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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 2017-07-01

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  254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
PCOMING SHO
ADVERTISE
JUL
SAY HELLO 2 HEAVEN: CHRIS
CORNELL TRIBUTE & FUNDRAISER
BOG, LEFT SPINE DOWN &
MORE
EARLY SHOW (7PM):
COMEDY SHOCKER XIII:
THE 13TH FLOOR kathleen
MCGEE, JORDAN DUCHARME,
ED KONYHA, HOST SAM
TONNING,&MORE
LATE SHOW (10PM):
TACO FEST AFTERPARTY
THE FOOD, THE FURNITIRE
EAGLES OF DEATH METAL
SOLD 00T THE DELTA RIGGS
MAD ALCHEMY CARAVAN
LSD & THE SEARCH FOR GOD,
STEVENSON RANCH DAVIDIANS,
JESUS SONS, & MORE
WEDNESDAY 13
INVIDIA, GABRIEL & THE
APOCALYPSE, HELLCHAMBER
A
JUL
. PICKWICK
^5J RICH HOPE AND HIS EVIL
DOERS, COBRA RAMONE
EVERY TIME I DIE neck of
I THE WOODS, ANCHORESS
ANCIIENTS
DEAD QUIET, MENDOZZA,
HASHTEROID, SEER
AUG
AUG
ONE LOVE WESTCOAST PARTY
ANTIDOPING.THE
SENTIMENTS, CAWAMA
MEW
MONAKR
fiP
h?
AUG
LAST PODCAST ON THE
LEFT
AUG
DIAMOND HEAD the
AGONIST, SPELL, REBEL PRIEST
GREEN JELLO
DEATH SENTENCE, THE JUDGES
SEP
SEP
DECAPITATED & THY ART
IS MURDER (CO-HEADLINING)
FALLUJAH, GHOST BATH
PERTURBATOR
WITH GUESTS
SEP
VENOM INC GOATWHORE,
TOXIC HOLOCAUST, THE
CONVALESCENCE, AGGRESSION
SEP
MARSHALL CRENSHAW Y
LOSSTRAITJACKETS
WITH GUESTS
SEP
THE SADIES
WITH GUESTS
ELTRI MIGHTY ONE,
MARIACHI LOS DORADOS
SEP
SHEER MAG
5fij TONY MOUNA, BB
Additional show listings, ti.
0, videos & more:
WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
PRINT
RADIO
WEB SPOTS
BRAIN WAVES
AVAILABLE!
LET S SWEETEN THE DEAL
AND MAKE IT A COMBO
ADVE
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(That's $2.0 for Canada,
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11 would like to support
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(How much would you like to donate?)
rOTAL:
SOBKIPT
io mm*
 SUMMER 2017
COVER I   PRADO  BY PAT VALADE.
ART PROJECT THROUGHOUT:by samuel morgan.
JFeature*
07 -   (INACCESSIBLE  VANCOUVER PT.2
RAMP, Denim Vest, and more.
08 -   GABI  DAO
Sound and space with Western Front's media
artist-in-residence.
09 -   GAYBLEVISION
Vancouver's LGBTQIA+ history archived at VIVO.
16 -  PRADO
Q&A with the hip hop artist calling shit out so we don't have to.
17 -   CHINATOWN  CONCERN  GROUPJSA&fMI£fiB
They won the battle for 105 Keefer Street, now what?.
18 -  WHO   IS  MALCOLM BIDDLE?
But  really?
Column* + flDt&er §>tuff
05
- Wristband
Vancouver Latin American Film Festival
10
-  Real  Live  Action
live  music,   festivals.
12
- SUMMER TAROTSCOPES
by Keagan Perlette.
13
-  July Calendar
14
-  Under  Review
music,   podcasts,   books.
20
- SUMMER PARK GUIDE
21
-  CiTR  101.9FM
Program Schedule
22
-  CiTR  101.9PM
Program Guide
23
-  June  Charts
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates available
upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please contact: editor.discorder@citr.ca. To
submit images, contact: artdirector.discorder@
citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE:  Send in a cheque for $20
toLL500-6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1, Vancouver, BC with your address, and we will mail
each issue of Discorder right to your doorstep
for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your
business, email advertising@citr.ca. We are
always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you love. To
donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
To inform Discorder of an upcoming album
release, art show or significant hapnpninn
advance to Brit Bachmann, Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station Manager: Hugo Noriega // Advertising
Coordinator: Sydney Thorne // Discorder Student Liaison: Claire Bailey // Editor-in-Chief: Brit
Bachmann // Under Review Editor: Maximilian Anderson-Baier // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D.
Wrinch // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Production Assistant: Jules Galbraith // Web Content
Coordinator: Katrina Wong // Accounts Manager: Halla Bertrand // Charts: Andy Resto // Discorder
On Air Coordinators: Claire Bailey, Dora Dubber, Kat Kott, Matt Meuse, Jordan Wade // Writers: Claire
Bailey, Ivanna Besenovsky, Mark Budd, Aidan Danaher, Joey Doyle, Clara Dubber, Leigh Empress, Josh
Gabert-Doyon, Jules Galbraith, Sarah Jickling, Dylan Joyce, Oona Krieg, Paige Lecoeur, Lucas Lund,
Hailey Mah, Lexi Melish, Keagan Perlette, Nathan Pike, Ana Rivera, Hannah Thomson, Eleanor Wearing,
Leo Yamanaka-Leclerc, Austin Zeller// Photographers & lllustrators:Olga Abeleva, Bryce Aspinall,
Janee Auger, Sara Baar, Duncan Cairns-Brenner, Jules Francisco, Roz Maclean, Kalena Mackiewicz,
Karla Monterrosa, Christine Phang, Michael Shantz, Pat Valade // Proofreaders: Brit Bachmann, Mark
Budd, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Caelin Finnigan, Josh Gabert-Doyon, Jules Galbraith, Brent Holmes, Jon
Kew, Sydney Thorne, Jasper D. Wrinch.
©Discorder 2017 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by
CiTR, located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hanqamiharh speaking Musqueam peoples. CiTR can be heard
at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487.
CiTR's office at (604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
I TAKE MY GENTRIFICATION WITH
A PEEL OF PAINT
EDITOR'S NOTE
c
olour me pink and yellow and take selfies with me, please.
I have complicated feelings towards neighbourhood beautifying
projects. In particular, projects that promote themselves as "activating space" or
making streets more "walkable." Many of these projects — many of which are
funded by municipal government — overlook immediate communities in favour of
populating new hashtags. In the downtown core and the DTES especially, gentrification and displacement under the guise of reinvigoration has the capacity to encourage stigmatization of homeless and low-income people. And for what? A pretty
photo-op against a colourful facade? It is a special type of arrogance that assumes
an industrial or city landscape can only be made beautiful with bright colour. What
irritates me most is the apparent lack of community consultation in imagery and
location. Or maybe longtime residents, businesses and binners are consulted when
a colourful splash pops up in a DTES alley? I'm curious to know.
This summer as you dare yourselves into the ocean, sip radlers in parks, embark on bike adventures to treehouses, and walk the streets hunting for night
buses, take it in. Enjoy yourselves, but don't forget the contexts that have
brought you to where you are, and the people you share these places with.
Paint has the power to draw attention to surroundings, but it also has the capacity to cover them up. What paint can't do is erase the stories of a land.
'it
From September through January 2018, Discorder and CiTR 101.9FM will have a
satellite location at PLOT, Access Gallery's new project space at 222 East Georgia
Street in Vancouver's Chinatown. We will be using PLOT as a hub for magazine
and radio content production in collaboration with neighbourhood residents, artists and organizations. Activities will include weekly radio dispatches, workshops
related to media democracy and technical training, live broadcasts of events and
panel discussions, and content meetings open to the public. Thank you, Access
Gallery for the space to engage and support initiatives in Chinatown and the
Downtown Eastside in ways we haven't before. We're looking forward to making
media more accessible, and helping people tell their own stories.
This Summer Issue features Chinatown Concern Group /SAfiiM/ilii
Gayblevision at VIVO Media Arts Centre, and part two of (In)Accessible Vancouver.
We also interview artists Gabi Dao, Prado and Malcolm Biddle, and local musicians weigh in on their favourite spots for our Summer Park Guide. Keagan
Perlette offer a little guidance with Tarotscopes on page 12. R.L.A. reviews one of
our favourite local festivals, Music Waste, and Under Review ventures further into
podcast and book reviews. Our art project is Samuel Morgan, who tagged this
issue with spot illustrations.
See you in September,
BB
P.S. Discorder will be posting several Web Exclusive interviews, album and
music video debuts, and general news throughout the summer months. Visit
discorder.ca, or follow us on the social medias for updates.
EDITOR'S NOTE
 JULY 28TH-30TH
A PACIFIC NORTHWEST FEMINIST ELECTRONIC ARTS SYMPOSIUM
www.currentsymposium.com
 WRISTBAND
VANCOUVER LATIN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL
words  by Ana Rivera  //   illustrations  by Karla Monterrosa
Putting on a gown
made up of the
finest films
from Latin America,
the VLAFF is celebrating its Quinceafiera from
August 24 to September 3. Just as a young
woman celebrates her 15th birthday in Latin
America, the VLAFF is seeking to show
us the way in which it has matured and
evolved into a diverse and well-composed
cinematic experience.
The festival aims to spread Latin
American culture from the various cinematographic discourses while promoting
social interaction and stimulating cultural
interchange. It also hopes to strengthen the
bridges of collaboration, exchange and dialogue between the cinematographic industries of both regions.
Each year the festival picks a country to
place focus on based on the support of embassies and consulate generals. This year
Cuba was chosen as the main focus because "even though it is a relatively small
country, it produces very significant high
quality films" according to festival organizer Christian Sida-Venezuela. He and his
team feel it is important to support these
filmmakers, particularly from this country
which doesn't receive as much support as
others to be featured in film festivals.
Over the span of the eleven-day film
event, apart from Cuba, one will be able to
indulge in films from nearly every country
in Latin America.
The goal of the festival is to highlight
the work of Latin American and Latino
Canadian filmmakers who have produced
their films in their country of origin or
Canada, and are interested in sharing
their experiences with Vancouver audiences. Without VLAFF, most of these films
would not have had the opportunity to be
shown in Canada. It also, and most importantly, aims to address socioeconomic
issues of importance to Latin America, as
well as promote the interaction of cinema
lovers from both Latin America, Canada
and beyond.
The event will host a competition for
first-time directors, which will include a
series of panel discussions by youth jurors who will chose those films awarded
by the festival.
One of this year's highlights is the opening film El Ciudadano Ilustre (The illustrious
citizen) by Argentinean director duo Gaston
Duprat and Mariano Cohn, a satirical dark
comedy that promises to be riveting and
uncompromising in exploring a man's
struggle between his roots and his journey
through fame.
^s a visual tool of education the
VLAFF provides a category titled
jActivismo! (Activism). This section
focuses on films that are profound, political and powerful: films that will initiate
o
CiTR 101.9 FM & Discorder Magazine
present the
34th   Annual
x-x-x- SUBMISSIONS ARE OPEN NOW -x-x-x
Send us a demo of original material containing a minimum of
three songs and your contact information including e-mail and phone number
to shindig.submissions@gmail.com to apply
»>> ALL ARE WELCOME ««
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS:
September 1
Prizes include studio time, mastered track,
a feature in Discorder Magazine, + more.
O
and inspire conversations on identity,
family, community and nationhood.
Given the political climate of such a diverse part of the world, it is expected that
this category will be an effective lens to focus on issues often overlooked or misinterpreted by the media abroad. Media in Latin
America is often times censored and manipulated in ways that can misinterpret an
event, often times diminishing its impact.
In a similar way, media in Western society
doesn't fully report on the issues.
A great example of what this year's
VLAFF hopes to continue is the strength
of a screening from last year: One day in
Ayotzinapa 4.3, written and directed by Rafael
Rangel, provided an insider's view into a
Mexican town in the midst of a wave of political violence. It showed audiences the resilient and true selves of all the citizens that
lived there, and the ways in which they are
fighting against their current circumstances.
When such events are documented and
shown through the eyes of a Latin American
filmmaker, this personal perspectives helps
humanize the victims. It is a platform to
educate and inform in a unique and impactful way that an outside filmmaker view
may not be able to provide.
As the Latino community in Vancouver
and Canada continues to grow, any avenue
that provides a level of understanding of
the diversity of culture in Latin America is
of great importance to nurture tolerance
and unity.
The Vancouver Latin American Film Festival
has taken place annually since 2003. Make sure
to check out their website for regular updates
on screenings and events, and more festival
information at vlaff.org.
