Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Jul 1, 2018

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0378942.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0378942.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0378942-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0378942-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0378942-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0378942-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0378942-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0378942-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0378942-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0378942.ris

Full Text

 left
4FE€€
vol 35 No. 06   Issue. 401
"tbat)5iprolb magazine from CiTOioi.g;f IB"
£<0CaC
ages
but no one mill be turneb aloaji!
Uamst
 254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
UPCOMING EVENTS
UPCOMING SHOWS
D.O.A. FIGHT BACK FESTIVAL I
D.O.A., ROOTS ROUNDUP, IN THE
WHALE, SORE POINTS, CHIEF
STATE, DAVID M. (NO FUN), JESSE
LEBOURDAIS, FORD PIER, & MORE, |
FEAT. MC AARON CHAPMAN
•<«i
JUL
PACIFIC SOUND RADIO
I SHOWCASE
THE LONG WAR, JASPER SLOAN
YIP, OLD. SOUL. REBEL, YEAR OF
THE WOLF
■juT
07
AUG
[SHE II
COMEDY SHOCKER XVII
BRETT MARTIN, MARK HUGHES,
YUMINAGASHIMA, STUART
JONES, KYLE P. FERRIS. HOSTED
BYSAMTONNING
RICKSHAW 9 YEAR
ANNIVERSARY PARTY
ART D'ECCO, SUNBATHE, THE
INTELLIGENCE SERVICE, CARTOON I
AUG
PUPPYTEETH'S DRAG
CARNIVAL
LAILA MCQUEEN, RUBBER CHILD,
LISA UMBAUGH, ROSE BUTCH,
VIXEN VON FLEX, EVA SCARLETT,
CLEOPATRA COMPTON,
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST, DJ
REGULARFANTASY
STEPHEN MALKMUS &
THE JICKS
SOCCER MOMMY
FIERCE QUEEN VANCOUVER |
PRIDE FEAT. AJA
ARSON NICKI, BERLIN STILLER,
SOUTH EAST
LIZARD, FEAT. THE MAD ALCHEMY
I LIQUID LIGHT SHOW
AUG
GANG OF YOUTHS
AUG
CKY& SLAVES
I ROYAL THUNDER, AWAKEN I AM,
BORT
AUG
YES WE MYSTIC
PSYCHE & RATIONAL YOUTH
I WEIRD CANDLE, IN MIRRORS,
VOID MIRROR DJ NIKKI NEWER
SUPERSUCKERS
30TH ANNIVERSARY THE BIG
SHOW TOUR'
CHARLIE OVERBEY
AUG
IU1
AUG
21
EYEHATEGOD
WAINGRO, UNROOT
AUG
AUG
POWERGLOVE
THE RUNAWAY FOUR, 20SIX
HUNDRED
MIDGE URE& PAUL YOUNG
MARY'S GUNNS
1 MARRY ME, LOACHY, UNDER THE
MOUNTAIN, DAMSEL
THE CAMBRIDGE
FOOTLIGHTS: PILLOW TALK
Ivfl
itional show listings,
o, videos &m
W.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.C
Aug 16
INSANE CLOWN POSSE
VENUE
Aug 16
TURQUOISE JEEP
FORTUNE
Aug 18 1
YELAWOLF
COMMODORE
Jul 19
Jul 21
Jul 28
Aug 16
Aug 16
Aug 18
Aug 30
Aug 30
Sep 03
Sep 06
Sep 17
Sep 23
Oct 06
Oct 15
Nov 08
Nov 17
NEUROSIS / CONVERGE
GREAT GRANDPA
DEAD SOFT
MELVINS
THE GROUCH & ELIGH
commodore!
FORTUNE
VENUE
FORTUNE
LETS EAT GRANDMA
HOBO JOHNSON
THE EXPLOITED
GRANDSON
J. RODDY WALSTON
& THE BUSINESS
THE PRESET'
CADENCE WEAPON
ATH
FORTUNE
VENUE
FORTUNE
VENUE
THE GRAPES O
GALLANT
ALL AGES
YOUNG FATHERS
VENUE
VENUE
FORTUNE
VENUE
VOGUE
VENUE
ADVANCE TICKETS FOR ALL EVENTS AT BPLIVE.CA
 TABLE of COflTEflTS
SUMMER 2018 ^^^^^^^^^^M
COVER : 401SI ISSUE PARTY POSTER FEATURING QUEEN DISCORDIA BY
RICKY CASTANEDO-LAREDO,
JFeature*
08 -  EVAN  DUCHARME
Meet the queer-Metis fashion designer turning heads
09 -   CURRENT:FEMINIST ELECTRONIC ART SYMPOSIUM
In its second year, CURRENT continues to punch patriarchy
in the face
17  -  lie
Vancouver-based dark punk group is back with a blistering
release, Hounds
19   -  BARTHOLOMEW THE LAWN GARGOYLE
Local artists David Manuel and Jessica May
share an exclusive comic with Discorder
Magazine.
Column* + £Dt$>er £>tuff
05 - Shelf Life:
Massy Books  +
Summer Reading List
06 - Homegrown Labels:
Hotham Sound
10  - Real Live Action
Music Waste, Sled Island
live music, comedy
12 - Art Project
by Shaun Mallonga
13 -  Summer 2018 Calendar
ADVERTISE:Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca.
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words
to Discorder, please contact the
editor at editor.discorder@citr.ca.
To submit images, contact the art
director at artcoordinator@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE:Sendina
cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133
University Blvd. V6T1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTED distribute
Discorder in your business,
email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE:We are part of CiTR,
a registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content
you love.To donate visit
www.citr.ca/donate.
14
18
20
21
22
23
Under Review
Music, films, books,
podcasts
No  Fun Fiction:
The God Story by Mack Gordon
On The Air:
Radio Pizza Party
CiTR Program Schedule
CiTR Program Guide
June  Charts
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising
Coordinator: Audrey MacDonald // Discorder Student Executive: Fatemeh Ghayedi // Editor-in-Chief:
Brit Bachmann // Under Review Editor: Sydney Ball // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch // Web
Editor: Zoe Power //Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Social Media Coordinator: Sydney Ball //
Accounts Manager: Halla Bertrand // Charts: Myles Black // Production Assistant: Muni Gholamipour
// Writers: Joshua Azizi, Slavko Bucifal, Jake Clark, Esmee Colbourne, Fatemeh Ghayedi, Mack Gordon,
Matthew Horrigan, Aly Laube, Jong Lee, Steffanie Ling, Lucas Lund, Lexi Mellish-Mingo, Andrei Mihailiuk,
Keagan Perlette, Nathan Pike, El Rosch, Amy Shandro, Judah Schulte, Melanie Woods | Special thank you
to Massy Books for reading recommendations, including Elizabeth Holliday, Patricia Massy, Michael Young
// Photographers & Illustrators: Shane Burnzynski, Alistair Henning, Madeleine Keen, Rachel Lau, Alicia
Lawrence, Nicolette Lax, Andi Icaza Largaespada, Kalena Mackiewicz, Jessica May, Mundane Cartoons,
Geraldine Pinzon, Emily Valente, Akhila Varghese, Juliana Vieira, Melanie Woods // Proofreaders: Joshua
Azizi, Brit Bachmann, Sydney Ball, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Fatemeh Ghayedi, Zoe Power, Jasper D.
Wrinch.
©Discorder 2018 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR,
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiherh speaking Musqueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM,
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager®citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
C&ere
EDITOR'S NOTE
€all me sentimental, call me carb-obsessed, but I've been imagining those St. Viateur
sesame bagels all week. Around this time last year, I was in Montreal for a vacation-
turned-research trip on call-outs, social justice and processes of accountability, and
I lived off bagels. Does Vancouver have an equivalent, cheap comfort food? I could
have really used it over the last 11 months.
Circulating on social media right now, there's a comic illustration with altered dialogue. It shows
people grooving out to a band and two people approaching the dance floor. One of them asks,
"Isn't that dude a known abuser?" looking in the direction of a man dancing. The other responds,
"He deleted Facebook and moved. Nothing more can be done." The meme, if you can call it that, is
uncredited at the time of this note's publication.
After so many call-outs, town hall meetings, public statements and policy updates, I wish that
image wasn't still so relevant. When talking with people in Montreal who had already confronted
the abusers in their community, I couldn't have imagined the amount of emotional labour that
my own community would spend addressing sexual assault allegations. I saw their exhaustion last
summer and now I feel it for myself. We've done good, but there's still work to do.
As the major media cycle moves on from #MeToo, I am reminded that this issue isn't over at
the call-out, town hall meeting, public statement or policy update. And it sure as hell isn't over
when abusers delete their social media accounts, move cities and try to reinvent their public
image. Accountability is a process of reckoning, not just with the individuals who hurt us, but with
the structures of oppression that enable and even encourage gender violence. It is as much about
looking inward and questioning our own actions as it is about dismantling the patriarchal and
colonial violence that exists outside of ourselves. If I sound like a broken record, it's because this
message is important to hear.
Discorder has prioritized articles about accountability, harm reduction, consent and toxic
masculinity to interrupt the apathy around these topics. This Summer Issue is no different, with
features on punk antagonists, lie; the radical CURRENT: Feminist Electronic Art Symposium; the
work of queer-Metis fashion designer, Evan Ducharme; and an op-ed on sexual assault in CanLit
written by UBC Creative Writing alumna, Keagan Perlette.
There is also an exclusive Bartholomew comic, a short fiction piece by Mack Gordon, reports
from Music Waste and Sled Island, and reviews of music, podcasts, film and more.
ft
Discorder is 3 5-years old — 3 5 years of free, independent, badassery — and we're celebrating with
an all-ages 401st Issue Party at Red Gate on Saturday, July 21. There will be performances by BB,
Francesca Belcourt, Mourning Coup and The New Rituals, a photo booth, giant Twister and more,
$10 at the door. We hope to see you there!
A+
BB
PS. I started a summer radio show called BB's Disco Party that airs every Tuesday from 3-4pm
on CiTR 101.9FM in Vancouver and online at citr.ca. Tune in to hear music, etc. from the pages of
Discorder Magazine.
CiTR 191.9FM+DI3C0RDER
1KB
UF
■^HIU^Hiy
SUBMISSIONS ARE OPEN NOW
TO APPLY SEND US Fl DEMO OF ORIOINFlL MFlTERIFlL
CONTAINING Fl MINIMUM OF 5 SONOS FlND YOUR CONTACT
INFORMATION   INCLUDING   E-MAIL   AND   PHONE   NUMBER   TO:
SHINDIG.SUBMISSIONS@GMAIL.COM
»» ALL ARE WELCOME ««
(SERIOUSLY, ANY GENRE)
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS:
SEPTEMBER S
PRISES INCLUDE STUDIO TIME, MASTERED TRACKS,
A FEATURE IN DISCORDER MAGAZINE, AND OF COURSE, THE
GLORY THAT CAN ONLY COME FROM A BATTLE THIS EPIC.
e£A
 FEMINIST ELECTRONIC ART SYMPOSIUM
I
3
STUD!NT
DISCWOMAN. #KUNQ.  NYC
MARIA CHAVEZ
  NYC
PERMALNK/BALA CLUB/DOOM TRIP,  DE/US
REVEREND   DOLLARS
DARQNESS/TUF. SEATTLE
GOO . VENETTA B2B ZAM ZAM . LILIOP
JAMILAH MALIKA. SOLEDAD MUNOZ. CONTRAST
COLLECTIVE.     KYINSKIES.     EMMA TOMIC.
ZANDIDANDIZETTE
WORKSHOPS/ENGAGEMENT
CEASE WYSS.    CAROLINE PARK.    ALANNA HO
JEN SUNGSHINE. ANA ROSE CARRICO.
BHUMBER VANESSA TAM
INTERSESSIONS. KARLA CRUZ
FILM : CURATED BY GENA
MILENASALAZAR.KARAHORNLAND.
DIANE ODOMSAWIN . SARA WYLIE.  ELLE MAMA
TAILFEATHERS   ♦   CHANDRA MELTING TALLOW.
KARA BLAKE. MICHELLELAT MER
JULY 25TH - 29TH
WWW.CURRENTSYMPOSIUM.COM
BRITISH
Columbia
Supported by the Province of British Columbia
CITY OF
VANCOUVER
^^H   UNIVERSITY
^^B  wART+DESI
%       FACTOR  -f~^: I Canada
1H KXJNMnON ASSETMQ CANADIAN TAUNT ON HCOROMQS
 8I0S   YAM i   9niXDgDflT 19bl032i(f
SHELF LIFE
MASSY BOOKS
words by Esmee  Colbourne
illustrations by Emily Valeiite
photos by Geraldine Pinzon
massy Books is an
independent bookstore
located in Chinatown on
East Georgia Street, owned and run
by its namesake, Patricia Massy.
Massy's bookstore is a labour of
love. Open for almost a year now,
Massy has used the space not
just to sell books, but also host
readings and build community.
The entrance is easy to miss.
