the music of I M U R.
Over smooth electronic-R&B production, Lea softly coos
stories of sorrow and loss that yearn for the early, blissful
moments of a broken relationship. In I M U R's universe,
heartache exists in duality with pleasure. For every painful
reminiscence of a former lover, there's also a lust-fuelled
paean to the intoxicating pleasures of physical intimacy.
In other words, they see attraction and heartache as two
sides of the same coin.
"You can't have one without the other," says Blige.
While exploring this duality in their lyrics, they create a
musical backdrop that makes their songs as sensual as they
are lyrical. Soft, plushy synth tones envelop listeners with
moody textures, creating a listening experience that's good
for zoning out but also substantial enough for close listening.
or Lea, topics like pleasure
and sensations are escapist.
"It's human nature," she
says. "It's why people are on the
internet. It's why people are reading
other people's interviews. It's nice
to be able to escape the monotony
of daily life, and if I could do that,
even if it's just through lyricism, then
fantastic."
The band also acknowledges that
working through difficult moments
with music has a strong therapeutic
power.
"We're no strangers to
adversity, and it has reall)
positive influence
A / *M
ALL GOOD THINGS
words by Joshua Azizi
illustrations by Nikki Lax
photo by Sara Baar
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n
on our lives to allow that to come out through our music,"
explains Lea. " [It's a] very cathartic and very therapeutic
exercise, and it's something that people can connect and
relate with because they're going through the same thing."
Either which way, the band wants you to feel something
— and they aren't subtle about what they want you to feel.
"I want to hit the musical g-spot," says Bouzaher.
Bouzaher added: "You know that feeling when you listen
to a song, when everything combines at the right moment
and you're lost in it and you get that little tingle in your
spine, a little rise-up? That's the musical g-spot."
The path that led to I M U R's inception began over five
years ago when Lea quit her job at a bank in Whistler and
ended a five-year relationship. "I just found myself being
like really unhappy and really materialistically driven," she
says. "It's not how I grew up and it's not really who I think
that I am as a person."
She began to find fulfillment in music, which she
practiced playing around her house before performing at
open mic events in Whistler. After two years of travelling
overseas, she moved back to Vancouver and formed
I M U R with Blige in 2015.
The band takes a unique approach to their live
performances. Instead of having Lea sing over
pre-programmed electronic beats, they reimagine their
songs so that they can incorporate as many live elements into
their performance as possible. Sometimes they'll simply use
different instruments in place of a keyboard, but other times
they'll completely rearrange songs based around jam sessions
that they had during band practice.
"It's nice to have that jammy element in our live sets,"
says Lea. "I don't think most people are expecting that
from what they hear on our records, and it adds a nice little
element of surprise."
Another big break for the band came when their song
"Breathless" was featured the sci-fi TV series, Wynonna
Earp, when two characters start to get intimate. In lieu of
this, Pique Newsmagazine designated the band as "genre-
bending makeout music" — a label they wholeheartedly
embrace.
"I really loved that," says Lea. "When we think about
what we want people to do when they're listening to our
music, a pretty high honour would be [for them to] get
busy, right?"
Although they make music that's quite melodramatic,
the band members in real life are actually wisecracking
jokesters. It's all in their Twitter bio:
"got dat electronic R&B fo' dat ass."
"We try not to take ourselves too
seriously," says Lea. "Our music might
come across as serious, and it's funny
because that's not really us. We are serious
about music, but otherwise we're just a bunch
of fuckin' dorks."
I MUR's release party for THIRTY33 EP
is on October 11 at Fortune Sound, with
additional performances by Prado, Nina
Mendoza, Nick Wisdom and live visuals
by Laine Butler.
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M festival season for many, but there are those
^^^^  among us that look to early Fall for exploring
],    art and culture. In recent history, SWARM, New
Forms and Destroy Vancouver served as bastions of art and
esoterica, to name but a few of the city's autumnal offerings.
This year marks the return of Wrong Wave, a festival
organized by UNIT/PITT that has intermittently showcased
independent and experimental art in Vancouver for over
30 years. Despite its longevity, 2018 marks only the sixth
installment of the festival, and its irregularity is in many
ways a part of its appeal: a snapshot of the city in a specific
moment, as captured by the artists who operate within it.
"The approach to Wrong Wave is really different every
mtU bg ®H|aE
creator, and a representation of experimental art in
Vancouver today. In particular, the inclusion and focus on
experimental film separates Wrong Wave no. 6 from its
predecessors.