Cinematheque
Vancouver's Community-Driven Concert Calendar
Home of the- BANDS! p'ease Update.
Vancouver Musicians Directory Your current status:
- Availability. Seeking Musicians, on Hiatus.
the CiTR Radio Sponsored
Vancouver Band Directory
and the
Vancouver Music Service
6 Resource Directory
New name. Writing/Recording. Broken up.
Your Current Members:
- Archive ex's. Indicate new blood.
G Grant new members G mgmt editing access.
Your New Info:
Changes to genres, bio. G social media links
LiveVan.com: Maintained by thousands, because it works!
Part of the network that includes LiveVictoria.com. ArtsVictoria.ca. CowichanCulture.ca G more
WRISTBAND: VANCOUVER LATIN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL IE9
 AUDIOPILE
RECORDS & CD's
EST. 2001
Anniversary
Saturday July 22nd and Sunday July 23rd
20% off New
and
40% off Used
2016 Commercial Drive, Vancouver, BC
Ph: 604.253.7453
www.Audiopile.ca
Choose from an absolutely massive selection
of new and used records and CD's
 (IN)ACCESSIBLE VANCOUVER PT.2
words by Eleanor Wearing
illustrations by Bryce Aspinall
r«V«l
1660 EAST BROADWAY
flh, summer. For those living in
Vancouver, this means (moderately) nicer weather, and the
annual proliferation of local shows and
events throughout the city. In
(In)Accessible Vancouver Part l published in the May issue of Discorder
Magazine, I ask the question, who is
responsible for ensuring event accessibility? Is it the City of Vancouver?
Venue managers? Organizers? The
feature looks to the accessibility of a
few local arts organizations outside of
Discorder''s typical scene — Kickstart
and Realwheels — who are addressing accessibility in the arts in different
ways. Keeping these conversations in
mind, I want to consider how organizers, venue managers, and show attendees might follow the lead of these
organizations, and not just talk about
goals for the future, but take tangible
actions right now.
For venues and organizers, one place to
start is with the information and strategies put forward by RAMP, or the Radical
Access Mapping Project. RAMP is a solo
project, founded and run out of Vancouver
by an individual known as romham. One
of the major focuses of RAMP is to perform accessibility audits of local venues,
bars and businesses, and make this information publicly accessible. RAMP also
provides blank templates for people to
conduct their own venue audits.
However, as romham points out on
the RAMP website, an audit is only one
part of the picture. It must be used "as a
whole process whereby individuals and
groups begin (or continue) to look at the
many ways their space / event / organizing group etc. can shift its priorities, its
philosophies, its understandings, and yes
its walls, sometimes razing the entirety
to the ground, to create and recreate not
only a more welcoming space for multiply disabled folks, but to change, shift,
demolish notions of worth, of solidarity,
of resistance, of community altogether."
With respect to groups enacting this
in Vancouver, romham has particularly
positive experience working with the
Reverb Queer Reading Series:
"The [series] was a great example of
taking the audit process seriously and
moving it forward by making incremental
changes a standard part of the organizing
of an event," says romham. "Organizers
intentionally started with a reasonably accessible space, and every installment they increased and improved access
in one area or another, from childcare,
chemical and EMF sensitivity, wheelchair
user access, fat-friendly seating, ASL interpretation, and so on."
There are other local organizers who are making use of the
tools put forward by RAMP and
working to expand our collective understanding of accessibility. For Melanie
Matining, one of the organizers of local
queer dance parties Denim Vest and Open
Relationship, accessibility is a big part
of event planning and discussion. Using
information from RAMP, organizers focus on physical accessibility, and ways to
make their events more inclusive, including emotional accessibility and financial accessibility. In a city as expensive as Vancouver, financial accessibility is
a really interesting thing to think about.
"With [financial accessibility] we think
about sliding scale, but take it a step further," says Melanie. "It's one thing to
say, 'no one is turned away at the door,'
but also that there's a point of discomfort
when someone has to come up to the door
staff to say they don't have enough. So
we've had conversations with community,
and one of the small things we did that
created a really awesome positive impact
to the party was to use a jar for the entry
fee so people have the ability to pay what
they're able to, without judgement."
flmong the important things
Melanie points to is the power of
having community conversations,
and asking folks who attend their events
what they need or what they'd like to see.
"I think people attending events have
a lot of power too [...] I think it would
help if the people who come out to events
could connect with organizers and have
real conversations and think about capacity," she says. This way, there are
opportunities for folks to work together
on what they think is important, while
also recognizing the capacity and resources that organizers are working with.
6
Bm '  iven all the things that
[organizers] want, sometimes we have to [work on
things] one by one," explains Melanie.
"Having a culture of compassion, and
being like, 'Okay we want to make it
accessible, but it's going to take some
time,' is important! We're living in a
racist, ableist, transphobic world, so
there's a lot of systems we have to debunk in ourselves, as well, if we want to
get to somewhere that is genuine."
I think the idea of having compassion is important, because implementing accessibility policies and practices
is tough work. It requires time, energy, emotional investment, and other
resources that are not always available. This being said, bringing compassion into these conversations will likely
look different for different people. For
organizers, it could look like starting small,
and being okay with things going slow —
as long they keep improving. And for show
attendees concerned about accessibility, it
means communicating needs and desires
with organizers, venue owners, and staff to
communicate needs and desires. Finally, for
anyone thinking about accessibility within
their own circles, to consider how actions,
discussion, knowledge and other resources
are strengthened when used collectively.
Find out more about RAMP at their website:
radicalaccessiblecommunities.wordpress.com.
JULY
HIGHLIGHTS
WWW.RIOTHEATRETICKETS.CA
JULY
7
GREASE
SING-A-LONG!
PROPS. COSTUME CONTEST. A HICKEY FROM KINICKIE.
**AISO ON JULY 22**
THE WARRIORS
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
THE WIZARD OF OZ
JULY
8
DOUBLE FEATURE!
TRAINSPOTTING (1996)
T2 TRAINSPOTTING (2017)
JULY
BATMAN: THE MOVIE (1966)
9
JEAN CLAUDE VAN DAMME
BL00DSP0RT
JULY
DELIVERANCE
10
T2: TRAINSPOTTING
JULY
11
WES ANDERSON DOUBLE FEATURE!
BOTTLE ROCKET
THE DARJEELING LIMITED
JULY
12
007 DOUBLE FEATURE!
A VIEW TO A KILL
THE GENTLEMEN HECKLERS PRESENT
MOONRAKER
JULY
13
MARILYN MONROES JANE RUSSELL IN
GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES
JULY
14
INDIAN* JONES TRILOGY MARATHON!
RAIDERS. TEMPLE. CRUSADE.
ALL INDIANA. ALL. NIGHT LONG.
JULY
15
STEVEN SPIELBERG'S
E.T. THE EXTRA TERRESTRIAL
STANLEY KUBRICK'S
2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY
JULY
16
DOUBLE FEATURE!
THE LAST PICTURE SHOW
STARMAN
JULY
19
MONTEREY POP!
50TH ANNIVERSARY REMASTER
JULY
20
DOUBLE FEATURE!
LEON: THE PROFESSIONAL
THE FIFTH ELEMENT
JULY
21
RITA HAYWORTH IN
GILDA
"THE LITTLE HAND SAYS IT'S TIME TO ROCK AND ROLL."
POINT BREAK (1991)
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
JULY
24
IGGY POP AND JOSH HOMME
AMERICAN VALHALLA
JULY
25
SPICE WORLD
(WITH LIVE DRAG SHADOWCAST!)
JULY
28
RYAN GOSLING IN
DRIVE
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
JULY
29
FOUFOU HA! FEATURING FOU YORK
THE 24 CARROT SHOW
"ALSO ON JULY 28
JULY
31
THE GEEKENDERS AND KITTY GLITTER PRESENT
A HARRY POTTER BURLESQUE
BIRTHDAY BASH
COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA
(IN)ACCESSIBLE VANCOUVER PT. 2
 AN ERR FOR AN EYE:
words by Jules Gulbrultk II -pkotos fry Pwic&h CuiT^s-^re^MT II iWusfrdtio^s by Kd\e^a lAackiewicz
'5 soNicspncE
'^H^B^B   hen we listen, where are we,
I   and where is the sound? What
■^BJ^^P   aoes it mean to listen to others
and have an experience of a space that has no
physical location? These are questions asked
by Gabi Dao, media artist-in-residence at
the Western Front, an artist-run centre
known for its new media cross-platform
and multimedia exhibitions, residencies and
workshops.
When I meet Dao, the artist is articulate and energetic despite having spent
the morning toiling over grant applications. Dao chuckles that the process has
prepared her well for answering questions
about her practice. Dao's installations
make use of both visual and sculptural
elements, as well as sonic and interactive
ones. "I'm interested in sound, and how it
exists ontologically."
Dao describes her practice as one that is
responsive, in active dialogue with a given
context. "No matter how psychedelic and
affective and deep from your intuition
[ideas] come from, I feel like they are always
responding to what happens in real life."
Bao's artistic preoccupation with
space and location has long roots.
As a second-generation Chinese-
Vietnamese immigrant, both of her parents
were affected by displacement following
conflict throughout the '70s. Dao herself
has the experience of growing up at the
intersection between the traditional culture
imparted by her upbringing, and her day-
to-day experience absorbing and creating
culture in contemporary Vancouver. She
moves through her practice with a keen
awareness of how identity and culture is
constructed and tied to place in the sense
both of current location, as well as more
abstract spaces, removed in time and distance, whose effects are nevertheless potent in individual consciousness.
"My practice looks at these conditions,
these forces, that shape values — families, governments, cultures — and how
layered they are, and how they intersect
[...] Identity is this really contingent thing,
hinged on external factors. As well, what
are the forces that make culture and determine what it is, which determine what
GABIDAO
culture is good and what culture is bad?
Different experiences, especially aesthetic
ones, are so controlled and mediated by the
social landscape that humankind has created for itself."
The Western Front is a weathered
wood-slat heritage building which
stands in humble contrast to the
modern condo housing on the opposite
corner. We enter the Grand Luxe Concert
Hall, the setting of Dao's Slow Wave, a festival that has featured unconventionally
intimate performances by Yu Su and Scott
Gailey, Soledad Munoz (alongside Samira,
There which is in dialogue with the concert
series.
I ask Dao what her partnership with
the Western Front and New Media Curator
Allison Collins, has lent her in terms of
resources. On top of the equipment for recording and editing, as well as curatorial
input, Dao exclaims, "The camaraderie!
The staff are all so generous and knowledgeable, it's like a family restaurant here.
I'm constantly humbled. And I'm not expected to produce anything, necessarily. I
can use this time to just workshop, think
and talk to people I wouldn't get to talk to.
It's a lot about feeling supported."
Prado and Nvrsne) as well as a sound
workshop hosted by Tom Whalen (Tommy
Tone).
Unlocking a door I had never noticed
before, she leads into a narrow corridor
stuffed with audio equipment and old cassettes — the Front's archive — and then
on to two smaller rooms, both equipped
with rippled modular wall-mounts: sound
dampers.
This is the recording booth and audio-editing suite where Dao spends much
of her time — granted 24-hour access as
a condition of the residency — at work on
the production of a podcast series Here Nor
Bao describes her intentions for
the podcast as producing a forum "to discuss what's happening in the community through what people
are doing, their relationships with what
they're making, and with the city."
During and now after her time at Emily
Carr University of Art + Design, Dao has
been involved in the studio-cum-gallery
spaces Avenue and DUPLEX. As such, she
has witnessed and dealt firsthand with the
difficulties that weigh on creative individuals in metropolitan centres, especially
emerging artists. Finding and maintaining
cultural spaces means facing the constant
menace of rising housing costs, development
and rezoning, dilapidated infrastructure and
personal burnout. "It's a dire time," Dao
observes, "and it always will be."
However, Dao has faith in the capacity of
artistic practices and objects, stating what
is needed is "a place for visibility. For me,
that means that [the art] can now elicit a
conversation [...] We as artists, as artistic labourers, need to go into the world and
exchange and dialogue and have real effects, make something happen in a direct
or indirect way."
Through podcasting, Dao hopes to
create a space not for just for visibility, but audibility. "Dialogue and
discussion have this great capacity, and listening is so hinged on community. You're
always listening to someone else. Sound is
this social architecture, this structure for
congregation. It literally builds something
— it's so present, but it's in the air at the
same time, totally ephemeral."
"It's hard here," Dao states, "and I
just realized that we just need a place to
talk. I'm asking what the role of a voice
is, what it means to talk and give space to
voices, and what it means to listen. Space
is a resource! And that is something that
I have hoped to extend to others through
my residency."
