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  254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
PCOMING SHOW
ALICE GLASS & ZOLA
JESUS
PICTUREPLANE
MAY
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WHISKEY RAIN REVUE:
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CALM LIKE A BOMB, NEVERMIND
P0NDER0SA 2018 LINEUP
LAUNCH PARTY
LAZY SYRUP ORCHESTRA, IM U R,
MALCOLM JACK
AT THE WISE HALL:
POLYRHYTHMICS
COCOJAFRO
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AT THE RICKSHAW:
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THE L0NGSH0T
FRANKIE AND THE STUDS
TRICKY
YOUNG MAGIC
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TYR ORPHANED LAND, GHOST
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MASSIVE SCAR ERA
iM
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JP MAURICE 'BOYS'
ALBUM RELEASE hotel mira,
BAD ANIMAL, FRANKIIE
FJ
MAY
8TH ANNUAL KICK CANCER'S 1
A$$! FUNDRAISER
FUNKDOOBIEST, ANTIPOLITIC,
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AWKWARD A/C,& MORE
POPTONE                 1
AUTOMATIC
MAY
MODIFIED GHOST FESTIVAL
I III (NIGHT 1): OBITUARY
PALLBEARER, SKELETONWITCH,
DUST BOLT, UNTIMELY DEMISE,
BUSHWHACKER
MAY
MODIFIED GHOST FESTIVAL
III (NIGHT 2): BLOODBATH
THE BLACK DAHLIA MURDER,
BEYOND CREATION, GATECREEPER,
HOMEWRECKER & MORE
MODIFIED GHOST FESTIVAL
III (NIGHT3): BONGRIPPER
YOB, RUBY THE HATCHET,
ELECTRIC CITIZEN, DEAD QUIET,
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SACRIFICE, NAILS, MIDNIGHT, BAT,
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MODIFIED GHOST FESTIVAL
III (NIGHT 5): POWER TRIP
SHEER MAG, FURY, WAINGRO, RED
DEATH, WOOLWORM
MONKEYJUNK
I WITH GUESTS
Additional show listings,
fo, videos & more:
WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.CO
^blueprint
UPCOMING EVENTS
May 04
BORN RUFFIANS
May 07
SABA
May 08
PETER HOOK & THE LIGHT
May 10
May 22
May 22
)un02
)un03
Juntf
)unl5
Jul 07
Jul 19
Jul 21
Aug 30
Sep 03
RYAN HEMSWORTH
May 12
BOB LOG III        J
1 May 20 1
RUSS (ALL AGES)
i
JOYNER LUCAS
SOFI TUKKER
. ■.. ■-■'.-, *■■».■/.:---W•'■-<.• '■■''.■ '■■'.'.
KING TUFF / CUT WORMS
SMOKE DZA & BODEGA BAMZ
THE SWORD
UPON A BURNING BODY / VOLUMES
NEUROSIS / CONVERGE
GREAT GRANDPA / DEAD SOFT
MELVINS
LETS EAT GRANDMA
, i. H^'JUUtt^i^tiUiJ^A. ■'-; ■■,-'.
THE EXPLOITED
FORTUNE
FORTUNE
VENUE
FORTUNE
FORTUNE
PACIFIC
COLISEUM
FORTUNE
COMMODORE
COMMODORE
FORTUNE
VENUE
FORTUNE
FORTUNE
ADVANCE TICKETS FOR ALL EVENTS AT BPLIVE.CA
 TABLE of COtlTEtlTS
MAY 2018
COVER S "STANLEY PARK SIT-IN 1970" BY HEATHER KAI SMITH.
iFeaturess
06 -  DOXA
Vancouver's documentary film festival is back
and stirring up trouble
07 -  DUSTY  BABES  COLLECTIVE
a group of artists reclaim clay
08 -  DJ  KOOKUM
not your grandma
16 -   GIRL  ROCK  CAMP  VANCOUVER
it's time to send your kids to camp!
17 -  JO PASSED
from DIY to Sub Pop + Royal Mountain notoriety,
where will he go from here?
18 -   GRUNT'S  URBAN  VIDEO  SCREEN
a bright spot on an ugly building
Column* + iDt&er £>t«ff
04 -   Io, Good Humour:
Nasty Women Comedy
05 - Unceded:
Review of Tanya Tagaq
& Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory
Real Live Action
Live music, theatre
10
12
13  - May Events  Calendar
Art Project
by Heather Kai Smith
ADVERTISE:Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words
to Discorder, please contact the
editor at editor.discorder@citr.ca.
To submit images, contact the art
director at artcoordinator@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE:Sendina
cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133
University Blvd. V6T1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTED distribute
Discorder in your business,
email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE:We are part of CiTR,
a registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content
you love.To donate visit
www.citr.ca/donate.
14  - Under Review
Music, films, books
19
20
21
22
23
Poetry:
"Gaba" by Ivanna Besenovsky
T
"he  Air:
Samsquanch's Hide-away
CiTR Program Schedule
CiTR Program Guide
April  Charts
To inform Discorder of an
upcoming album release,
art show or significant
Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
comments, complaints and
corrections via email.
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising
Coordinator: Audrey MacDonald // Discorder Student Executive: Tintin Yang // Editor-in-Chief: Brit
Bachmann // Under Review Editor: Maximilian Anderson-Baier // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D.
Wrinch // Web Editor: Zoe Power //Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Social Media Coordinator:
Sydney Ball // Accounts Manager: Halla Bertrand // Charts: Myles Black// Production Assistants: Savilla
Fu, Muni Gholamipour, Christina Dasom Song//Writers: Joshua Azizi, Brit Bachmann, Jennifer Brule, Jake
Clark, Esmee Colbourne, Dusty Exner, Bridget Gallagher, Melissa Haberl, Elizabeth Holliday, Nick Jensen,
Pernilla Jonsson, Dylan Joyce, Jonathan Kew, Alyssa Laube, Erica Leiren, Lucas Lund, Jean Sadler,
Madeson Singh, Indigo Smart, Alex Smyth, Madeline Taylor, Dylan Toigo, Douglas Vandelay, Sarah Wang
// Photographers & Illustrators: Sara Baar, Javiera Bassi de la Barrera, Evan Buggle, Erin Fleming, Jules
Francisco, Josh Gabert-Doyon, Alistair Henning, R. Hester, Alicia Lawrence, Jamie Loh, Sunny Nestler, Lua
Presidio, Joy San, Alejandra Sanmaniego, David Wakeham // Proofreaders: Maximilian Anderson-Baier,
Brit Bachmann, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Jake Clark, Nick Jensen, Jonathan Kew, Zoe Power, Hannah
Toms, Aidan Tong, Jasper D. Wrinch.
©Discorder 2018 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR.
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiherh speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM.
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager©citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Ojat Political
3pag from CfiOt
101*9 JFffl
EDITOR'S NOTE
7^^^ 1  I   hat does it mean to be "too political?" I ask myself this every time we
A   A conduct a readership survey, when, like sour keys between general praise,
^B^^^P   honest suggestions and new music leads, there are comments that I'm
^^^^      too political and that my editorial direction has led Discorder astray. I
live for these sour keys. They keep me motivated to continue profiling organizations and
movements that challenge the reader to think outside their realms of understanding.
And honestly, isn't that what a dynamic publishing platform is all about? Discorder isn't
hard-hitting journalism, but we aren't a mag of fluff pieces either. Like all good medicine,
we supplement our bitter aftertaste with a little buzz.
So, when I read Jonathan Kew's DOXA feature on page 6, and the Director of Programming,
Selina Crammond, mentions that DOXA has been getting complaints for becoming too political
with their program, I admit I got giddy. DOXA and Discorder are completely different, and yet,
our structures are similar in that our teams both work an incredible amount of (often unpaid)
overtime to produce something for the public that we hope will provoke emotion, even if that
emotion is anger.
In this issue of Discorder, we feature several artists and organizations provoking emotion
within their own corners of the universe. Dusty Babes Collective is a group of ceramicists
challenging the conventions of clay; Girls Rock Camp Vancouver is working towards a more
gender diverse music scene; DJ Kookum's EDM sets overshadow the rap and country music she
grew up around; Nasty Women Comedy pushes against Vancouver's male-dominant comedy
scene; grunt gallery's urban screen brings storytelling to The Independent; and Heather Kai
Smith's artwork revisits history through gesture.
I   would also like to remind readers that May is Asian Heritage Month. Last month, Mayor
Gregor Robertson issued an apology to the Chinese community for the prejudice shown
towards immigrants and their descendants by the City of Vancouver. In the same week,
the City rolled over to amend zoning, seemingly at the request of the Vancouver Chinatown
Business Improvement Area Society and the Vancouver Chinatown Merchants Association,
which directly contradicts the efforts of community organizers standing up for legacy
businesses and elders. In the VCBIA and VCMA joint press release, they accused younger
activists of "reverse-zenophobia" and not representing the true stakeholders of Chinatown.
If you live or work or play in Chinatown, especially this month, please take some time to
research the neighbourhood and consider your position within it. Visit chinatown.today for
current news and follow @chinatown_today on Twitter.
A+
BB
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
I'm thrilled to start as the new Station Manager at CiTR / Discorder*. No doubt this
will be a challenging and rewarding experience, and I look forward to being of
service to the station and the community at large. A little about me:
Growing up (and still living) in the Downtown Eastside, I developed an interest in
and passion for community building and grassroots art and culture in Vancouver. Fortunately,
I have been able to pursue this passion as founder and Director of Red Gate Arts Society,
which is committed to providing affordable, inclusive working, exhibition and performance
space for artists, musicians, and creative individuals of all kinds, in a supportive and creative
environment. I became the Executive Director of the Red Gate Revue Stage in 2016, expanding
the disciplines that Red Gate can support to include theatre and dance.
Vancouver is at a crossroads. The cost of living in this city has risen to the point where it's
difficult for venues and audiences to take a chance on paying to see a show or buy an album
from an unheard of or untested artist. In spite of that (or perhaps because of that — struggle
often leads to amazing art!), the quality and diversity of music coming out of Vancouver is
better than ever. As a city, we must decide what our priorities are. Grassroots art and culture can
disappear unless conscious decisions and focused effort are made to facilitate it. I truly believe
that we can make Vancouver an incredible city for everyone to live in, but it will take a lot of
work and cooperation among many disenfranchised groups.
CiTR / Discorder has been a guiding voice in this effort and will continue to do so for
many years to come. The Station Manager position will allow me to advance and expand my
passionate efforts on behalf of Vancouver culture, guided always by the principles of collaborative governance, community building, and providing opportunities for lesser known and
underrepresented artists to showcase their work.
- Ana Sose Carrico
 in GOOD HUiHOUR
NASTYWOMEN COMEDY
interview  by  Jennifer Brule  //  editing +  writing by Douglas  Vandelay
//   illustrations  by  Jamie  Loh //  photo  by  Sara Baar
nasty Women, unsurprisingly, is an all-women sketch comedy group based in
Vancouver. Founded by Jenny Rube, the group is comprised of a laundry list of some
of the city's greatest rising talent, listed in no particular order: Rae Lynn Carson, Kerri
Donaldson, Racquel Belmonte, Ese Atawo, the aforementioned Jenny Rube, Stacey McLachlan,
Allie Entwistle, Denea Campbell, Annalise Stuart and Carla Mah.
Discordefs Jenn Brule sat down with Jenny, Allie and Kerri to discuss everything Nasty Women.
a    _ f3
Discorder magazine | MAY 201E
Is Nasty Women sketch comedy or improv
or both?
Jenny: It's mostly both. First half is sketch,
second half is improv. A couple of times we've
done just all improv, [or] sketch like Saturday
Night Live. Usually we have a theme for the show
with everything planned out, and then we'll do
sketches — either new ones or pre-existing ones.
What kind of sketch do you do? Is it
geared towards more of a feminist lens?
J: Honestly we're just women who do comedy;
not just; we are women who do comedy.
Kerri: It's just, none of us are setting out to
write a feminist sketch, but we all are feminists,
so it naturally comes out in our writing. We just
write what we want to do. That being said, so
many of our sketches come out that way, and all
of a sudden a silly premise is a metaphor that's
bigger than us, involving political satire and the
the state of affairs.
Why is now a great time for Nasty Women
to exist?