This, in combination with its
clubhouse-meets-library feel
makes for a cool and welcoming
oasis from the hot summer.
There's no trace of that musty
odour normally associated with
secondhand books, yet the main
space is laden, floor to ceiling,
with stocked shelves.
Massy and her staff are
approachable and knowledgeable.
While watching her talk to the
people coming and going, it was
easy to see the pleasure she gains
from small exchanges with new
faces and her dedication to finding
niche books for customers. Her
personal love of books stems from
the learning that can be gleaned
from them, for example "a sensical
kind of rabbit hole that books can
take you down and lead to other
books and other histories and other
works." She also enjoys dense or
complex novels because they enable
her to emotionally connect with
and learn about characters' lives:
"It's like travelling without going
anywhere. Sometimes when a book
is challenging I literally feel my
brain working hard [...] It feels good,
kind of like weightlifting, but with
words and ideas."
o
wning a business and living
in Vancouver comes with
issues of affordability and
precarity. Luckily, the building
that houses Massy is relatively new
and there's co-op housing above
the store, decreasing the likelihood
that redevelopment will affect them
during their current five-year lease.
Massy believes that the lack of affordability is what makes Vancouver so
unwelcoming to small businesses and
residents. "[Vancouver] really caters
to developers. I was asked by the
City [...] to sit on a panel on how to
support the promotion of Indigenous
culture and I didn't go. [...] I basically
said, fWe should be talking about
how to make spaces more affordable
so [Indigenous-oriented] events and
cultural things can exist.'"
Massy Books is fast becoming
the go-to place for discovering
Indigenous literature. "A lot of great
fiction by Indigenous people exists.
It's just a matter of finding them
used. People hold onto their books
or there weren't enough printed
in the past," explained Massy. The
sheer quantity of Indigenous books
as well as Indigenous-focused events,
such as the Indigenous Brilliance
Reading Series in partnership
with Room Magazine, or the
shop's willingness to host book
launches for Indigenous authors,
have cemented Massy Books as a
cultural centre. In fact, thanks to an
anonymous donor through Room
Magazine, Indigenous Brilliance
Reading Series will continue with
more resources. "Now we can pay
the readers for their work. So often
Indigenous people are asked to work
for nothing, so it is really great to
be able to offer an honorarium,"
explained Massy.
Massy's support for the
community extends to the artists
shown in the bookstore's upstairs
gallery. "We are always looking for
artists. [...] We have a link on our
website, a call for artists [...] and a
call for Indigenous artists. It would
be great if people started applying to
utilize the space. [...] It's for established artists and emerging artists
that have never had a show before."
Currently, photography by Laura
Noonan and Tara Paget of Meet
Me at the Lamppost (MMATLP)
is on display until mid-July. For
the entire month of September,
there will be a showcase of different
Indigenous art forms featuring
Northwest Coast Indigenous
Women/2SQ artists.
Massy Books is a quiet haven
for Vancouver book lovers.
Patricia Massy's commitment to
stocking enriching books and her
engagement with customers and
artists is what makes Massy Books
such a lovely place to be in. The
shop is a joy to wander through and
a prime example of what a good
independent bookstore should be:
community and identity driven,
supportive of artists and welcoming
to visitors.
ft
Massy Books is located at 222 East
Georgia Street. You can follow them
on social media or visit their website
for news and upcoming events:
massybooks.com.
MASSY BOOKS
Summer Reading List
EVERYTHING  IS AWFUL AND   YOU'RE A   TERRIBLE PERSON  BY
DANIEL ZOMPARELLI (2017)
This collection of short fiction is tender, strange,
dark and hilarious. These sometimes-overlapping stories
explore love, connection, intimacy and anxiety amongst
gay men in a uniquely 21st Century way. —Recommended by
Elizabeth  Holliday
MRS.    GOLIGHTLY AND  OTHER  STORIES  BY ETHEL WILSON (1961)
Wilson was Vancouver's most modest Modernist. These
stories, set between the 1930s and '50s, are flung
throughout Vancouver and environs, and filled with
humour, compassion and the quiet struggle to make sense
and do what's right. —Recommended by Michael   Young
FATALE  BY JEAN-PATRICK MANCHETTE (1977)
So different from Wilson, Manchette' s novel is terse,
tense, dark. French '70s noir. A protagonist worthy
of Chandler or Ellory, except female and delivering a
horrible reckoning on smalltown, bourgeois morality.
—Recommended by Michael   Young
MY CONVERSATIONS   WITH  CANADIANS  BY LEE MARACLE (2017)
In her newest collection of essays, Maracle challenges
readers to think deeply and seriously about
colonialism, appropriation and reconciliation in
Canada, and she emphasizes the power of art to heal and
improve relationships between all Canadians.
—Recommended by Patricia  Massy
THE DISPOSSESSED  BY URSULA LE GUIN (1994)
The Dispossessed is a perfect introduction to Le Guin's
legendary science fiction. It is a beautifully-drawn and
engrossing tale that provides a fascinating exploration
of functional anarchism. —Recommended by Elizabeth
Holliday
THERE   THERE  BY TOMMY ORANGE (2018)
A web of complex characters spanning multiple generations make their way to a fateful powwow in Oakland.
This novel is poignant, powerful and funny. It is
a contemporary Indigenous story about identity,
family and what it means to be Indigenous in an urban
landscape. —Recommended by Patricia  Massy
SHELF LIFE J MASSY BOOKS + SUMMER READING LIST
A
L
 Discorder magazine | SUMMER 2018
HOlllEGROWri LABELS
HOTHAM SOUND
words by Judah Schulte
photos edited b-y
y Duncan Cairns-Brenner
as  by Alicia Lawrence
-^   n the website for Hotham Sound,
the geographic place after which the
label is named is described before
the label itself. Hotham Sound is a sidewater
of the Jervis Inlet, located on the South
Coast of British Columbia. This prioritizing
of information says a lot about Hotham
Sound's focus and inspiration.
Hotham Sound releases the work of
experimental electronic artists from
the Cascadia region. Their catalogue is
atmospheric, textured and cinemat™
boasting nine releases from the likes of
Mount Maxwell (a project by label founder,
Jamie Tolagson), Khyex, KR75 and others.
Although each release has its own personality, they make the listener feel that they
are suspended in dark waters or laying in an
evergreen forest at dusk, grainy synthwork
and eerie samples painting sonic nictures of
the Pacific Northwes^.
When Jamie started the label in 2015,
he didn't expect it to flourish as it has. This
year alone, he has released four cassettes
with another one on the way. This success is,
in part, due to the coincidental conception
of Hotham Sound. Jamie met friend and
fellow artist Kristen Roos (one half of KR75)
bonding over music. Within one week of
meeting, they were talking about how to
release their sounds. "[The growth was]
exponential because every new person that
gets involved brings with them this whole
little community," says Jamie. And so, like
the seedlings of one tree planting several
others, that one connection has spawned a
rich discography in less than three years.
It might seem enigmatic to emulate nature
with electronic music, but Jamie thinks
otherwise. "To me, electronic music has
more of a connection to nature than acoustic
music," says Jamie, "It's all sinewaves, all
processes. It reminds me of natural processes.
That seems to be a big mental block for some
people; electronic music is [associated with]
clubs and nature is [associated with] guys
with acoustic guitars." ^T'
The label is run with an unwavering
vision: "I want it to feel like a place." Jamie
continues, "I've had a lot of submissions
that I really liked, but they were more suited
to a dark, cavernous space in Berlin, overtly
synthetic. I have no problem with that, it's
just not what I'm looking for."
This attention to detail extends beyond
the music itself; Hotham Sound's aesthetic
is also neatly maintained. The website is
sleek and minimal, featuring no photos of *
the artists themselves, and Jamie works at
length with the artists to design the graphics
for their releases. It's not only the music
that's experimental, but also the operations.
—  amie works on a contractless system,
splitting the cassette releases
50/50 with the artists, with all
digital sales going directly to the artists.
Another unusual aspect of the operati
>at Hotham Sound offers its music^«,
>sure but not publicity. Jamie wants the
listeners to share in the same experience of
discovery that inspires the music. "I let the
artists know that it's not the kind of label
that will be marketing them. It's almost a
hidden thing, something I want people to
stumble upon at 2AM and say, fWhat is
this?'"
One of the more unorthodox projects in
Hotham Sound's repertoire is the MMR
Broadcasts, four hour-long sound collages.
Each ambient soundscape is composed
by a group of artists and decorated with
radio static and dialogue samples from old
films. Another is The Mondrians, a sound
compilation based on the works of Dutch
artist and theoretician, Piet Mondrian. The
project seeks to re-imagine Mondrian's
abstract, geometrical grid paintings as
graphic scores.
Scientists know more about the surface
of the moon than the bottom of the ocean.
Jamie Tolagson is no scientist but Hotham
Sound is a sort of laboratory, and the artists
on the label are its crew. Where the average,
big-time label seeks out stars, Hotham
Sound and its roster are much more interested in the depths, what's underneath the
surface of music. Together they pose the
question, "What better way to learn than to
experiment?"
ns is set to release m October
~„^, ~^ ^ Mil accepting submissions. For
more details and to listen to Hotham Sound
sounds, visit hoiham-sound.squarespace.com.
6
DUMB - SEEING GREEN - LP/CASSETTE/CD/DIGITAL - OUT NOW!
HOMEGROWN LABELS! HOTHAM   SOUND
 . a n u : a a i
CANLIT,
GET   YOUR   SHIT   TOGETHER
- | ■    m-.m II
ill
I
n ■■ him ii
■ i   i
■ ■ ■ vr ±v bk k-1
nrii
■ ■
I'll
ihMlhiiB**
iran-rh
v Hi
I rt i~h
iri^Un'
tathn
irilm
■ ■bhh'
.!■
ni
lm        fc*liiii»t
ii I
=-
pLyt. II     I      II   II
ib-hi
r     i
ir-itthi
■   ■
*rM^ h*rfi
^    ■ I.  B    |
ttdHHbrUH
i fa ntfiB
iHfc--i
iH^i-hl
.1-
■   ^-M
i ri ax r ■
-if-il-B-aU
hm !h it  V
irna*
i ■
!■■■
"EmiHf tf ■*■■] Viii ihFfi TmH fliKh""
A
L
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | SUMMER 2018
EVAN DUCHARME
Redesigning Colonial Dialogue
words by Lexi Mellish-Mingo
illustrations by Rachel Lau
photos by Geraldine Pinzon     f/j
M A RELATIVELY WHITE-
PASSING, QUEER-METIS
BOY WHO GREW UP IN
THE COUNTRY, entrenched in
culture, surrounded by family, feminine strength,
masculine strength and just strength in general,
and that's what I talk about in my work," expresses
designer, Evan Ducharme. Mid-day sun streaks
into his studio, an artfully infused room in a East
Vancouver heritage home. His work is draped all
around us; there are sketches on the walls, orders in
bags, and a proud mannequin wearing a culturally
informed wedding dress that Evan is designing for
his cousin.
2015, Saudade challenged Evan to reconsider the
perception of sexuality in colonial and ancestral
contexts. The following two collections, Origin
and Atavism were more politically informed. Evan
explains that Origin (2016) "was really about me
reclaiming traditionally male roles that I wasn't a
part of as a kid and thinking about the barriers of
queer folk in traditional communities."
Before anything, Evan expresses the
importance of honouring his Metis
ancestors. "Our relation to our ancestors
does not end when that person is no longer in
their body. This person still contributes to your
life in very meaningful ways, and [you] really
have this strong sense of relationality to them,
and that's never not going to be present in my
work," he says. But as Evan explains, this ancestral
influence "might not be there in visual ways. They
might be more in the research and in the ethical
methodologies that I use within my company." He
continues, "There's always going to be what some
would consider a very strict code of ethics for
what we do, and how I interpret my own culture
"My culture has
been alive and
thriving,
ultiplying
ging."
what was thrown at us," Evan explains.
With a consciousness of the pervading nature
of colonialism, Evan stresses that "decolonization
is a process, not a destination." Being educated
within the Western fashion system, he admits that
his own training has been infiltrated by colonial
impressions, particularly around body image. "I've
spoken to a lot of people who don't fit into the
visuals that I put out into my company and it's
really been unsettling to me that I've been perpetuating this fashion industry standard. [...] Those
sets of ideas about what is beautiful is something
I'm actively working on right now. Within the
next season, there will be a lot more visual representation of different bodies," says Evan.
Evan's new collection aims to conceptualize the
joy of being Metis. "Just lately, I've been thinking
about this notion that Indigenous artists in
general have to lay bare their struggle and their
trauma to validate their work," explains Evan.
Although he admits these experiences need to
be shared, he believes in holding space for the
celebration of diverse First Nations, Metis and
Inuit identities.
"I was extremely lucky to
grow up where I did. I was very
entrenched in my culture,
entrenched in that sense in
family," explains Evan. "I
don't think that folks are used
to seeing a very confident
self-assured Native person.
It's almost [as if they're] like,
'You should know your place.'