$
Gabi Dao is artist-in-residence at the Western
Front for Spring and Summer 2017. Her residency
will conclude with a public exhibition this Fall.
More information atfront.bc.ca/events/gabi-dao.
 Gnmevision
** VRHCOUVER QUEER HISTORY UDSCRIPTED,
UflCEflSORED ROD RRCHIVED FOREVER
words by Aidan Danaher//
illustrations by Jules Francisco//
archive imagery courtesy of VIVO
^^M  f you are interested in the vivid histories of
I  Vancouver's subcultures before the turn of the
■^^   century, VIVO Media Arts Centre's library is full of
thousands of archived textual and video documents spanning from the '70s through to the '90s and '00s that are
entirely open to the public. VIVO began in 1973 as The
Satellite Video Exchange Society, shortly after the MATRIX
convention, Western Canada's first-ever video media conference. VIVO's heart is The Crista Dahl Media Library &
Archive, but the organization is also known for its events,
workshops and equipment rentals. With the preservation of so many primary sources from the last 40+ years,
a lifetime of knowledge is just waiting to be unearthed by
some curious minds with keen interest in the legacy of
past generations.
In honour of Pride, VIVO is promoting their collection
of Canada's first "for gay people, by gay people" television program, Gayblevision (later renamed PacificWave),
which was based out of Vancouver's West End. It was
originally released through public-access broadcast, now
Gayblevision producers (clockwisejrom top left) Don Durrell, Barry Spillman,
Mary Anne McEwen, Greg Cutts and Don Larventz
immortalized in their archive as video time-capsules of
Vancouver's LGBTQIA+ community in the early-to-mid
'80s. Episodes range from exuberance, such as detailing
how Pride started as a fledgling movement and became
an international phenomena, to incredible tenderness,
as seen through raw footage of unedited interviews with
people afflicted by HIV. Most of Gayblevision is digitized,
and footage is accessible online.
One of the most intriguing things about Gayblevision is
how it provides such a unique insider perspective on the
LGBTQIA+ culture as it simultaneously grew and combat-
ted adversity. In the summer of 1981, Vancouver declared
its first official week dedicated to Pride. In a clip showing the official commencement address, the declaration of
the Gay Unity Week '81 promoted the "basic humanity and
rights of gay people as citizens and members of the community," while making note of Vancouver's diversity as
one of its many strengths.
0
Gayblevision opening credits
^^M   n the summer of 1990, Vancouver hosted
I   Celebration '90, an installment of San Francisco's
^P  Gay Games. In an interview with Gay Games organizer Tom Waddell, he said of choosing a new host, "It
needs to be a gay community that is known for its friendliness, and has the facilities, and perhaps the most essential element is that it has a good working relationship
with the city government." Vancouver covered all of those
criteria. Waddell made a great point about the appeal of
hosting the event internationally, that through the growth
of the event, "cities will realize that gay communities
contribute a great deal to the cultural life, to the social
life, to the physical life of any city that they inhabit."
Some particularly incredible footage is from an interview with Alan Hicox, who was Vancouver's first openly
gay man also openly battling AIDS. Hicox was a founding member of Vancouver's first
AIDS support group. His bravery
was reflected by his decision to
publicly face the disease, and he
admitted on tape that his confidence was greatly strengthened
by the loving support of his
friends and family. Sadly, he
passed away only nine months
after being diagnosed.
I can't help but think that
the further our society ventures into this century, our
inclination towards obsessive
nostalgia grows. It is as if the
populus has largely held onto
this mythical notion that quo-
tidien life in past decades was
unaffected by the same sort
of troubles that we experience
today. This phenomenon is in
part due to our recollections of
childhood, as we compare them
to the turbulence of our current
lives, unable to contextualize
the bigger picture. For instance, as I keep watching more
episodes and excerpts of Gayblevision, I notice it is easy to
forget how the media firestorm around AIDS / HIV caused
widespread stigmatization. In effect, this only plagued the
LGBTQIA+ community with increased discrimination that
caused further alienation, rather than raising awareness in
an educated manner to help prevent the suffering and loss
of innocent lives. Just because it's more pleasant to think
of the '80s in terms of neon leg warmers, one-hit wonders and Brat Pack movies, doesn't mean there isn't more
to learn from that era.
The Crista Dahl Media Library & Archive at VIVO is rich
with the preserved history from the Lower Mainland and
media organizations across the world. These documents
and videos, our cultural heritage, are being made readily
available as the archive grows and older works are digitized and redistributed. Gayblevision, in particular, demonstrates the value of such archives in preserving a strategically pivotal period of LGBTQIA+ activism on the West
Coast. It shows us how much we have progressed, and also
helps us understand how much farther we have to go.
Access to the Crista Dahl Media Library & Archive is free of
charge, andyou can learn more here:vivomediaarts.com/archive. If
you wish to see the archive for yourself, contact VIVO at
library@vivomediaarts.com. The video archive catalogue can
also be browsed online at videoout.ca. VIVO will have a screening 0/Gayblevision on Thursday, August 3 at 8pm, admission by
donation.
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fiction
JUNE 2017
EXCERPT FROM MUSIC WASTE 2017
JUNE 1-4 / VARIOUS VENUES
^■^^ hile I was still recovering from my late night at Fortune, I knew
J^J^r  my second night of Music Waste was going to require travelling
around the city from venue to venue. Before the sun had even set, my evening began at the Cobalt.
First on deck was Tesstopia, a solo performance from Daniel Tessy (of
Fuzzy P, who were playing later that night at Pat's Pub) with his semi-hollow electric guitar. His bellowing vocals were at times a jarringly high-pitched
falsetto or bloated, with delicate melodies. Before he finished his set with
"Impossible to Know," he mentioned that he was unable to play the song's
closing guitar solo. Instead he decided to sing it note for note. While it wasn't
necessarily my cup of tea, it was very entertaining and you could tell he was
having a great time.
Shortly after, Milk took to the stage. Sporting a Hawaiian shirt,
Milk's enigmatic vocalist / guitarist Thomas James carried himself with a similar disposition to Dinosaur Jr's J Mascis, with drawled singing complimented
by the ability to pull off ripping guitar solos. Some of my favourite songs from
the set were "Marmalade," with guitar melodies and harmonies reminiscent
of Real Estate, and "Standards," where James sings: "Everyone's so worried
they are losing their damn mind / Anyway I guess I feel alright."
For the final act of this show, all four members of Jock Tears were bouncing around the stage, each with their own spastic rhythms. Almost every
song —which was never longer than two minutes — was preceded by a
quick "1 -2-3-4!" Similar to their name, their songs were cheeky, lightheart-
ed jabs at different kinds of insufferable stereotypes. For instance, singer
Lauren Ray announced before one song, "This is a song about cool guys
who aren't cool," and proceeded to sing about boys with bleached blonde
hair. Another song was preceded by a, "This song is about Tinder, I hope you
find true romance." While it was completely unexpected, their set wouldn't
have been complete without their encore: a cover of GG Allin's "Don't Talk
To Me."
By the time I left the Cobalt, the sky was finally dark. I made my way
across the city to make it to my next stop of the night: The Toast Collective
for Winona Forever's set... [Read the full review on discorder.ca]
—Aldan Danaher
MUSIC WASTE: PALM OIL / DAD THIGHS
/WARES/LITTLE SPROUT
JUNE 3 / TOAST COLLECTIVE
Pt 9 p.m. on Saturday, June 3, the front door of Toast Collective was
locked and the windows were boarded up. Confident that a Music
Waste show was supposed to be occurring, I searched for a way in.
The back alley revealed a nondescript entrance which led to a shoebox
of a space. Inside, people were quietly chatting, sitting on couches and piling
their jackets up in the corner — we could have been hanging out at a band
practice in a friend's parents' garage.
Vancouver-based Little Sprout opened to a crowd of two dozen. The
show was so intimate that Amie Gislason, on vocals and guitar, asked if the
sound was alright with everyone and we directly replied. Gislason's voice
had a sweetness to it reminiscent of Hannah Georgas, that could transform
into a heavy metal wail in an instant. Sean Aram Gordon played a drum set
that included a cymbal cracked within an inch of its life, and Reese Patterson
grinned along on bass. Little Sprout seemed genuinely happy we were all
there, and the feeling was mutual.
After a short intermission, the crowd easily doubled in size. Everyone was
chattering amongst themselves and waiting for the next act when feedback
shrieked through the room. At first, it seemed like Wares' Cassia Hardy was
fiddling with the equipment in an attempt to stop the noise, which had grown
unbearably loud in the small space, but it gradually morphed into something
calculated and melodic.
Seeing Wares perform reminded me of why I love small shows. Their
music is the product of genuine talent, and watching them perform felt like
bearing witness to something greater. Hardy's commanding presence blended with her unpretentious vocals to create garage rock infused with absolute
sincerity. It wasn't a show I can easily forget.
At some point between Wares and Dad Thighs, Toast Collective posted on the Facebook event page that they were at capacity. People were
stripping off clothes and squeezing up front to get closer to the action.
Headbangers lost themselves to Dad Thighs' wailing and meandering guitar rhythms. Lead vocalist Victoria denounced the yuppies making it harder
to live and work in Vancouver. The crowd roared in response. Dad Thighs
seized our attention and their 30-minute set whizzed by.
Finally, Palm Oil took to the stage. The four-piece took a clear political
stance, and made no attempt to sugarcoat their message that "humanity is
doomed." They were the most hardcore act of the night and the room pulsated with the energy they emitted and received in return.
Palm Oil ended just after midnight and the audience piled out into the
alleyway. The Saturday show at Toast Collective may have finished, but
Music Waste was far from over.—Hannah Thomson
MOUNT KIMBIE / KUCKA / SUITMAN
JUNGLE
JUNE 8 /IMPERIAL
I get to the Imperial too early, and it is already hot. Red lighting and
•^P smoke machine haze give the venue a steam room vibe — either that,
or slightly reminiscent of the opening sequence from a bad '80s action movie set in stereotypical Chinatown, complete with a fish tank near the bar and
fake terracotta warriors decoratively looming over the dance floor. Seriously
though, where am I?
Suitman Jungle ("I wear a suit, and I play jungle") opens, transporting
the audience of 40 or so to the streets of London with recordings of the
Underground, British parliament and casual conversation woven into jungle beats. Suitman Jungle is a playful performer. Every song is a narrative
meriting some explanation and context. During one song he talks about
writing a letter. He says he signs '"Yours Faithfully,' because I don't really
know the person." At one point he takes "a break" to read headlines from
Vancouver's Metro newspaper. He asks us specific questions about the
structure of Canadian government (embarrassingly, the small audience
stays silent). It is, of course, election day in the U.K., and as the sounds of
London fill the Imperial, Suitman Jungle's set is a not-so-subtle reminder
that politics fill his thoughts.
In no time at all the Imperial fills up, and Australia's KUCKA begins.
Her set opens with recordings of birds — a fitting transition from Suitman
Jungle's sample-heavy set. KUCKA improvises her beats in the moment and
layers her vocals to create an electronic soundscape not unlike the familiar music of Stefana Fratila or Grimes' early albums. The audience mirrors
KUCKA's stage presence and dances anonymously. I close my eyes while
dancing and let the bright stage lights pass over me. I notice that someone
around me smells like strawberries, and it stays with me. KUCKA's set is an
authentically sensory experience — the perfect lead into Mount Kimbie.
Mount Kimbie holds off four songs before saying hello. Kai Campos
explains, "Last night we played, where the fuck? Somewhere small ... I got
used to playing to 10 people, so this is a bit fucked up." Looking around, the
room is packed and the audience is hanging off Campos' every word. It's
hard to imagine them playing near-empty rooms.
Mount Kimbie performs live as a 4-piece with Campos and Dominic
Maker as the focus. They alternate instruments seamlessly. The nature of
the stage presence seems to imply that Campos and Maker perform in their
own worlds, each adding to a shared universe. They play a balance of older
and newer songs, but they are stylistically distinct. Newer tracks, including
"Marilyn" and "We Go Home Together" have a sophistication that exemplifies
Mount Kimbie's slow drift from trap. Not that the audience is paying much
attention to the stylistic tension — even wallflowers for KUCKA and Suitman
Jungle joined the dancing for Mount Kimbie. Near the end of the set,
Campos addresses the audience again as if completing his initial opening
comments: "It's a real pleasure to have some of you come out when we've
done jack-shit for four years."
No, it was our pleasure.—Paige Lecoeur
DOUSE / THE JINS / CASUAL LUXURY
JUNE 9 / STYLUS RECORDS
^7 rom floor to ceiling, every surface of Stylus Records was cluttered
^«  with some arcane artifact, rock poster or handmade chair. I began
the night standing on a coffee table at the back to get a better view of the
packed venue for Douse's The Light In You Has Left vinyl release show. The
well-received record has now been given the vinyl treatment from local label
Kingfisher Bluez nine months after its initial release.