K: I think now, more than ever, there's a
movement happening, so every time a bunch of
girls are going to get together it becomes political,
you know? We're just comedians, individually,
and we didn't set out to change anything.
Allie: We set out to be comedians.
K: Yeah, we just want to make people laugh,
but the act of us coming together is a very
political choice. Like, here we are and this is
what we want to say. Because, we've all had our
own experiences where we've been in shows and
groups and stages where we were the only female,
or we were made to feel unsafe, or unwelcome
in either overt ways or subtle ways. So, [Nasty
Women] is just like our way of taking it back.
As much as it's political, we just want to work
together and have fun.
A: There have been times where I am the only
woman and it's tiring. You're often made to play
parts where, all of a sudden, you're the princess, or
the girlfriend, or the wife.
J: I have been on a team where I'm the only
girl in the group, and then people look to you to
fill the female role. Because, when you're the only
female in the group, you should be doing these
roles — like the powerful one, or the bossy one,
or the complacent one — and you have to nail it.
The pressure is higher and if you don't... It's just,
I have felt held to a different standard. What's
great about this troupe is that were all women
and we play whatever role we want.
A: What I do love about Nasty Women is that
because sometimes, as a woman, I will take a back
seat and let a dude do more. But when I look
around, it's all women and we're in charge.
K: Yeah, exactly. Women play so differently
with each other, I like playing with men too, but
it's just different energy. With women, we don't
have to shy away from specific stories like we do
with men and be like, "Oh no, he'll feel uncomfortable about this very specific female thing that
happens to women. "
What is your favourite aspect of working
and collaborating with other women?
K: Everything. It's my favourite show, so
much fun. I look forward to it, and there's never
any dread in my heart. I feel supported. The
audience is always excited to be [at the Biltmore]
on a Monday night, and immediately excited and
ready to go, which makes the perfect combination
for comedy. We all adore each other as well.
A: In an environment that could be competitive, this group of girls always support each other.
J: There are 10 of us, so we all have our own
opinion, but I have never not felt heard.
Follow Nasty Women Comedy on Facebook, Twitter
@nastywomenvan, or on Instagram @nastywomencomedy
for upcoming performances, and news on individual
comedians and side-projects. The next Nasty Women
Comedy show is on May 14 at the Biltmore Cabaret,
8:30PM. Tickets are $10 in advance or $14 at the door.
4
IN GOOD HUMOUR|Nasty Women Comedy
 8I0S    YAM |   9rti5DpDlTI 19blOD2iQ
UilCEDED
REVIEW: TANYATAGAQ & LAAKKULUKWILLIAMSON BATHORY
words  by Melissa Haberl  and Madeson Singh //   illustrations  by Alicia Lawrence
In the time before there was light. In the
darkness, there were stories. A place
where you could be any gender. A place
of sexual desire and pleasure. All fantasies
went. They played games. They played
games in the dimming of the light.
A little light to warm us all. She tends to
the light. A flame.
On the floor, to the centre left of the
intimate, circular theatre stage, Laakkuluk
huddles over a kudlik, slowly bringing its
flames to life from left to right. Behind
her, Tanya sighs and growls softly and
repeatedly, her throat singing gradually
building tension and momentum. Over
the flickering fire of the kudlik, Laakkuluk
tells us of a world of possibility and fantasy
— a place where passion is embraced and
embodied. Then, from the oil and soot of
the kudlik, she smears her face in black,
scratches lines across her cheeks and
forehead, and puffs her cheeks out with
large wooden beads. She transforms. Tanya
quickens and intensifies her sound, and
together, they invite us into the unknown.
Laakkuluk is performing uaajeerneq, a
traditional Greenlandic mask dance and
form of storytelling which centres elements
of sexuality, fear and hilarity. Transformed,
she moves away from the light, stepping
forward into the darker foreground of the
stage. She begins to move around the space,
crawling and lifting her body in every
direction. Eyes bright and piercing, she
circles the audience, taking us in. She feeds
on our curiosity, our awe, our anticipation of
what will come next. The energy and feeling
in the space sharpens. Tanya rumbles and
snarls. Laakkuluk works her way to the back
of the stage to join her in an instinctual and
fiercely intimate exchange of singing and
dance. Exploring and testing their boundaries, they grasp and hold each other with
a hunger and intensity that permeates the
room. Tanya ducks between Laakkuluk's
her entertainment as she is ours. Boundaries
blur between audience and performance.
Face to face, eye to eye, she flips the gaze
of the show and the observers become the
observed.
The performance is a dialogue. Tanya
and Laakkuluk speak to one another
through their art — Tanya through her
voice and Laakkuluk through the mask
dance. Their synergy tantalizes and
intrigues, almost intimidates. They relate
through an emotive and kinetic language
that is both familiar yet otherworldly. In
the shared space of the performance, the
audience is invited into the dialogue. We
become integral to the evolution of the
show as they look to us and us to them.
In a loop of actions and reactions, the
energy emanating from the crowd and the
responses of the artists push the performance forward.
As the show nears its end, Laakkuluk
exits and reenters the stage. Suddenly, she
is visibly afraid. She seems lost and her eyes
desperately search the room. She unravels.
At no point in the performance is uaajeerneq's theme of fear more palpable. Panicked
and whimpering, she crawls to Tanya. They
find each other, centre stage, and embrace
in an electric moment of relief and love.
Tanya's dress sparkles as the passion and
care of their relationship saturates the room
and fills us with light.
Laakkuluk returns to the kudlik. Snuffs
its flames one by one. The room dims. Tanya
relaxes her breath. They smile and bow to a
standing ovation. As the lights come on, we
are left to navigate what we have witnessed.
Tanya Tagaq and Laakkuluk Williamson
Bathory performed at The Chan Centre from
March 16-18,2018 to a fully sold out theatre
every night. This column is produced by CiTR
101.9FM's Indigenous Collective, who also produce
Unceded Airwaves on air Wednesdays at 2PM.
Visit citr.ca/radio/unceded-airwaves for show
archives.
legs and howls from beneath the tulle of
her dress. Limbs entwined, panting and
breathless, the performance climaxes in
a visceral entanglement of sound and
movement.
moving away from Tanya,
Laakkuluk redirects her focus
on the audience. Weaving and
creeping her way through the crowd, she
peers into the faces of her onlookers. Tanya's
guttural rhythm emboldens her, feeds her,
propels her into our space. At times grinning
and mischievous, at times erratic, maniacal
and terrifying. In Kalaallisut, she whispers
and points, as though taunting us. She crawls
over chairs, slinks through our ranks, and
jumps into the laps of her prey. We are her
playthings. We are implicated. Just as much
FLEMISHEYE.COM
UNCEDED!     REVIEW:   TANYA TAGAQ & LAAKKULUK WILLIAMSON BATHO'RI
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | MAY 201E
DO
XA
DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTIVAL
A Deeper Understanding
words by Jonathan Kew
illustrations by Jules Francisco
photo by Josh Gabert-Doyon
Y7 W   HEN THIS INTERVIEW TAKES
fl   A PLACE, WE ARE TWO WEEKS
mJ^P   FROM THE SEVENTEENTH DOXA,
^w^^      the Media Documentary Society's annual
film festival. I'm sitting with Selina Crammond and Milena
Salazar, respectively DOXA's Director of Programming and
Programming / Industry Coordinator. The two anticipate the
hubbub that festivals inevitably entail. But right now, DOXA's
office, nestled in a shared arts space next to CBC's downtown
offices, has a quiet and steadfast energy.
DOXA's foremost purpose is to serve as a platform
for alternative voices and the art of documentary. But
documentary — documentation — feels fraught in this era of
political fragmentation: burdened with anxiety
and bursts of aggression. Last year, this energy
manifested in the showcase series Trumped!
This year, it is perhaps represented in Embedded
With Extremists, featuring films about
apparent jihadists and white supremacists.
If DOXA strikes a nerve, it's not necessarily
didactic. "Every film has the opportunity
to deepen your understanding of an issue,"
Crammond tells me; "we would never program
a film that is completely one-dimensional."
The films that do agitate evince the prescience
of DOXA's curation.
DOXA is a small operation, conspicuously independent. There are no resource
companies, banks, or developers in its
list of sponsors: the Media Documentary
Society is not a monied powerhouse. Still,
this year they received over 1200 submissions. Volunteers are essential, especially
for the year-round screening process. From
each year's thousand-plus submissions,
DOXA selects films spanning the breadth of
documentary form. Showcases compile these
films into thematic showcases, including
topics such as Rated Y for Youth, French
French and Press Play.
Crammond and Salazar are both new in their positions:
Crammond was previously the Programming and
Communications Coordinator, while Salazar was an associated
filmmaker and festival volunteer. This is the first year since
the departure of Dorothy Woodend, DOXA's Festival Director,
and the inauguration of a "horizontal" management style,
reflecting an ethos collaboration and dialogue that reflects the
genre of filmmaking DOXA celebrates.
"We're like an independent film crew — everybody has
to do a little bit of everything," Crammond tells me. "We're
in constant contact about everything because we're such a
small team. It's an open-concept office so you inevitably
hear what everyone's talking about. [...] It can be distracting,
but also really awesome, and offers potential for better
decision-making."
DOXA's core staff and programming committee are
backed by a strong volunteer base. Over the years, DOXA's
volunteer-base has grown, and the festival's curation grows
more assiduous. They make risky choices, often for the
best. Crammond tells me, "After being on the
committee for a few years, you get a sense of
what's going to work. It's one of the best feelings
when you find a gem, and it takes on a life of its
own outside of DOXA. It's like your little film
baby grows up."
This adds up to a lot of particularities. I was
delighted to see Ethiopiques: Revolt of the Soul
in this year's listings, a documentary covering
the birth of Ethiopia's recorded music. When
I ask about her favourites from this year's
schedule, Crammond — an underground music
mainstay as the drummer of Supermoon —
shares Desolation Center and Punic Voyage. Salazar shares
favourites with geographic and tonal similarities: "We
had all these films by Latin American women, which were
amazing. We didn't even plan it, it just happened." Primas
and The Creator of Universes, two such favourites, take a
familial approach to documentary journalism.
"We have some films," Salazar notes, "Primas for instance,
which are just a one-person crew. It's a person going to Argentina
and filming their nieces. Anyone could film their family. But
only someone with years in the industry could create a piece like
that; the poetics of the filmmaking, the form."
DOXA is incomplete without its industry panels
and workshops. Salazar tells me that they range
from "hands-on practical skills panels" to "funding
opportunities in BC" to something more expressive: "We're
seeing a rise in artistic investigative work, so we're inviting
people to talk about the intersection of documentary and
journalism. We have [a workshop] on storytelling and sound.
We're looking at the artistic choices." DOXA hopes to foster
local documentarians by providing the means to experience
documentary, and the entry-points to practice it.
Shortly before our conversation, Crammond received an
email critiquing the festival as partisan. She was reconciliatory
but resolute. "The nature of documentary is telling stories that
aren't told. The mainstream media does a good enough job of
giving out certain ideas, and these films are meant to deepen
conversations... You need to engage with people. But this is
what we have, and this is what we stand behind."
This year's opening film is The Rankin File: Legacy
of a Radical. Harry Rankin was a Vancouver city
councillor, veteran activist and co-founder of C.O.P.E.
[Coalition of Progressive Electors], who ran and lost against
newcomer Gordon Campbell for the mayoral seat in 1986.
The director, Teresa Alfed, is from Vancouver. The film is a
combination of old 16mm footage shot by Peter Smilsky on
"Cfie nature of documentary i*
telling stone* tfjat aren't toft*
Khz mainstream media does a good
enouflf) job of gibing out certain idea*,
ant> tf)e*e films are meant to
deepen conservation*/'
Rankin's campaign trail, and new interviews
with those who were there, including Jean
Swanson and Libby Davies.
As a socialist politician active during the
era of Expo 86, a key moment in Vancouver's
urban transformation, Rankin's story reflects
a juncture for many local progressives
concerned about affordability. Today, the
illusion that politics can be deferred is deteriorating, and presenting work that opens up past
wounds and reflects ongoing struggles is a fact
of reflective filmmaking.
DOXA is a paean for the documentary:
"a platform for independent documentary
filmmakers" put on by a volunteer team who
"love the art of filmmaking." By zooming
on Vancouver history, The Rankin File is an
appropriate film to open DOXA 17 and bring
the festival into focus.