I know my place. My people
suffered immensely for me to
be able to stand here confident
and speak, for them to speak
through me."
from Vancouver Indigenous Fashion Week
to Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto to a
feature in Vogue, Evan's stunning designs
and confronting patterns are forward-thinking
and intricately dialogical. Evan may identify as
a Vancouver-based queer-Metis fashion designer,
but his work is much more complex than any
label could imply. We use these descriptors to
address people who deviate from the "norm," but
it must be acknowledged that these labels come
with colonial connotations. The very ethics of
Evan's brand work to destabilize stereotypes of
Indigeneity, sexuality and fashion, which have
been defined under colonialism.
Since Evan graduated from design school in
2012, his career has had a constant trajectory.
In 2014, Evan gained greater public attention
with collections, Halcyon and Iconoclast. In
for a customer that might not be Indigenous."
Evan's most recent collection, Atavism (2017)
opened a platform for discussion with the use of a
fabric patterned with a census print from 1916. It
replicates a document where Evan's grandfather's
name is listed, followed by his racial identity
which was initially classified "French," but was
scratched out and re-labelled "Indian." Evan
says, "This was my first collection where I spoke
explicitly about my Metis identity."
Evan explains that Atavism was "really all about
survival and thriving in the midst of hardship."
The term comes from a Western scientific root
describing biological traits inherited from
ancestors that re-emerge after lying dormant.
"My culture has been alive and thriving, multiplying and changing. [...] That's just the nature of
Indigenous culture. We were forced to adapt to
It's clear that Evan's experience is not
independent of his ancestors, but that their
presence in his life is not only inherent but
vital: "I always think back to this Maya Angelou
poem where she says: fI enter as one, but I stand
as 10,000.'" Enlightened by his ancestors, Evan
redesigns what it means to be queer and Metis in
the contemporary world.
ft
Evan will be a guest speaker at Ancestral
Inheritance, an event taking place on August 12 as
part of the Vancouver Queer Film Festival. To see
his designs, visit evanducharme.com and follow him
on Instagram @evanducharmestudio.
8
"Euan Ducharme'
 8I0S   H3MMU8 |   9niSDgDfn 19bl032i(f
a fl u t a a *?
GSGS
^[Nl
<^=^
FEMINIST    ELECTRONIC
ART
SYMPOSIUM
ID
W
[MDTIIM1IK]
ummm
1        I
'  VII   FTER THE
£11   SUCCESS OF
Jl    I   LAST YEARS
\J I   FESTIVAL, the
organizers of CURRENT: Feminist
Electronic Art Symposium are more
certain than ever of their role as culture
creators, and the resonating impact it is having.
The mission is the same; CURRENT is still a
multidisciplinary intersectional feminist electronic art       §
symposium that seeks to provide more visibility for women
and non-binary artists. Over this past year, they have been
expanding on the symposium, and their expectations along
with it. With the theme Dream of a New Future, this year's
installment will host larger discussions about the involvement
of women and non-binary people in the electronic music
scene, and the struggles that come with it through an
intersectional lens that considers issues of accessibility and
affordability. The biggest hope is to move beyond talking, and
to figure out what Vancouver can do to make tangible changes
and support a more open and accountable scene.
In addition to extending the event, the organizers of
CURRENT have made many changes for this year. "The
program is a lot more blown up and we're not limiting
ourselves to music and visual art. There's a lot more," says
Alexandra Chen of New Forms Media Society, who was
recruited onto the organizing committee since last year's
symposium. The collective has been broadening their
understanding of'electronic art' to other media
including film, spoken word and different
genres of sound. This diversity is in order to
break down barriers between the various
scenes and to create room for interdisciplinary art forms, knowledge-sharing and
collaborations in a city that is otherwise
"cliquey and very rigid," as Alexandra
puts it. They are also expanding their
geographical reach by inviting more
artists from the Canada's East Coast
and the United States, whereas last year
was centred around the Pacific Northwest.
Speaking to this, organizer Ashlee Luk says, "I'm
really looking forward to seeing the community here
and how it responds to that, and to program events without
any type of fear of needing to play to a certain audience.
We're doing it for something we want to see in the future, a
community we want to cultivate."
This year, CURRENT is making an increased effort to
O
T ®       (S)
address financial barriers
and other obstacles faced
by artists engaged or
wanting to engage in the music
community, acknowledging that
the attempt to secure funding can
often be discouraging or oppressive.
There will be a panel with their own project
funders Creative BC, Music BC and FACTOR,
and another presentation on pitching projects
to the NFB Interactive Studio. "With more partners
[for this year's CURRENT] came
more funding, and we want to be able to
show people how to get this funding for
themselves," explains Nancy Lee.
She continues, "We're trying to
increase visibility for underrepresented
people to the funding bodies, including
women, non-binary, BIPOC, newcomers
and queer people. We want to be able to
build a bridge between culture creators
and people that make art with these
funders that are actively trying to support
more diverse artists, because that's been an issue. [Financial
support] is not distributed in a way that compensates under-
represented people." By introducing workshops and panels
through which women and non-binary artists can learn
about sources of funding, CURRENT wants to reduce the
intimidation or resentment that underrepresented
artists may feel towards institutions, and to
demystify the application processes.
a
nother focus of discussion
for Dream of a New Future
is the abuse of power in
media, and how to support and aid
survivors of gender-based violence
and abuse. Although this was a
focus of last year's symposium as
well, the organizers admit that a lot
has changed in one year. "We've had
women doing things around the world,
like #MeToo, and we can't be deaf to that, so
we're going to confront it," says Soledad Munoz.
CURRENT allows for women and non-binary people to share
knowledge and information, whereas traditionally decisionmaking and discussions around the status of the music
scene have been dictated by white men. "I think it's really
important that women of colour and non-binary people
'CURREtlT'
are in power because sometimes the dialogue gets taken
up otherwise and is used to perpetrate the patriarchy and
misogyny," she explains.
"This year we have a specific grant in order to give a
platform for more of an engaged participation as cultural
creators, because that is something that really interests us.
That it's not just a symposium, but it's actually changing
culture. We have the City of Vancouver Host Your Own
Engagement Grant and [the grant] is looking
to create or recommend policies so we can
bridge that gap between cultural creators
and the city. Sometimes it's hard to communicate with the city and actually make cultural
change," Soledad shares. CURRENT is holding
three different panels to encourage conversations about topics such as creating a space and
facilitating culture that is accountable to its
people. Through these panels, the organizers
and participants will identify areas of concern
and begin to formulate substantial policies
based around them.
This element of cultural change and exchange is
something that comes up a lot during discussions with the
organizers of CURRENT and it's evident that they're not
interested in being just another festival that comes and goes
without effect. The organizers want to bring about legitimate
change to the culture of Vancouver music scenes, especially
within the electronic arts, which have been male-dominant
and haven't always allowed for the participation of marginalized groups. Time after time, we have seen festival lineups
book their token "underrepresented performer" without any
real conviction towards making a difference; they're booked
to fulfill a diversity quota. Not only does CURRENT want
women and non-binary artists to achieve visibility for the
strength of their work, but also to have access to safe spaces to
produce and perform their art. Through panels and performances, CURRENT is a testament to the talent and resilience
of this community.
ft
CURRENT: Feminist Electronic Art Symposium's Dream of
a New Future takes place July 25-29, spread across several
Vancouver locations. More information, including schedule and
lineups at currentsymposium.com.
0
 Btal tine
Action
JUNE 2018
MUSIC WASTE PT. 1W/ PALE
RED /JOCK TEARS /WALLGRIN/
MAMARUDEGYAL/BE AFRI AD/
SHITLORD FUCKERMAN / HAILEY BLAIS
/ MOSFETT / TIMING X/ HOPE /CLUB
SOFA /HUSH PUP
JUNE 7/ FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
music Waste is always a scramble of a weekend, desperately
dashing between venues, leaving sets early and arriving
moments too late to see all the shows you had hoped to catch. Of course,
that's part of the fun. With over 70 of the city's best bands, not to mention
the comedy, art shows, drag performances, poetry readings and dance
parties, it's easy to be overwhelmed by all the excitement that you will
undoubtedly not be able to see.
All that made the opening night at Fortune an absolutely perfect way
to launch the wild weekend. Twelve bands, three stages, all in the same
venue, with set times spread out just
enough to be able to comfortably see it
all — which is just what I did.
Kicking off the night on the
Electronic Stage, Hush Pup's
vibe-heavy pop music filled the small
room, while the bassist's solid grooves
pushed out into the main room of the
venue and drew the early-comers in.
Simultaneously, club sofa started up
the Art Room Stage downstairs. The
surf punk four-piece cruised effortlessly
through their quick and catchy set,
sounding like a more uplifting Speedy
Ortiz and setting the bar high for the
rest of the bands to come.
As the opening two sets came to
a close, Hope took to the Main Stage.
His bass-heavy beats infiltrated every
inch of the venue, while his incredible
wordplay and flow captured the
attention of the ever-growing crowd.
Mamarudegyal, who had been DJing
throughout the set, stepped out to sing
for the last song, just hinting at what
would come later in the night.
At this point, the venue really started to fill up, with the crowds migrating
between the three stages almost in unison. With the Electronic Room and
Art Room sets happening concurrently, the crowd was split between the
two, converging every hour for the Main Stage set.
Mosfett's set made the Art Room almost unbearably loud, with their
outstandingly heavy and distorted guitar tones pushing the limits of a
healthy concert-going experience. At the same time upstairs, Timing X's
brutally fast dungeon synth set pumped pure energy into the Electronic
Room. Sounding like they were fast-forwarding through Zelda: Ocarina of
Time, they crammed what seemed like 30 songs into their 30-minute set.
On the Main Stage, Haley Blais played to a now-full Fortune. Her soft
voice and ukulele would've felt small amidst the big room if not for her solid
backing band, hitting all the marks of a successful if not safe set of indie
pop tunes. Standing out among the rest, Blais' "Small Foreign Faction"
showcased her vocal chops while serving as an emotional crescendo to
the set.
Packed in as tight as physically possible, the audience overflowed the
Electronic Room for shitlord fuckerman. Clearly a crowd favourite, shitlord
fuckerman's earnest and hilarious onslaught of 8-bit wonder proved that
they are truly one of the most entertaining acts in Vancouver.
Downstairs, Be Afraid's loud and messy alt rock perfectly evoked that
fusion of grunge and pop done best by Built To Spill. Despite tearing
through a snare drum halfway into their set, Be Afraid kept the increasingly
steamy Art Room transfixed.
With a hint of deja vu coursing through the venue, Mamarudegyal and
Hope emerged onto the Main Stage again, but this time the focus was
clearly on Mamarudegyal. Despite a slow, R&B infused start to the set, the
k
momentum gradually built, with every person in the room grooving hard to
her voracious flow and hard-hitting beats.
A marked change of mood came over the Electronic Room with
Wallgrin's set. With the volume set low enough to allow for their vocal and
violin layers to loop cleanly, the set was the most solemn of the night.
Among the quiet moments, the intensity and grandiosity of songs like "River
Valley" hit even harder, with a choir-like wall of vocals smashing through the
middle of the otherwise gentle song.
Down below, Jock Tears' unbridled power pop energy nearly burst out of
the Art Room. Every member of the four-piece constantly bounded around
the small stage, infecting the tightly packed room with pep.
With some of the audience trickling out, Pale Red closed the night on
the Main Stage. Smashing together over-the-top fuzziness, beautiful vocal
harmonies, punk thrashing and in-the-pocket grooviness, Pale Red were
amazing, as usual. Like the entire festival crammed into one band, their
spastic, catchy and undefinable sound was the perfect way to end Music
Waste 2018's opening party. —Lucas Lund
MUSIC WASTE PT. 2 W/ BOOTY EP / THE
TROLLS / LAVERNE / FINE / MY WIFE
JUNE 8-9/VARIOUS VENUES
Pfter the tightly packed and singularly located opened night,
Music Waste 2018 spread out with 18 separate showcases over
the following three days. Bands overlapped left, right and centre, so I
formulated my very own particular schedule to guide my movements to and
from the sets that I truly could not miss. While
I would love to go into detail on my rigorously
planned weekend, that doesn't make for a riveting
review. Instead, here are a few highlights.
Shouldering my way up the stairs of the Avant
Garden, the off-kilter pop sounds of My Wife filled
the over-crowded room. While I didn't manage to
get far enough into the venue to catch a glimpse
of the band, their sound and the voracious
applause that followed were ample proof that My
Wife is a group to watch out for.
After a slight shuffle amidst the crowd, I snuck
along the side wall to a vantage point with a clear
view just in time for Fine. Far from just fine, the
four-piece's complex song structures, paired with
their laid-back and truly warm stage presence
made for an incredible set — moments like the
drummer apologizing out loud that he messed up
his one and only drum fill, and promising to make
up for it during the song, endearing the crowd to
them all the more.