Borrowing two members from Douse, multi-instrumentalist Ethan Hall's
modern rock project Casual Luxury opened the show as a four-piece with
drums, bass, electric guitar and synth. The set featured a loud-quiet dynamic with clean arpeggios and tense power chord climaxes, but the set was so
short it was hard to get a sense of what the band is all about.
For the main event, Alea Clark, Jeremiah Ackermann, Patrick Farrugia
and Victoria Spooner expertly replicated The Light In You Has Left's ethereal
atmosphere and complexity with washes of lush reverb, delay and shimmering chorus. Douse's cinematic art rock draws comparison to the likes of The
National and Wye Oak, though Douse lacks their peers' sinister edge, which
eft some of the more musically aggressive tracks coming off a bit limp.
Instead, Douse were at their best in sparse and vulnerable moments like
the gorgeous "Hypertension." These tracks allowed the character and quality
of Clark's voice to shine through and really draw the listener in. Ackermann
cited their penultimate song "Unrest" as their most popular "based on the
online play statistics," and it provided the climax for their solid set. Whatever
side of Douse fans prefer, many left happy with new vinyl in hand.
The Jins were loud, their gear looked like it was barely holding together
and their garage rock sound was the polar opposite of Douse. They blasted through their set with drummer Jamie Warnock brutalizing his kit, bassist
Hudson Partridge kicking on the overdrive, and vocalist Ben Larsen coaxing huge guitar tones from his 150-watt tube amp. They're a noise complaint
waiting to happen in the best way possible.
Warnock broke his kick drum after the first song, but with a hand from the
audience they just flipped it around backwards and carried on. A few songs
later the cymbal stand and floor torn toppled over. Standing in the front row
of a Jins show comes with certain responsibilities — you might want to brush
up on your roadie skills.
So what is The Jins' most popular song based on online statistics? I
would guess "Inner Child." The song started out with gently strummed chords
underneath deranged whistling from Larsen and Warnock before dropping into thick power chords paired with a brilliantly sludgy chorus effect.
Ignoring a broken guitar string they obliged the call for an encore and despite
Larsen's warning that it would sound bad, nobody was expecting perfection.
—Dylan Joyce
MARBLED EYE/TOUGH CUSTOMER/
BORED DECOR
JUNE 15/RED GATE
^■^^ hen Vancouver locals Tough Customer ended their set, the band
JjJJJjAr clustered together on stage in fits of laughter. Kat grabbed the mic
and addressed the audience one last time, singling out Nik of Bored Decor:
"Sorry Claire grinded up on you. She thought you were Aidan."
This was the final punchline in Tough Customer's comedy of errors.
The closing of a hometown sandwich with Bored Decor and Marbled Eye
(Oakland), Tough Customer's set was nothing short of a hot mess. This outcome was foreshadowed by Katie and Claire's choice of warm-up music —
guitar riffs from Heart's "Crazy On You." Though every song was bookend-
ed with Kat cussing out malfunctioning parts on the drum kit, the beats were
consistent enough to keep the crowd dancing throughout.
After giving an impassioned "Tell You Off," Katie lost her voice to coughing and Claire took the mic, holding its stand at an angle. She stepped off
stage to join the dancing audience, clunkily dragging the mic stand with her.
Suddenly confused, Claire exclaimed into the microphone, "What? You're
not Aidan," followed by, "I can't tell Liam about this." (Liam being her partner.)
I  Bored Decor 9 Music Waste,
photo courtesy of Pat Valade
REAL LIVE ACTION
 Claire was grinding up against Bored Decor vocalist Nik thinking that he was
someone else. The absurd interruption of Claire's realization was more than
anyone in Tough Customer could handle — except for maybe Ben on guitar,
who kept his cool through all the mishaps and stage banter.
If Tough Customer had a post punk doppelganger, it was Marbled Eye.
The four-piece played a tight set. The vocals alternated between band founders Chris and Michael, who were stationed on opposite ends of the stage
both playing guitar. Andrew on bass played between them, taking up most
of the stage rocking out. The band thanked the venue and wished a happy birthday to Kat, who they claimed, "promised us a twerking crowd surfer during our set." The audience was tentative with their affection, but they
inched closer with every song and were won over.
Bored Decor opened the evening with dramatic flare. Nik lit candles on
stage ritualistically, and the band started off with some of their slower songs.
After the opening song, Nik said, "I would say come closer, but there are a
lot of candles up here. I wouldn't want something to happen." In blatant disregard, the audience crowded the stage, casual swaying transforming to
moshing. The set hit a climax at the lyrics, "Any form of pleasure is relief" in
"Spasms," a song off their forthcoming album. The audience actually sighed
in disappointment when the song ended.
If only we had known then what was to come. —Leigh Empress
FLEECE / FUNK SCHWEY / JERICHO / MY
SISTER MARIA
JUNE 16 / FOX CABARET
Pn early show time often calls for a smaller crowd, and as the first
bands set up at the Fox Cabaret, it seemed as though that would be
the case. What is usually a lively and eccentric venue felt dull and divey —
despite the rooms stark appearance, it wouldn't be too long till its vibe would
be revived. First up was an acoustic set by My Sister Maria, who had yet to
arrive.
Nearing 8 p.m., there was no sign of My Sister Maria. A small crowd
awaited her set, Jericho prepared for theirs. Without any formal introduction,
Jericho transitioned from their sound check straight into their set. The crowd
was sparse at first, but as they played, loyal fans shuffled in from the light of
the early evening into the dark Fox.
The energy, which was lacking at the start, was instantaneously sparked
as the crowd grew in size and enthusiasm. Despite the light that leaked into
the murky cave-like hall, Jericho's dark and entrancing sound enticed listeners and felt at home between the red and black walls.
After what felt like a quick set came, what some may argue, the act of the
night. If you've ever seen Funk Schwey before, you probably know what's
next. They jumped right into spellbinding the crowd with charisma. As the
two brothers, Isaiah on the bass and Jarah on the mic, grooved in Funkadelic
unison, the crowd mimicked, hooked by the irresistible energy. The room was
electric as the mass of charged bodies bumped and boogied.
Between sets, My Sister Maria appeared and quickly played two acoustic songs. Her voice was soft and sincere, but it was diffused underneath the
chatter of the buzzing crowd.
It was steamy and hot after Funk Schwey, but that didn't stop the crowd
from getting cozy with the show's headliner, Fleece. The five-piece started off
humbly, the audience still charged from the previous set. Their jazzy psych
rock sound contrasted with their casual demeanor. While seeming mildly dis-
WEST 41
STREET  PARTY
THE ZOLAS
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D.O.A.   LOUISE BURNS
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DOUSE ART D'ECCO PEACH PIT FRANCESCA RELCOURT
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MINIMAL VIOLENCE THE JUDYS DOPEY'S ROBE
FRANKIE BLUE J UNKNOWN MOBILE TULIP ONLY WOLF
DANIEL TERRENCE ROBERTSON THE ORANGE KYTE
KASH HONEY + YWN PRADO THE WRITTEN YEARS
Al HASHIMOTO MICHAEL & THE SLUMBERLAHD BAND SCUM LAUDE
DID YOU DIE JO PASSED GENTLE PARTY HAZY GHOST MEAT DEVOURS
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connected from the audience, the band seemed connected with each other
and their music had a "mind-fuck" sort of presence.
The ambiance of the room felt snug and pleasantly lethargic, as people
swayed and minds wandered with the rotating disco ball lights, moving off
tempo to the jazzy drumming and Sesame Sfreet-like synth. Just after 10
p.m. the final set came to a close. The crowd exited the building in a dreamlike state, only to find they still had the rest of the night ahead of them. —Lexi
Melish
EXCERPT FROM CAMPBELL BAY MUSIC
FESTIVAL
JUNE 23-24 / MAYNE ISLAND
rike any music festival, you have to find your groove before you can settle yourself into the ebb and flow of festival community. Campbell Bay
Music Festival is no exception. Even though it has been going for nine years,
this Mayne Island festival has no formulaic feel to it — just people who love
being on an island, listening to music together. For the first time in maybe 20
years, I found myself looking for a shady camping spot near a bathroom, but
not too close. I should add that I brought my two kids. We set up near the top
of the hill, away from the real partiers, amongst the somewhat familial folks
who had an idea of longevity and pacing for the weekend. But the real bonus
was the afternoon shade.
The festival runs on volunteer power, while the money from tickets very
obviously goes into securing excellent music from all over North America
The folks who run it genuinely seem to be in it for the show. It was a perfect
balance between every kind of music you'd want to encounter at a festival:
bluegrass, '80s synth haunt pop, slam poets, poetic musicry, western shirts
with pearl topped buttons, steely guitars, soul country, folkish rogues, naked
beach jams and jokesters. There was art, murals, moving meditation dancers, hoop lessons, indigo dye workshops, and so much more. As for the
bands, there were too many to talk about individually. Each had its own separate and sublime quality, I could never fully capture, so I'll vociferate a few
of the standouts for me.
On Friday night, Thus Owls, a Montreal-based Swedish / Canadian duo,
caught my attention with the singer's heart-centric soul stuffs lingering in
my ears. She ascended while the steely guitar stayed grounded, a friendly reminder to watch from below. There were The Revelers, a high energy
grass-cajun-roots act that every Acadian can deeply relate, and Nanaimo's
experimental electronic band, Top Men who did a cover of Peter Gabriel that
made me cry a little tear in my beer under the stars from my tent, while I
watched my finally sleeping children... [Read the full review on discorder.ca]
—Oona Krieg
!!!
To have a live show cc
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eviev
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Magazine
and online, please en
nail event det
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-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action
Edito
at rla.discorde
@citr.ca.
RLA is also expanding t
o include con
nedy
and theatre, an
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REAL LIVE ACTION
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Btoiew
MUSIC
ROCOCODE
(Marquis)
16  /  06  /  2017
Tl ancouver does not deserve local pop-duo Rococode. Our city has an
^■P abusive relationship with pop music. Local scenes often look down
on it, as if pop is a lesser genre of music not worthy of our noise festivals
and college radio stations. Yet when we think no one is listening, we turn on
Beyonce and Taylor Swift, and crank the volume. Pop music is always there
for us when we need it, whether it's when we spend too long thinking about
the ills of the world or when we finally overcome feeling guilty about our
musical pleasures.
In Vancouver, we have some of the best pop musicians in the country
creating immaculate hits that will ease the pain of any heart break or existential crisis, all while showcasing extraordinary musical skill. Rococode's new
EP Young Ones is a perfect example of the addictive hooks and seamless
production that we have come to expect from Vancouver's own Laura Smith
and Andrew Braun. This EP's dark, synth pop dreamscape acknowledges the heavy dread that has become synonymous with the year 2017, while
simultaneously lifting the listener out of the gloom with unexpected melodies
that float over the tracks with ease.
Crafting music that encapsulates both the dark and the angelic hinges
on refinement and talent. Smith's rhythmic runs in "Can't Get Enough," for
example, are expertly written, and will send a shiver down the spine of an
unsuspecting listener. In the last track, Smith sings "Wake me up, I thought
that it'd be over / But dreams can't make me sober." This imagery brings
to mind a generation waking up on November 9, 2016. All that darkness is
there, amongst the synths and the drum machines and the show-stopping
melodies. Yet, the duo also provides glimpses of light, as they coo, dove-like,
on the vocal hook to "A Love That You Will Never Know."
Rococode's music is carefully crafted by two veteran musicians who know
what the hell they are doing. They further prove that pop can encapsulate
complexity, depth and diversity. And while it may be easy to disregard music
for its melodic, hook based sensibilities, it's time for Vancouver to stop judging musicians by genre and, instead, finally listen.—Sarah Jickling
CHASTITY BELT
(Hardly Art)
02   /   06   /   2017
most fleeting. Songs like "5 AM" roar suddenly out of a series of calm and
thoughtful meditations; just as suddenly, the din subsides. Through these
flashes of turbulent emotion, Chastity Belt evokes the plight of contemporary
young adulthood, in all its timid self-loathing and earnest, honest expressions
of love. / Used to Spend celebrates that we are capable of pure, raw emotion, and mourns that incessant paranoid anxiety is the price we must pay for
those moments of uninhibited passion.
In the end, though, we are left resigned to ourselves and our fates.