In Crammond's words, "that's the power
of documentary. You shoot something and
it feels like it's going nowhere. And now
someone finds it, brings it to life. You never
know how it's going to turn out."
DOXA Documentary Film Festival runs from May 3-13.
Festival schedule, passes and general information can be found
at doxafestivalca.
//
\
t
'DOXA Documentary Film Festiual'
 8I0S    YAM !   9rti5DpDlTI 19blOD2iQ
HUTAH
DUSTY BABES COLLECTIVE
Working Clay, Individually and Together
but also more and more
artists are having to leave the
city, so it's kind of like we're
already there."
Ludington continues, "I
think that we act as a strange
little punctuation down there.
When we did Comfort Show
we were in a suburb, in a
plaza near a Pita Pit, and we
were just injecting ourselves
into spaces and engaging and
saying hi. It feels like less of a
hustle, and more of a conversation or a presence. [...] It's
kind of like a double installation, like the installation as
installation."
words by Madeline Taylor
illustrations by Joy San
photo by Sara Baar
66
1
it
^^ HE DUSTY BABES COLLECTIVE
/ IS AN ALL-WOMEN GROUP OF
^^L  CERAMICISTS started in 2013. They
^\   held potlucks and made space to support
members — ah of whom were burgeoning artists in
Vancouver. This group have since graduated to produce
shows and disrupt artistic norms through a feminist
ethic of collective support and rural organizing in
South Surrey, White Rock and Gibsons — spaces far from their
beginnings at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.
Amelia Butcher, Heather Lippold and Emily Ludington
spoke with Discorder on behalf of Dusty Babes. On the
collective's origins, Butcher explains, "You can't do ceramics
in your bedroom — I mean I have done ceramics in my
bedroom." But as she, Lippold and Ludington describe,
starting a collective had just as much to do with soothing the
challenges of an isolated art practice outside of school as it
did with finding a space to create.
Five years on, the four local collective members (there are
ten in total, though some are inactive or out of province), are
happily settled into a ceramics studio in South Surrey built
in the '70s by now-retired art teacher, Don Hutchinson. The
Dusty Babes found it on Craigslist — a stroke of good luck
Butcher, Ludington and Lippold recount with pure giddiness.
"I remember when Angela found it, she couldn't even talk,"
says Lippold, "She was vibrating!" The space was perfect,
and the isolation and rurality spoke to the Babes as people,
having all grown up in the suburbs.
Butcher points out, "being based in Surrey instead of
Vancouver, you don't get to be part of things like [Eastside]
Culture Crawl. [...] We've been able to take on this role of
art space in the suburbs. We've done pop-ups in Surrey and
White Rock, [...] and it's just so different to be presenting
contemporary art in [the suburbs]." There may be drawbacks
to being far away from Vancouver, but Dusty Babes were
perhaps ahead of the curb. Butcher explains, "We're kind of
divorced from whatever scene is happening in Vancouver,
Dusty Babes are upfront
about the importance
of feminist ideology
in their work. The first line
you read on their website is, "We are a collective of artists /
feminists / ceramicists working in our shared studio in British
Columbia." Feminism permeates the collective's approach,
though as I learn, it is fluid. They all identify as feminists,
but feminism does not dominate the subject matter of their
work as individual artists. For Dusty Babes, feminism is an
ethic first. Butcher expands, "I feel strongly that feminism is
fed s kvmg fy that
mlsilsm Is d m<§tlfo@dl°9
doem't always km®
be yow sub feet"
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a method; it doesn't always have to be your subject. If you're a
female artist, you have to be free to make work about whatever
you want, because men always have that freedom no matter
what. So you shouldn't be expected to be making work about
being female all the time. It's not all we're interested in. And
that to me is feminism." Lippold adds, "For me, it's [aboutl
having the support and having this connective
space with an all-female group. It's been the most
life-changing for me and my art practice." Ludington
finishes, "Our intention is feminist and our method is
feminist and our energy is feminist. It's both intrinsic
and a byproduct, at the same time."
The collective is hyper aware of the history of
ceramics as women's work, as something tied to the
domestic sphere. At one point, they worry out loud
that they might sound defensive in explaining their
approach to visibility, dialogue and presenting their
work, but this moment of unease is short lived. They
are solid in their insistence that they disrupt this
legacy through conceptual work and by confronting
the history of the material. Through the presentation
of contemporary art that moves beyond craft, they
seek to create art that challenges the spaces they
occupy as people and as artists.
Opening May 12, the Dusty Babes are taking
their work to the Gibsons Public Art Gallery
on the Sunshine Coast. The exhibition, titled
Subject Matter, will look at, "the anecdotal, personal
and cultural symbolism bound up in materials." Exhibiting
artists include Butcher, Ludington and Lippold, and fellow
collective members Sam Knopp, Dana Vallee and Angela
Hopkins. The show explores tension, challenging their own
relationships with clay, and pushing the material of their
work to its limit as a medium. As Butcher says, "ceramics is
very familiar. It's in our houses and it touches our bodies all
the time. But it's also so sneaky. It always surprises me how
easy it is to make a surprising object in clay. You can really
easily access the uncanny."
This is Dusty Babes, making the unseen seen. Each
artist finds their own way of breaking down misconceptions around their practices, challenging their material,
and working on the periphery, individually but together.
Expanding out from potlucks to pop-ups, Dusty Babes has
proven the strength of working collectively, and of taking
risks for the sake of art and building community.
Visit dustybabes.com for individual artist bios, links and upcoming
events. Subject Matter will be on display at the Gibsons Public Art
Gallery from May 10 to June 12 in Gibsons, BC.
"Dusty Babes Collectiue'
A
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | MAY 201E
DJ KOOKUM
FINDING HER BEAT
words by Dusty Exner
photo by Evan Buggle
illustrations by Sunny Nestler
*M^k   *^L KOOKUM'S NAME MAY BE A
I  \\ I  RIFF OFF THE CREE WORD
\W I  FOR GRANDMOTHER, kokum,
^^^^    W M*  but she is far from anyone's grandmother.
The name reflects a culture central to DJ Kookum's act: her
Indigenous heritage. The Vancouver-based trap and EDM DJ
is Cree and Dene, from the Alexis Sioux and Cold Lake First
Nations. For DJ Kookum, Indigenous visibility is important.
She explains, "It's rare to see Aboriginal people doing things,
like in the movies and stuff. For me, also being female is part
of it and being native. People are hyped on it."
After discovering her passion for electronic music, DJ
Kookum attended the Indigenous Independent Digital
Filmmaking program at Capilano College, eventually trying
her hand at DJing. "When I was growing up in my small
community, everyone was into rap and country, and I was
into techno. When I moved to the city, I found this whole
world, all-night dance parties and that kind of thing. That's
what inspired me to become a DJ, because I went to all these
shows and I only listened to house music," she says. These
days she plays mainly hip hop because there is a demand for
it. "Most girl DJs play house music, and I want to hear more
girl hip hop DJs!" she exclaims.
DJ Kookum has been embraced not only by the local
Indigenous community, but by the Vancouver DJ scene
at large. Aside from her Foolish Fridays residency at the
Biltmore Cabaret, she has performed at other local venues
and a JUNO Showcase in March. Some of her favourite local
DJs include Flipout, Able and Krisp Kutz, though DJ Kookum
is quick to say, "There are a lot of great DJs in Vancouver who
have supported me."
*   "OTften 3 foa* BrofoinB up in mp small community
etoerpone teas into rap and countrp, and 3 teas into tecftno*'
k
DJ Kookum has already had her share of interesting
experiences, being relatively new to the scene. "Once I was
playing an event that didn't really have set times. I practiced
for two weeks straight because I was so nervous, and I showed
up at like, 8 PM with all my DJ gear. I waited all night, and my
friends had come to see me, and I just kept getting bumped,"
she explains. "Finally they let me play, like, four songs at
4AM when the event was almost over. I literally cried!"
Despite the occasional crappy gig, her overall
experience as a fresh-on-the-scene DJ has been
positive — evidenced by her appearance at JunoFest
with Mob Bounce. On top of the increasing exposure she has
been getting as a DJ, she also does film production, video
editing and youth workshops and dances. Her work as a
youth facilitator, bringing hip-hop skills to kids in remote
communities, is another extension of her identity as a Cree
/ Dene artist. "I think there's a need to focus on Indigenous
youth," she says. "It's easier for kids in the city to access
[workshops], but kids on reserve don't have anything. They
have internet that barely works, no Long & McQuade."
This passion for outreach recently led DJ Kookum to
uncover a bit of her own history. Her mother, originally from
Alexis Sioux nation, was orphaned and raised by a family
member in the Cold Lake First Nations. DJ Kookum grew up
not knowing any of her family in Alexis Nakota Sioux First
Nations. Over the years, she had bumped into random people
from that reserve, some of whom, it turns out, she is related
to. Eventually word got out that DJ Kookum has family in
Alexis Sioux and that she is involved in music and she was
asked to do a workshop. She recalls, "One of the elders came
up to me and asked me who my grandparents were, and then
'DJ Kookum'
started telling me stories
about them. It was so
cool!"
DJ Kookum will be
setting out on tour next
month with Vancouver
duo, Dani and Lizzy. The
tour kickoff is May 17 at Fortune Sound Club, followed by
an appearance at the Q'emcin Two Rivers Remix Festival in
Lytton, and then dates all over British Columbia, Alberta
and Saskatchewan.
After touring, DJ Kookum will be turning her focus on
music production. Thanks to a grant from the First People's
Cultural Council, DJ Kookum can think about having her
own studio and creating her own music. "Every DJ's dream is
just to play what they want to play, but you have to cater to
the crowd in a club," she says. "I just wanted to be a DJ, and
now that I am, it's time for me to focus on [it]."
DJ Kookum is available for private gigs, youth dances and youth
workshops. She is also part of a new hip hop drop-in night on
Wednesdays at Astorino's for youth ages 12-18. DJ Kookum will also
be performing at Pretty Good Not Bad in Victoria on Saturday, May
19. Follow her on Facebook or Instagram, and check out djkookumcom.
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HEXISTENTIAL
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CfTRIOI .9FM + DISCORDER & PANOSPRIA PRESENT
HEXISTENTIAL II
CONSUMER ELECTRONICS
(Philip Best of Whitehouse, Ramleh)
W NADJA(Berlinr^f   %
i MAJEURE
AUGUST 24-25 2018 % VANCOUVER
Submissions at www.hexistentialfestival.cojpt*
Deadline for submissions is May 30th, 2018 ^>
I WOULD LIKE AN
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION
(that's $20cnd For Canada, $25cnd for U.S.A.)
S WOULD LIKE TO
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WITH A DONATION
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i3
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Jehd this form with some cold hard cash or a cheque to-.
DISCORDER MAGAZINE, LL500- 6133 UNIVERSITY BLVD. VANCOUVER, B.C. V6T 1Z1
 Heal title
fiction
APRIL 2018
THE GIVING SHAPES / WALLGRIN
APRIL 1 / THE WOODLAND HOUSE
Tucked away a block off Broadway is the Woodland House, sitting
so inconspicuously among its peers that I walked straight past it on
my first approach. Walking up to the house, I was casually greeted from
the porch by Robyn Jacob, part of the musical duo, The Giving Shapes.
Seeing the pile of shoes near the door, I removed mine and entered
the living room where a couple of couches and chairs were arranged to
face a mic, a full sized harp, a million electronic pedals, an amp and an
upright piano. The "crowd" (maybe 15 people) was sprawled out on the
furniture and floor Despite my knowing no one, everyone was friendly and
welcomed me in readily.
The host, Elisa Thorn of the Giving Shapes, eventually stood up, turned
off the music, and welcomed Wallgrin to the front. Wallgrin is the solo
project of Tegan Wahlgren, who started off by mentioning that they don't
speak much onstage before beginning their set.
Wallgrin created their music using vocals, a violin, and looping and effects
pedals. Like the siren described in their single, "Ae'aea," they drew the
listener in with hypnotic music. Building songs layer by layer, they wove violin
into vocals, making simple percussive beats on their violin, and harmonizing
with past selves. While Wallgrin created magical music with their looping
melodies, I found myself wishing that they would sometimes let the loops play
without adding lead violin or vocals overtop. The loops that Wallgrin built up
were powerful — it would be good to give the audience time to absorb the
loops before going on to the next song.