Later at the Remington Gallery, set in front of
the white-backdrop of the photo studio, Laverne
smashed through the austere atmosphere of
the room with a truly energetic set. The trio,
with DiscorderJs former Under Review Editor, Max
Anderson-Baier on the guitar and vocals, brought the energy with their
movements seemingly losing control during their punk injected garage
rock set. Even at their most tender moments, like during "The Seagull,"
Laverne's set was engrossing.
Venturing into the new incarnation of Red Gate Arts Society was a
highlight unto itself — seeing the same furniture, PA equipment and art
piece gracing the walls of its new Main Street location was like stepping
into an only-slightly alternate universe. Everyone there seemed to be both
exploring the new space and settling in once again to the already familiar
venue. Fitting that I managed to catch The Trolls' performance there. Made
up of members of countless other local bands — Only A Visitor, Jock Tears,
Birdo, Big Evil, and probably many, many more — The Trolls' familiar set of
faces dealt out a short-but-sweet set of weird and wild rock songs.
Walking down the alleyway behind East 2nd Avenue was an adventure
unto itself. What is usually a largely vacant strip of commercial loading
bays and unmarked back doors was transformed into a bustling metropolis
during Music Waste. Housing both Stylus Records and MW Venue #23, the
crowds spilled out onto the pavement. Squeezing into Stylus for the final
set of Saturday evening, I found a spot with an only slightly impeded view
of Booty EP. Their smooth, R&B infused synth-pop sound caused the whole
room to bounce along. Featuring songs from their latest EP What, what and
the who now?, plus a very tasteful cover of SZAs "Child's Play," Booty EP
was excellent — especially drummer Kai Basanta, whose quick fills and
incredible groove held my attention throughout.
After three nights filled to the brim with the city's finest underground and
independent music — not to mention the art, comedy, drag and much much
more — I couldn't manage to get out to the afternoon and early evening
REAL LIVE ACTION
shows on Sunday. More than satisfied with the barrage of music that I did
manage to catch, Music Waste 2018 was yet another success. And for
those bands that I didn't manage to catch, I've got quite a list to check off
now, until next year's festival starts it all over again. —Lucas Lund
UNCLE JANES: CRYSTAL QUEER COMEDY
JUNE 15 / LITTLE MOUNTAIN GALLERY
Uncle Janes: Crystal Queer Comedy is a brand-new improv show
co-produced by Jill Lockley with Blind Tiger Comedy, featuring a
fully queer-identifying ensemble of improvisers, including Jordan Wesley,
Michael Sousa, Bradley Bergeron, Chris Reed, Cassidy Anhorn, Charlie
Cook, Koby Braidek, Briana Rayner, Chloe Willes-Speakman and Jill
Lockley, with guest monologist Continental Breakfast. Tucked behind a
convenience store, the small and cozy Little Mountain Gallery felt like a fun
secret.
In this constantly under construction, bunker-like room, the ensemble
began the first half of show with some fun improv games, like innuendo, a
game in which they compared their ideal partner to an object. Immediately,
the game was more polite than I've seen it done prior, with "I like my
partner" being the most common way to start. Some spectacular lines came
from this, like "I like my men like I like my coffee, I don't" or "I like my women
like I like the moon, going through a phase."
Next, they played a scene where the performers had to end it by saying
the most heartfelt "I love you" that they could. At my suggestion, the scene
took place in my dad's basement, where two men slowly unravelled and
expressed their love for each other, which had grown during the decades
they spent lounging and writing bad novellas. Refreshingly, the scene never
played the idea of two men falling in love as the joke, instead making their
weird backstory the centre piece.
They finished up the first act with a classic game of freeze, tapping
each other in and out of scenes. They played through multiple wild
locations, from a liberal arts prison to Jill's womb, with a recurring theme of
having arms that are just made for fishing.
The second half was a long-form set, with scenes by guest monologist
Continental Breakfast, who stole this half of the show wearing a full
gold-sequined gown that they had made themselves. They divulged
multiple stories from their lives from high school to last weekend, messy
details included. They monologued about a high school trip in Austria where
they got roofied and then made-out with their physics teacher, then about
their employee / long-term hookup that they discovered was homeless, and
finally about their sexcapade in a Reno airport bathroom, 12 minutes before
their flight left. The improvisers did well making scenes with the stories
given, although I don't envy the effort they had to make to avoid acting out
the raunchier details of the stories (which were most details).
Overall, the whole show was fun, funny, and joyful. The relationship
between the audience and performers felt close — the audience wanted to
see them succeed, and succeed they did. The laughter that filled the room
was enthusiastic and well-earned. Clearly it was a successful premier show,
as it will be a recurring show at Little Mountain Gallery. If you come to the
next show, you'll definitely be seeing me there. —Amy Shandro
SAM TUDOR /DEVOURS /MY SISTER
MARIA
JUNE 15 / RED GATE REVUE STAGE
Sam Tudor and band came home to a rapt audience. The final show
of their Quotidian Dream tour demonstrated vanloads of professional
talent that folk-pop fans across the country ought to keep their ears on.
Red Gate Revue Stage is an awkward venue. Despite theatrical
amenities like a thrust stage and enclosed tech booth, the house feels like
a cross between a dive bar and an ice rink, with a sterile, fluorescently-lit
lobby that resists all efforts to make it look clean or, indeed, like part of
the building, which itself sits uneasily at the periphery of Granville Island's
bourgeois glitter. But Red Gate's new venue has a redeeming feature:
its sound system. And on Friday night, the tech team did a classy job,
lighting the instruments before the show in a way that fomented mystery
and anticipation, and then, once in the thick of things, bringing out the
performers' voices with a clarity rare even on the fanciest stages around.
The audience was able to transcend its location. Phones were put away
without anyone asking. The venue choice was vindicated.
First up, singer-songwriter My Sister Maria delivered a set marked by
both extraordinary potential and questionable judgement. At the guitar, My
Sister Maria is a competent performer with an amazingly smooth voice.
(Alas, the guitar half of her set suffered because its songs, by MSM's own
admission, had been written just days prior to the set.) At the keyboard,
though, My Sister Maria is a brilliant musician whose idiosyncratic time
feel—which manages to combine a jazz drummer's deliberate consistency
Discorder magazine i SUMMER 2018
 with a fin-de-siecle salon pianist's affinity for rubato—is the product of
genius, and whose voice and presence befit any size of stage. If she
focuses her act around her strengths, I think My Sister Maria will reach a
very large audience.
The middle act was Devours, an affable, sparkly-costumed performer
with an outstanding ability to integrate keyboards with DJ material. Devours
makes synth-wave pop, whose grooviness clashed with Revue's lack of
standing area, although some audience members (including yours truly)
danced in the wings anyway. The strongest part of the act was the song
"Friday Night Fur," a rant about Tinder culture, whose lyrics leapt from the
boring ("Have fun / Swing by your house / Because I need the release")
to the startlingly on-point ("Can you imagine a life without this tragedy? /
Follow the script, read back your lines to me / If we get
hurt it was the only way").
In contrast to the bittersweet catharsis Devours offered,
Sam Tudor's performance initially kept its tension coiled.
Drummer Harry Tudor was rock-solid if never relaxed,
guitarist Craig Aalders was precise but quiet, and bassist
Jasper Wrinch was understatedly tasteful. Violinist and
backing vocalist Tegan Wahlgren is a virtuoso in her own
right, sounding at times like a more aggressive Garnet
Rogers circa 1982, but her solos never cashed out more
than a fraction of the foreboding twisted up in the band's
arrangements.
The programmed set was eminently respectable.
But Tudor's encore, a solo version of "Joseph's in
the Bathroom," burned its way into my memory like
no performance has for a long time. Tudor used the
microphone only for the banter and the first verse, then
stepped away, realizing that his clear, bright voice was
enough to fill the venue on its own and that its unamplified
tone complemented the song's subject matter.
I think Tudor's lyrics are sometimes imprisoned by their
quotidianness — in stories about songwriting, for example,
or of being depressed in one's room — which produces a tendency to
string metaphors together until they don't add up. Things change when
Tudor steps outside of himself, applying his introspective exactitude to
another person's point of view. "Joseph in the Bathroom" is the account
of his experience as a bystander observing the bullied among his high
school peers. The song reveals a depth of consideration so devastatingly
on-the-head that it feels exhausting to consider at length. When Tudor sang
of wanting to "pull out all the circus pegs" about the absurdity that was his
high school, the sentiment impacted the audience not because it is positive
or pretty, but because it is true—and, as Tudor knows, all the more haunting
given that it can be expressed only now, so far removed from the time,
place and people who needed it most.
Although the main set didn't get a standing ovation, the encore sure as
hell did. —Matthew Horrigan
SLED ISLAND: MINT RECORDS
SHOWCASE W/ LIE /DUMB/
PEACH KELLI POP /FAITH HEALER/
SUPERMOON/BRIDAL PARTY
JUNE 22 / COMMONWEALTH (CALGARY, AB)
Vou know a show is certainly going to be something when you start
the afternoon holding your camera bag under a bathroom hairdryer
in the basement of a nightclub in the middle of the afternoon. And that is
where I found myself to kick off Sled Island's Mint Records showcase.
Calgary felt a little more like Vancouver thanks a torrential downpour
that kicked off early in the day and did not let up. It also felt a little like
Vancouver due to the stacked lineup Mint brought to showcase.
The Mint Records showcase is a great annual cleanser at Sled Island.
Coming at the midpoint of the festival, it's a free, all-ages event that
highlights a broad spectrum of bands all signed to the Mint label. And
running for almost five hours, the showcase offers up plenty of time to step
in and out of the party.
Bridal Party kicked things off with a high-energy set. Vocalists Suzannah
Raudaschl and Joseph Leroux weaved breezily in between jangling guitars
and easy beats. Supermoon followed up with their signature brand of
sugary sweet pop — perfect afternoon music.
Things really started to get going as the rain let up a little leading up
to Faith Healer's set. The trio filled Commonwealth's cavernous space
with their light and breezy energy. It was easy to listen to the music while
also navigating the room, running into friends the whole time. I ended
up spending a good section of the set lounging on one of the couches,
bobbing my head along to the tunes.
By the time Peach Kelli Pop took the stage though, the crowd had
8I0S   H3MMU8 j   9niXDgDflT 19bl032i0
coalesced around the front to absorb the band's saccharine energy. The
California-based band is a fresh addition to Mint's line-up in the past few
months, and has spent the past few weeks touring across Canada and the
United States. For the Mint showcase, they brought a high-energy set filled
with classic tracks — "Hello Kitty Knife" is always a favourite — as well as
songs from newer releases.
Speaking of new releases, Vancouver favourites Dumb held their
unofficial album launch party as part of the showcase. Playing the day
your album drops brings a special spark to the performance and it was
easy to see the joy on each of the band members' faces as they brought
those new songs to a new crowd. It was fast, it was joyous and it was a
delight to take in.
The mood shifted slightly with final act lie, who took the airy pop of earlier
and sunk it down, down, down into a chilling and resonante heaviness.
Sporting leather bondage attire, the group brought pounding guitars and
vocals to the stage. As if by sheer force of will, they seemed to clear away
the rain. After they concluded, I emerged from the venue bleary-eyed at
the sudden sun — it felt like a Sled Island miracle.
—Melanie Woods
SPECIAL: THREE SLED ISLAND
DISCOVERIES W/ CARTEL MADRAS /
MYST MILANO/GLAUX
JUNE 22-25 / VARIOUS VENUES (CALGARY, AB)
Sled Island is a time of discovery. Over the years, I've found that the
best experiences at the annual music and arts festival in Calgary are
often the ones I least expect. With over 200 bands and overlapping show
schedules, I've wandered into shows I did not anticipate going to and come
out with a new favourite band.
Last year, my pleasant takeaway was Feed Dogs — an
Edmonton-based garage rock group playing upstairs at the Legion on
the Saturday night. I wandered up to escape the crowds of Shonen Knife
downstairs and left delighted, my head spinning with jangly guitars and
smiles.
This year was no different. Here are my three picks of the best new (to
me) shows from Sled Island 2018.
CARTEL MADRAS (CALGARY):
Pleasant surprises came fast and early in the form of Calgary rap group
Cartel Madras, who headlined Sled Island's Tuesday night kick-off show at
Commonwealth Bar and Stage. Cartel Madras is a relatively new entity —
while sisters Eboshi and Contra have rapped together in their basement for
years, they only really started performing within the past year.
With two scheduled shows and a slate of guest appearances with
other acts, Sled Island was Cartel Madras's debut to the world. At
Commonwealth, the two rappers burst out onto stage with a bundle of
energy, Eboshi sporting a huge fur coat that seemed to consume her small
frame. Within moments the crowd was bouncing along to the beat, hands in
the air. The two are not only great rappers, but transcendental performers.
At one point Eboshi produced a bottle of vodka, passing it around the front
row and encouraging them to "slurp up!" Later on, the crowd chanting along
to lines like "All them boys got whiskey dick / So Imma keep fucking chicks."
And alongside the incredible hype, there was also lyricism, as the group's
verses address feminism, queerness and South Indian heritage.