Darkness is omnipresent; despite flashes of light, it will inevitably consume
us once again. / Used to Spend reminds us of this. But it also reminds us
to appreciate the moments when we can find freedom from our fears and
worries. We may just have to be content that we are, for now, happy.—Joey
Doyle
AN ANT AND AN ATOM
(Self Released)
01   /  06  /  2017
The latest record from Seattle's Chastity Belt, / Used to Spend So
Much Time Alone, is an old lost friend, grown up and returned home.
Dark, composed and mature, this record expresses not a longing for youth
or a nostalgia for simpler times, but rather the coming to terms with a world
that seems unrecognizable, full of unwanted responsibility and irrevocable
choices. Chastity Belt's record understands that, while our lives are rarely
desirable and offer little freedom to escape, we can still find moments of joy
amidst it all.
While the thematic concern of the album is fractured and uncertain, the
musical and lyrical composition is anything but: this is Chastity Belt's most
coherent and refined work to date. Julia Shapiro's vocals evoke the perfect
balance of resignation and hope, underscored by the insistent interplay of
Shapiro's own rhythm and Lydia Lund's lead guitar, and the stable presence
of Annie Truscott's bass and Gretchen Grimm's drums. These elements
come together to lull the listener into a space of calm amidst a storm of
assorted emotions that constitute existence.
Loneliness and uncertainty are contrasted against desire and confidence, each in brief glimpses. Nothing is sustained, nothing is sustainable.
The brightest and most beautiful moments in the album are the rarest and
UNDER REVIEW
Pn Ant And An Atom's Exterior is an interstellar wonder. This
Lethbridge, Alberta based artist has escaped our planet on a doomed
spacecraft. Through the five-track composition that is Exterior, a journey of
galactic survival is portrayed. Unlike other space-themed albums, such as
Mogwai's 2016 Atomic, Exterior distinguishes itself by providing the listener
with a greater sense of realism. Rather than emphasizing the spectacle of
space, An Ant And An Atom chooses to highlight the magnitude and loneliness of the cosmos.
The album opens with the heavy rhythm of "My Craft Broke At Launch."
The pulsating bass perpetuates a sense of urgency. This intensity is in contrast to the latter half of the song. As, this initial rhythm fades and is replaced
by a spacey mechanical tune defined by an unusual hum (perhaps that of a
spacecraft). An eerie quietness now rests within the listener's ears, paving
way for the rest of the album.
Soon, however, long drawn out notes slice through this silence. The track,
"The Crush of Gravity," begins and brings with it a wailing that sounds like
unheard sirens. Following this jarring alarm, "Locked In Adrift" opens with
a deceivingly peaceful melody that dissolves into an isolated tune adrift
amongst steady interstellar winds. Having not truly been in outer space
myself, I can only speculate that this accurately captures the essence of cosmic solitude.
The somberness of these first three tracks is carried into the fourth: "I
Dreamt Of Reaching Space, But Couldn't Calculate The Escape Velocity For
Reality." As this song progresses, the listener becomes aware of the dangers
and stress of space travel. The dreamy tones that opened the song suddenly
escalate into chaos. Just as quickly as it arrived, this harshness cuts away,
bridging into "Heat Up Another Planet, Burn Out Another Sun." An immediate
sense of doom is realised within the first few seconds of this richly layered
piece. Immense, it sounds like a train going through a tunnel lost amongst
white noise.
For someone who spent the summer rewatching Star Wars, Exterior was
a brilliant reminder of the terrible power of the cosmos. Somehow, An Ant
And An Atom has managed to sonically render the vast emptiness of space.
I recommend Exterior to those who look to the stars with respect and wonder.—Austin Zeller
SICK BOSS
(Drip Audio)
26  I  0b  I  2017
^■^^ ith each of its three members playing in an obscene number of
4^J^P musical projects, it's a wonder Sick Boss even found the time to
put a record of their own together. After years in the making, the self-titled
Sick Boss is here.
Comprised of drummer Dan Gaucher, bassist James Meger and guitarist
Cole Schmidt, the Vancouver trio runs the gamut between genres and styles
throughout their debut release with incredible ease and dexterity.
"Amadman" kicks off the record with glitches and gloom alongside truly
incredible musicianship. An unnerving soundscape emerges from the start,
with tweaking guitar and synth noise and a wash of keys. Slowing, a steady
pulse materializes and Gaucher's driving drums kick in, as a moaning voice
floats in and out. The cacophony builds until, in perfect sync, all the sounds
coagulate in a carefully orchestrated stab.
This mixture of compositional nuance and free-wheeling improvisation is
what brings the entire album together. Every song seems to be on the verge
of exploding with musical ideas. At the hands of lesser artists, the album
would crumble under its own weight, but Gaucher, Meger and Schmidt show
that they have the confidence and skill to keep it alive and exciting.
Despite diving into the depths of discord, Sick Boss is not afraid to produce something sonically beautiful as well. This dichotomy is best seen
during the last two tracks of the record — "Bug Ya! (Pt. 2)" is a jittery, dissonant and intricate collection of sounds, more textured than harmonious, followed directly by "Troubled," a slow burning ballad featuring rich piano, string
pads and Debra-Jean Creelman's gentle crooning.
While technically only a trio, Sick Boss enlists the help of countless prominent Vancouver musicians to fill out the entirety of the nine tracks. Peggy
Lee's cello slashes across "Mona," JP Carter's trumpet soars over the ending of "Bad Buddhist;" Jeremy Page's clarinet cuts through the noise of
"Amadman."
Vocalists Creelman and Molly Guldemond take centre stage on the jazz-
age "See You Out There." Overtop the smooth shuffle of instrumentation
they sing "See me / Out there / Always / See me / Always / Out there," as if
embodying the music itself, suspended in time, drawing on both antiquated jazz and cutting edge experimentalism. Sick Boss's constantly morphing
style and sound seems always to have been here and sounds like it always
will. —Lucas Lund
CAMERON MACLEOD
(Self Released)
19/05/2017
^■^^ ith Icon Of An Orange Juice Container, an instrumental comedy
4^J^P album, Cameron MacLeod strives to be a jack-of-all-content. He is
a writer, director, producer and performer at Pleasant Mountain Productions,
a comedian, and the driving force behind The HERO SHOW (a monthly
Vancouver sketch comedy show). MacLeod flexes comedy at every level and
this album attempts to stretch it further.
Icon Of An Orange Juice Container's title and track names were born
as late-night epiphanies and the beats and voiceovers were developed later. Each track name is an introduction for a spoken bit laid over bouncy
beats that range from the precise in "Suck Me Like a Dyson," to the bubbly
in "Chilly Toes & Bros." Home produced, MacLeod made everything himself
excluding the Point Break samples in "Chilly Toes & Bros," an homage to
MacLeod's work in classic action film parody.
Music, rather than stand-up, comprises the bulk of the album. With three
minute long songs like "Club Renovation" and its 20 seconds of voiceover,
this album is more aptly classified as comedic instrumentals than instrumental comedy. Despite this musical emphasis, MacLeod draws heavily from his
sketch comedy roots. Though the tracks merge music and narrative, the isolated voiceovers could be performed as stand alone sketches. An acoustic
track, "I Can't Do The Dew Like I Used To" has both strong comedic content,
a Mountain Dew advocate lamenting his waning ability to "do" it, and striking
instrumentation. The content anchors and supports the music, and the slow
guitar reinforces the ambiance of the track, each justifying the other.
By starting the creative process with song names, however, the listener is left with mixed results. On one hand, this approach provides MacLeod
with a lovely comedic springboard for each track. But, on the other hand, it
limits the impact of the album as a whole. Each song being a separate burst
of inspiration means that cohesion was forcefully imposed. The tracks' disparate content leaves the music to connect everything. Instead, MacLeod
emphasizes the music's relationship to the bit, making the album feel like a
collection of singles as opposed to an album unit.
Icon Of An Orange Juice Container is a beautiful idea whose main fault
lie in MacLeod's unfamiliarity with musical media. His palpable excitement
suggests that this is a passion project meant to test himself and the boundaries of his comedy. The project is so conceptually exciting that the actual content is almost secondary.—Clara Dubber
s^;
 SLATES
(New Damage Records)
19  /  05  /  2017
SLATES!
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Coyotes," a buried B-side on Summery, begins with a dissonant major chord chiming beneath distant sirens and
the howling of animals. Depicting backyard coyotes under
the watchful eye of an indoor cat, vocals cut in and disrupt this eerie field recording. The song diverges abruptly into an extended instrumental. A simple
rhythmic structure guides the guitars as they squeal discordantly through a
four-part crescendo. It is as feral as much as it is nimble. Vocals cut back in
and we revisit the coyotes. The song comes to a halt.
Like "Coyotes," many of the memorable moments on Slates' fourth full-
length album are found deep within songs. The expressive vocals use observational imagery to colour lyrical content about loneliness and death. Yet,
the tension is created by unanticipated shifts into emotive, unconventional
solo sections — sludgy rhythms, jagged guitar work and a trio of lo-fi segues
between songs.
The solo sections, typically repetitive two-chord vamps, are an exertion of
strength from Summery's only apparent flaw. Although remarkably powerful,
the vamp sections begin to wash together by the record's end. Is this intentional? It barely matters; the sequencing is seamless and the album hardly
loses momentum within thirty-three minutes of music.
Summery is a fitting rejuvenation of where Slates left off on their previous
album. Slates continue to refuse the confines of circle-pit punk. The intricate
guitar chords, boisterous rhythm section and articulated half-spoken vocals
echo an Unwound influence. Yet the band is definite in carving their own trail,
using meaningful subtleties that are fit for repeat headphone listens through
summer rambles.—Mark Budd
DO MAKE SAY THINK
(Constellation Records)
19  /  05  /  2017
fvery time I spin a new Do Make Say Think album there is a moment
of fear. Perhaps I'm not going to fall in love this time as I commonly
do with every album they release. But then I listen again and it sinks comfortably under my skin, confirming and continuing the love affair. For years
the Toronto post-rock instrumentalists have been creating urgent and tense
music that jumps between blasting the skin clean from your body to soaking your weary frame in the healing waters of lucidity. Their seventh release,
Stubborn Persistent Illusions, continues this trend and it is staggering to me
just how beautifully it flows.
"War on Torpor" is a hell of a way to open an album, as it is erratic and
manic like a chicken without a head. Truth be told, I was not quite sure how
I felt about this song at first, but then again this is my most treasured band
and time must be allowed for the music to unfold organically. And good god
does this album unfold in such a magnificent way, even after the rabid energy of its opening track.
In contrast, "As Far As the Eye Can See" provides immediate gratification. It will quite likely go down as one of my favourite songs by Do Make Say
Think, with its sweet buildup and finger picked guitar inflections that curl the
hair on my noggin before a wash of steady chaos straightens it out again.
This is their standard attack: delicious guitar tones leading into a twang and
tremolo that smacks faintly of country. The gentle sweep of brush on snare
and the even gentler thud of kick drum. Horns melt the spine as odd synth
steer you into uncertainty. DMST will envelope you in warm gooey sauce
and you will nearly fall asleep, only to be jostled into total alertness when the
peace finally snaps and a furious din fills your eardrums.
Stubborn Persistent Illusions is yet another foothold for DMST and it
seems that their years of hiatus have been kind to them. Having gotten older,
some married and now parents, this new album shows maturity and growth.
As always I come away with these songs resonating, echoing and rattling my
bones. This is what music should do. To make one feel, to make one think, to
make one marvel over the beauty of it all. To have songs stuck on repeat in
your head for hours at a time has never been more welcome. —Nathan Pike
(Self Released)
12  /  05  /  2017
MARTIN GRICE
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rook no further than the playful, hand drawn album art — detailing a
number of ways in which to consume the herb mullein — to have an
idea of Singer-Songwriter Martin Grice's sense of humor on this set of ten
alt-rock tracks. With its lo-fi, homemade feel, Mullein swings with an undeniably catchy groove.
The album kicks off with "Roy" and "Palimpsest," a pair of tunes with jazz-
tinged instrumentation and dark, esoteric lyrics. "Palimpsest" speaks of a
recent break-up. Halfway through, its initially upbeat tempo suddenly falls
into a mournful slow dance. The lyricism here is the album's best. While in
the verses, Martin sings of twisting his ex-lover's image so as to frame her
as the villain, the chorus overturns those words by musing that" It's easier
to digest your unholiness / Than to feel nostalgic for our happiness." With
"Palimpsest," Martin shows his vulnerability.
With the next track, he reveals his comedic side. The breathy vocals of
"Without Funds" play well into its humorous meditations on paying off college debt and aspiring to be rich. To this end, the song dissolves into a short
rendition of the chorus of Lorde's "Royals" before finishing with a repeated
desire for freedom.
