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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 2018-11-01

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254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
.
UPCOMING SHOWS
BGUILED DEBATE TRY-OUTS
RAYGUN COWBOYS
GRRL, CAMPFIRE SHITKICKERS
NOV
SUN K yep
3
FU MANCHU
MOS GENERATOR
KORPIKLAANI
ARKONA
■AT THE BILTMORE:
ART D'ECCO ALBUM RELEASE
BORED DECOR
a •;?*•
THE MAIN EVENT URBAN
DANCE SHOWCASE
NOV
TEN FOOT POLE
v> ■
OFF BY AN INCH, RUSSIAN TIM
AND PAVEL BURES
NOV
ICEAGE & BLACK LIPS
SURFBORT
NOV
LUCKY CHOPS
6
WITH GUESTS
NOV
THESELECTER
7
DJ RHODA DAKAR
ALL THEM WITCHES
HANDSOME JACK
DEAPVALLY
CANDACE, DOPEY'S ROBE
WEDNESDAY 13
ROADRASH, 2 SHADOWS
UNDER BAD INFLUENCE
TOUR UBIQUITOUS, JOEY COOL,
THE PALMER SQUARES & MORE
HAKEN& LEPROUS
BENT KNEE
■AT SBC: GUTTER DEMONS
IN THE WHALE, THE SHIT TALKERS
NOV
THIS WILL DESTROY YOU
CLARICE JENSEN
INTHEWHALE
DESERT DWELLERS
KAMINANDA
NOV
NOV
r i
MATTHEW DEAR (live)
WITH GUESTS
THE CONTORTIONIST
INTERVALS
NOV
PALAYEROYALE
BONES, DEAD POSEY
STIFF LITTLE FINGERS
THE MAHONES
Additional show listings, ticket info, videos & mi
WW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.C
blueprint
UPCOMING EVENTS
Nov 06
Nov 07
Nov 08
Nov 10
Nov 14
Nov 17
Nov 23
Nov 24
Dec 06
Dec 14
Dec 15
Dec 19
Jan 18
Jan 31
Feb 07
Feb 7/9
Feb 21
JACK HARLOW
JMASCIS
(OF DINOSAUR JR)
FORTUNE
IMPERIAL
AUTOGRAMM
NEEDLES//PINS
GHOSTEMANE
THE LAZYS
FORTUNE
FORTUNE
VENUE
YOUNG FATHERS
ALGIERS
LUCA FOGALE
VENUE
FOX CABARET
THE FLATLINERS
VENUE
GODFLESH
FREDDIE GIBBS
PREOCCUPATIONS
PROTOMARTYR
JAZZ CARTIER
TAGGART & TORRENS
ORPHEUM
KING TUFF
MONSTER TRUCK
SHAD
PLEASE CHECK OUT BPLIVE.CA
FOR ADVANCE TICKETS AND MUCH MORE
 TABLE Of COnTEIlTS
NOVEMBER 2018
COVER S SOFTIESHAN BY ALISTAIR HENNING.
ifeatutreff
07   -  ESSAY:   AN  OPEN  LETTER
TO WHITE STUDENTS IN NATIVE STUDIES AND QUEER STUDIES
08   -
ACTIVIS
ARCHIVE  RECOLLECTIVE
A conversation about in-house archiving strategies for
artist-run centres and Vancouver Independent Archives
Week
16 -   CAITLIN  FFRENCH
Local maker extraordinaire talks sustainability and
finding place in her practice
17 -  LORETTA  SETO
A playwright who understands the significant of face-to-face
interactions
18  -   IVORY
T
Monsters, birds, marshmallows and self-care; the gooey organics of
music-making
19   -   SOFTIESHAN
A powerful, but soft reshaping of space:
DJing towards inclusivity
Column* + £Dt&er 3>tuff
04  -  Campus Beat:
Social Justice  Centre
05 - Filmstripped:
Short  Circuit  Tour
06 -  Shelf Life:
An interview with
Sunny Nestler
10 - Real Live Action
ADVERTISE: Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To learn how
to get involved with Discorder
contact volunteer@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a
cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133
University Blvd. V6T1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute
Discorder in your business,
email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE: We are part of
CiTR, a registered non-profit,
and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you
love.To donate visit:
citr.ca/donate.