So often at festivals like this, bands come and go without taking time to
revel in the music around them. But I ran in Cartel Madras several times
throughout the week, always at the front of the crowd, giving every ounce of
support to the artists on stage.
Besides the opening night set, Cartel Madras made several other
on-stage appearances throughout the festival. Notably, the hopped up for
a few tracks with Vancouver's own Snotty Nose Rez Kids (nominated for
the 2018 Polaris Music Prize), who were opening for 2017 Polaris Music
Prize-winner Lido Pimienta. Later they revealed that Pimienta had invited
them to Toronto to spend time with her. When Lido says you're good,
you're good.
Stay tuned for their three-part mixtape dropping this summer and get
ready to join the cartel.
MYST MILANO (TORONTO):
Opening for Thundercat is no easy task. The
acclaimed music mastermind has worked alongside
everyone from Kendrick Lamar to Childish Gambino and
he can rip a cool 45 minutes straight on his electric bass
like it's nothing. Pair that with the Palace Theatre — by
far Sled's most unforgiving and largest venue — and you
have a mountain to climb as a new and emerging artist.
And when a friend told me I had to make sure I caught
the opener for the highly anticipated Thundercat show,
I was skeptical at first. What kind of person can live up
to that hype? Well, if anyone was up to the task, it's
Toronto-based rapper and producer Myst Milano. She
brought the house down with a fast-paced, personal and
fun set that had the whole crowd dancing.
Milano produces and mixes all of her own tracks,
and there's a calculated ease in how she approaches
the computer and drum machine that accompany her on
stage. She layers her vocals over a variety of drum and
electronic beats, weaving the components together to
create a vivid musical experience.
The highlight of the set came when Milano pulled an
audience member on stage with her to dance to "Perfect." While at most
shows this will result in the audience member uncomfortably bobbing
along to the track, that was not the case here — this guy came to play.
Through a combination of vogueing, twerking and other body undulations,
he surprised and delighted not only the crowd, but Milano herself. Watching
her try to rap while containing the pure glee was a show in and of itself.
Milano's set was the perfect segue to what became one Sled's funkiest
night. I can't wait to see her headline her own show.
GLAUX (CALGARY):
One of the best-curated shows of this year's festival came on its
final night with the Femme Wave showcase at Dickens Pub. Featuring a
headlining turn by power pop punk superteam Cherry Glazerr, as well as
support from sweet-as-heck Peach Kelli Pop and Vancouver pals BB, the
sold-out show did not disappoint. But it was opener Glaux that came as my
pleasant surprise of the evening.
Pronounced "glow," the trio brought a comfortable vibe to the dark
Dickens basement. Playing through persistent sound issues is never
easy, but Glaux did not let it sway them. As vocals cut in and out, the
group powered on, making the best of what they could with what they had.
Looking like they just stepped out of their mom's garage — but in, like, a
good way — they brought a breezy ease to the stage. Their tunes were
simple, but catchy and a great way to ease into what would be a long,
heavy show.
Glaux provided the perfect backdrop to getting a few beers and pizza at
the bar, settling down at a pool table and mentally preparing for the night
ahead. That's best you can hope for in an opener to a four-act show, and
they performed admirably. If you're looking for pleasant tunes for a house
party with friends, Glaux has got you covered. —Melanie Woods
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and
online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences.
Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
REAL LIVE ACTION
11
L
  L
 Unfctt
tttimtD
• • • • •
MUSIC
JO PASSED
Their Prime
(Sub Pop/ Royal Mountain Records)
May  25,   2018
W
e gave you everything, what's left?" pleads the titular
Jo on the opening track of Jo Passed's debut LP Their
Prime. It's one of those questions that makes for a lot of sleepless nights,
and sure enough restlessness permeates every one of the album's 43
minutes. Like literally every other millennial keeping up with the news cycle,
main songwriter Jo Hirabayashi is knee-deep in existential woes, and the
music won't let you forget it: grooves are mangled, whammy bars throttled,
fretboards set ablaze. This band's got chops, and thank goodness those
chops are in service of some strongly crafted pop-rock.
Back-to-back singles "MDM" and "Glass" showcase Jo Passed's skill
in rocking out while freaking out. The former pairs strangled-cat-like guitar
leads over a chord progression that would make the Pixies blush. The latter
finds Hirabayashi processing his alienation from his Vancouver birthplace
over a deconstructed boogie. "What's a home?" he asks, halfway between
sincere and sardonic, "Is it for grabs?" All the while, the band stops and
starts on a dime, interlocking guitars hold everything steady and the bass
ambles up and down the fretboard. The subject matter may be a bummer,
but its delivery is thrilling.
Throughout the album there is a tension between the unconventional,
sometimes abrasive song structures and Hirabayashi's austere vocals.
These prog-ish sensibilities place their sound somewhere between Tera
Melos and Grizzly Bear. Short and sweet track "Facetook" wears the latter's
influence especially well, giving it a lo-fi twist. "R.I.P." is less flattering,
meandering awkwardly for its first half and not really earning its heavy,
barnburner outro.
Of course, taking rock apart like this is tricky business, but when it
works, oh boy, it works! Album highlight "Sold" is arguably a frontrunner for
Catchiest Song in 13/8. The repeating bass and drum pattern that anchors
the song cuts like a knife, while guitars alternate between in-your-face
and coy, supporting a simple, perfect vocal line. And, contrary to "R.I.P.,"
this one earns its ending, driving that angular bassline into the motorik
stratosphere with a rising set of chords.
Those looking to do some close reading of the lyrics may be
disappointed: Hirabayashi's voice is so heavily processed that it's often
useless to parse the syllables through the haze. For an album that's low-key
trying to address urban living under late capitalism (the cover art is a black-
and-white photo of Rize's much-maligned condo tower in Mount Pleasant, a
neat hole burnt in the centre) this is kind of a drag.
But this may be missing the point. Their Prime seeks to capture that
impulse of looking for meaning in a confusing and messed-up world.
They're serious, but also seriously fun. And while their full-chops-blazing
approach can be exhausting — listeners will be especially grateful for
ambient comedown "Another Nowhere" — on the whole, Jo Passed
succeed in bridging the gap between dense and accessible. —Andrei
Mihailiuk
SCUM LAUDE
ScumLaude
(Self-Released)
May  25,   2018
Experimental downer rock has come to define Scum Laude, a
three-piece that have been gigging in Vancouver since 2017. Their
newest, self titled full-length, Scum Laude, was recorded in a basement
but mixed to sound like a fuzzy bedroom tape. If you're in the mood to
settle into a comfortable kind of sadness, you'll float through the 12 tracks
easily. Stylistically, it's a low-maintenance listen that feels like you're
H
commiserating with an old friend rather than admiring the art of a stranger.
I had been hearing about Scum Laude and seeing them play live for
months before I listened to their music online. It wasn't quite what I was
expecting — their live set is considerably more raw and energetic than this
album. Instead of in-your-face, carefree punk, Scum Laude's tracks present
folk elements wrapped in lo-fi production.
From the very first track on Scum Laude, I hear Girlpool. It's not just
because of the female vocals, but the down-on-your-luck lyrical vulnerability
and the minimalism in every aspect of their sound. The drums are low in the
mix and about as simple as possible, with minor chords and jangly guitar
riffs leading the songs forward. The second track is the sweet and dreamy
"Desolate," recalls "Sarah" by Alex G, a bonus song on the record Trick.
I hear The Submissives — and their many influences, among them The
Shaggs — easily throughout. The inspiration is clear in Scum Laude, but
their brand of indie is just different enough to be its own beast.
You can pretty well daydream your way through the album. This can be
inviting, but also borderline dull. In a very real way, their style is escapist.
Both the lyrics and instrumentation are accessible enough that you'd never
have to think yourself into liking it. It's not technical, it's not bold, and it's not
fluffy or overly laboured.
But if you're hoping for a collection of unique songs rather than 40
minutes of straight downer rock, you'll be disappointed. After listening to it
front to back, I struggled to remember any one song in particular, but I knew
that I wanted to hear it again. —Aly Laube
ALANISOBOMSAWIN
Bush Lady
(Constellation)
June   15,   2018
Planis Obomsawin, from the Abenaki Nation, is best known as a
storied filmmaker whose documentaries serve to shed light on
struggles for Indigenous rights. Beginning as an artist in the '60s, she finally
recorded her lone full-length album after 20+ years of live performances
and social activism. Bush Lady, originally released in 1985 as a CBC
recording and later remastered by Obomaswin in 1988, came at a time
when assimilation was just being phased out of official government
legislation and the violent history of Indigenous peoples experiences as
a result of colonization was not a prevalent topic of national discussion.
Bush Lady gets its third reissue at a pivotal moment in Canadian and
Indigenous history as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission attempts to
educate and acknowledge the oppression of the past. The record is a sonic
testament to Obomsawin's unrelenting fight for Indigenous peoples located
within the borders of Canada. The dialogue on the record is a powerful
reminder about the impact colonization has on Indigenous women and
culture.
The two-part title track is the story of a woman cast out by the settlers
and her own community after the birth of her blond child to a white man.
The prose is spoken from the perspective of a number of different narrators
including the colonial invaders who treat the woman like an object in
passing, casting her out after her pregnancy is revealed: "Go back home
to your people / Go home now, you hear?" The dialogue is broken only by
Obomsawin's chants. In the second part the titular Bush Lady, who has
had to abandoned her child to the settlers, is rescued by her Nokum, her
grandmother in spirit form, who beckons her to follow to a place of no pain,
away from the earthly existence of homelessness and despair. While "Bush
Lady" is the story of an individual's pain and demise, "Theo," also split in
two parts and beautifully sung in French, tells the story of a village pushed
towards assimilation. Obamsowin's chants become noticeably angry as
the Christian names are forced upon the villagers towards the end of the
second part of the song.
Set amidst a beautiful musical score composed of a traditional, animal
skin drum and classical woodwind and string instruments, Bush Lady
provides a stunning narrative on the experience of Indigenous people living
under a colonial state. —Slavko Bucifal
III
To submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please
email Under Review Editor Maximilian Anderson-Baier at
ur.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1.
LIE
Hounds
(Mint Records)
July 6, 2018
Hounds is an appropriate title for the Vancouver based dark punk,
three-piece lie's second LP, most viscerally because of its dogged
energy. While lie have always been far from sedate (see their first album,
Consent, reissued on Mint Records earlier this year) this record rages
forward with heavier instrumentation and a relentless pace that feels very
much like being pursued by a pack of ravenous hounds.
lie continue the thematic approach they began on Consent, focusing
their lyrics on power, relationships, sex and coercion, yet the vocals are
more an instrument in their own right than a vehicle for lyrics. They soar
among the other instruments expansively, recalling classic goth voices in
their full-bodied tone. The guitar is so grungy that it becomes paradoxically
ethereal, washing over careening drums and rumbling bass to create a
sound that vibrates with frantic energy.
The first track, "Better Sex," opens with a ringing riff and a jarring
screech before rolling right into the kind of aggressive rhythm that drives
the rest of the album. It also opens the album with the recurring theme
of unhealthy relationship dynamics. The refrain "He's handsome / You're
desired / Why wait for something?" calls out with resigned dissatisfaction,
and the abrupt, unresolved ending mirrors the frustration underlying the
song.
The band's concern with toxic relationship dynamics continues in the
eighth track, "It's Really Nice," which narrates the self-denial necessary for
day-to-day survival when you are trapped in an abusive relationship. The
contrast between the strangely catchy, slinky bass line and the squealing
breakthrough moments of guitar intensifies the disorienting stress conveyed
by the lyrics. These lyrics are brutally clear. With lines like, "Controls you
with / Hardened fists / Gives you gifts / And every day's a test," there's
no mistaking the agonizing precarity of abuse. Repetitions of "It's really
nice / You make a sacrifice" and "On your knees, please" build into a raw,
exhausting crescendo of part religious, part sexual imagery. Fast, hostile
and viciously honest, "It's Really Nice" is a highlight on Hounds.
Calling Hounds a pleasure to listen to would do it a disservice, because
it's not a pleasurable album and it doesn't want to be. Instead, it's a
catharsis — a roiling build-up of dark emotion that refuses to rest even once
in its nine tracks, lie has built on their previous work and on their classic
goth and punk influences, but they have also transcended those things to
create an album that feels violently new. — El Rosch
FILM
UNDER REVIEW
Casey Wei
MURKY COLORS
The Cinematheque
Screened  on May  22,   2018
The first time I ever watched Casey Wei's Murky Colors (2013) was
while I was looking at a sculpture by Patrick Cruz at Centre A.
There were three small and obsolete monitors installed on a low platform
addled with glitter and post-consumer offerings, wholly covered by Cruz's
maximalist paint treatment. (1) The monitors each showed a work by Dada
Docot, Jac Phillipe V Carpio or Casey Wei. I had gone to the exhibition
with the intention to review it but I spent the majority of my time squatting in
front of this sculpture watching Wei's film. Cruz's exhibition was very flashy
and timely, a zealous display of the aestheticized debris of globalization
and accelerated capitalism. Facilitating an ideal viewing experience was
low on priority. In spite of the chaos, shitty headphones and sleepy limbs,
Wei's film remained with me long after I wrote the review and the exhibition
closed.