Wallgrin's music holds a lot of tension, using dissonance to good effect.
Most of their songs weren't soothing — they draw you into an otherworldly
realm and sweep you into feeling the emotions with which they are infused.
The audience was enthralled until the end of Wallgrin's performance broke
the spell. The lights came back on, Wallgrin turned back into Wahlgren,
and the audience took a break to get snacks and drinks from the next room
over Chips, dip, Clementines, oh my!
After the intermission, Thorn and Jacobs sat down to become The
Giving Shapes: Thorn on the harp and vocals, Jacobs on the piano and
vocals. Their intricate melodies were simply gorgeous. They used odd
time signatures to great effect, admitting themselves that their complicated
rhythms are far from easy to play. The entire show was very informal, but
the quality of the musicianship cannot be understated. The audience, smal
though it was, was largely made up by musicians. After commenting on my
inability to remember names the first time around, one audience member
said, "that's the nice thing about the Vancouver music scene — you'll keep
seeing the same people around." The entire experience gave me a great
sense of community, from the playful quips the musicians made in between
songs to the casual hangouts before and after the concert. If you're looking
for good conversation and great music, I can't recommend the Woodland
House enough. Be on the lookout for the Woodland Patio Series this
summer. —Nick Jensen
MR BURNS, A POST-ELECTRIC PLAY
APRIL 3 /STUDIO 1398
The minute you step into the Studio 1398 building, you enter the
future. Mounting the stairs to the third floor theatre space, you
encounter spray-painted cardboard proudly introducing Mr. Burns, A
Post-Electric Play. Posters of recent films spiral the staircase, graffitied
with images evoking The Simpsons and something vaguely post-apocalyptic. Thanks to the Lobby Project initiative, the audience is immediately
presented with immersive decoration that is clever, unsettling and funny
much like the play itself.
Set in three acts in three time periods, Mr. Burns is at once strange,
hard and delightful. In a version of our world where widespread nuclear
meltdowns have transformed society and decimated the population, it
explores the mutation of culture when all that is left of electronically-consumed entertainment is our memories of it. Taking place seven months,
three years and 82 years post-meltdown, Mr Burns presents an attempt to
hold onto cultural memory when all the world's conditions have changed,
focused around The Simpsons episode, "Cape Feare."
At the centre of this piece is the relationship between storytelling and
humanity — the necessity of the former in preserving the latter — and the
vital importance of art, even and
especially after our worst fears about
society's destruction come true.
Anne Washburn's writing take us
expertly through these time periods,
weaving subtle yet recognizable
ties and imagining an intriguing
approach to post-electric copyright
and information sharing. The world of
the play is drawn with similar subtlety
and effect, getting progressively
safer and allowing the performance
within the performance to take a
more central position. By act three
the dangers appear to have receded:
our characters can get through an
act without whipping out defensive
weaponry. And the theatre they
produce in that context, that new
world, is truly remarkable.
The design aspects of the show
follow a similar evolution, mounting
in finesse as the acts progress,
mirroring a post-disaster rebuilding
of capacity. Heipo C.H. Leung's
set design is flexible and full of fine
touches. From the opening curtain
gap of nuclear glow to the third
act's striking set, the transitions are
extensive, but well worth it. Of equal
note is the costume design courtesy
of Johnny Hamilton and masks by Sarah Elizabeth.
But all this creative infrastructure would be nothing without the
performances to carry it through. This script asks a lot of its actors, and
the seven-person cast of Mr Burns more than rises to the task; they sing,
they dance, they navigate the apocalypse. Graham Coffeng brings a
compelling range to Matt, and Stephanie Iszak is expertly cast as Quincy
and Mr. Burns.
The creative team mustered by Little Mountain Lion Productions and
Director Madelyn Osborne holds its audience in good hands, keeping them
safe while keeping them unsettled. After all, this is the apocalypse. Nothing
is sure. Except, in Mr Burns, A Post-Electric Play, a good time and a lot to
consider. —Elizabeth Holliday
SLOW /MIKE VAN EYES
APRIL 6 / PENTHOUSE CABARET
If you thought rock was dead, think again. Slow, as you may know, were
the marquee act on the mighty Zulu Records' roster in the '80s, along
with bands like Go Four 3, Enigmas, Knock Down Ginger and Daytona.
They famously broke up after Expo '86 and have been missed ever since.
Tales of their legendary talent, charisma and yes, notoriety, have kept the
fire burning. So when they emerged again from the tall grass in December
2017, it was to an audible rustle of excitement and anticipation.
Slow really know how to set the scene. This was one of ten sequential
nights they played upstairs at the Penthouse, in a room very reminiscent of
the Seymour Street Arts Club Lounge. Walking into the intimate space, we
arrived to a friendly bar at the back and just a mic set up in the front area of
the room. Tickets were limited to 60 a night, so the place was packed out,
although it felt like the band was performing just for you. I'd seen Slow play
downstairs once, in the late '80s when my Hip Type bandmate Tracy and I
arrived in velvet outfits we'd just brought back from London.
The evening began with a short intra to the historic club from Aaron
Chapman, author of Liquor, Lust and the Law followed by an excellent set
of boogie-woogie piano from Mike Van Eyes — the perfect lead-up to Slow.
The band emerged from the back and walked through the crowd to the
stage, picked up their instruments and began with a playfully muscular
medley, taking us back to their days as SISU gigging with Agent Orange
at Stalag 13. Snippets of the Yardbirds' "Think About It," "We Want Him
Crucified" from Jesus Christ Superstar, the original Spiderman theme,
"Miserlou," "Outer Limits" and Link Wray's "Black Widow" all ran seamlessly
together. Then Tom sauntered on stage and "Bad Man" rolled over the
audience like a sonic wave.
Make no mistake: this was no nostalgia act. Slow Mach 2 is all original
members and hitting a brand new stride. Tom has grown into that big
voice of his and the new songs are some of their best yet; "Asphalt Plain"
and "Polaroid Queen," to name two. Now recording with producer Dave
Ogilvie, the band is super-tight, agile, cerebral, powerful and finally together
10
REAL   LIVE  ACTION
once again. They broke the circle, but they're back. Like battle-hardened
brothers, Slow realized their strength lies in the whole and that each one
of them is indispensable. If the gods of rock are listening, these guys are
gonna be huge. Hold your breath.
Back to the show. There was no encore. Slow left the stage the
way they arrived, through the audience, to back slaps that told, by the
sweatiness of their landing, that they'd put every particle of their energy into
the performance. This Vancouver run was clearly the warm-up for their new
record and tour-to-come. Lucky us! —Erica Leiren
PHARMAKON/JSAURELIUS
APRIL 13/LEISURE CENTER
I aiting on a street that I don't frequent. Leisure Center awaits at
^^r   the front of the lineup. Slowly inching forward. Almost all new
faces. Wearing anything, everything with extreme confidence. Moving in.
Being told to step forward, up stairs. Saying my name. A hand extends
with earplugs. Another with a drink ticket. Another offers to take my coat. A
sparse and expensive room. A few racks of otherworldly clothing. A table
full of noise relics. JS Aurelius stands at DJ console, in front of shelves
of white neon light. Turning knobs, pumping out a motley collection of
feedback, speed metal, distorted bass. Trickling in and standing back, the
crowd scans each other Clear trench coats next to torn jeans. Balenciaga
shuffles by Nike. A black-shirted camera crew flows around the room.
Setting up. Capturing everything. Every angle. Aurelius walks off, leaving
the sound going. Then it stops. Full room now. Yang Li, designer and brand,
takes the stage. His Li/ve Mas/chine. Occupying new spaces. Bringing
worlds together Removing contexts. "Music is a physical experience," he
says. Bodies crush in. Pharmakon steps out. Wet leather jackets smear
against satin. Against mesh. Against flannel. Against well-tailored suits.
Only a handful can see the table that sits on stage. The crowd looming
overtop, gawking down at a pile of electronics, being tweaked and twisted,
emitting a wall of sound. Distortion ripples through the room. My pants
tremble against my legs under the torrent. I can feel the noise occupy
every nook and cranny between the bodies in the crowd. Taking up space.
Filling in. The noise stutters, jolts and falls into an unsteady rhythm. Only a
few heads attempt to nod along. Knowing pain is looming just outside the
earplugs. Pharmakon shouts, shrieks, bellows out. She seizes the room.
Phones fly up over the heads of those in front, straining to catch a glimpse
at the source. Their screens offer a glimpse of the action to those behind.
More phones fly up, snapping pics of the screens of phones snapping pics
of the stage. She is tied to the stage by a microphone cable. Pharmakon
dashes into the wall of people. Indiscriminate. Shouldering and shoving.
B-lining though. Turning, screaming, tangling legs. Parting seas. The stage
is not enough space. Storming through. The front of the audience becomes
the back. Back becomes middle. The cable trips up. Everyone is involved.
Watching swivelling heads to know where the focus of the room is directed.
Discorder magazine ! MAY  201E
 She stops, singles out, locks eyes, performs at someone. At anyone. Moves
on, further tangling bodies together. Pulling people off their feet with the
mile of cable. She storms back to the stage, cuts off the noise. The hiss of
silence for a moment. Everyone, all one now, cheer. Then we all spread out
again. Back to our worlds. Contexts reinstated. —Lucas Lund
WINONA FOREVER (TOUR KICKOFF AND
FAREWELL)/BRIDAL PARTY/BB
APRIL 20 / BILTMORE CABARET
BB
I puts love first and ain't afraid to look you in the eye,"
reads the Facebook description of BB, the "dark surf
rawk" trio who kicked off this triple-billing of BC-based indie rock artists at
the Biltmore Cabaret. While they're at it, they'll be sure to blow your wig off
with some loud guitar crunch too.
Decked out in leopard-print bodysuits, BB hurled an explosive set of
fuzz-pop tunes at the audience that were both catchy and loaded with guitar
skronk. All of this was coupled with their stage theatrics, which included
howling, screaming, synchronized kicking and a variety of up-close rockstar
acrobatics (memorable line: "your crotch is on my fretboard"). They're a
thrill to watch, and I admire that they want to make something loud and
in-your-face — however, their best moments came when they let their
melodies and vocal harmonies soar amidst all the shredding.
Next up was Bridal Party, an indie-pop band from Victoria who specialize
in smooth textures, reverb-laden guitar, sky blue keyboards and lyrics about
casual sex. It's bright, breezy and enjoyable, and they have a strong knack
for melody too. Sometimes the band got too smooth for their own good, but
the vocal stylings of singer Suzannah Raudaschl kept things interesting.
She can play it straight just fine, but she stood out the most when her voice
swirled into a Kate Bush-like upper range. Here she cooed, crooned, and
swayed through the music, effectively pulling more emotion out of it and
piercing through its complacent smoothness. It added some excitement and
originality to the music, and it would be great to see her and the rest of the
band develop their styles together.
Headliners Winona Forever were easily the stars of the night, having
packed the venue and getting the room to dance and cheer to songs with
titles like "shrek ~ chic." After seeing them perform at an all-ages venue
three years ago — the Facebook event page for that show described them
as "basically One Direction" — I'm happy to announce that they've grown
into an adept, confident indie-rock outfit. Their songs are catchy, witty and
fun, and judging by the quality of their most recent singles,"~ keep cool ~"
and "Heads or Tails," they only seem to be getting better.
"Heads or Tails" in particular stood out as a highlight because it showed
a progression of their sound: soulful and focused, rather than knotty or
irony-ridden. Performing it live, vocalist Ben Robertson revealed himself
to be a great romantic too: his sighed vocals against the soft rock backing
behind him reminded me of the twisted ballads of Pavement's Brighten the
Corners, had they been updated for the Mac DeMarco generation.
Discorder's review of Winona Forever's 2016 release this is fine.
described them as a band with "a lot of potential," and I personally think
they have yet to reach that peak — they still need to refine their ideas
and focus their guitar-pop sprawls. But judging by their confident stage
presence and growing catalogue of great songs, I'm confident that they can
reach that peak as their songwriting grows and matures. —Joshua Azizi
HOLY HUM/HELLO BLUE ROSES
APRIL 21 / YORK THEATRE
Part three of Soft Cedar, an 'unconventional' series of concerts
organized by The Cultch, was Holy Hum and Hello Blue Roses at
the historic York Theatre.