"I think this Wrong Wave is responding to other forms of
media that exist in relation to the music that's happening,
because if it is an art rock practice there's usually a visual
or a written element alongside the performance of [music],"
Wei says. "I don't want my practices to exist in separate
boxes. I want all the practices to be speaking to each other,
and this is a great platform to do that."
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time," says KC Wei, the curator for this year's Wrong
Wave no. 6. "The first one was in 1984; Jim Carrico from
Red Gate was one of the organizers, which is an amazing
historical throughline."
For those unfamiliar, Wei has become a mainstay of
Vancouver's independent art and music communities over
the past four years. From numerous bands (Late Spring,
hazy, Kamikaze Nurse), to performance and experimental
art/music projects (art rock?, Kingsgate Mall Happenings),
to her own music and printed matter label (Agony Klub),
it feels unjust to distill the body of her work into such a
simple list.
"It was very underground, super punk for that time,
experimental and performative," Wei continues, recounting
her own research on the festival's first ever installment. "It's
had those qualities that I was interested in for art rock?, and
I think that's why I was asked to curate it [this year]."
The disparate nature of Wrong Wave, both in what
the festival has offered over the years and in its actual
occurrences, is something Wei had to consider in her role
as curator.
"Every time it happens it's a completely unique scene
or moment in time," she notes. "In 2012, it was at The
Waldorf and it was way more electronic music-based. I
guess it ebbs and flows in trying out what experimental art
music is and isn't."
The programming of Wrong Wave no. 6 feels very much
like a consolidation of Wei's interests and expertise as a
The festival will premiere Wei's own documentary,
art rock? The Popular Esoteric, and Myles Black's
Virga Soundtrack, a documentary surrounding queer
expressionism across several artistic communities. With
both projects having taken multiple years to complete, Wei
felt a belaboured kinship between her and Black's work and
saw fit to present them together within the unique staging of
Wrong Wave.
"In his mind, he'd never finish it," Wei says of Black's
film. "It's very experimental, creating spaces that feel very
safe and then collaging them together in this pursuit of what
otherness and queerness can be in the music scene."
In regards to art rock? The Popular Esoteric, Wei
explains that she began recording performances during her
monthly series without too much thought as to what they
would become. In part sparked by Wei's dissatisfaction with
previous documentaries surrounding Vancouver's music
scene, she began to see the footage in a new light and with a
newfound purpose.
"It was a really long learning process; I was learning
the techniques to make a music documentary and learning
that I wanted to make a music documentary at the same
speed," Wei notes.
Scenes include performances of artists and musicians
in spaces pivotal to Vancouver counterculture, from The
Astoria to Red Gate to the Toast Collective, spanning from
Kingsgate Mall Happenings in 2014 to art rock? in 2016 to
its finale in April 2018.
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"It takes a space to make a community happen, and
it takes a city to support these spaces to allow a scene
to happen — to allow experimentation to happen," Wei
posits. "It's kind of a portrait of that: this moment in
time in Vancouver where every conversation is about how
unaffordable it is, and how impossible it is, and how all our
friends are moving away. But at the same time, we still have
a lot of fight in us."
I   n addition to the two film screenings, Wrong Wave no.
16 will feature two nights of live music, at Red Gate and
8EAST respectively, with the latter also serving as a
book launch for the companion piece Wrong Wave 666.
"It's a book, a publication, a collage," Wei says of the
printed material. "I asked all the performers and musicians to
send me various ephemera they had [collected] over the years:
setlists, posters, prints, tour diaries — anything that's related
to their practice that they haven't thrown away for some
reason. Then, I collaged them altogether in page form."
Between the book, the documentaries and the live music
performances (of which her band Kamikaze Nurse is a part),
Wei's interdisciplinary contributions and connections are
central to the newest installment of Wrong Wave. What's
most important for her, however, is the issue of visibility: the
need to be witnessed by those apart from the scene.
"Just because we're underground and experimental
doesn't mean we don't need to be seen by the status quo,
because that's how we maintain our community," Wei
opines. "Contributing, for me, means doing something
that will be seen or heard at some level. I don't care if only
10 people come to the show. To know [that] the world —
the world outside — is seeing that something like this is
happening is more important."
Wrong Wave no. 6 may be yet another festival for
Vancouver's independent and esoteric crowd, but Wei's
vision for it goes further. It is a portrait of the city's best
and strangest in this moment, and it's integral that those
with the power to support or extinguish the celebration of
experimental art take heed of what have creators like Wei
have to offer.