While the following song, "Last Resort," retains some of this rhythmic
playfulness, the songs that come after slip in terms of both lyrical and musical focus. In "The Movie Theatre is a Bad Place for a Date," for example,
Martin's chaotic vocals and odd lyrics do not amount to much more than
filler. Moments like these summarizes the largest issue on Mullein: a lack
of variety. And although I enjoy the lyrics and grooves of many of Martin's
songs, a broader instrumental palette would've added a much-needed sense
of balance.
The final two tracks — "Let's Fall Asleep Together" and "Sloth" — buck
this trend and are welcome additions, each sounding like nothing else on
the album. The former is a soft, sugary slow jam, with its occasional trumpet working well alongside the quiet, unassuming vocals. The latter's echoey
guitars and unrefined chorus finish the album off on a high note.
Martin Grice's latest release is an imperfect set of songs, yet the album
is defined by an honest sense of fun. I look forward to Martin's growth as an
artist and his future releases which will surely break away from this album's
mold.—Leo Yamanaka-Leclerc
PODCASTS
THE IMP0STER
vnsmnsiistm
2016-Present
Thirty minutes into Episode 34 of The Imposter, guest Sholem
Krishtalka drops a nugget of truth which perfectly describes the entire
podcast: "Criticism, for me, is always an act of care. Whether it's good or
bad, it's always an act of care."
The Imposter does not shy away from critiques of Canadian media, but
only because it cares so damn much about art. In a national media climate
where high-profile cases of cultural appropriation (and facetious calls for an
Appropriation Prize) run free, the Imposter is a welcome antidote. It is a platform for Canadian artists to speak about their own lived experiences which
inform their creative practice — along with a healthy dose of weirdness.
Highly listenable, 77?e Imposter is a weekly dispatch of the country's most
exciting creators, run out of the podcast network Canadaland. The show acts
as a curator, using equal parts prestige and eccentricity to create wonderfully unpredictable content. Unlike most gatekeepers to the art world, The
Imposter casts a wide net. Recent guests have ranged from internationally renowned comics artist Guy Delisle to emerging Anishinaabe electronic
musician Ziibiwan. What ties together this eclectic curatorial slate is a charismatic host, Aliya Pabani. She's astoundingly candid with each interviewee:
probing but never pushing in order to get to the heart of each artist's work.
For example, in the bitingly titled "Why There Are No Period Pieces About
Black People in Canada" (Episode 41) the filmmaker Charles Officer is interviewed about everything from his childhood hockey-playing aspirations, to
untold stories of Canadian Black excellence. These topics are woven together by Pabani's conversational dexterity to form a dialogue around narrative
truth.
In Episode 34, "Century Egg," Pabani speaks to the admin of the @
CanadianArtWorldHaterz Instagram, who's biting memes have spawned
reactionary accounts and online vitriol. The interview could have easily been
a frivolous gag, but instead it becomes the starting point for a vital discussion
about the difficulty of making it in this country's fragmented artistic scene.
This is The Imposter's signature magic trick: conversations about each
guest's current work often transform into immersive reflections on living an
artistic life. There's an undercurrent of urgency in just about every interview
— a common understanding that creating is often a tool for survival and livelihood. The Imposter is a reminder for us all: seek truth in art, even if things
get a little weird in the process.—Hailey Mah
BOOKS
JETTISON
Nathaniel G. Moore
(Anvil Press)
06  /  10 /  2016
Jf ever there was a mystery novel in its purest form, Jettison would be
among the forerunners. But this is not a mystery in the sense of crime
and intrigue, cloak and dagger type shit. No, this is a mystery because half
the time you will be left wondering what the hell is going on. To make matters
even more mysterious, this is not really a novel at all but, instead, a series of
short stories, each with their own dangling carrot of intrigue.
Some of the stories follow a fairly straightforward premise. "The Amazing
Spider Man," for instance, offers an easy to digest tale. Focusing on 18-year
old Peter and Mulysa, it portrays young love at its simplest. Hosting slight
turns and a twist, nothing is too sinister, save for a nagging spider bite,
Ontario's bitter winter cold, and some fleeting back seat make-out sessions.
Not all of Nathaniel G. Moore's stories are so clear. Many will leave you
scratching your head. The opening tale of this weird, dark and twisting collection, "The Catullus Chainsaw Massacre," leaves you feeling thrashed
about. Centering on a Waterloo University student, Henry, and his roommate
Catullus (the ancient Roman poet), who appears to be out of his mind, the
reader is both sideswiped and awe-stricken. Catullus has an unhealthy fascination with Henry's girlfriend, who Henry clearly would prefer Catullus to
stay away from. But, unfortunately, Catullus does not understand boundaries. And here is where it twists and turns and leaves the reader in disarray.
The last two pages are breathtaking and demand an immediate re-read in
order to make the pieces fit a little more comfortably. In stories like these, the
payoff comes with reading between the lines and "getting it" when the story
wraps up.
Though striking, Moore's commitment to the absurd can be a workout for
the mind. Often, these stories are like being given pieces of lego, doll parts
and a couple of Uno cards with the instructions to build a waterproof shelter. Possible and rewarding, but work is required. Now, this is not to say that
Jettison is an unenjoyable read. In fact, author Nathaniel G. Moore writes
with a style and imagination these eyes have rarely seen. I found myself
poring over certain passages because they were just so damned moving.
And my only qualm with his style lies in the fact that it demands a presence
of mind. When your attention drops momentarily, you find yourself floating
into a confused head space, babbling senselessly.
While Jettison, with its quick shifting scenes, has its moments of confusion, it is the poetry with which Moore writes that keeps the reader interested. With some truly memorable lines and wicked wordplay, as well as a heap
of pop culture references and figureheads cast into bizarre situations, I found
myself wanting more. Though, when all was said and done, I had to take a
deep breath and give the crossed wires in my head a shake.—Nathan Pike
To submit music for review consideration in Discorder Magazine and online, please
senda physical copy to the station addressed to Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Un-
..view Editor at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver l~ "
11. Thouah our contributors prioritize physical copies, you may email do1....
'.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums sent prior to their
official release dates.
Under Review is also expanding to include independent
Feel free to submit those, too.
ns, books and podcasts.
UNDER REVIEW
 Q&AW
c^Wzfc
interview by Ivanna Besenskovsky // illustrations by Janee Auger // photos by Pat Valade
I sat down for early-morning coffee with 18-year-old hip
^P hop artist Prado to chat about Vancouver's hip hop scene,
challenging bro culture, and thriving as a woman of colour.
IVANNA: Where did you grow up?
PRADO: I grew up in Vancouver — the Joyce / Renfrew
area, but not like, the good Renfrew. All the coloured people
stuck in that one area. I didn't go to school with white kids
at all. It wasn't like, Lord Byng or some shit.
When did you first start making music?
When I was 14, off of Garageband. Then I found
Soundcloud and started building an online presence. No
one knew I was a girl; I was just known as AlienKanye.
People who liked my stuff would ask if I made the beat,
and who the girl was singing on the track, and I was like,
"Hah, I did them both."
What compelled you to start performing?
Well, about a year ago I was getting really serious about
music, and I knew these boys from my neighbourhood. We
made a group called Dead Poets. But literally, one of the
dudes snatched the mic out of my hand during our first
performance. They wanted me to play only bangers, and
act in a certain way. I wasn't invited to certain meets, I
was writing "overly emotional," and my ideas were shut
down. I knew these guys didn't respect me as their equal.
PRADO
How'd you get out of that situation ?
I jumped ship. I didn't want to take
anyone with me. I was like, "Floaters,
grab a fucking life vest," and they
ended up eventually dropping the project because they just weren't working. I
honestly had a falling out because I repositioned my target audience. I didn't
want to be the Lauren Hill of the group.
I want to help women in the industry,
not raise up men, who most of the time,
don't work as hard as women do.
At the time I was [also] ghostwriting for some big rappers, and I got
discovered that way last year. If you want to actually do
something, you have to constantly be working. When I
get up in the morning, I promote myself, I make music,
I go to studio meets. I do everything that I possibly can.
Especially if you're an oppressed minority, you have to do
it even harder than anybody else. That's just how it goes.
In what ways do you challenge 'bro
culture,' and make space?
I'm a bigger-bodied person.
I was literally born like, 11.5
pounds — a big bitch from the
womb. My dad always told me
that when you're a bigger person,
you'll always get due respect from
people if you demand it. In my music, I express doubt, but
putting it there makes it so the doubt doesn't linger on
my body. It's cleansing, liberating. And that's what I want
for other people. There are no rules.
What's your view on the hip hop scene here? How do you see
hip hop evolving?
I feel like it's happening. People who have bad things
to say about the scene are really stuck in asking "What is
hip hop, what is hip hop?" You know what I mean? But
hip hop can be anything now. As long as it bumps, it's
working properly.
Do you feel like putting conceptual limitations on hip hop —
what it can and should be — is just another way of confining
people of colour?
Yes, and people should be challenging that. I try to
challenge that with singing; So Loki is challenging that
with unique electronic beats. Being Black is cool as fuck
now. You know, hip hop culture has been so berated. I feel
like there was a time when hip hop wasn't cool — that
was the real oppressed days — but now it's cool to be
Black, it's cool to make hip hop.
Do you see yourself as a role model for women of colour who
are coming up in the scene?
That's what I want the most. When I meet other artists,
my main concern is deciphering what the purpose of their
art is. Like, I get it; everybody wants money, everybody
wants to be a famous artist, but are you doing things to
make sure that your community is safe? Are you catering
to the right people? I want my music and everything that
I do to be oriented towards women of colour and women
being comfortable. I'm fighting for accessible spaces.
How so?
My goal is to build a [safe] studio for women of colour
to come record, and it'll be exclusive — no open door policy. I'm trying to build a community of women who will
be strong in their professions, and have a space to do
that in, and not have to be controlled by some dude at
a table, telling [us] how to do things. I want to make
something authentic. I don't want to deal with bullshit.
What other projects do you have going?
My sister and I are publishing a book [called] Superniho
— a nickname my dad had — that'll [include] photos and
poetry. He's Afro-Colombian and came to Canada on a
boat. We tell stories about our childhood, working our way
out of poverty, not having money and eating at like, Little
Caesars — just special shit that's important to us. It's really an emotional book. It'll be released in July, on a tight
budget — 100 copies. We wanted to focus on, and have it
produced by, people of colour. There's already books that
white people have written about like, the potato famine or
whatever. So, you know, I just want to tell a story that's
not being told in 2017.
Where do you see your music going over the next few years?
I'll still be doing what I do. People expect to be relaxing
or some shit after a few years, but life is not relaxation.
I'm going to be working. Every single day I wake up and
I'm like, I gotta do this. That's how it's always gonna be
and I'm happy with it. I'm fine, I'm awake.
'it
Listen to Prado at soundcloud.com/alienkanye and follow
@lilkanye on Instagram for upcoming shows and such. You
won't be disappointed.
 JM
CHINATOWN CONCERN GROUP
FIGHTING GENTRIFICATION WITH INTERGENERATIONAL COOPERATION
WORDS BY CLAIRE BAILEY
ILLUSTRATIONS BY ROZ MCLEAN
PHOTOS BY SARA BAAR
"^B^B^B   hen I meet with Chinatown
I   Concern Group members
4^Q^Br    Beverly Ho and Xing-Jun
Gao next to the Chinatown Memorial
Monument, it looks beautiful and grand
in the golden light of a setting sun. The
memorial sits directly next to 105 Keefer
Street, the site of recent public outcry, and
part of the reason I'm meeting with these
two. Many readers will probably have already heard of the situation, but if you
haven't, here's the run-down: a developer
proposed building a luxury, mixed-use
condo complex in Chinatown. Many residents and activists came together to fight
the proposal, and in the end, Vancouver
City Council voted against the development 8-3. Chinatown Concern Group was
one of the groups leading the fight against
the development, and I met with them
to discuss their recent success and future
directions.
Ho is in her 20s, a recent graduate of
Emily Carr University of Art + Design, and
Gao is a longtime Chinatown resident in
her mid-eighties. Together, they are a fair
representation of the group's make-up;
members vary widely in age, education and
language skills. During our conversation,
Ho acts both as interviewee and translator,
as Gao is not fluent in English.
As we walk past the site of 105 Keefer
on our way up to the Carnegie Community
Centre (where CCG has its office), Ho and
Gao note that the rezoning application sign
has been taken down. However, we soon
pass another rezoning application sign
— it includes "Details" and information
on an upcoming open house. The sign is
written entirely in English, something Gao
notes (in Cantonese) with irritation.