The show started with a special solo set of Hello Blue Roses, performed
by Sydney Hermant. While I loved their new release, Trade Winds, the show
did not do the album — or Hermant —justice. Crushed forward on the stage
by a red velvet curtain, Hermant's voice warbled, and it gave the impression
she was nervous about her new songs. During the few moments that
Hermant seemed comfortable, it was breathtaking. Hermant's nerves cleared
when she played her flute, an instrument that, from an audience perspective,
felt like an extension of her body. Unfortunately, looping it was an issue —
the rhythms never lined up, melding together into unintentional dissonance.
Hermant didn't have the support she seemingly needed.
Holy Hum was in stark contrast. Full bodied and precise in their sound,
the six-piece band headed by Andrew Lee took the stage with a quite
determination. The show started with a pinpoint of aqua marine on the giant
screen at the back of the stage. Slowly it expanded, growing into waves,
casting the band as silhouettes. This projected art, which transformed into
cities and forests, kept the set moving. He only spoke once during the set
to say that the album, All Of My Bodies, was a personal project for him —
reconciling the loss of father — and that it was weird and wonderful that it
brought in a full house.
His music was made up of multi-layered strings, driving rhythms, myriad
synths, piercing guitars and earnest vocals. Each element would've been
enjoyable on their own, but the sound of them all melding together made a
true piece of art. My favourite part was the looped background vocals that
made a beat for one of the songs. At first it seemed like Tegan Wahlgren
was performing to a metronome, but then moved off sync, responding to
her own voice to create the base of the song.
Hello Blue Roses and Holy Hum both performed from the heart, in each
their own ways. Yet both sets were played with love to the people in the red
plush chairs in the theatre before them. —Esmee Colbourne
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and
online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences
Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
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MUSIC
PEACH KELLI POP
Which Witch
(Mint Records)
21  /  04 /  2018
fllthough Peach Kelli Pop's Allie Hanlon started the band in Ottawa,
Hanlon's sound fits right into the Los Angeles surf rock scene. It
is no wonder then, that two of her albums, Peach Kelli Pop II and ///, were
released on Burger Records, alongside bands like The Aquadolls and
Summer Twins. Hanlon's newest EP, Which Witch was released on April 21
by Vancouver's Mint Records.
The EP is short n' sweet, with six tracks that are each roughly one
minute long. For such a short EP however, Which Witch packs just as
much, if not more, punch than Peach Kelli Pop's previous albums. While
Hanlon's earlier work holds a sweetness and almost carefree attitude,
Which Witch departs from some of the lo-fi, fuzzy vocal quality of earlier
tracks like "Dreamphone," but maintains a blend of surf rock rhythms and
jangle pop melodies.
The EP's opener, "Pitch Black," already takes a more minor-key
approach compared to the more peppy sounds of Hanlon's past releases.
"Los Angeles," probably my favourite track on the EP, keeps a fast tempo
initially, but slides into something more slowed down. Even as Hanlon's
voice grows more melodic and soothing, her guitars maintain the same kind
of crunch, much akin to the soft / rough combination in artists like Mitski.
'You can do whatever you want / But you're all alone," Hanlon sings in
this bittersweet track, presumably about the often alienating nature of Los
Angeles, her current home.
Vocals are more at the forefront in Which Witch, especially in the last
track, "Drug Store's Symbol of Happiness." With a hauntingly sweet melody,
Hanlon sings, "I no longer needed the pills that I take / My spirit was free,
my mind was clear /1 could finally see myself in the mirror," in a more
explicitly self-reflective track than her previous work.
At first glance, Which Witch could appear all too similar to Best Coast's
early albums, or to bands like Cherry Glazerr which populate much of the
southern California music scene. But perhaps it's because Hanlon is a L.A.
transplant, with roots lying elsewhere, that she can surpass the hundreds
of songs about the beach, surf culture and exclusively Californian content.
Hanlon acknowledges her status as an outsider, and embraces it in this
seemingly simple, but subtly bewitching EP. —Alex Smyth
THE SUBMISSIVES
Pining for a Boy
(Egg Paper)
17   /   04   /   2018
nn off-beat, off-kilter and generally unsettling vibe blankets The
Submissives' new record, Pining for a Boy. Using comparisons to
electroshock therapy and cancerous growths to describe having a crush, it's
just a sliver short of being a sickly sweet homage to love.
As such, it's hard to listen to the record and take it as anything less
than tongue-in-cheek. The influence here from The Shags is impossible to
miss — doubled, out-of-key vocals are at the heart of every track, and the
split-second misses on the drums and guitar feel like a tribute to the creepy
childlike style that was once sparingly found in '90s indie.
Still, The Submissives maintain an edge of their own. "I'm Obsessed"
balances an eerie string section with a groovy guitar riff that keeps the
track enjoyable without losing the attitude that makes Pining for a Boy
unique. A few songs later, "Is It What You Wanted?" captures a similar
mood. The strings are gone and, instead, the song revolves around a
minimalist arrangement of backup vocals and a clean, playful riff that
sticks in your head.
14
The band's wit, in part, lies in making a mockery of the expectations
usually, and historically, thrust on women. This is music for people who
laugh at the prettiness and frills often associated with traditional Western
femininity. It might strike a chord, so to speak, with those who are sick
of hearing overproduced sounds and eerily perfect vocals in indie and
alternative music. By keeping the instrumentation sloppy but somehow
harmonious, the lead singer's saccharine, half-asleep tone is charming
despite being a jab at conformity and, surely, the expectations of many of
its listeners.
You can pick it apart as a statement without trying too hard, and I
think that's a good thing, but when it comes down to it, Pining for a Boy is
fun to listen to. It's the kind of album you can both think about and sway
along to. It's not for parties, it's not for socializing, and I wouldn't say it's
for everybody. But if it is for you — if you dig that weird, chilling form of
expression that you can only find in bands like The Submissives — then
you are in for a real treat. —Alyssa Laube
BRASS
For Everyone
(Self-Released)
07   /   04   /   2018
BRASS, Vancouver's rowdy sweethearts, bring punk to the people by
softening traditional aggression with care-free self awareness. Yet
beneath this nonchalant energy, BRASS retains a dark, self-reflective edge.
Their debut album, No Soap Radio, explored issues like drug abuse and
mental health with punchy riffs and catchy melodies. BRASS' lighthearted
vibe makes you forget that you are screaming along to lyrics like "everything
is not fine." The band's most recent release, For Everyone, follows suit,
but chooses to dive deeper and continues to turn expectations of punk
upside-down.
For Everyone immediately presents itself as the older, more mature
cousin of No Soap Radio, as crying metallic guitar tones and twinkling
ivory keys act as a prelude to the chaos. The melodies of opening track
"Coral" are melancholic, nostalgic and hopeful all at once. The guitar, both
driving and emotional, brings to mind the ballads of '80s metal. While this
particular tone doesn't return, this may be a sign that BRASS is beginning
to experiment with their sound in creative ways through incorporating
elements from different genres.
But BRASS soon returns to the basics. The third track, "Set Ur Phasers
2 Gun" is brimming with catchy riffs and mosh-friendly drum beats.
However, under the fun melodies are serious themes around mental illness.
Lyrics like "I'll be just fine / But in my mind I can't stop counting," will likely
strike a note with any listener struggling with anxiety or addiction. While the
subject matter is heavy, the playful instrumentals carry much of the weight,
making "Set Ur Phasers 2 Gun" an unexpectedly rowdy track.
BRASS gets even more socially charged on "Imminent." "We're not
istening to them," bellows Devon Motz between sludgy riffs, urging the
istener to pay attention to the suffering of the oppressed. The band throws
in a metal inspired breakdown and ends the track with Motz's intermittent
screams. The vocals are the perfect match for one of the hardest tracks on
the album — both lyrically and musically. BRASS even brings back the
piano keys for added dramatic effect.
Unlike No Soap Radio, For Everyone feels more like an album with a
purpose. This is in-part due to a willingness to experiment. For example,
both the piano and violin recur throughout the album. These sprinklings of
untraditional punk instruments add an edge of refinement and cohesion to
For Everyone. Overall, the album suggests BRASS' penchant for subverting
musical expectations is only growing deeper —Bridget Gallagher
KILLY
Surrender Your Soul
(Secret Sound Club)
06  /  03  /  2018
Haunting and ambitious; Surrender Your Soul, the 11 -track project
from Victoria-raised rapper, KILLY, marks his distinctive role in
Canadian hip hop as an experimental and deeply personal musician.
Chronicling his ascent to fame, this melancholy EP is autobiographical
in nature. Throughout, he explores personal experiences and his identity
as an emerging artist in a genre and music scene marked by fluidity and
volatility in the age of digital accessibility. KILLY's dynamic and severe
vocals, distinguish him from his contemporaries. Fluid in tone and rhythm,
yet marked by a distinct coarseness, his uncut voice is layered with
autotune and digital manipulation — a vocal style cognizant of Travis Scott.
Despite these similarities, however, KILLY's flow remains distinctly his own.
Each song is guided by melodic and authentic, yet harsh, multi-layered
tracks. It is exemplary production and illustrates an artistic style which
works holistically, each element operating in accordance with one another,
but still individually controlling certain aspects of the songs. Multidimensional, bass-heavy tracks such as "Doomsday" and "Kilimanjaro"
layer heavily refined, but rough vocals, with a beat that is at once both
stripped-back and overwhelming, creating songs that occupy the divided
space of sonic juxtaposition. A cohesive EP, building on the success
of singles like "No Romance," Surrender Your Soul is a deep personal
exploration of KILLY's experiences as an artist "searchin' for his purpose."
—Pernilla Jonsson
VOLUNTEERS
/ Wish I Was As Happy As John Denver
(Barn Records)
03   /   05   /   2.018
Uolunteers' barroom brand of music trundles along like a savvy drunk,
deftly swerving through a crowd. Swaying along with a meandering
momentum that speeds and slows, weaving between classic country and
garage rock, but always with a vintage southern groove.
The band consists of Brad Felotick on bass and vocals, Dave McMartin
on guitar, John McMartin on drums, Fraser With on guitar and pedal steel,
and Craig Pettman on guitar, keys, harmonica and vocals. They recorded
their new album / Wish I Was As Happy As John Denver with Andrew
Wilkinson of Big Cat Recordings.
The sound of this new release marks a notable progression along the
same dusty path as past efforts. Out digitally via Barn Records since March
3 with a vinyl release show planned for June 2 at the Lido in Vancouver,
/ Wish I was As Happy As John Denver marries a gritty, live off the floor
sound with brighter, cleaner production. It's sort of like the aural equivalent
to someone smacking the side of an old TV to make the picture less fuzzy.
The album kicks off with "Slough Road," an introductory mix of dreamy,
jangly guitars ringing over a soft, slow-rolling floor torn beat. The sedated
soundscape lulls you in, like a sweet scent leading you out of the sun,
through a door, up to a stage, and straight into the chugging, shimmy-shake
rhythm of album standout, "Dollar Bill."
The sharp, sliding twang of pedal steel, ringing organ notes and
swooning background harmonies (featuring Jamie Elliott and Hannah
Walker of Twin Bandit), all build upon the band's sonic foundation to create
a new depth that is characteristic of the album as a whole.
There is a new patience as well. Tracks like the plodding "Pass My Time"
and the keyboard-driven "I Don't Mind" hint at a more seasoned approach.
And songs like "Ten In The Sky," with it's acoustic backbone and floating
tempo, or the serene blue lilt of "Jealous Kind," show the impressive range
that Volunteers find on this record as they explore their sound.
Of course, that range still includes tunes like "Don't Get Me Down," that
sprints over a driving bass and backbeat from the first strum to the last.
And "Come On Through," which encompasses that familiar, rolling, Western
tinge. But overall, there is a little less distortion and a little more texture
(shout out to whoever is playing the guiro on "Mother Nature's Blues" and
the piano on "Open Hearted Strangers"). All this provides the listener with
a dynamic musical experience in a cohesive collection of well crafted jams.
—Dylan Toigo
CHAMPION LAWNM0WER
Babies
(Self-Released)
12 /  12 /  2017
UNDER REVIEW
December brought us the breakout work from Vancouver-
based four-piece, Champion Lawnmower As the band's debut
album, Babies efficiently establishes Champion Lawnmower's punkish,
contemplative sound.