Wrong Wave no. 6 begins with a screening of new works by
KC Wei and Myles Black at VIVO Media Arts Centre on
October 10, doors at 6:30PM and screenings starting at 7PM
(with free pizza). It continues on October 12 at Red Gate
with music by Kamikaze Nurse, Crotch, Maskara and Vomit
Fraud. The finale is on October 13 at 8EAST for the launch
of Wrong Wave 666 and live performances by Dashes, Julian
Hou & Tiziana La Melia and My Name is Del.
V
_
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | OCTOBER 2018
BEING AN EMERGING FILMMAKER
and trying to break into the industry is no easy
task, but the Vancouver International Film
Festival might have just made it a little bit
easier. This year, VIFF has launched a mentorship program
designed to provide an immersive festival experience and
build connections that will hopefully open doors for 11 loca
filmmakers.
The mentorship program was piloted in previous years
by VIFF's Associate Director of Programming, Curtis
Woloschuk, drawing from filmmakers who had submitted
their work to the festival. This July the program officially
launched after securing a grant that made it possible.
Alysha Seriani, Youth Engagement Coordinator and
former mentee herself, suggested to Woloschuk the idea
of having open applications for the program because,
as she puts it, " [we] might not know all the filmmakers
that are in town."
Any filmmaker between the ages of 19 and 30 who
has completed one film and lives within commuting
distance of downtown Vancouver was eligible to
apply. The application requirements were deliberately
minimal in order to make the opportunity accessible to
people that are just starting their careers and showing a
passion for bringing projects to fruition. Out of around
100 applications, 20 candidates were interviewed and
11 were selected.
"MANY MAINSTREAM
FESTIVALS AROUND THE
WORLD TEND TO OVERREPRESENT
WHITE MALE FILMMAKERS
T
hrough this program, VIFF is committed to
encouraging underrepresented and misrepresented
perspectives in the film industry. Another reason for
adopting an open application process was to encourage
people to apply who might not have done so
in the past — filmmakers that identify as
Indigenous, people of colour, and those
across gender, sexuality and
ability spectrums. Seriani
sees this as one step
towards changing
film festival
culture: "Many
mainstream
festivals
around the
world tend
to overrep-
resent
white male
filmmakers
and it was really important for
us to not do that, especially
because we want it to be this
door opening [experience]." According to Seriani, it takes
forcing your way in to instigate change.
Sheridan Tamayo-Henderson is one of this year's
mentees. Speaking to the accessibility of the program, she
says, "One of the things that really impressed me about [the
application] was the fact that it only asked for one film [to
have been made]. It might not seem like that big of a deal
for other people, but if you haven't had the [resources] to
develop a huge portfolio, it becomes an indirect gatekeeping
thing." For Tamayo-Henderson, it's about more than just
reducing financial barriers: "I think it's a really important
equalizing thing for people from different classes and
different geographic positions [to have access to programs
like this onel."
s part of the
mentorship
program
each mentee receives an all
access pass to VIFF screenings
and conferences, one-on-one
mentor meetings with acclaimed
filmmakers, access to networking
events and eight programmed
sessions ranging in topics. Some of
the workshops introduce the mentees to
a festival environment, while others focus on
away valuable experiences. Not only do mentees
have access to their mentors, but mentors can
also call upon mentees to work on film projects
in the future. "It's about getting access to
resources but also building a community, from
the ground level of emerging filmmakers," says
Seriani.
Each of the 11 mentees has a different style
and different levels of education, contributing
to the diversity of the cohort. Gholamipour, for
example, is one of the mentees who does not
have formal filmmaking education, but whose
potential made him a perfect candidate. Seriani
points out that although one learns from watching what
they want to do, understanding other aspects of filmmaking
is as much about learning from peers as observation.
As this is first year of the mentorship program, there are
high expectations about its outcome. Seriani believes that
there is room for enhancement, but completing the first
official mentorship program with dedicated programming
and funding is a milestone towards solidifying its future.
Perhaps next year, VIFF will screen its mentee's films, but
for now, these 11 emerging filmmakers will have the chance
to see the industry through more experienced eyes that will
hopefully unlock unlimited possibilities.