The film, Murky Colors, is based on a made-for-hollywood spy novel
by Menjin Wei, Wei's father. It is not, by any measure, a conventional
adaptation, however, it begins to chart the poetics of one. Wei's editing
approaches the arrangement of images with a writerly consideration by
Discorder magazine i SUMMER 2018
 incorporating elements of the film essay and collage in her participatory
documentary.
All characters in the recreation of Menjin Wei's novel are played by Wei.
Throughout the film, the action scenes are intercut with Wei interviewing
her father, him reading from his manuscript, gonzo footage of their family
trip to China, and Hollywood and Hong Kong action films. Her editing and
post-production techniques amplify the tropes of spy movies and pulp novels.
Scenes where Casey negotiates a drop (with herself), interrogates a suspect
(herself), are done without an iota of irony and are convincing enough to
make all the different characters and their contrasting moral agendas distinct.
At times the Hollywood footage is edited in such a way that it fulfills the action
that couldn't be logistically shot with a one-woman cast.
Her post-production techniques with green screen and special effects
purposefully expose the seams of film editing. The willful and genuine
facture Wei advances by splicing a hotel scene from Murky Colors with
footage of Daniel Craig's Bond moving through their respective hotel rooms
demonstrates an internalized spatial fluency with the movement through
that space, that story. Genre films follow a formula we've been exposed to
so many times, we could reproduce it like the lyrics of a Backstreet Boys
song. We've seen this spy movie before — but not quite like this. There are
moments of light agitprop, such as the political address layered over a CNN
segment, or footage of a march against the Chinese Communist Party in
Vancouver, narrated by Menjin Wei's explanation of how corruption in China
is parcel to emergent economic power. But Wei's goal is not caricature or
to dish up an underhanded, artful critique. The film's plethora of crafted
sequences with interludes of personal footage and popular media provoke
us to reconsider how we might visualize the narratives we're familiar with,
and that they might still be legible, or illuminated when abutted to other
forms of fiction or formal experimentation.
Bringing her father's novel / unrealized spy movie into proximity with
its past aspirations demonstrates something that I think all artists have
the capacity to do with their work, yet so few rarely do. It recuperates a
possibility that was lost in one context. In this case, the adaptation of Murky
Colors, is revitalized in its own lifetime, and it pulls the rest of us into the
chronology of an artwork. It's not a grand statement, but universal in feeling.
Menjin Wei narrates over footage of the dramatization of his novel, directed
by and starring his daughter who intercuts the story with footage of car
chases and a family trip. Is this the adaptation he thought he would get? I
think it's astronomically better. —Steffanie Ling
Murky Colors screened with her second film Vater und Sohn/Father and
Son/ (2014). This screening was programmed as part of the exhibition,
sum of the parts at 221 A, curated by Jenn Jackson.
1. Bulaklak ng Paraiso (Birds of Paradise) at Centre A in 2016. Curated by
Makiko Hara
• •••••••
PODCASTS
rYouissicK
Produced by Alicia Tobin
and Kevin Lee
YOUNG AND SICK
April 2018 - Present
I  remember sitting on my couch nearly two years ago, staring at the
floor, feeling helpless, as one of my closest friends told me that he has
been diagnosed with a chronic condition. I remember wanting something —
a pamphlet, book, counsellor or whatever — to explain to me what he was
going to go through and how to best support him. Transporting myself back
to that moment, it would have been incredibly helpful to have the recently
launched Young and Sick Podcast.
Prominent Vancouver comedians Alicia Tobin and Kevin Lee co-host
this monthly podcast in which their conversation weaves around all of the
burdens and absurdities of living with chronic health conditions, the former
with Hashimoto's Thyroid Disease and the latter with atrial fibrillation. Both
hosts live with conditions that could act up at any moment to cause pain,
or in the worst cases, a rush to the emergency room. As threatening as
their conditions may seem — Tobin's immune system is attacking her own
thyroid gland, whilst Lee's heart could beat out of rhythm as the result of the
most mundane triggers like drinking cold beverages — throughout the first
episode that the two co-hosts dip into a humourous tone from time to time
whilst talking about their conditions. They do not make jokes just to keep the
audience engaged; the humour is part of a larger process of unburdening
themselves and resisting the notion that people with chronic conditions
should always be on edge and stressed. For example, Lee emphasizes how
8I0S   H3MMU8 j   9rtiXD|)DflI 19bl032J0
important it is, "to enjoy our lives and to try to alleviate the anxiety, because
otherwise all your doing with being so intense about everything and trying
to be perfect" is trying to "erase [the] condition, which is impossible."
The co-hosts don't overpopulate Young and Sick with jokes, nor do
their jokes diminish the seriousness of living with chronic conditions. Tobin
and Lee often find humour when talking about situations that would be
otherwise insufferably frustrating. Often times, these instances have much
to do with the medical system and treatment rather than the conditions
themselves. For example, Tobin recalls discussing her severe hair loss with
a doctor whose prescription was, "You should just try Pantene!" Likewise,
the first time a syringe was plunged into him to calm his heart, Lee
remembers the nurse saying, "Fun fact, this was the drug that killed Michael
Jackson," and left without another word.
Tobin and Lee do an admirable job of empowering their listeners. Their
honest and intimate accounts of struggling through their chronic conditions
could be relieving for anyone who has to constantly deal with the health
care system. As Tobin says, it's nice to, "hear that other people have
similar days." Lee mentions near the end of the first episode that young
people generally don't think about mortality until it hits close to home.
For me, it was on a grubby couch while my friend told me how his illness
had disrupted his work and travel plans. I didn't know how to support him
well back then, and it will still be some time before I get the hang of it.
For listeners with chronic illnesses as well as those who seek to support
them, the first episode of Young and Sick Podcast ought to be an insightful
40-minute experience and I look forward to hearing more from these two
thoughtful and funny hosts. — Jong Lee
• • • • •
BOOKS
Jen Currin
HIDER/SEEKER
(Anvil Press)
April  30,   2018
Hiding from the people who project onto us, finding freedom in the
people who enlighten us. We are a broken people, some more than
others. Some hide, some seek, some find.
In this debut collection of fiction penned by Vancouver author Jen Currin,
the reader is taken through a rapid-fire series of lives coming together and
unraveling, relationships budding and breaking, self awareness developing,
and the hard realities met along the way.
There is a thread of yearning that binds these stories together. Between
tales of deceit and weakness are pillars of strength and meditative silence.
As often as the characters in Hider/ Seeker are searching for peace and
spiritual meaning, others are simply looking to numb their pain through
substance or relationship addiction. Take for instance Mikio in "Up the
Mountain," who is on their way to a meditation retreat. Somewhat frozen in
fear and with unease in their heart they embark on this journey into silence,
met with distractions and annoyances along the way, but it isn't until a
ghostly visit from a long lost parent that the fear starts to melt away.
There is a satisfying sense of closure within most of these stories,
whether it be the two ex-partners attempting a second go and realizing
it just won't work, the trials of substance abuse, the peace
found amidst distraction, and even the morbid tale of three
sisters finding their way through years of abuse. This
collection of stories shows us how we hide and seek our way
through life.
Currins wordplay is beautiful and clever, drawing the
reader in with an easy and relatable grace. Her largely
LGBTG2S+ characters are as strong willed as they are fragile!
as they flirt with death and each other, the mystery of spirit,
the need for spiritual retreat, and the facing of harsh reality.
We are, after all, a wounded people in search of our
personal answers and though these stories are works of
fiction, they speak with a very real voice. — Nathan Pike
APDIOPILE
RECORDS & CD's
EST. 2001
ANNIVERSARY
SAT. JULY 2IST & SUN. JULY 22ND
20% Olf New
and
40% on Used
Choose from an absolutely massive selection
of new and used records and CD's
2016 COMMERCIAL DRIVE
VANCOUVER, BC V5N 4A9
PHONE 604-253-7453
WWW.AUDIOPILE.CA
i\n £vening 1n VomoMM
Experience traditional Syrian food, dance and song while meeting the Syrian
newcomers to Canada and their sponsors, and supporting a noble cause.
**«
Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre
Tuesday, July 31, 7pm - 10pm
cash bar
Media Sponsor
Tickets available at eveningindamascus.com
UNDER REVIEW
15
 f
^SS^QtiSfe^-^
HEXISTENTIAL
PRESENTED BY,.
CiTR 101.9FM/DISCORDER MAGAZINE & PANOSPRIA
AUGUST 24/25
*&
:«^"
^WOLFEYES   NADJA
-  MAJEURE
THE NAUSEA^i^t^iSSA    DEVOURS
V VECKER ENSEMBLE    SH!TLOR[#UCKEtiMAN
HQLZKOPF/BOTFLY    PSYCHIC POLLUTION
_ SCANT INTONE W.FRANQblS HOULE    MIDDEN
KAMIKAZE NURSE    CHARIOT CONTAINING LIFE
;I8    BODY BREAK    PlSYCHEblEl^Ar^i^
Witht visuals by Erica Lapadat-Janzen    ^"
^  RED GATE REVUE STAGE   tickets available at
1601 JOHNSTON STREET, VANCOUVER BC     RED||||^ASTING%JVENSI ^
MORE INFO AT Y   WsTENTIALFESlm.COM      & h ENTIALFESTIVAL.BANDCAMP.COM
Proceeds from this event will be donated to the Kettle Society
l\D ISCORMRl
LN.fffb
m    •    %    %
•   •   • •
•   •   •  • •
••TO/
•„• •-.
%% • .
The Kettle Socie
 8I0S   YAM i   9niSDgDfn 19bl032i0
OUTAH
IN THE MUSIC VIDEO FOR LIES "CANT GET
ENOUGH, "THREE SHABBILY-DRESSED
PUNK ROCK BROS ARE LYING IN
SEPARATE BEDS, fully clothed, before rising in
unison and ambling towards a smoke-filled lie show. Each
band member singles out one of the men and lures them to the
stage, completely enthralled and zombie-fied. A moment later,
they're tied up in chains as the members of lie stand overhead,
laughing mercilessly and even chucking a beer can at one of
them.
It's a bizarre, almost surreal video and even the band
isn't too sure what's going on, since the video's director,
Katayoon Yousefbigloo, came up with its concept. But it's
also a wickedly funny clip, thanks to its campy aesthetic and
vintage VHS-camcorder quality. The band starts laughing
when I bring it up.
"We just wanted to do something that was
a little more lighthearted, because a lot of our
content and our past videos have been heavy
material," explains Brittany West, one of lie's
vocalists and bassist.
What it does have in common with
the rest of lie's oeuvre is its exploration
into power dynamics, which have long
been a point of focus for this dark
punk band. As they explained in an
interview with Discorder in 2014, lie
approach themes of power, violence
and oppression not through preaching about what's good or
bad, but by laying out fragments of grotesque situations for
listeners to judge accordingly. The world they create is a cold
one — threats are uttered, deception is lauded and violence is
depicted — but there are no clear morals or narratives for a
listener to fall back on.
"I like for people to be able to interpret things their own
way and get what they need out of it," says West. For Ashlee
Luk, lie's co-vocalist and guitarist, this form of songwriting
often involves taking the perspective of oppressors.
"Writing from that perspective can sometimes be therapeutic. [It] can allow you to work through things from a
different angle, and also to challenge the existing power
structures from not such an obvious point of view," they
say. "If [people] are [listening] from the viewpoint of the
oppressor, [they can] see how ridiculous it is from that angle."
It's a technique lie employ throughout their new
record, Hounds, which is co-released by Mint Records
and Monofonus Press on July 7. Recorded in the
sweltering heat of Austin, Texas, it's a
blistering record that sees the
band moving away from
the jagged post-punk of their previous releases into a sound
that's louder, faster and grimier. Highlights include the
aforementioned "Can't Get Enough" and "Ethics," a 300-BPM
romp that features some of their tightest musicianship and
catchiest melodies yet.
Ofter signing to Mint earlier this year, lie reissued their
2014 album, Consent, which dived deep into themes
of violence and power. As its title would suggest,
sexual assault is explicitly explored — on "Sorry," the band
confronts an abuser and coldly echo his defences as guitars
screech in the background. In lieu of cultural events such
as #MeToo that have pushed sexual assault to the cultural
forefront, Luk says that they have been thinking back to
Consent.
"At the time that album came out, it wasn't in the
conversation," they say. "And now it's being
addressed: people are being taken seriously,
and as a community we're working towards
trying to create safer environments. [But]
that doesn't necessarily mean it's anything more
than talk."
"And now we just talk about it, doesn't mean
that much has changed," chimed in Kati J, lie's
drummer.
West expressed a similar frustration: "-[Consent]
is just a compilation of women's experiences
and things that have always gone on, and it's
frustrating that it takes this long [for others to listen]."