The album's intra track, "Babies," utilizes the unconventional narrative
Discorder magazine ! MAY  2018
 shtick of offering its listener a wealth of vaguely questionable life advice.
Champion Lawnmower uses the tight instrumental backing as a vessel to
cajole listeners to "tell your grandmother to fuck off," as well as presenting
the ever-appealing option to "never finish what you've started." Moving
through the album, "Spread (Butter)" highlights the often-overlooked
strength in a simple yet creative and unpredictable rhyme scheme. The
entertaining lyrics pair beautifully with a repetitive and low key musical
line that knows when to claim the listener's attention and when to let the
vocals carry the song. Champion Lawnmower kicks it up a notch for the
foreboding, "Holistic Weather Network." This song channels power through
its drum line, which matches the new, slightly unsettling, edge of the vocals.
"Insides Out" eases you into Babies' B-side with a slow build. The
suddenly tentative vocals weave through a confident, cymbal heavy
arrangement, creating the album's first track that rests its focus on instrumentation. In comparison, "Lime Crisis of 2014" sees Champion Lawnmower
stepping out of their usual sarcastic tone to build a narrative, albeit one that
is still witty and satirical. The album's penultimate track, this three-minute
public service warning about the imminent rise in lime prices is a beautiful
example of Champion Lawnmower's niche talent for making endearing music.
Babies outro, "You're The Best," finishes the album with enthusiasm and an
ear-catching guitar line sure to worm its way into your musical rotation.
Champion Lawnmower's Babies sets itself apart with its carefree charm
and well-honed creative edge. The album's unusual, and often nonsensical,
topics and storytelling makes for a striking collection of songs and a
thoroughly refreshing listen. —Indigo Smart
FILM
BLOOD
(Web-Series)
24   /   02   /   2018
my first and most abiding impression of this webseries is that, if you
ike Girls, you'll like Blood, but you don't have to like Girls to find
Blood entertaining. Having thanked my stars for capitalization and italics, I'll
try to unpack that.
The series concerns three characters, Sam (writer Sam Shier), Nina (Nina
Kiri, who you may recognise as Alma in The Handmaid's Tale) and Tom (Tom
James), embarking on a night out. Sam and Nina are distant acquaintances
who have a mutual friend, Tom, and meet up for a night on the town despite
Sam's concerns that their lack of previous interaction might make things
awkward. This is an accurate although not all-encompassing prediction, with
every episode building to at least one vivid art-cringe punchline. It is also
worth noting, the title and theme do not convey this, with bold red letters,
creepy, bubbling instrumentation and distant, harmonized vocals that would
better suit a student version of True Detective.
Blood is set in Toronto, with references to King West and OCAD,
although it fits just about the majority of post-mumblecore arts quasi-com-
munities across the continent, with the appropriate nostalgic touchstones
("All '90s R&B, like, that's what I do") and screwball projects ("it's a queer
re-imagining of Winnie the Pooh — it's semi-autobiographical"). This is
where the Girls comparison comes out in force, with a lot of easy but
effective young-artist jokes about sexual freedom-as-awkwardness and
personal independence-as-irresponsibility. The other touchstone of the
series is queer humor, with energetically gay Tom motormouthing his
way through several attempted hookups. The third episode of the series
emphasizes both comic veins, by bringing the characters to an artsy
LGBTQAA party.
With four episodes cumulatively constituting about twenty minutes
(plus a three-minute bonus feature, which contributes little) Blood doesn't
overstay its welcome. Each episode, save perhaps the last, has the
wherewithal to end on a good joke, and the character humor keeps pace
throughout. James' delivery wavers between dynamic and obnoxious for
most of his screen time, but Shier's lackadaisical contralto appreciates in
appeal the longer she's onscreen, and Kiri provides a consistent foil to both
by emphasising her character's moments of wide-eyed panic and insecurity.
Girls often came off as sociopathic while aiming for quirky, and while
Blood's characters have a tangential relationship with adulting, they have
the empathy to keep the joke from becoming cruel. —Jake Clark
BOOK
Sarah Cox
BREACHING THE PEACE:
The Site C Dam and a Valley's Stand
against Big Hydro
(On Point Press / UBC Press)
2018
Breaching The Peace is not a comfortable read. It's not a happy read.
But, it's a necessary read for all British Columbians and Canadians,
for whom the environment should be a dominant election issue. This book
by Victoria-based journalist, Sarah Cox, is a comprehensive timeline of the
highly controversial Site C Dam project that has been met with resistance
from Treaty 8 First Nations, farmers in the Peace Valley, and environmental
activists around the world. Described as a modern-day David and Goliath
battle, Breaching The Peace investigates the somewhat suspicious, behind-
closed-doors tale of how BC Hydro secured approval for Site C, and the
lengths they have gone to intimidate and suppress resistance efforts.
At the centre of this book is Arlene and Ken Boon, who had a large
section of their land expropriated. They became tenants in their own family
home, their land now managed by BC Hydro, in an arrangement that seems
more like bullying than politics. While Breaching The Peace introduces
several key figures in the fight against Site C Dam — West Moberly Chief
Roland Willson and fellow Indigenous leaders and elders — the Boons are
the grounding anchor and case-study in Cox's investigation. They have
incredible will and determination to defeat the Site C Dam project, they are
literally fighting for their lives.
This book is especially timely, as it coincides with other provincial and
national debates around Indigenous consent and the ongoing colonialism
manifest in large-scale industry development projects that alter Canada's
landscape. There is a section of the book that mentions the opposition to
the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion, the protests on Burnaby Mountain,
the media attention that issue has gotten, and the bitterness of Peace
Valley residents who feel that Site C isn't as strong a priority to coastal
communities, where BC's population is more dense. This is a very real, very
difficult observation.
Over the last several months in particular, Kinder Morgan's questioning
of the pipeline expansion in the face of Indigenous-led opposition —
well-documented by major media organizations based in Vancouver —
has proven the power of community organizing and resistance. Site C has
had just as much opposition, perhaps even more when you consider the
decades of strategic organizing that residents have done to fight off the
dam, and yet, it is barely a headline issue these days. It's debatable which
project will have the most devastating longterm environmental impact.
Opposition to the Kinder Morgan expansion is based on well-researched
speculation— that a pipeline might burst, that the inlet might become
polluted beyond clean-up, that marine life will be impacted by an increase
of tanker traffic — but the flooding of the Peace Valley, the destruction of
sacred Indigenous land, the displacement of sensitive species of wildlife,
the irreversible pollution of what was once British Columbia's most fertile
farming land, is a sure thing. Site C is happening, right now. And John
Horgan's provincial NDP government that made the reassessment of Site C
an election promise, has washed their hands of it.
If this pisses you off, read Breaching The Peace. Share this book with
your friends and family. Arm yourself and your community with the history of
the Peace Valley and Site C Dam opposition, the ongoing colonial violence,
and demand more from your government and your media.—Brit Bachmann
To submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please
email Under Review Editor Maximilian Anderson-Baier at
ur.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1.
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 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | MAY 201E
EVERYONE
DESERVES
TO
Cjirls Rock Camp Uancouuer
tootf}$bp3fcan&>aWer
illttjstrationjs by SUejanora g>anmanfego
pfjoto bp Blarutera 15am oe la ilBarora
IT'S NO SECRET THAT THE MUSIC i
INDUSTRY REMAINS A BOYS CLUB.
This reality is perpetuated by privilege — who gets
the chance to play instruments, who is imbued with
the confidence to learn to play them, and who is encouraged
to form bands at young ages? Though boys are more likely to
have access to music, organizations like Girls Rock Camp are
working to change this trope.
Girls Rock Camp is a non-profit, community organization
that runs summer camps and after-school programs in
an effort to raise girls, trans and non-binary youth's self
esteem through exposure to music. In Vancouver, summer
camps are one week long. Campers each learn to play an
instrument of their choosing, form a band, write songs
together, and then perform to a public audience. In the
past, finale showcases have taken place at the legendary
Rio Theatre, and are broadcast live on CiTR 101.9FM.
Dusty Exner has been an organizer with Girls Rock
Camp Vancouver for two years. Like many people
involved with the camp, she is a longtime musician in
Vancouver. She found GRCV at a moment when she
needed a way to access local community.
"At that time, I was really looking for something to put
my energy into because I had been playing in a band and my
band broke up, and I was like, 'that GRC is like a feminist
organization that has to do with music, right?' Being a female
tf>VERTZS£-
&ST,
Talk to-.
ADVERTISING@CITR.CA
'S SWEETEN THE DEAL,
MAKE IT A COMBO
musician, it's kind of a no-brainer. But I also like that it's really
community oriented. It's about building capacity and building
community in Vancouver," explains Dusty.
Thinking back over her experiences with GRCV, Dusty
recalls one camper whose journey proved to Dusty how
important early empowerment is — especially for young girls,
trans and non binary youth:
"One year we had an 8 or 9-year-old girl at camp who was
really, really quiet and introverted, and every day she wore
"IT^f^HATEVER
THE KIDS WANT
TO DO."
mandate continues by stating, "We provide resources and
space for community building to our membership in order
to build a strong movement for collective liberation," giving
the impression that Girls Rock Camp isn't just a training
platform, but the foundation for a way of life.
In Vancouver, Dusty points out that the camps and
after-school programs are "more workshop-based. So, [topics]
like stage moves, or how to rap." GRCV also works with the
Urban Native Youth Association (UNYA). "We run a drop-in
jam that's actually open to boys as well,
because Indigenous male youth are one
of the most underserved sections of
the community — that's really an area
where we have expanded our mandate
to include boys and male volunteers,"
says Dusty. In addition to these after-
school programs, GRCV has just recently
started a radio show on CFRO 100.5FM,
Vancouver Co-op Radio that airs every
other Monday night at 7PM.
G
this big huge sweater [...] I would go up to her and say, 'Hi,
how are you?' and she would give this sort of frightened look.
And then at the showcase, she rocked out so hard. She was
singing and her lyrics were so powerful."
Dusty continues, "After the camp, we got an email from
her mom thanking us so much because she said that her
daughter had been going through [...] really intense body
issues. She had so much fun at camp that she told her mom
she wanted to keep playing guitar and come back next year."
And this is the type of feedback that keeps Dusty and
other organizers motivated, despite challenges with finding
space, volunteer burnout and fundraising. "It's really
important that we are starting young with these girls and
teaching them about healthy self-esteem," she explains. It
is worth mentioning, many organizers and volunteers are
former campers themselves.
GRCV is just one chapter in the Girls Rock Camp
Alliance, sharing the slogan, "Joy is a revolutionary
force." They are not just about the arts, but also
identify as a group of "social justice organizations." Their
RCV is proud to operate under
an anti-oppression framework.
Dusty says, "We want to include
anyone who identifies as female, as
well as trans and non-binary youth.
It's also really important to us to raise
up the voices of people of colour, and
do rock camp in a culturally sensitive
way." GRCV is constantly working on
improving their own understanding of
music history, which means being aware
of cultural appropriation in certain
genres, and sharing that knowledge with campers as they
explore their interests: "It's whatever the kids want to do. It's
called Rock Camp, but it's pretty much just modern music."
The bands formed at camp have represented rap, pop, folk,
punk and plenty that have defied genre designation.
In a time of growth and development for Girls Rock Camp
Vancouver, one thing stays constant — their passion and
belief that music is the strongest tool of youth empowerment.
To learn more about Girls Rock Camp Vancouver, visit
girlsrockcampvancouver.ca. If you are interested in getting
involved, GRCV is always looking for volunteers to help facilitate
camps and programming. People with the desire and financial
means to help support the camp are encouraged to visit the Girls
Rocfe Camp Vancouver website to donate one-time, or set up monthly
donations. Email info@girlsrockcampvancouver.ca for more info.
is
'Girls Rock Camp Uancouuer'
 8I0S    YAM !   9fli5DpDfn 19blOD2iQ
HUTAH
words by Dylan Joyce
photos by Alistair Henning
44
V
OUTUBE COMMENTERS
[...] I DON'T KNOW ANYONE
THAT DOES THAT."
I'm sitting across from Jo Passed's
Joseph (Jo) Hirabayashi, and our conversation has swerved
sharply from the art of songwriting and pastiche in modern
music to the absurdity of the online comments on his music
videos. "Oh it's great," he says with a laugh.