"It's very frustrating," she says when I
ask her about it later. "How can the government make these policies and do these
consultations in Chinatown if it's not
also in Chinese? A lot of seniors, like me,
came here later in life, or even if they've
been here for a long time, they had to
find a job right away so they didn't have
time to learn English."
BT   ighting for language rights was a big
■^HF reason Chinatown Concern Group was
■^^   formed. King-Mong Chan, one of the
founding members, discovered while doing his social work practicum with Carnegie
Community Action Project that he was
working with a lot of non-English-speaking
people, especially seniors, who — because
of the language barrier — didn't have
an 'in' to organizing, and whose voices
weren't being heard in local and provincial
government. So, he decided to form CCG.
Watching Ho and Gao interact, it is
clear each views the other with respect
and esteem, as well as friendship. It's
a relationship rarely seen across such a
wide age gap, and this type of comrad-
ery and interdependence is clearly what
gives the group strength. Younger members, like Ho and Chan, are able to bridge
language gaps and ensure that the older
non-English-speaking residents are heard
by elected officials. In turn, it is these
voices that really matter — "they know
their struggles the best," as Ho says —
and are possibly the ones that made the
difference in the fight against 105 Keefer.
"A lot of our members are elderly
women who aren't educated or literate in
English or Chinese, so they've always been
told that their voices don't matter," Ho
explains. "A lot of times they look to [Chan
and I], because they're like, 'Oh, you guys
went to college and you speak English,
people will listen to you more.' But we're
trying to [express] that their voices are
really important too [...] Even in the past
year that I've become more involved with
Concern Group, they've become a lot more
confident and better at speaking, and
they're starting to believe that their voices
do matter, and that they do have power."
6oing forward, the group intends to
continue opposing market developments that displace established members of the community.
They hope to see the government
put policies in place to prevent the
displacement of essential businesses like grocery stores and
pharmacies, and for the government to build more social housing rather than allowing luxury
condos to enter the area and push
current residents out.
"So many people right now
S<V^'
don't have a place to live," Gao says.
"The government needs to solve this —
they need to house these people. When
I came here 30-some years ago, there
wasn't a homelessness crisis. That's because the government was building social
housing every year."
As of now, BC Housing is not building any social housing — their current
social housing strategy involves making
deals with developers to include some below-market units in new buildings. For
instance, the Beedie Group had proposed
including 25 units of "low-to-moderate income seniors housing" in their 105
Keefer development, which would be owned
by BC Housing. If you've ever been to the
Downtown Eastside, you'll know that 25
units of social housing is a pitiful response
to a dire need for housing. Furthermore, it
was determined unlikely that these 25 units
would have even been affordable to low-income residents of Chinatown.
"We can't just rely on the government, we need to continue organizing and
fighting," Gao says. For her, fighting for
Chinatown is important not only because it
is her current home, but also because of its
history. "We can't forget the early Chinese
Canadians who built Chinatown for us,
who had to suffer a lot more than us [...]
A lot of Chinese people built the railroad,
or they worked other labour jobs after the
gold rush was over. We can't forget our
history and the people who came before us,
who made it easier for us to be able to live
here and who gave us our rights."
You can learn more about Chinatown
Concern Group /HASflli/ilJl by visiting
chinatownconcerngroup.wordpress.com.
CHINATOWN CONCERN GROUP
\AffiM&m
 the technical workings of the studio, getting me turning dials and even manipulating tape. It's easy to see how this plays
into his aesthetic as a producer.
He recounted a session for Johnny
de Courcy's Master
Manipulator to describe
how the analog workflow shapes his output.
Want delay on the chorus vocal? Dial it in at
just the right time. Make
a mistake? Better try it
again. Analog recording
is a performance in and
of itself, it provides limitations, it forces you to
be good at your instrument, and it keeps you
from endlessly fussing.
His new record as Malcolm Jack comes
after last year's Inner Circles, which provided acoustic folk meditations drifting in and out of twenty-seven minutes
^ of continued new age ambi-
/&^y*T       ence. Wide Rain will be more
fcy~\}f      song-based, but don't let that
*f V* suggest convention. The sonic
palette is filled with overlapping tape loops and field recordings. I asked him what he's
been listening to lately, and he
cited a list of open-tuned guitar masters: Bert Jansch, John
Renbourn and John Fahey.
For Malcolm, this seems the
start of a new creative era. He
wants music left to develop in
the moment, even by chance.
-r
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^ ere are a few names to jog your
I memory: Malcolm Jack, Malcolm
P Biddle, Sun Wizard, Capitol 6, and
Dada Plan. Over the past decade he has
developed a reputation for reinvention,
collaboration and experimentation in everything from folk to jazzy psychedelic.
For our interview, Malcolm invited me to
his home to hang out and hear some new
recordings, and naturally, I had no idea
what to expect. Two hours later, I left his
apartment filled with aspirations of trying out some new guitar tunings. It might
seem a bit irresponsible, but I didn't write
anything down while we talked. To make
the words permanent between quotation
marks would have been to miss the point
entirely.
After a warm welcome I was whisked
into his living room, which was adorned
with a couple of Roberts tape machines,
shelves packed with records, and a worn
Persian rug. This is where the Tascam 388
analog recording console that has served as
the centre of his studio since Dada Plan's
The Madness Hides now resides in a small
closet.
There was just enough room for the
two of us to squeeze into the gear-filled
space. I couldn't make out everything
Malcolm was saying when I put the
headphones on, but I watched intently
as he whizzed around the console while
acoustic guitars and percussion flew in
and out of the composition. For these new
songs, a trio of Malcolm, Dada Plan bassist Colin Cowan, and Sick Boss drummer
Dan Gaucher retreated to Galiano Island to
record. Malcolm slid a fader and the sound
of lush rainfall began — this is the field
recording from which his upcoming album
derives its name: Wide Rain.
A flute had materialized in Malcolm's
hands and he turned on the microphone in
front of us — it was then that I could hear
him properly. He told me he'd been learning to play the flute. I said "cool," hearing
my own voice with a gentle reverb.
Over the past few years the Vancouver
native has recorded out of a shed behind
The Lido, where he also played the role
of producer (and often Eno-esque creative partner) on records including Colin
Cowan's Spring Myths and Kim Gray's
Perfume. To my delight, Malcolm explained
■^B^B^B   e moved to the living room
I   couch and the conversation
4^Q^Br    turned introspective as he
cued up another new track on a Roberts
machine. Malcolm's creative philosophy
makes little distinction between the way
he wants to create and perform music and
the way he wants to live his life. There's
something of that '70s easygoing Laurel
Canyon spirit in his reflections. He's
searching for pastoral perfection, where he
can tour and record all while his creativity
is informed by his experiences. He told me
there are still a few missing pieces though,
and while he circled around the idea, he
didn't quite come to it.
Maybe the song will swell at the chorus,
but maybe not. If he doesn't feel like singing a verse, he could skip it. The sound is
free spirited, uncontrived, flowing from
whatever he's feeling. For the listener, the
composition is left undefined, ephemeral,
like wind blowing through a set of chimes.
I caught a glimpse of this last summer
when Dada Plan headlined the Smithers
Midsummer Music Festival. The psychedelic 4-piece left their recorded songs
behind and performed something entirely new. Malcolm didn't even have a real
guitar, instead playing loops, pedals and
a homemade oil can guitar over extended
hypnotic grooves of congas, sax, and Juno
synth. Legend has it Can vocalist Malcolm
Mooney went insane when he got "caught
in a Can groove," and I believe it.
3 descended Malcolm's stairs to
leave thinking about my own creative aspirations and everything I
could take away from our conversation. I
kept ruminating on an offhand comment
Malcolm made about his studio setup being
"a long time in the making." I think anything that's really good needs a long time
— time for connections to be made, experiences to be had, and time to have boundaries explored, pushed and refined. That's
what it's all about for Malcolm. The free-
and-easy outsider spirit that was present
in our conversation was imbued in everything I heard from the spinning reels.
The tentatively titled Wide Rain will be
available this coming Fall.
MALCOLM BIDDLE
 0    SEPTEMBER H-17, 2017 I VICTORIA, BC
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JULY TALK-A TRIBE CALLED RED
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v HANNAH GEORGAS • LEEROY STAGGER »
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P *  BAND OF RASCALS • ASTROCOLOR     *
RALPH • FLEETMAC WOOD • NEON DREAMS
'   *   THE CHOIR • TWIN BANDIT ' f
CHRISTIAN HUDSON • J GRGRY     ^
AND MANY MORE TO BE ANNOUNCED!
"N
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TWITTER.COM/RIFFLANDIA  •  FACEB00K.COM/RIFFLANDIA   (
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\*\s\S
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KALYAN STUDIOS
DOWNTOWN Victoria
*
TOURISM
VICTORIA
PAW
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!SL ?*&■  &*&* BEATWUTi   Ml straight
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an a clear summer day, Vancouver residents flock
to their favourite park like animals to an oasis, laying out blanket, and nervously plucking
at blades of grass. Traditional Indigenous sites, colonial
clearcuts, the result of an over-zealous urban planning committee, an impromptu lunch spot, or anything
in-between, Vancouver's parks run the gamut of the
good, the bad, and the ugly. We decided to ask some local
musicians about the parks closest to their hearts — the
results are a hazy collection of industrial backwash, natural serenity, fuzzy feelings, and slow afternoons.
fMSttMM
SUMMER PARK GUIDE
compiled by Josh Gabert-Doyon
illustration by Michael Shantz
Jlauren jjMaon, $uft}> $ I &ttattano Beacfj $arfe
"One summer I got a flat tire biking down Yew Street. There was a cold spicy chicken burger from Wendy's in my backpack,
which I ate on a bench near the ocean. One person in a wetsuit swam really far, displaying a stamina I could not comprehend.
It was a pretty good afternoon."
SDorotfjp jjJoifelt), §>totm Ceam I labour (Drmt $arfe
"I like it here the most because Coal Harbour is both empty and familiar at the same time. It's futuristic. It's great."
3feff Cancata, SDriwura I Crab $arfe
"I moved to Vancouver from Montreal in 2010, and having been a fan of Japandroids, I was determined to find out where
they were photographed for their No Singles cover art. Soon after moving here, I started dating someone who wanted to show
me around the city; he brought me to Crab Park one summer evening to watch the fireworks, and as we stood on the pier, the
mystery solved itself — I was standing right where their album cover was shot. It was a magical, starstruck moment, and everything has been downhill since then."
.franco Koaatno, SDumb I W8L€* &Wq> $arfe
"W.C. Shelley Park is overall kind of gross, but has perks. If you're trying to get rid of old furniture or electronics, Shelley
Park is your zone. Also a hotspot for cigarette smokers, so if you're into cigarettes you may bump into some like-minded folk
who frequent one of the three benches in the park."
0Ufe Jlpncfj, £>upermoon I jj&to Brtflrjton $arfe
"Ever wanna get lost in nature, but not so lost that you forget about global shipping vessels? Then I've got the place for you:
it's peaceful, it's strange, it's grassy and industrialized, it's a miracle of the paradoxical modern world and there's a damn outdoor swimming pool right next to a beach. It's New Brighton, and I've never seen a cop there."
jjitfe Barfeman, ilBorrti SDecor I Cea §>toamp $arfe
"There certainly is a place for everyone at Tea Swamp Park. After nightfall, expect the unexpected — the uncanny wisdom
of anonymous drunken monologuing or perhaps the surely uncomfortable public displays of sexual affection splayed out upon
the parks pointedly placed benches, decorative boulders, or on very special summer nights, the tenderness of Mother Earth's
grassy boudoir."
£Dmar ^ra^fjart, Mutual I spemortal WLt&t ^arfc
"For 2 years I lived in Dunbar and I used to go that park a lot. One day me and my roommates hung out there for hours and
by the end of the day we became best friends."
0prtt-2Ue Bfr&nion, itautibe I Crab^arb
"It's a good place to jump into the water and build an immunity to filth."
¥i)omiv Kobftn, &bunt I Crout %abe
"Trout Lake is my favourite park because you can walk around and look at all the dogs, and have a huge party with all your
friends. If you sleep in your car there it feels like you are camping, but you can still go to Bon's in the morning."
ffltiay 2D, ffltiotp 2D / Jlaptip Slama I £>tantep $arfe
"Stanley Park is the main attraction, for me it's all in the colours — that mix of green and blue skies, browns and sunshine
just gets me all the time! It's perfect for a bike ride, a little shade picnic and just a long walk to take it all in."
W&, 2DaD 2D&t$* I Prince dDDtoarti $arfe
"In the summer of 2013 Felix and I would hang out in the wee hours of the night at Prince Edward Park, after work.
Sometimes the daycare there would leave their bucket of sidewalk chalk — we found it and used the chalk to write about how
sad we were. Eventually we would write a song about the park, too."