12
13
14
20
Music, mostly
Art Project
by John Pachkowsky
November 2018 Calendar
Under Review
music & films
The  Air:
Deliberate Noise
nform Discorder of an
ominq album release,
all relevant details 4-6
weeks in a '
Mallory Amirault,
Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
comments, complaints
21 -  CiTR Program Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 - October  Charts
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising
Coordinator: Audrey MacDonald // Discorder Student Executive: Fatemeh Ghayedi // Editor-in-Chief:
Mallory Amirault // Under Review Editor: Sydney Ball // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch //
Web Editor: Zoe Power //Art Director: Ricky Castanedo Laredo // Social Media Coordinator: Sydney
Ball // Accounts Manager: Halla Bertrand // Charts: Myles Black // Production Assistants: Savilla Fu,
Christina Dasom Song // Writers: Joy Astudillo, Joshua Azizi, Robyn Bowes, Issa Braithwaite, Katherine
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Jonathan Kew, Hannah Kruse, Aly Laube, Jamie Loh, Lexi Mellish Mingo, Lua Presidio, Jana Rolland,
Autumn Schnell, Judah Schulte, Chris Yee. // Photographers & Illustrators: Javiera Bassi de la Barrera,
August Bramhoff, Fatemeh Ghayedi, Zadrien Kokar, Alistair Henning, R.Hester, Matthew Lim, Jamie Loh,
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Ghayedi, Nick Jensen, Hannah Kruse, Zoe Power, Jana Rolland, Jasper D Wrinch.
©Discorder 2018 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR.
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemihem speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM.
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager©citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada
EDITOR'S NOTE
ello Discordian readers,
B^^k       As you all know, BB has been a tenacious and innovative Editor-in-Chief
^P  for the last three years at Discorder, amplifying its cultural content and
^ J    honouring our mandate. Truth be told, I've been slightly intimated taking
up the reigns as incoming editor. However, my hand has been held by the amazing
CiTR/Discorder staff and BB has been wonderfully supportive (like prepping the
content for this issue, for example- she's not quite done with us, yet!)
To introduce myself — I'm a born and raised Maritimer from Mi'kma'ki, Nova
Scotia, with Acadian and Mi'kmaq ancestry. My roots belong to a part of the province
called Yarmouth, the Kespukwitk district, which translates from Mi'kmaq as 'where
the land ends.' If you know a bit about the province, you might know that it is shaped
like a lobster. Essentially, what I'm trying to say is that I come from the ass of a lobster,
something that has come to make a lot of sense to me overtime and maybe in its own
way, will come to make some sense to you, too. (Particularly in the way of humour.
We'll see in the coming issues...)
In saying this, I want to take the opportunity to reiterate our mandate, which is to
provide a platform for voices that are frequently under or misrepresented, a mandate I
will be practicing rigorously.
As incoming editor, prioritizing Indigenous content will be a focus of mine, as well
as broadening our scope of how we are examining the Vancouver "local." I have a
tendency to seek out work that is experimental, politically driven and uncomfortable
and hope to continue developing the creative direction BB has bravely ventured
toward; I am truly excited to uncover the work that is ahead of us.
With that, allow me to tell you what to expect in this issue (thanks, BB!) This
November, you'll encounter a no bullshit letter to white students in Native and
queer studies classes; the inclusive softness of local Dj, Softieshan; an emphasis on
connectivity from playwright, Loretta Seto; the sustainable practices of artist, Caitlin
Ffrench; interviews with local musician, Ivory Towers, and multidisciplinary artist,
Sunny Nestler; and a look into the activist archival series, Recollective: Vancouver
Independent Archives Week.
Yours,
M'aritime  N'8V
SUBSCR/8£
tltSCORpFR
Send this form with some cold hard cash or a cheque to:
DISCORDER MAGAZINE, LLSOO- 6133 UNIVERSITY BLVD.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  V6T 1Z1
_
 Discorder magazine | NOVEMBER 201?
campus beat
SOCIAL JUSTICE CENTRE
words  by  Fatemeh Ghayedi  //  photo  by  Ciaran Scaaloa //   illustrations  by Emily  Valente
The Social Justice Centre grabbed
the attention of many at UBC at
the beginning of this academic year
with the little handbooks they were passing
around, titled "Resisting the University:
An Alternative Orientation." According to
Gabby Doebeli, one of the co-chairs of the
student club, the handbooks are part of a
broader mission to reframe the conversation
around social justice initiatives. "I feel like
common narratives around social justice are
that we're just angry people who are fighting
and raising our fists. This handbook is really
trying to reinvigorate old traditions and
Vl'/
/, ,.\
radical imaginings, and with this, comes a
broader frame of reference to tackle issues
and provide students with a safe campus.