Jo is a veteran of Vancouver's music scene, with past
projects including SSRIs, Spring and recording credits on
numerous local albums. His
current project is Jo Passed,
with a lineup featuring
guitarist Bella Bebe, drummer
Mac Lawrie, and bassist
Megan-Magdalena Bourne.
After a single and two EPs,
Jo Passed has captured the
attention of Seattle's venerable
Sub Pop Records to release
their debut LP, Their Prime.
In Canada, the record will be
released through Toronto's
Royal Mountain Records.
As we carry on talking
about technology, commercialism, and what it means
to play noisy guitar rock
— "dumb adolescent guitar
stuff he quips — in the age of
synthesizers, the story of the
Sub Pop signing comes up.
"I met someone from Sub
Pop at a show, and then pretty
early on in the process of
the record I was sending, just, rough mixes 'cause they said,
Ve'd love to hear it as it's being recorded.'" I ask him if it
was intimidating to send songs off to a label, and without
hesitation he replies, "totally."
It's no secret that the creative integrity of the artist is at
stake in the shadow of commercial
success, but it turns out there was
even less feedback than Jo thought
there would be. "I was prepared for
some things to happen, like maybe
we should change the track order or
cut this song, and that didn't really
happen." My impression of the role
of a major record label from our
discussion is that they open doors
— for promotion, distribution and
connections — but you still need to
walk through on your own, good
record in hand.
If anything, the pressure turned
into a boon for the creative process
by providing a finish line. The
importance of structure proved a
recurring theme in our discussion,
"Jo Passed'
and seems central to Jo Passed's success. "Make your own
deadlines [...] That's the trick really — structuring yourself
when you're recording DIY," he says, joking that that's his
only piece of advice for people. So what does structure look
like? "Don't go down the hole of just cycling through a
browser of all these different sounds on your synth thing,
and then there goes the three hours you had to work on your
tune."
Their Prime is emphatically a rock record, filled with
crunching guitar riffs, blaring feedback and crashing
cymbals all carefully placed in spacious mixes. The
details — layered guitars on "MDM," a nifty time signature
change on "Glass" — speak to a skillset that makes Jo Passed
a cut above typical garage rock. They're bold sounds bashed
out by a hand capable of great delicacy. For comparison, just
listen to the gorgeously slow "No, Joy (I'm Not Real, Girl)"
from 2016's Out EP. Spending time with these tracks, you can
hear nods to Jo's recording influences like Deerhoof, Steve
Albini, David Fridmann and Alicia Bognanno of Bully.
The record evolved from a discontinuous recording
process, which was an exercise in DIY, a style of recording Jo
loves. Recorded with a patchwork of personnel, equipment
and spaces both at home and at KW Studios, Jo relates just
how complicated it is to finish an album. "I've lived in studio
rooms for like eight years or something, building my room
into this intense laboratory with foam on the wall and guitar
hooks and monitors and gear,
thinking that somehow that
would inspire creativity."
Instead he's sought to
separate spaces, reverting
his home setup to a simple
two-channel audio interface,
and saving the studio gear and
space for the loud and live
components. Reflecting on the
outcome, Jo says the record
sounds disjointed, but sees it as
a profound truth rather than a
detriment — life in Vancouver
is the same way.
T
he content of Their
Prime was very much
informed by Vancouver:
place, space and identity as
major themes. The lyrics and
videos for singles "MDM,"
"Glass" and "Millennial Trash
Blues" reveal the Jo Passed
worldview — it's sardonic,
postmodern, but not post-hope.
It balances a frustration at the current state of the world with
a pensive appreciation for the good things in life. The songs
feel like great exhales of built-up tension.
One of those good things is playing music in the local
community, which Jo is very involved in, working at venues,
hosting recording workshops and serving as soundperson
at gigs. When the opportunity came up to have their record
release show at Red Gate's final weekend in May, there was
no way they'd have missed it.
In a 2010 interview with The Georgia Straight Jo
mentioned a curse that seemed to follow him. I ask him
about its current status and he brightens up, "Oh man, I
thought about that actually, recently. It must have lifted
with the Sub Pop and Royal Mountain signings," he laughs.
"Either it was the curse or my idiotic youth and I've learned
from my mistakes... maybe. We'll see."
Their Prime will be available May 25 through Sub Pop and Royal
Mountain Records. A record release show with supporting acts Little
Sprout and DUMB will take place at Red Gate Arts Society at 855
East Hastings Street the same day. Follow Jo Passed on social media
for upcoming tour dates and visit jopassed.bandcamp.com for
previous releases.
V
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | MAY 201E
AVE YOU BEEN FOLLOWING THE
B*^k   CONSTRUCTION OF RIZE'S THE
■  INDEPENDENT AT THE INTER-
B J   SECTION OF BROADWAY AND
KINGSWAY? Depending on what area of town you live
and work in, it's difficult to miss. But what you may not have
noticed is a screen facing the street on the western side of
Kingsway Avenue. Over the next 5 years, that screen will be
programmed by grunt gallery, an artist-run centre with ties to
the community spanning 30+ years.
grunt has been in the news recently. Their Program
Director, Glenn Alteen, won a 2018 Governor-General's
Award in Visual and Media Arts for Outstanding
Contribution. The gallery is more than just an exhibition
space — they house a video and print archive, they host
Spark: Fireside Artist Talks with the Native Education
College, and they have been working to save the historic
Blue Cabin as an artist residency. A quick look at their
programming proves that grunt is all about forming relationships, and the Mount Pleasant urban screen is no different.
Discorder met with Glenn and grunt's Screen Coordinator,
Kate Barry to discuss how this ambitious new screen project
came to be.
Public art consultant, Maureen Smith, approached
grunt about taking on the project independently, and they
accepted after Western Front and VIVO Media Arts Centre
declined participation in the project. As Kate says, "We saw
it as a way of being able to support new technologies on the
screen — digital media, interactive arts — and we saw it as
an opportunity to have the community reflected back in
Mount Pleasant."
Indeed, this screen may prove to be the only familiar
feature on The Independent, a development that has been
in the works since RIZE's purchase of the land in January
2005. Its scale and design, which has long been considered a
symbol of developer-driven gentrification, stands out in the
otherwise modest retail / residential neighbourhood. Many
arts organizations and businesses — some of which have
been priced out or no longer exist — had spoken out against
its approval, grunt included. Glenn stands behind his initial
opposition to the development: "I think it was important to
do that at the time, but then the City made a decision that
was completely against what most people were saying. So,
what do you do?" Kate affirms, "[grunt's] still here and we
still want the community; we want representation of the
community through the public art."
Glenn says, "Of course the RIZE connection is going to be
an [issue] in the beginning, but I don't think it will define the
project in any way, shape or form, and I don't think it needs
to. [...] You've got to put it into perspective, otherwise [you]
just get booted out of the neighbourhood."
Glenn speaks from experience, having seen other organizations leave Mount Pleasant, in part, to avoid challenging
or negotiating with real estate developers. But grunt, which
has a history of making deals — they secured their current
location in the mid '90s through a marketing exchange with
a realtor — sees cooperation with developers as a means of
survival. "If we didn't think [about these topics] differently,
we would have gotten kicked out of the neighbourhood 20
years ago," Glenn explains. On the issue of gentrification
and displacement, he gets frustrated at the hostility shown
towards developers, "when really it's about the politicians —
what they let happen and what they don't let happen."
Kate, who is also on the curatorial committee that will
determine the content on screen, points out that the
screen itself can become a slate for these discussions,
grunt is soliciting responses from new and established artists
in the community through the production of work and
the reworking of old archives. "We are looking for those
marginalized voices and those artists who have been erased.
Those are the types of stories and artworks we are interested
in, and that we want represented on the screen," she says.
The first program will respond to the theme, Place, and
words by Brit Bachmann
illustration by David Wakeham
photos by Alistair Henning
grunt's
Urban Screen
will feature an original short by stop motion director,
Amanda Strong. There will be a call for submissions for
additional short films, video art and interactive digital
media open to artists and community organizers. Every
person whose work is screened will receive an artist fee
based on CARFAC and IMAA rates, something that Kate
emphasizes: "We know that we can distribute the wealth. [...]
We recognize that there's been a terrible push-out [due to
unaffordability], but at the same time, we're hoping to bring
some economy back to local artists through this screen."
grunt has tapped EastVan Digital Stories to help with
the production of new works. Multimedia artists Lorna
Boschman and Sebnem Ozpeta are leading workshops
on digital storytelling that are free and open to the public.
The shorts produced at those workshops can be submitted
to the screen curatorial committee, and can also stream on
EastVan Digital Stories' website. As for interactive storytelling, grunt will be using Creative BC's Interactive Fund to
create some camera and live texting components.
The strategic commissioning of works, the video
workshops, the consultations with other organizations and
artists — all of it is about finding new ways to get Mount
Pleasant residents and workers to share their individual
perspectives on the neighbourhood. It will be a litmus test to
gauge how people feel about change.
Real estate development isn't the only way the
neighbourhood has visibly changed over the last few
years. Vancouver Mural Festival, now in its third
year, descended upon Mount Pleasant with mixed reviews.
Glenn comments, "The problem with [organizations] like
[Vancouver Mural Festival] isn't that they're doing murals,
but that the murals have no connection to this neighbourhood
at all." Although, he admits that VFM conducted more
community consultation for last year's festival than for their
inaugural one.
That community disconnect, common for inexperienced
organizers, is a misstep that grunt hopes to avoid with their
urban screen, having been in the neighbourhood since
its founding in 1984. They are also in communication
with screen projects in Melbourne and New York. If any
organization can transform a patch on the exterior of The
Independent into a community beacon, it's grunt gallery.
But still, the urban screen is an experiment, and neither
Glenn nor Kate pretend to know the outcome. Glenn
concludes, "Politically, it maybe seems a little crazy, but
judge us on what we do with it."
The Mount Pleasant urban screen will launch in July 2018. Follow
gruntfs social media for a cali-for-submissions. If you would like
to attend a digital storytelling workshop with Lorna Boschman and
Sebnem Ozpeta, email lorna@digitalstories£a to RSVP. Upcoming
dates are May 6, May 13, May 20 and June 10.
«
'grunt's Urban Screen'
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poem by Ivanna Besenovsky // illustration by R. Hester
"Gaba'
9
 Discorder magazine | MAY 2018
OF
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
You get discounts at these
FRIENDS OF CiTR + DISCORDER locations.
OH THE AIR
SAMSQUANCH'S HIDE-AWAY
words  by  Sarah Wang //   illustrations  by Lua Presidio
photos  by Erin Fleming
Onita Bee, host of Samsquanch's
Hide-away on CiTR 101.9FM,
inherited her timeslot around 2003,
having previously shared it with another
show. The name, Samsquanch's Hide-away,
was inspired by Trailer Park Boys (specifically, an incident involving the character
Bubbles and the sighting of a large furry
creature most people refer to as a Sasquatch).
For a long time Anita played all Canadian
music, but, as of late, she has allowed herself
some freedom with that. Her show playlists
focus on indie and punk rock, both current
and older, though you will also hear the
occasional track by Cadence Weapon, the
Righteous Brothers or Bruce Springsteen.
Anita just read Springsteen's autobiography, Born to Run, and loved it. "He writes
very poetically," she says. "It's not in the
genre of CiTR, but I've listened to so much
indie rock, punk rock, I've [gone] full circle;
now I'm listening to like, Bruce Springsteen,
and I love Tom Petty - he's my favourite."
Some of her top all-time albums are the
Pixies' Bossanova, We Were Dead Before the
Ship Even Sank and The Lonesome Crowded
West by Modest Mouse, and Wolf Parade's
Apologies to the Queen Mary. She's been into
the newest album by A Tribe Called Quest,
too. Among local bands, Anita is a fan of
Fashionism, The Evaporators, Slow Learners,
Brutal Poodle and Viewmaster. The latter
three all include Vancouver musician John
Johnston - "he's really amazing."