In the years since Consent, lie released another album,
Truth and Consequences (2016), and toured "pretty much
everyf Ask A Punk' venue across North America," as
their press release puts it. The band loves touring, despite its
discomforts.
"You don't get much sleep, you're crammed in a car and
you're eating shit and you're drinking every night and
you're sleeping on floors and you get sick," West says. "But
it's great because you're working in community
with these amazing, talented people and
everyone's very hospitable. You're
seeing what's going on
in every city and
you get to
experience a city in a different way, where you're connecting
right at the roots immediately."
Swimming also takes up a chunk of lie's schedule. They try
to sneak in a swim every day on tour, and they capped off the
recording sessions for Hounds in a nearby Austin river, where
the water was brown and bathwater hot. "There are tires
floating by, everyone's catfishing in their clothes, drinking
beer [and] there are bugs everywhere," explains West. "It was
an authentic Texan experience."
Six years and four albums since the band formed in 2012,
the creative spirit that drives lie's seething punk snowstorms
shows no signs of slowing down: this summer, they're
planning to embark on an East Coast tour, film another
music video and write another record.
"Get the arms nice and buff, Kati, fcause we're going two
times faster," says West.
ft
lie is playing an album release party in Vancouver with Body
Break, minimalviolence and J.S. Aurelius on July 7 at 333.
Hounds is available for stream and purchase at
lievancouver.bandcamp.com.
 Discorder magazine | SUMMER 2018
no Fun FicTion
THE GOD STORY
words by Mack Gordon // illustrations by Mundane Cartoons
"FROM THE TIME I WAS ABOUT FIVE YEARS OLD
I went to Sunday school everyday.
Grandma Kelly taught Sunday school.
It was mandatory.
I don't know for how long. But it was a long time I thought.
"From the time I was about five years old
Grandpa Bob always had a fly rod and a sleeping bag in the back of his car.
And his hunting knife. His old hunting knife. I wish I knew where it was.
"He would come early in the morning and get me out of bed.
She knew it was happening. Sometimes she'd come along and stuff a sandwich in
Otherwise we would just go. And we might be gone for two or three days.
"All we had was a sleeping bag and a fishing rod and his hunting knife.
Sometimes he would have a can of beans or a can of spaghetti.
He had mars bars in the glove box that he would eat like crazy because he was a diabetic.
When I was 12,1 remember having my first beer with him.
Lucky Lager which is what I thought that you guys were drinking.
"Driving down the road drinking my one first beer and I remember how good it tasted.
He'd drive down these roads and we'd get to where a creek would cross.
We'd walk down the creek eight, ten hours, and you'd fish all along the way,
catching the brook trout.
"Then we'd camp someplace up in the creek. In the arch wilderness.
Camp, spend the night, and in the morning walk, fishing the holes all the way back.
I can remember going up the creeks -
I've got all my stories mixed up here but I can remember the ties.
"We would live off the land.
Grandpa was really good at that.
He'd make stinging-nettle salads.
I've eaten fresh water clams. I ate frog's legs once.
We found this acre, it was huge, a pond. It was black with tadpoles.
Just some of the most exciting stuff I've ever seen. Just fascinating stuff.
"He knew where all the game trails were and what the animals were that were on them.
Grandpa Jack had taught Dad. He was a very very accomplished wilderness man.
There were old pictures of Dad and him out hunting deer on horseback.
"But anyway, when we were babies, my dad always suffered from hemorrhoids.
They were living up in North Vancouver, up in Dollarton actually, on the peninsula, and
they didn't have any money.
He always blamed his hemorrhoids on the fact that he'd come home from work and have to go
out in the row boat and fish for cod for dinner that night. That was when Colleen was born.
He'd always blame sitting on that hard wooden bench, out in the cold, as the cause of his
hemorrhoids.
"But anyway, we would eat so many things.
He would make traps to catch birds.
I was with him once when he threw his old hunting knife at a grouse and it went right
through its breast and stuck to a tree.
Cook the frogs on sticks.
Of course we always had trout.
And there was always something green to go with it. God only knows what I ate.
I've got tons of stories of being with him.
"Did you ever hear the story about the first time I asked my dad about God?
The first time I can ever remember having a conversation about God I was five years old.
Lying on the banks of the Similkameen River near Cherryville.
It was absolute wilderness. Remind me and I'll tell you another story about that wilderness.
We were there and we were sleeping and I was in a sleeping bag and I was five years old.
And I would sleep with him in the sleeping bag, he would just hold me.
We'd sleep under the stars.
Or else he was great at cutting cedar fronds or fir branches and making beds and making
lean-tos and stuff like that.
But anyways, there we were on the banks. I remember asking, "Dad, what's God?"
And I remember clear as day him saying:
'You know I used to ask your grandmother that all the time
and Granny told me that God was everything.
God was our dog Queenie. God was the clothesline. God was the tree outside.
God was the flowers and God was the cactus plant on the window sill.'
Granny always had a cactus plant on the window sill.
"And my dad went on, 'You know it's funny, because I'll tell you what happened,
she said God was the cactus plant so I started to celebrate God as the Cactus plant.
Pray to the cactus plant. Speak to the Cactus plant. Because I thought it was God.
And one day the Cactus plant died and my God was gone.'
"And it's funny because I went to Sunday school for ten years
and in all that time I can't remember a single story told by a preacher.
But I remember that like it was yesterday."
ft
Mack Gordon is a Canadian writer and performer. His plays have been produced across Canada.
Published work includes, "Whistle Like the Wind" (carte blanche magazine), The Only
Difference Between Me and Peter Bogdanovich (Speakeasy Theatre Press) and Six Fine Lines
(Level-Headed Friends). He also runs a Family Feud Night at the Biltmore Cabaret that you can
catch on July 19. You can learn even more at medium.com/@mackgord and mackgordontheatre.com.
Cinematheque /Me,mu
AtmaAtS-23
coVtitfltiioti, afowd, and (he
www.theCinematheqih
18
OPENING NIGHT
Ruday,. AtujitAt3}td
■  Recjeptim and' Refym/utwutA,
OUT OF TINE PA ST
and CRISS CROSS
88.82021 straight
no fun fiction i The   God  Story
  Oil THE AIR
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
words by Jake Clark // photo by Madeleine Kleen //
illustrations by Ahkila Varghese
44
w
e're always on, always
wheeling and dealing," says
Tristan Wheeler. Beside
him, his co-host, Jack Lamming, points
out the relevance of the name fWheeler' in
this light. In unison, they give out with a
sardonic "aaahhh" of revelation. Although
this interview takes place in a cramped
Kitsilano kitchenette rather than CiTR's
soundproofed booth, they easily convey
the chummy chemistry of their
Friday evening show, Radio Pizza
Party.
Since March 2017, Lamming
and Wheeler have been putting
out weekly installments of
semi-improvised character
comedy, with topics ranging from
styles of radio voices to musings
on the province of Ontario.
In-character, Wheeler remarks,
"We like hearing the sound of
our own voices and we like it
when other people hear that too."
With a chuckle, Lamming adds,
"Basically, we just like talking and
bullshitting."
The two met as first-year
roommates at the University
of Victoria and transferred to
UBC-Vancouver after one year,
arriving at CiTR in September
2017. ("We just didn't like the
island," says Lamming.) They had
experimented with pitches for
the show, although its presentation and tone would change significantly
before its on-air debut seven months later.
The show's title, Radio Pizza Party, is a
misnomer, considering CiTR's no-food-in-
the-studio rule.
Originally, the show's topic was to be
chosen from a hat and discussed with
in-studio guests, but Lamming and Wheeler
quickly realized that the discussion tended
to meander into personal anecdotes. While
these diversions were an issue for a talk show
format, they recognized the potential for
comedy: "A lot of the time it would just be
free-associated conversation, which was just
not that fun to listen to. There's enough of
that out there," says Lamming, adding, "We
decided to go with [the personae of] college
radio DJs who are really bad at their jobs, and
just come up with dumb ideas every week."
However, for two full-time students -
Lamming in History, Wheeler in English —
coming up with the sort of slyly silly prompts
for Radio Pizza Party is more demanding
than it sounds. The show's format has grown
to emphasize improvisation and bringing
in a new topic every week was challenging at
the outset, with the first few months putting
strain on Lamming and Wheeler to keep the
improv material cogent.
"As the show has evolved, we've been able
to find a format that is really malleable and
one that we can adapt to nearly any topic
quite easily," says Lamming. Wheeler adds,
"Sometimes we'd go for weeks where we
wouldn't have really planned that much and
the show would suffer for that reason."
Radio Pizza Party's cheerful absurdity
hinges on the self-aware awkwardness of
improv comedy, with many featuring an
idiosyncratic fguest,' usually portrayed by
friends Nick Morgan or Ben Flynn.
Segments are usually introduced with
brief and surreal theme songs, described by
Lamming as "15 seconds of a Flight of the
Conchords song" created by Wheeler and
Morgan on Audacity, open-source audio
software. Wheeler jovially remarks that "a
lot of segments exist just to do the theme
song for them." Another running gag
is their news segment, where the two
bandy around a headline in a parody
of self-important commentators.
Wheeler, who credits the podcasts,
Comedy Bang! Bang! and R U Talkirt
R.E.M. RE: ME? as influences for the
tone of Radio Pizza Party, describes
the humour as "post-juvenile." A
fitting example is their self-described
strangest prompt, "That's Gross." The
theme for the segment combined the
sound of mac n' cheese being stirred
with a Harrison Ford soundbite from
Star Wars: The Force Awakens — at
that point the highest-grossing movie
in history — as a preface to a series of
riffs on various unsettling things.
Future ambitions for the show are
modest, with both hosts expressing
an interest in a reporter-on-the-street
segment, although for two undergraduates on the verge of their fourth
year of university, the time it would
take to record and edit this segment
has left the project still unrealized.
Over the next year, at least, they will
continue their Beckettian bonhomie on
the airwaves, welcoming the weekend with
Friday evenings full of twisty, erratic and
sonically surprising humour.
ft
You can tune into Radio Pizza Party every
Friday from 6-7:30pm on CiTR 101.9FM
in Vancouver or online at citr.ca. Visit past
episodes at citr.ca/radio/radio-pizza-party.
Discorder magazine | SUMMER 2018
OF
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
You get discounts at these
FRIENDS OF CiTR + DISCORDER locations.
m n i n
ANTISOCIAL
SKATEBOARD SHOP
*10% off
THE BILTMORE CABARET
* 10% off at the bar
DANDELION RECORDS
S EMPORIUM
* 10% off used records
EASTVAN GRAPHICS
*10$ off
EAST VANITY PARLOUR
* 10% off any service
FAS IN FRANK
*15% off
LUCKY'S BOOKS S
COMICS
*10% off
NEPTOON RECORDS
*10% off
RAG MACHINE
*10% off
RED CAT RECORDS
*10% off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
*A free DIY button with
any purchase over $5.
The Regional
TRUE VALUE VINTAGES
I FOUND GALLERY
*10% off
WOO VINTAGE CLOTHING
*10% off
THE WALLFLOWER
MODERN DINER
eommeRcuiL
AUDIOPILE RECORDS
*10% off
BOMBER BREWING
*10% off
BONERATTLE MUSIC
* 10% off of accessories
THE CANNIBAL CAFE
* 10% off
non-alcoholic items
HIGHLIFE RECORDS
*10% off
JO CLOTHING LTD.
*10% off
MINTAGE
*10% off
PEOPLE'S CO-OP
BOOKSTORE
*10% off
THE RIO THEATRE
* $2 off regular Rio ^
Theatre movies
/ select events
STORM CROW TAVERN
BEAT STREET RECORDS
* 10% off used records
THE CINEMATHEQUE
* One small bag of
popcorn per person
per evening.
DEVIL MAY WEAR
* 10% off
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
S ART EMPORIUM
* 10% off
THE PINT PUBLIC HOUSE
* 20% discount to
guests on food bill
SIKORA'S CLASSIC
RECORDS LTD.
* 10% off of Merchandise
VINYL RECORDS
* 10% of New and Used
AUSTRALIAN
BOOT COMPANY
* 15% off Blundstone and
& R.M. Williams Boots
THE BIKE KITCHEN
* 10% off new parts &
accessories
BANYEN BOOKS fi SOUND
* 10% off
FRESH IS BEST
ON BROADWAY
* 15% off
GRANVILLE
ISLAND BREWING
* 10% off food / 10% on
merchandise (not beer)
KOERNER'SPUB
* 10% off food
ON THE FRINGE
HAIR DESIGN
* 10% off
RUFUS GUITAR SHOP
* 10% new instruments
and accessories.
STORM CROW ALEHOUSE
* 10% off
TAPESTRY MUSIC
* 10% off in-stock
music books
UBC BOOKSTORE
* 10% off general
merchandise(clothing,
giftware, stat ionery,
general     bOOkS ) "Exceptions apply.