For more information about VIFF's Mentorship Program
and additional programming, visit viff.org
AND IT
WAS REALLY
IMPORTANT FOR
US TO NOT DO THAT"
the process of acquiring funding,
gear and other technical aspects of
film production and distribution.
The program is meant as a way
to launch these mentees into the
filmmaking industry, in part, by
providing access to resources and
fast-tracking connections that
would take time and extra effort
to build organically.
As mentee Nima Gholamipour
put it, the program aims to "plant
a mentorship seed" whereby
mentees and mentors both take
ON TOUR FROM MONTREAL.
@ Red Gate
196s Main St.
.with local support
SIGH
CO-OP
TYEP
9
"UIFF mentorship'
 8ios aaaoToo! 9nhD|>Dm ™ino38i<i
EflUfAH
J-he Reat
words ^~^
by Tash King ...
illustrations by
Dana Kearley
I know I am going to faint.
The fact announces itself with a shiver and a bead of sweat.
Timber Timbre has just begun their first song. My dread
feels out of place. The band smiles conspiratonally at each
other; my friends beam in anticipation.
My vision is kaleidoscopic. The venue fragments into a
blur of plaid, tattooed limbs, shaky hands clapping off-beat.
The show unfolds around me, continuing, unaware that
my illness is announcing itself in my body like a blade.
The exit is a faint glow across the room. The first song
isn't over yet. I search for a seat, frantic. The closest stool is
occupied by a serene pregnant woman,
her head nodding in time with the slow
circles her finger draws on her belly.
I see the empty seat behind the
lighting technician. Could I ask him
for it? The exit, presumably leading
backstage, catches my eye. Could I
make a dash for it? Escape into the
alley, a cab, my bed?
Before I have time to act, the first
song ends and a seat opens up behind
me against the wall. I feel relief but
don't move for it. One song passes,
then another.
I hesitate because of what sitting
means — I fear it will publically mark
my body as ill.
my parents love to tell certain stories about my body. Stories about its
former strength. "She probably didn't tell you she was a basketball
star," they'll say to my friends, "she could have gone far."
In these stories, I am in the middle of a game. My body is rooted to the gym
floor and a small opponent runs into me. I am tall and unmoving. They bounce
off of me and collapse, injured. These stories are interchangeable, true and
violent. They are certificates of authenticity. They point to my body and say, she
wasn't always this way.
In the summer of 2015, I sat in a waiting room on the third floor of St.
Paul's Hospital. I was hoping to receive a diagnosis for my mystery
illness.
There was a TV on the wall. It was showing footage of a street two
blocks away, where a deer had run out of Stanley Park and become trapped
in heavy traffic. Everyone in the room watched, silent. A group of cyclists
surrounded the deer, herding it back towards the park. The women sitting
next to me started clapping and laughing. The noise
jolted me out of my seat.
I left the hospital one hour later with a diagnosis:
Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME). It has no known cause,
no treatment, and very little funding or research behind
it. The primary symptoms are severe fatigue and brain
fog, which come and go with no logic and are not made
better by sleep. Many people with ME lose the ability to
walk, work, and sometimes talk. In the last century, ME
has been conflated with hysteria and dubbed the yuppie
flu. Most doctors believe that we the afflicted have
manifested the symptoms with our minds — that we
simply need to correct our thinking to get well.
At the time, I could not process that this illness was
my reality.
Os a teenager I bussed into the city for concerts. I
can chart each season through ticket stubs, set lists
and homemade band tees.
My body was my greatest ally on these adventures into
the city. I would feed it Starbucks and cheap pizza and in
return, it would activate with such enthusiasm, hurtling
around the city in search of whatever band I was seeing
that night. I would stand in line for hours only to plant
myself in the front row, where I would stand for hours
more. The band would begin and I would lovingly crane
my neck upwards, bliss bursting from my eyes and mouth
and arms. That was my joy: the gift of my body.
In the time immediately following my diagnosis, I believed
that if I performed wellness convincingly, my body would
follow. For every three days spent socializing, I spent three
days in bed. I rarely told people about my diagnosis. When you
have an invisible illness, you can hide it until you can't.
In 2015, I saw Angel Olsen at the Biltmore Cabaret. It was a
packed, sweaty show. I stood behind the stage watching Angel
croon through chain link. With nothing to lean on and nowhere
to sit, I spent the set on the verge of fainting and left early. I
staggered the three blocks home and collapsed.