Onita splits her time between
Vancouver, where she teaches grades
9 and 10 Social Studies, and the
Windsor-Detroit area, where she grew up. "I
bought a house [in Detroit]," she says, "I go
[there] in summers." She can be ambivalent
about Vancouver at times. On one of her
shows last spring, Anita lamented the
tearing down of interesting old buildings
Cinematheque
'.theCinematheque.ca | 1131 Howe Street | 604.688.8202 | Straight
BERGMANIO'
MAY Itt-JUl
CONTINUING THROUGH'
THE SEVENTH SEAL • SUMMER WITH MONIKA
SAWDUST AND TINSEL • THE VIRGIN SPRING
THE DEVIL'S EYE • BRINK OF LIFE
SECRETS OF WOMEN • PORT OF CALL
THETOUCH • SUMMER INTERLUDE
.?IA DAY TRIPLE BILL!
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and rapid redevelopment here, and the loss
of the city's past. Detroit, she thinks, is in
many ways the polar opposite of Vancouver:
"You have relics, buildings just standing,
from forever [...] It's so different. It's really
gritty, obviously." Anita continues, "I don't
want to diss Vancouver too much, [but]
there's an artificiality about the city, that
gets me down. All the money, the excess."
Nonetheless, she acknowledged the great
culture here. Anita, a lifelong baseball fan, has
been playing in the East Van Baseball League
(EVBL) for the past few years. Many people in
the league are musicians, or involved in local
arts, including present and past CiTR staff
and radio producers. One of her Samsquanch
highlights was interviewing Isotopes, a
Vancouver baseball team punk band, which
was how she got involved with the EVBL.
She plans to continue the show in the
present format, though she has considered
shifting the music focus to stuff from the
Pacific Northwest - Washington, Oregon,
Idaho and Alberta, in addition to BC. Anita's
interest in broadening her music range was
solidified during a solo roadtrip she took
to Boise, Idaho last year, driving through
parts of Washington and Oregon. It was the
first time she had been and the terrain came
as a surprise. "It's full on desert — Eastern
Washington, Eastern Oregon. You're driving
and it's serious nothing, nothing at all."
For now, she will keep the 'mostly
Canadian' theme, and every so often give
herself room to play other things. Lately,
that seems to be music from either side of
the border, and revisiting old favourites, be
it Springsteen, Modest Mouse or Motown. "I
try to listen to new music," says Anita, "but I
always seem to go back to the old stuff."
Samsquanch's Hide-away airs on CiTR 1019FM
every other Wednesday from &30-8PM. Show archives
can be found at dtrm/radio/sanisquarichs-hide-away.
m ji i n
ANTISOCIAL
SKATEBOARD SHOP
■10% off
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DANDELION RECORDS
S EMPORIUM
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■ 10% off used records
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popcorn per person
per evening.
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uiic
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o t[ g e r
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and accessories.
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music books
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merchandise(clothing,
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general books)-^^^ apPi,v.
ONTHEAIRiSamsquanch's   Hide-away
(VISIT:
CiTR
. C a/friends
for more   info. )
 S1T1S M&J
mmw
U     VXJ
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Cuetfrnp
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Cfmratmp
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£>aturt>ap
&>unftap
6AM
TRANCENDANCE
CiTR GHOST MIX
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GHOST MIX
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U DO U RADIO
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM
12 PM
SYNCHRONICITY
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
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GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
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12 PM
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THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
KOREAN WAVE:
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4 PM
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THE LEO RAMIREZ
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FINDING THE FUNNY
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YOUR NEW SHOW
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EXPLODING HEAD
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MOVIES
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DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
"DISCORDER MAGAZINE RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERY DAY!"
 ■ monti/iy
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
3AM-11AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththebrowns
@h otmail.com
ROOM TONE
11AM-12PM, TALK/MOVIES/
SOUNDTRACK
Room Tone is a talk show
focused on Filmmaking that
invites guests weekly to
discuss their slices of reality
on set, tips, past/future
projects and love for the craft!
From Directors/Producers, to
Cinematographers, Production
Designers, Actors, Composers:
Writers, Editors... anyone!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CITR DOCS SEASON 3
4PM-5PM, TALK / SOCIAL
COMMENTARY
Tune in for insightful work on
niche topics. For season 3
we keep it local with work on
refugee detention in Vancouver
housing, sexual assault
policy, the drug war and more.
Subscribe on iTunes & Stitcher!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm-6:30pm, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
3AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the LGBTQ +
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmaii.com
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM,  ROCK / POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY/
DISABILITY
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communityiivingradio@gmaii.com
INTERSECTIONS
2-3PM, talk/feminism/gender
EMPOWERMENT
The Gender Empowerment
Collective's goal is to center
the voices, issues, concerns:
and experiences of women:
transgender, intersex, Two-
Spirit, genderqueer, gender
non-conforming, non-binary:
and gender fluid folks and allies.
Tune in weekly for interviews:
commentary, stories and news
from YOUR communities.
Contact:
genderempowermen t@citr. ca
INTO THE WOODS
TUES 3PM-4PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope:
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DOUBLESPACE
ALTERNATING TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/
DESIGN / FEMINISM
Investigating interactions with our
surroundings and society. Every
week we discuss our experiences
with these interactions, how
they emerge and the impacts
of these invisible forces.
Twitter | @doubiespaceshow
WORD ON THE STREET
5pm-6pm, rock/indie/pop.
Hosted by the Music Affairs Collective, every episode is packed with
up-to-date content from the Lower
Mainland music communities including news, new music releases:
event reviews and upcoming events:
interviews with local musicians and
industry professionals and discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES &TREASONS
3PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room.
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/ POP
Jayden targets the audience
in the Korean community in
Vancouver to introduce the
News on Korea, Korean Culture
while comparing other Asian
Cultures, plays all kinds of
Korean Music(K-POP, Hip Hop:
Indie, R&B,etc),talk about the
popular trend in the industry of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows:
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, what's
going on in Korean Society here
in Vancouver, Talk with Guests.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
2PM-3PM, talk/cultural
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
third season! This team of
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
folks produce a weekly show
on Indigenous issues, current
affairs, entertainment, culture
and news - all centering
Native voices. Come make
Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Foiiow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves
KEW IT UP
3PM-4PM, experimental/talk
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica:
Post-Punk, Industrial.
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
4PM-5PM, talk/ accessibility
POLITICS
CiTR Accessibility Collective's
new radio show. We talk
about equity, inclusion, and
accessibility for people with
diverse abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every week
for interviews, music, news:
events, and awesome dialogue.
Contact:
accessibiiitycoiiective@citr.ca
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC:
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves
on CiTR Radiol01.9FM:
Wednesdays from 5-6pm.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco uvermedicinesho w@gmaii. com
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk, and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSSay
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture:
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CONVICTIONS & CONTRADICTIONS
thurs, 8am-8:30am, talk/comedy/
social obeservations
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society; shown through social
observational comedy. To boot,
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
CULT! FROM THE UBYSSEY
CULT! is a bi-weekly radio show/
podcast about culture at the University of British Columbia (UBC). From
The Ubyssey— UBC's independent
newspaper and a definitive source
of campus/community news — the
show will feature the rag's brightest
minds discussing the happenings
and issues in the arts and culture
scene as well as interviews with the
creators and creatives involved in
the various projects around town.
Hosted and produced by Ubyssey
staff writer Olamide Olaniyan
Contact: Twitter \ @UbyssseyCuiture
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr(3>gmaii. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Roc ke t From Russia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean:
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B.
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, TALK/SCIENCE
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
3:30pm-4pm, talk/sports
Your weekly roundup of UBC
Thunderbird sports action from
both on and off campus with
your hosts Eric Thompson
Jake McGrail, and Jacob Aere
Contact: sports@citr.ca
SHOES ON A WIRE
4PM-5PM, rock/pop/indie
Reworked as a music show
with the occasional sprinkle of
commentary, Shoes On A Wire
is back. As always, stories:
interviews, and hot takes will
make an appearance, but
mostly you'll hear sweet tunes.
Contact:
Twitter | @shoesonawirepod
Instgram \ @Staunchjitters
DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this
is CiTR's brand new Current
Affairs show! Tune in weekly
for commentary, interviews,
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
FLASHBACK WITH ALEC
CHRISTENSEN
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
TALK/MUSIC/ARTS & CULTURE
Each episode, join host Alec
Christensen and friends
as they discuss the pop
culture and politics affecting
Vancouver and beyond.
Contact: Twitter | flashbackaiec
NO DEAD AIR
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
JAZZ FUSION / POST ROCK
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion:
experimental electronic, and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook | NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30pm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautonomy, com
■ TRinay
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraitentacies@hotmaii. co m
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse<3>canadaiandshow. com
CITED
3AM-9AM, TALK/ACADEMIA
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact:
facebook.com/citedp odcast
Twitter | @citedpodcast
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary:
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion:
mastery, and a 'IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiop odcast@gmaii. com
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA©weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30pm-5pm, music/interviews
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp ://nardwuar. com/rad/con tact/
THE UBC HAPPY HOUR
5pm-6pm, talk/news/current
AFFAIRS
The UBC Happy Hour is
produced by the UBC Affairs
Collective, and made by
students, for students! The
show is all about what's
happening on UBC's campus.
Tune in for updates on
campus news, clubs outreach
and just about everything
else you can find at U BC!
Contact: ubcaffairs@citr.ca
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6pm - 7:30PM, talk/comedy
6pm-7pm,  Every week Jack
Tristan and a special guest
randomly select a conversation
topic for the entire show;
ranging from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure.Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop:
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skaids_Haii
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock remains committed to the
best in post-rock, drone, ambient
experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can
put the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
■ saTURSay
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citriatenightshow@gmaii.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codebiue@pauinorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary:
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmaii.com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavoina@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy:
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hone
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmaii.com
SOCASTORM
3PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoN #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
Sbit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ sunti/iy
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM,  INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targetinc
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
ALTERNATING SUN. 3PM"5PM:
COUNTRY
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmaii.com,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
3PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmaii.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
3PM-9PM,  ELECTRONIC/DEEP HOUSE
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, DeepTrance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Antherrr
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmiieymike @trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS:
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ isvam>°f
VOSTTOgS
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citrca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
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Mint
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Out Of A Paperbag      |
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Who Cursed Me Then Cured
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Kele Fleming**
No Static
Self-Released
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Heavy Petting
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Medicine Songs
True North
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Late Bloomer (reissue)
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Stone Woman
Self-Released
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In A Poem Unlimited
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East Man*+
Red, White & Zero
Planet Mu
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Enter The 37th Chamber
Fat Beats
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First Aid Kit#
Ruins
Columbia Records      |
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Staying at Tamara 's
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Heavyweights Brass
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This City
Slammin Media
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Jeff Snyder
Sunspots
Carrier
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The Last Rock N Roll
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Aagoo Records         |
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Never Look Back
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Take Flight
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>X CONCERTS
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
May  4
F
May 8
RAINBOW KITTEN SURPRISE I EZRA FURMAN
Vogue Theatre
Fox Cabaret
May 8
UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA
Commodore Ballroom
May 9 May 9
PREOCCUPATIONS I HORSE FEATHERS
The Astoria       Fox Cabaret
May 12
ARIEL PINK & DIIV
Commodore Ballroom
May  12
JOEY BADA$$
Vogue Theatre
May  13
WASHED OUT
Commodore Ballroom
May 14
THE GLITCH MOB
Commodore Ballroom
May 17
MOUNT KIMBIE
Imperial
May  20
POPTONE
Rickshaw Theatre
May  20
SMALLP00LS AND GREAT GOOD FINE OK
Imperial
May  21
THE BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE
Vogue Theatre
May  30
ALEX LAHEY
Fortune
June  5
BHAD BHABIE
Venue
May  21
HINDS
Biltmore  Cabaret
May  26
AQUILO
May  29
LAKE STREET DIVE
Biltmore Cabaret  Commodore Ballroom
June 4
DAMIEN JURADO
Biltmore
June 5
ELISE TROUW
Rio Theatre
June 4
GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR
Vogue  Theatre
June  5
KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD
Malkin Bowl in Stanley Park
June 6
NIGHTMARES ON WAX
Imperial
June   9   &  10
BREAKOUT FESTIVAL 2018
PNE Amphitheatre
June  12
JONATHAN RICHMAN
Imperial
June 13 June 19       June 20
A PLACE TO BURY STRANGERS I SUNFLOWER BEAN I M.WARD
Fox Cabaret Fox Cabaret   I Imperial
ickets  & mor
t   timbreconcerts.com

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