9 ®
20
o^ & e r
BOOK WAREHOUSE
*10% off
BAND MERCH CANADA
*15% off
PANDORA'S BOX
REHEARSALSTUDIOS
* 10% off Hourly
Studio Rentals
ON the airiRadio Pizza Party
(VISIT:
CiTR
. Ca/friends
for more  info. )
 OT M&3
xxj
fx^
Lru u
UU      VXJ
DPu
•DISCORDER MAGAZINE  RECOMMENDS  LISTENING  TO  CiTR EVERY DAY!'
SPonfcap
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
TRANCENDANCE
GHOST MIX
Cuetfmp
PACIFIC PICKIN1
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
ROOM TONE
SYNCHRONICITY
PARTS UNKNOWN
VANCOUVER PQDSHQW
2UEER FM
YOUR NEW SHOW
MORNING AFTER SHOW
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
ft2ietmc£t>ap
CiTR GHOST MIX
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
POP DRONES
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
YOUR NEW SHOW
BB*S DISCO PARTY
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
KEW IT UP
GOODIE
YOUR NEW SHOW
DEMOCRACY WATCH    ALL ACCESS PASS
Cfcurittap
CiTR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
YOUR  NEW  SHOW
JFrftap
AURAL TENTACLES
CANADALAND
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
U DO U RADIO
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
K-POP CAFE
YOUR NEW SHOW
MIXTAPES WITH
MC & MAC
THE REEL WHIRLED
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
TOO DREAMY
ASTROTALK
THE SPENCER LATU
SHOW
SHOES ON A WIRE
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
£>atur&ap
CiTR GHOST MIX
THE SATURDAY EDGE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
POWTTR   rHORT)
CODE  BLUE
£>tm&ap
CiTR GHOST MIX
YOUR NEW SHOW
SHOOKSHOOKTA
THE ROCKERS SHOW-
LA FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
5 PM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
INTO THE WOODS
ARTS REPORT      DEMOCRACY WATCH
WORD ON THE STREET
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6 PM
FINDING THE FUNNY
YOUR NEW SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW-
FLEX YOUR HEAD
7 PM
THE
MEDICINE
SHOW
EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
SAMSQUANCH'S
HIDE-AWAY
8 PM
MIX CASSETTE
CRIMES & TREASONS
9 PM
YOUR NEW SHOW
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
NINTH WAVE
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
FLASHBACK
w/ ALEC
CHRISTENSEN
NO DEAD
AIR
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
Cl RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SKALDS HALL
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL
CANADA POST ROCK
COPY / PASTE
CiTR GHOST MIX
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
TRANCENDANCE
10 PM
11PM
RANDOPHONIC
THE AFTN SOCCER
SHOW
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
o
hey, this kind of cell means this show is hosted by students
They are also highlighted in the spot colour on the guide,
you can't miss it.
 ■ monody
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM, ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8AM-11 AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththebrowns
@hotmail.com
ROOM TONE
11AM-12PM, TALK/MOVIES/
SOUNDTRACK
Room Tone is a talk show
focused on Filmmaking that
invites guests weekly to
discuss their slices of reality
on set, tips, past/future
projects and love for the craft!
From Directors/Producers, to
Cinematographers, Production
Designers, Actors, Composers,
Writers, Editors... anyone!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B in spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail. com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
VANCOUVER PODSHOW
3PM-4PM,TALK
Tune in every week to hear new
local podcasts showcased.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
GOODIE
4PM-4:30PM, TALK / INTERVIEW
Goodie is an interview show
with the do-gooders who are
using business, innovation
and creativity to make positive
change in the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
6pm-6:30pm, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television, along
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks,
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ Tutsnay
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
8AM-10AM, talk/politics
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver,
Queer FM features music,
current events, human interest
stories and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmail. com
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM, rock/ pop / indie
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music,
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter \ @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY/
DISABILITY
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communitylivingradio@gmail.com
3'S DISCO PARTY
TUES 3PM-4PM, MULTIGENRE / SALT
/SNARK
Guaranteed, you've never
been to a disco like this
before. Discorder Magazine's
Editor-in-Chief, Brit Bachmann
plays a hot selection of music
featured in the current issue,
representing every genre
from hip hop to experimental.
Some of it you'll love, some
of it you'll love to hate. To
paraphrase Donna Summer,
"God had to create [Discorder]
so [BB] could be born and be
successful." This is the show
you've been waiting your
whole lives to listen to. | Art by
Ricky Castanedo-Laredo and
theme music by The Misc.
Contact: Twitter\ @DiscorderMag
TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/LOCAL NEWS
Tune in for a rebroadcast
of last week's episode of
Democracy Watch.
Contact: Twitter\ @CITRnews
TUES 5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope,
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
8PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles,
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels,
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons. com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ urcstrcstiAU
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• ij^^^^^^|ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/ POP
Jayden targets audiences in the
Korean community in Vancouver
to introduce the News on
Korea, Korean Culture while
comparing other Asian Cultures,
playing all kinds of Korean
Music(K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie,
R&B,etc),talking about popular
trends in the industries of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows,
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave
or Hallyu), the news about
Korean Entertainment Industry,
what's going on in the Korean
Society here in Vancouver and
conversations with guests.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
2PM-3PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
third season! This team of
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
folks produce a weekly show
on Indigenous issues, current
affairs, entertainment, culture
and news - all centering
Native voices. Come make
Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Follow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves
KEW IT UP
3PM-4PM, experimental/talk
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica,
Post-Punk, Industrial,
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
4PM-5PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
POLITICS
CiTR Accessibility Collective's
new radio show. We talk
about equity, inclusion, and
accessibility for people with
diverse abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every week
for interviews, music, news,
events and awesome dialogue.
Contact:
accessibilitycollective@citr.ca
• ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC,
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm,
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins,
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM,
ECLECTIC/LIVE INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vancouvermedicineshow@gmail.com
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too) and relished in the merging
of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM, HIP hop/ r&b/ soul
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains,
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes,
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURStlAU
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM,TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
thurs, 8am-8:30am, talk/comedy/
social obeservations
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society, shown through social
observational comedy. To boot,
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new,
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com,
@tima_tzar,
facebook. com/RocketFromRussia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM, ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat,
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners an
introduction to music &
entertainment in Asian Cultures,
especially, Korean, Japanese
and Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, TALK/SCIENCE
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SPENCER LATU SHOW
3PM-4PM, talk/ political commentary
The Spencer Latu Show is a
progressive politics show that
speaks truth to power. We
provide much needed coverage,
and media criticism of stories
at the municipal, provincial,
national and international
level from the perspective of
two progressive working class
students; Spencer Latu and
Ajeetpal Gill. We are based
out of UBC in Vancouver BC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOES ON A WIRE
4PM-5PM, rock/pop/indie
Reworked as a music show
with the occasional sprinkle of
commentary, Shoes On A Wire
is back. As always, stories,
interviews, and hot takes will
make an appearance, but
mostly you'll hear sweet tunes.
Contact:
Twitter \ @shoesonawirepod
Instgram | @Staunchjitters
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
• FLASHBACK WITH ALEC
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30,
TALK/MUSIC/ARTS & CULTURE
Each episode, join host Alec
Christensen and friends
as they discuss the pop
culture and politics affecting
Vancouver and beyond.
Contact: Twitter | flashbackalec
NO DEAD AIR
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30,
JAZZ FUSION / POST ROCK
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion,
experimental electronic and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook \ NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
THURS 7:30PM-9PM, HIP hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ TKIDAU
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance,
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
87AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news,
politics and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse@canadalandshow.com
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery and a 'lil dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@gmail. com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP/SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on each other
and leave mix tapes and love
letters in each other's lockers xo
Contact:
Facebook | @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CITR'S 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
http://nardwuar.com/rad/contact/
• WORD ON THE STREET
5pm-6pm, rock/indie/pop
Hosted by the Music Affairs Collective, every episode is packed with
up-to-date content from the Lower
Mainland music communities including news, new music releases,
event reviews and upcoming events,
interviews with local musicians and
industry professionals and discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming® citr.ca
6pm - 7:30PM, talk/comedy
Every week Jack, Tristan and
a special guest randomly
select a conversation topic
for the entire show; ranging
from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming® citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30pm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
national
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and future.
This includes jazz, soul,
hip-hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
There are also interviews
with local and international
artists. Truly, a radio show
with international flavour.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings,
poetry recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock,
drone, ambient, experimental,
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
■ SATURtlAy
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
i2:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise,
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citrlatenightsho w@gmail. com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music,
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum,
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena,
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks,
blues and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, electronic/mantra/
NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats,
music, chants and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact:
mantraradioshow@gmail. com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7PM-8PM, experimental/ambient/
CHILLWAVE
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy,
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker,
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmail.com
SOCA STORM
8PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
Papayo!! #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
8bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79. We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ sutraay
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM, INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock,
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmail.com,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM, ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds,
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmail. com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, ELECTRONIC/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver,
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmileymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points,
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
1 isumtrf
LOSTTOyS
Marks any show that is
produced primarily by students.
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citr.ca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9FM JUNE CHARTS
Dumb
Jo Passed*+#
Kellarissa*+#
Dusted
Swim Team*+#
Parlour Panther*+#
Lindi Ortega*#
The Submissives*#
The Huaraches*
Scum Laude*+#
Seeing Green
Their Prime
Ocean Electro
6\mmmmmi!mmsi
|    ft|     |     Christina Vantzou*#
T
T
|        Blackout Summer        |
|    CiTR Pop Alliance Vol 5   j
Hot Magic
Liberty
Pining for a Boy
\Curl Up With The Huaraches\
Scum Laude
No. 4
^    1J2    i Champion Lawnmower*+#|
I    oZlAdrian Teacher and The
Subs*+#
Babies
Anxious Love
High Plains*+
C/Tfl Pop Alliance Vol 5   j
I    <i^    1     Aus*iM^ *..«i~..~™*       1  Hot Blood & A House For \
y    US    |    shitlord fuckerman*+    | . wpad
I    US    I Nice Apple/Cruel Sport*+#|    Cruel Apple Nice Sport    J
^      p-I
•s I?
*J  T^
^ rt
00     _f
fc a
F-J U U
a $ o
REAL RENT CONTROL
in B.C.
what is real rent control? It's called vacancy control,
and it means NO raising the rent between tenants or
landlords.
.ction on Poverty I Real Simple
Head to
to take action
tsunion.ca/realrentcontr
Vancouver,
Tenants
Union
SVJBSCR/Bf
W9P"
I WOULD LIKE AN
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION
(that's $20cnd For Canada, $25cnd for U.S.A.)
I WOULD LIKE TO
SUPPORT DSSCO^DE®
WITH A DONATION
(hey, thanks!)'
T0TAL:J>
Send this form with some cold hard cash or a cheque to:
DISCORDER MAGAZINE, LL500- 6133 UNIVERSITY BLVD. VANCOUVER, B.C. V6T III
 AMem
Drr
V
UPCOMI
p
STEPHEN
MALKMUS
& THE
JICKS
SWEARIN'
CONCERTS
SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
July 7
WE ARE SCIENTISTS
Fox Cabaret
July 14
S. CAREY
Fox Cabaret
August 3
STEPHEN MALKMUS & THE JICKS
Rickshaw Theatre
August 9
GANG OF YOUTHS
Rickshaw Theatre
July 20
BLIND PILOT
Imperial
August 6
SWEARIN'
Fox Cabaret
August 11
DEAFHEAVEN
Imperial
August 31
ROLLING BLACKOUTS COASTAL FEVER
Fox Cabaret
July 28
VACATIONER
Biltmore
August 8
THIS IS THE KIT
Fox Cabaret
August 14
AMEN DUNES
Imperial
August 31
SUPERORGANISM
Imperial
August  14
BODEGA
Fox Cabaret
Sept  1
G0LDR00MK
Abitibi  Boat
Sept  9
ANDREW W.K.
Imperial
Sept  9
THE GROWLERS
Commodore Ballroom
Sept  10
TREVOR HALL
Imperial
Sept  12
ISLAND
Fox Cabaret
Sept 20
BIG THIEF
Imperial
Sept 23
JON HOPKINS
Imperial
Sept 24
PARQUET COURTS
Imperial
Sept 29
YUNGBLUD
Fox Cabaret
Oct  3
FLINT EASTWOOD
Fox Cabaret
Oct  4
THE CHURCH
Fox Cabaret
Sept 25
RYLEY WALKER
Wise Hall
Sept 30
ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER
Wise Hall
Oct 4
IDLES
Rickshaw Theatre
Sept 27   &  28
CHVRCHES
Commodore Ballroom
Oct 2
FIRST AID KIT
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Oct 4
SHANNON AND THE CLAMS
Wise Hall
Oct 7
TY SEGALL AND WHITE FENCE
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct 9 & 10
COURTNEY BARNETT
Vogue Theatre
I Tickets  & more  shows at   timbreconcerts.com

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0378942/manifest

Comment

Related Items