The Timber Timbre show took place 3 years after my
diagnosis. By then, I had stopped drinking and riding
my bike. I had watched my social circle fold itself up
into smaller and smaller pieces. Yet, the person I imagined
myself to be could still stand, dance and experience live
music as I had as a teenager.
Disability scholars use the term "biographical
disruption" to explain the way a chronic illness can change
the course of your life, critically challenging the future you
imagines for yourself.1 This disruption has been described
by some as a death of self, especially when an illness is so
unpredictable, overwhelming and controlling that you have
little power over your own life. I did not want to have to
change the way I lived my life; I did not want to stop participating in the activities that I saw as central to my identity.
After years of missed shows, I channeled everything into
seeing Timber Timbre. I called the venue ahead of time to
ask if there was seating. I read reviews to find out if they
had air conditioning. I casually interrogated friends who
knew the venue to find out if there was a water station. I
was a disabled detective.
As   Timber   Timbre   plays   I  stare   at   the   seat
I have spent years using the invisible nature of ME as camouflage among the able-bodied. The
bliss of performing wellness is intoxicating, causing me to forget myself until I come to like this:
trapped and unmasked.
All the familiar fears of making my illness public take hold of me. If I sit down, the venue
could be swallowed by silence and a single spotlight could wash over me. If I sit down, I could
have to welcome a new public identity as a person with a disability.
Another song passes. Nausea and vertigo thread their way through my sinuses. I walk around
the table and sit.
No one notices me. The show doesn't stop. My friends eventually realize that I have moved,
and smile at me. I lean against the wall. Fatigue drains from my fingertips and pools around my
feet on the floor. For the first time that evening, I am able to pay attention to the music. I feel good.
Tash King is a writer and media educator who has spent the
last two years facilitating media literacy workshops at The
Cinematheque. She lives, works and plays on the traditional
and unceded territory of the Musqueam, Skxwu7mesh and
Tsleil-Waututh peoples.
1. Dickson, A., Knussen, C, & Flowers, P. (2008). 'That
was my old life; it's almost like a past-life now': Identity
crisis, loss and adjustment amongst people living with
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Psychology & Health, 23(4),
459-476.
'The Seat'
9
_
 Otl THE AIR
CONVICTIONS AND CONTRADICTIONS
interview  by Dan Miller  //   illustration by Akhila Varghese
photo  by Matthew Lim
no you ever have a stupid moment? Where do you sing? Are we using the word
"guys" properly? If there's anything to take away from Neetu Dha's radio show
Convictions and Contradictions, it's that there are a lot of curiosities about our
society that we don't always notice or contemplate. Neetu hosts a comedy program that airs
at 8AM on alternate Thursdays on CiTR 101.9FM, where she explores humorous social
observations. The following is an interview with Neetu.
Why is it important that the show be funny?
I'm making social observations and when
I talk about them, I don't want it to feel
like an essay paper. I don't want to make
a documentary, I want to make a funny
documentary.
Who are your inspirations for the show?
I feel like I draw from my high school
teachers a lot. In high school we'd spend
whole classes just talking about things
like concrete. * Laughs* There's something
about teachers where they want to make
things funny because I think they have a
belief that more students will listen. I guess
that instilled something in me to try and
make things funny.
Do you think of yourself as a teacher when
you re on
the ;
Who is Neetu Dha?
That's a difficult question. I guess I
could define myself by my roles. Like,
I'm a student; I'm Sikh; I'm Punjabi; I'm
Canadian; I'm a daughter and I'm a sister.
I also feel like I'm intelligent too, though
one of my shows is about how everyone
has a stupid moment - I definitely have my
fair share of those, but I don't think I really
know who I am. Neetu Dha is something in
the works.
How would you describe your show?
The show is about how everybody has
their convictions - you have your
convictions, I have mine - but there are
contradictions to our convictions, we
just don't know about them yet. I always
describe the show in the same way: it's about
social observation and I want it to be funny.
A little bit. I'm trying to teach everybody
something, but at the same time I also
want the audience to understand that
[they] probably already know this, I'm just
pointing it out to [them].
As a student, how do you balance your
academics with your commitment to radio?
That's always something that weighs on
my mind, it is difficult to juggle everything.
I have five courses, I have an internship, a
part-time job, I illustrate, I have this show
and I try to exercise, although that's not
going so well. * Chuckles*
Is there anyone else involved with
producing the show?
It's all me. Although, sometimes I ask
people at the station, "what do you think
about this?" because I think another
sub-meaning of this show is that I have all
these observations that I've made and I find
important, but I can't experience everything
and I would still like to articulate the
experiences [of others] and therefore I need
to go to other people for that.