0mte (Di0la0on, %ittlt Sprout I &im&t Beacfj ^arfc
"Sean and I don't have a dog but we really like them, so we often walk down to the dog friendly beach at Sunset Beach Park
and watch the doggos play like a couple of creepers. We never pet the dogs because we feel like it would draw attention to the
fact we don't have a dog. We are always the only people without a pup."
w.
cHECKoincmjCMHiietttmRiW(Gtt\\ms>
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SUMMER PARK GUIDE
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TLE BIT OF SOUL
TEXTBOOK        SHOES ON A WIRE
NASHA VOLNA     NOW WE'RE TAL'
5 PM
6 PM
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AFRICAN RHYTHMS
8 PM
INSIDE  OU
IX   CASET
8 PM
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LATE
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"DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERYDAY"
 TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM, ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFASTWITH THE BROWNS
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththe-
browns@hotmail.com
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
11AM-12PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
second season! The team
of Indigenous and non-
Indigenous peeps produce the
show weekly. We talk about
Indigenous issues, current
events, and entertainment
centering Native voices through
interviews and the arts. Come
make Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Follow us @uncededairwaves 8
facebook.com/uncededairwaves/
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE BURROW
3PM-4PM, rock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
department manager Andy
Resto, the Burrow is Noise
Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock,
with a nice blend of old
classics' and new releases.
Interviews 8 Live performances.
Contact: music@citr.ca
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
4PM-5PM,JAZZ
Host Jade spins old recordings
of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies and motown.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm-6:30PM, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown 8
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television, along
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks,
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TUESDAY
THE SCREEN GIRLS
12AM-1AM, HIP HOP/R&B/ SOUL
The Screen Girls merge music
and art with discussions of
trends and pop culture, and
interviews with artists in
contemporary art, fashion and
music. We play a variety of
music, focusing on promoting
Canadian hip hop and R&B.
Contact: info@thescreengirls.com
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6AM-8AM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM8am-io:30AM, talk/
politics
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver,
Queer FM features music,
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmail.com
FEMCONCEPT
TUES, 10:30-1130, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
A show comprised entirely
of Femcon* music and
discussions of women's
rights and social justice
issues. Featuring all genres
of music, with an emphasis
on local and Canadian artists
and events in Vancouver.
•"Femcon" is defined as
music with someone who
self-identifies as female in 2/4
categories: music composition,
lyric composition, performance,
or recording engineering.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
12PM-1PM, ROCK/ POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music,
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
PARTICLES & WAVES
2PM-3PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Like the quantum theory it
is named for, Particles and
Waves defies definition. Join
Mia for local indie, sci-fi prog
rock, classic soul, obscure
soundtracks, Toto's deep
cuts, and much more.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TEXTBOOK
4PM-5PM, talk/storytelling
Textbook (FKA The Student
Special Hour) is a show
about students by students
hosted by Josh Gabert-Doyon,
CiTR's student programming
coordinator. There are three
segments: Feature interview,
student storytelling, 8 "Tell
Me About Your Paper".
Contact: outreach@citr.ca
DISCORDER RADIO
5PM-6PM, ECLECTIC, TALK
Produced by the Discorder
On Air collective, this show
covers content in the magazine
and beyond. Coordinated by
Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse,
and Jordan Wade. Get in
touch to get involved!
Contact: discorder.radio@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6PM-8PM, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
INSIDE OUT
8PM-9PM, dance/electronic
Tune in weekly for dance music!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
9PM-11PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop 8 Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles,
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels,
LuckyRich, horsepowar 8 Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/ POP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
2PM-3PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
The CiTR Music department
program, highlighting the
newest/freshest cuts from the
station's bowels. Featuring live
interviews and performances
from local artists.
Contact: music@citr.ca
KEW IT UP
3PM-4PM, EXPERIMENTAL/TALK
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica,
Post-Punk, Industrial,
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOES ON AWIRE
4PM-5PM, TALK/ ARTS 8 CULTURE
Take a moment to look up.
Tune in for stories, interviews,
hot takes and sweet tunes
that consider a side of
things you may not have.
Contact: Twitter | @mjeantaylor
DOUBLE SPACE
5PM-6PM,TALK
Investigating interactions
with our surroundings and
society. Every week we
discuss our experiences with
these interactions, how they
emerge and the impacts of
these invisible forces.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ANECDOTAL EVIDENCE
6pm-6:30pm, talk / story telling
Anecdotal Evidence is a live
storytelling series in Vancouver,
where people share true stories
of how they experience science
in their lives; stories of failure,
fieldwork, love, death, cosmic
loneliness and more. Tune
in for humour, humanity, and
sometimes even science.
Contact: Twitter | aestories
INNER SPACE
6:30PM-8pm, electronic/dance
Dedicated to underground
electronic music, both
experimental and dance-
oriented. Live DJ sets and
guests throughout.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
6:30PM-8pm, rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins,
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
WHITE NOISE
9PM-10PM, talk/sketch comedy
Join Richard Blackmore for half
an hour of weird and wonderful
sketch comedy, as he delves
into the most eccentric corners
of radio. Then stay tuned for
the after show featuring Simon
and Connor who make sense
of it all, with the occasional
interjection of quality music.
Contact: whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
■ THURSDAY
SPICY BOYS
12AM-1AM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
Playing music and stuff.
You can listen.
Or don't.
It's up to you.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host IssaArian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture,
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
9AM-10AM, talk/accessibility
This show is produced
by and for the disabled
community. We showcase
BC Self Advocates and
feature interviews with people
with special needs. Hosted
by Kelly Raeburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and friends.
Contact: citrlatenightshow@gmail.com
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new,
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com:
rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com,
@tima_tzar,
facebook.com/RocketFromRussia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM, ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat,
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music 8
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean,
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R8B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
2PM-3PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
The Accessibility Collective
radio show! They talk equity,
inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse
abilities, on and off campus.
Tune in for interviews, music,
news, events, 8 dialogue.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
3-3:30PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TERRA INFORMA
3:30-4pm, talk/enviromental
Environmental News,
syndicated from CJSR
88.5FM in Edmonton.
SIMORGH
4PM-5PM, talk/storytelling
Simorgh Radio is devoted
to education and literacy for
Persian speaking communities.
Simorgh the mythological
multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-
in as your mythological narrator
in the storyland; the contingent
space of beings, connecting
Persian peoples within and
to Indigenous peoples.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ADAMANT EVE
5PM-6PM, talk/interviews
Feminist news, interviews, and
commentary. Syndicated from
CJSR 88.5FM in Edmonton.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM-7:30,
ECLECTIC
Celebrating the message
behind the music. Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SOUL SANDWICH
7:30PM-gpM, hip hop/r8b/soul
A myriad of your favourite
genres all cooked into one
show. From Hip Hop to Indie
rock to African jams, Rohit
and Ola will play it all, in a
big soulful sandwich. This
perfect layering of yummy
goodness will blow your mind.
AND, it beats Subway.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
C1 RADIO
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy 8 guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ FRIDAY
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact: auraltentacles@hotmail.
com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
87AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news,
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse@canadaland-
show.com
CITED!
8AM-9AM, talk/academia
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn 8 Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact: facebook.com/citedpod-
cast, Twitter | @citedpodcast
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM, rock/pop/indie
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery, and a lil dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@gmail.com
FRESH SLICE
1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Tunes are hot and fresh.
Talk is cheesey. Pop,
rock, DIY, pop-punk.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RADIO ZERO
2PM-3:30PM
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams
from New Wave to foreign
electro, baile, Bollywood,
and whatever else.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30pm-5pm, music/interviews
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
http://nardwuar.com/rad/contact/
CITR DOCS SEASON 2
5PM-6PM, talk/documentary
Tune in for insightful work
on niche topics. We cover
everything from queer
history to environmentalism,
accesibility, the Grunge
scene of the early '90s, and
gentrification in Vancouver.
Contact: Twitter | @CiTRradio
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6pm - 7PM, talk/comedy
6pm-7pm, Every week Jack,
Tristan and a special guest
randomly select a conversation
topic for the entire show;
ranging from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure.Also
theSre is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-gpM, r8b/soul/inter-
NATIONAL
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop,
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings,
poetry recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post-Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock,
drone, ambient, experimental,
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, eclectic/live
INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vancouvermedicineshow@gmail.com
■ SATURDAY
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise,
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citrlatenightshow@gmail.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world 8 roots music,
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll
like it. Sonic assault provided
by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
Contact: sports@citr.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, electronic/mantra/
NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary,
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats,
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmail.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, TALK/RUSSIAN
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7PM-8PM, experimental/ambient/
CHILLWAVE
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy,
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker,
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmail.com
SOCA STORM
8PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoM #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
8bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ SUNDAY
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
7AM-9AM, experimental/difficult
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPAN© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @BEPICRE-
SPAN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
9AM-10AM, CLASSICAL
From the Ancient World to
the 21st century, join host
Marguerite in exploring and
celebrating classical music
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM, INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views 8 interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock,
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmail.com ,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORETHAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM, ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds,
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock 8 Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
8 Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver,
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmileymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS,
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points,
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OF
LOST TOYS
STUDENT FILL IN
ECLECTIC
A place for experimentation
8 learning!
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9FM JUNE CHARTS
1   4
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Tiny Vipers#
Laughter
Ba Da Bing!
Girlpool*
Powerplant
Anti-
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This Old Dog
Royal Mountain
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Trembly Fog
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Agony Klub ^
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Arbutus ^
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Saddle Creek
Prairie Cat*
Is Cary Pratt
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Independent ^
Arts & Crafts ^
Dalava*#+
\\~be Book of Transfigurations^
Shrouded Amps*#+
Come Along To The
Chocolate Church
songlines ^
Self-Released
Dixie's Death Pool*+     \   Twilight, Sound Mountain   \
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Sarah Jane Scouten #+   | ,,    n
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Bored Decor/OKGB*+    I   Bored Decor/OKGB split   |
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ROCKSALT
LIVE7/18 CQ) THE COBALT W/ROYAL HEADACHE
LP/CD/CASS - 8/25/2017
AVAILABLE ONLINE OR FROM OUR RETAILER CHUMS:
RedC
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4307 MAIN        2447 E HASTINGS 3561 MAIN 2016 COMMERCIAL
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REDCAT.CA REDCAT.CA NEPT00N.COM AUDI0PILE.CA
mint r6C©rCiS  www.mintrecs.com ST © Ii ©mintrecords   FACTOR '-^sgiCanadi
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'•V*                                M
IN VANCOU
July 2
JESSIE REYEZ
Alexander  Gastown
July  13
ALGIERS
The  Cobalt
July  8
THE DISTRICTS
The Cobalt
July 13
THE AVALANCHES
Commodore Ballroom
July 10
BEACH FOSSILS
The Biltmore
July 11
NITE JEWEL
Fox Cabaret
July 15
EAGLES OF DEATH METAL
Rickshaw Theatre
July  21
MAD ALCHEMY
Rickshaw Theatre
July  24
LUCY DACUS
The  Cobalt
July  25
WAXAHATCHEE
Imperial
August  3
TY SEGALL
Vogue  Theatre
August  7
DUNGEN
Fox  Cabaret
August  7
BETTY WHO
Imperial
August  9
JOHN MORELAND
The  Cobalt
August  9
TEMPLES
Imperial
August  14
VNV NATION
Biltmore  Cabaret
August  15
PALLBEARER
The Cobalt
August 18
MEW
Rickshaw
August 19
QUANTIC (LIVE)
Imperial
August 23
RYX
St. James Hall
August 24
FRANKIE COSMOS
The Cobalt
August 24
POKEY LAFARGE
Imperial
August  25
DEAD CROSS
Vogue Theatre
August 26
SAN CISCO
Fox Cabaret
September 7
CIGARETTES AFTER SEX
Imperial
September 10
XYL0
Biltmore Cabaret
August 31
MIDDLE KIDS
The Biltmore
September 2
VERITE
The Cobalt
September 9
BENJAMIN BOOKER
Biltmore Cabaret
September 12 & 13
MAC DEMARCO
Vogue Theatre
September  3
G0LDR00M
Abitibi  Boat
September  10
THUNDERCAT
Commodore Ballroom
September 22
GOLDFRAPP
Vogue Theatre
September 23
THE SADIES
Rickshaw Theatre
September 24
THEE OH SEES
Commodore Ballroom
September 25
SHEER MAG
Rickshaw Theatre
September 25
SHEER MAG
Rickshaw Theatre
September 29
AUSTRA
Imperial
Tickets   & more  shows  at
imbreconcerts.com

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