Are you ever hesitant about sharing
yourself on the air?
I feel like I'm not scared to share myself,
I think sometimes what pulls me back from
sharing something personal is that it might
veer from what the show is about. It will no
longer be about social observations, it'll be
about personal observations and the show
isn't about me. But I do always try to bring
in my observations and my perspective. The
one thing I think that really brings me back
is that my parents listen to the show, very
frequently, and there are some things you
don't want to say in front of your parents.
*Laughs*
Why do you only play instrumental music
on your show?
I've always been drawn to instrumental
music. I feel like music today is just so
focused on the words but really when you
listen to the song, you're not focused on the
words. I don't play an instrument, I don't
know how music works, I just know that I
like the sound of instrumental music. I play
video games and video games have instrumental music most of the time. I feel like
it's just so underrepresented and I feel like
we're losing music to the lyrics that we
don't actually listen to. Instrumental music
is an abstraction that needs to be used more
and made aware of more. That's what I try
to do with the show.
You can catch Convictions and
Contradictions every other Thursday at
8AM. on CiTR 101.9FM or listen to past
episodes on CiTR's website:
citr.ca/radio/convictions-and-contradictions
m
3 i
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ON THE AIR I Convictions & Contradictions
(VISIT:
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special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communityiivingradio@gmaii.com
• DELIBERATE NOISE
2PM-3PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Love rocking out to live music,
but don't feel like paying
cover? Tune in for the latest
and greatest punk, garage
rock, local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
contact: programming@citr.ca
■ 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
• INTO THE WOODS
TUES 5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope,
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES&TREASONS
3PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
Malik, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
• THE SPENCER LATU SHOW
TUES 10PM-11PM, TALK/ POLITICAL
COMMENTARY
The Spencer Latu Show is a
progressive politics show that
speaks truth to power. We
provide much needed coverage,
and media criticism of stories
at the municipal, provincial,
national and international
level from the perspective of
two progressive working class
students; Spencer Latu and
Ajeetpal Gill. We are based
out of UBC in Vancouver BC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room:
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/POP
Jayden targets audiences in the
Korean community in Vancouver
to introduce the News on
Korea, Korean Culture while
comparing other Asian Cultures,
playing all kinds of Korean
Music(K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie,
R&B,etc),talking about popular
trends in the industries of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows,
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave
or Hallyu), the news about
Korean Entertainment Industry,
what's going on in the Korean
Society here in Vancouver and
conversations with guests.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• UNCEDED AIRWAVES
2PM-3PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
third season! This team of
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
folks produce a weekly show
on Indigenous issues, current
affairs, entertainment, culture
and news - all centering
Native voices. Come make
Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Foiiow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook. com/uncededairwaves
■ 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
• ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC,
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM:
eclectic/live INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco uvermedicinesho w@gmail. com
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too) and relished in the merging
of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-10PM, HIP hop/ r&b/ soul
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
10PM-11PM, TALK
Listen to your favorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes.
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSSay
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• CONVICTIONS &CONTRADICTIONS
thurs, 8am-8:3oam, talk/come-
dy/social obeservations
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society, shown through social
observational comedy. To boot,
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
• GOODIE
8:30AM-gAM, talk /interview
Goodie is an interview show
with the do-gooders who are
using business, innovation
and creativity to make positive
change in the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• FINDING THE FUNNY
gAM-g:30PM,TALK
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocke tfromrussiacitr(3>gm ail.com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Rocke tFrom Russia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored bydonuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
• K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners an
introduction to music &
entertainment in Asian Cultures,
especially, Korean, Japanese
and Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr.ca
• DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK /NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
• FLASHBACK WITH
ALEC CHRISTENSEN
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM-7:30.
TALK/MUSIC/ARTS & CULTURE
Each episode, join host Alec
Christensen and friends
as they discuss the pop
culture and politics affecting
Vancouver and beyond.
Contact: Twitter | flashbackaiec
NO DEAD AIR
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
JAZZ FUSION / POST ROCK
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion:
experimental electronic and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook | NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:3opm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), if II
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ TRVOAU
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraitentacies@hotmaii. com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse(3>canadalandshow. com
• SEEKING OFFICE
8AM-9AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
On October 20th, 2018,
Vancouverites will vote in a
new mayor, city council, park
board and school board.
This is a change election,
in the midst of Vancouver's
worst housing crisis. With a
fractured right and a divided
left, CiTR's News Collective
brings you unique coverage
of the issues and individuals
seeking office. Seeking Office
is available for download on
iTunes, Stitcher or where
ever you get your podcasts!
Contact: @CiTRNews
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether ifs contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery and a IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Damawill bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiop odcast@gmaii. com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP/ DREAM
POP/SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on each other
and leave mix tapes and love
letters in each other's lockers xo
Contact:
Facebook \ @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter \ @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp ://nardwuar. com/rad/con tact/
• WORD ON THE STREET
5PM-6PM, ROCK/INDIE/POP
Hosted by the Music Affairs
Collective, every episode is
packed with up-to-date content
from the Lower Mainland music
communities including news,
new music releases, event
reviews and upcoming events,
interviews with local musicians
and industry professionals and
discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7:30PM, TALK/COMEDY
Every week Jack, Tristan and
a special guest randomly
select a conversation topic
for the entire show; ranging
from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:3opm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
imational
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and future.
This includes jazz, soul:
hip-hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
There are also interviews
with local and international
artists. Truly, a radio show
with international flavour.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock:
drone, ambient, experimental
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
m     rf£~?l1
irctiay
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:3oam-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citriatenightshow@gmaii.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crash nburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
Contact: codebiue@pauinorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact:
mantraradioshow@gmaii.com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavoina@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy:
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hone
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmaii.com
SOCASTORM
3PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
Papayo!!#SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
Sbit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79. We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ sunti/iy
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM,  INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmaii.com,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORETHAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
3PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmaii.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
3PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem:
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmiieymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ lSUHU>°f
1 £l<TT£ltI<
• STUDENT PROGRAMMING
ECLECTIC
Marks any show that is
produced primarily by students.
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citr.ca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9 FM SEPTEMBER CHARTS
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Carlo*#
Carlo
Self-Released
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I   2
Ghost Thoughts*+#
No Chill
Self-Released
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Adrian Teacher and The
Subs*+#
Anxious Love
Self-Released
I   *
Kellarissa*+#
Ocean Electro
Mint
I   3
Club Sofa*+#
Cool 4 Me
Self-Released
I   *
La Kasquivana*+#
Rebeldia Radikal
Self-Released
I   J
Sore Points*+
Sore Points
Deranged
I   •
Fine*
Thanks for Asking
Self-Released
I   »
Raine Hamilton**
Night Sky
Self-Released
«
Peppermoth*
Glimmer Tide
Big Mind
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My Wife*+#
mess u lately
Self-Released
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Devours**
Late Bloomer (reissue)
Locksley Tapes
I»
Bored Decor*+
The Colour Red
Self-Released
I<*
Mamarudegyal MTHC*+#
MRGEP
Self-Released
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Heavy Dive*
Warn The Dark
Self-Released
l«
Julia Kent and Jean D.L.*#
The Great Lake Swallows
Gizeh
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Dusted*
Blackout Summer
Polyvinyl
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Debby Friday*+#
bitchpunk
Self-Released
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YEP*+#
Grub b/w Julian
Self-Released
|l«
Smaller Hearts*#
Smaller Hearts
Self-Released
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Blood Orange
Negro Swan
Domino
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Dead End Drive-ln*+
Mea Culpa
Self-Released
Is
Freak Dream*+
Into The Sun
Artoffact
1
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Dumb*+#
Seeing Green
Mint
la
Mike Farris
Silver & Stone
Compass
B
Future Star*+#
i went home and all i got pt 3
Self-Released
l»
Low#
Double Negative
Sub Pop
»
Joani Taylor*+#
In A Sentimental Mood
Cellar Live
h
Primp*+#
Half-Bloom
Self-Released
l»
Mitski#
Be The Cowboy
Dead Oceans
Ii
Land Line*+#
(fka Sony Edith)
Goodbye Frida
Self-Released
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Sarah Davachi*#
Gave in Rest
BaDaBing!
1*
The Oh Wells*+#
Roll With The Punches
Self-Released
»
Tough Age*+#
Shame
Mint
1*
Anybodys*+#
Necessity Of Contrast
Self-Released
I"
Fatoumata Diawara#
Fenfo (Something To Say)
Montuno
l»
I'm With Her#
See You Around
Rounder
»
Champion Lawnmower*+#
Babies
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