Aside from providing resources, they also do
their own organizing around issues members
are interested in, such as the recent "B-Line
and Bike to the Ballot" event they hosted
to bring students together and vote in the
municipal election.
Obig focus of the group is community
building: within the SJC and
the UBC campus, but also more
generally across Vancouver and the
unceded, ancestral Indigenous land on
which it is situated. "From my impression,
campus is like a bubble that exists outside
of Vancouver," Gabby tells me, "so my
intention with the handbook was to break
that bubble and situate people who are
coming from all over the world and ground
them in relationships to the different people,
organizations, clubs and to the land that
they're on."
Going beyond that, they also want to be
a space where people feel like they belong,
can find others with similar ideas and build
collective power to work towards those
ideas. "I see [the SJC] as something that has
potential as a networking piece that connects
a lot of the different movements and initiatives on campus. [...] We've been thinking
of ways that we can provide students with
resources that are not just financial — like a
community where they feel their ideas around
social justice can be expressed, shared and
acted on," Jacob expresses.
The SJC's community focus is also apparent
in the organization's structure. They're proud
of the group's non-hierarchical nature, which
aims to create a genuine, safe environment
where everyone has equal say and where
your say is respected. The structure takes into
consideration how many marginalized folks
don't have a great relationship with authority
and may find it intimidating or inaccessible
to speak out for themselves. "The resource
groups are a space especially for marginalized
folks, so it's really important to organize this
way," says Gabby. The only thing co-chairs
are mandated to do is call meetings and ensure
they are taking place and they often help to
initiate or guide the conversation during the
meetings. "We try to envision ourselves as
a group that is critical of the existing status
quo and critical of legitimacies that power
structures claim. We definitely see a lot
of things that could change in the world.
It's important for us to be enacting and
practicing the change that we want to see,"
Jacob continues.
The co-chairs mention that over the
past couple of years turnout has been low,
which has led to the group performing with
reduced capacity. They are hoping to revive
the conversation around the potential of
social justice practices and welcome new
people into their weekly meetings. If you're
ever free and on campus on a Thursday
evening, you're more than welcome to come
to Room 2108 in the AMS Student Nest and
join in on the discussion of what our futures
should look like.
the space [..] to allow us to re-centre and
focus on what we actually want to see in the
world, rather than just resisting or reacting
to things."
The group has existed as a resource
centre at UBC since the events of the 1997
APEC summit, wherein the RCMP was
found to have employed excessive force
on students protesting the presence of
autocratic leaders. "Out of the protests
came a movement to fix some institutional
shell of an organization that would, into the
future, pool resources of students and have
those be accessible to students, in terms of
organizing, movement building and social
justice," says Jacob Fischer-Schmidt, the
group's other co-chair. The SJC describe
themselves as idealists who centre around
anti-oppressive, decolonial, feminist and
4
CAMPUS BEAT I Social Justice Centre
 8ios HaaMavon | snixogDm T9bioD8ia
fOISTRIPPED
SHORT CIRCUIT FILM FESTIVAL #PNW TOUR
words by Lua Presidio // illustrations by Zadrien Kokar
<^
<^?
This year, for the first time, Short Circuit Pacific Rim
Film Festival will be touring the Pacific Northwest
with eight screenings at Dawson City, Tofino,
Vancouver, Portland, Nanaimo, Salt Spring Island, Juneau
and Seattle. This is only the second year of the Pacific Rim
Film Festival — it was previously the Pacific Northwest
Film Festival, which ran for four years before expanding to
accept movies from over thirty countries in the Pacific
Rim region.
The regular festival, put on by the
CineVic Society of Independent
Filmmakers, occurs every May
in Victoria, BC, which includes
panel talks with filmmakers
and three sets of screenings
— one for BC films, one
for Pacific Rim Fiction
and one for Pacific Rim
documentaries. However,
this is the first time CineVic.
Society has created a
program of this magnitude',. '
the PNW tour will be limited-
to showing one screening
per location. Filmmakers are
encouraged to attend, and in
the case they are present, a Q&A
session will be added following the       ' •'.",'. J. . '. ." .■'. :'
films. Vancouver the only location hosting        "'••'•  ■_'■
a reception open to all ticket holders before the
screening on November 8, at the VanCity Theatre.
Each screening will consist of a nine short films
ranging in length from three to seventeen minutes
that deal with a variety of themes focusing on
regional relationships. The approaches of each film are
incredibly diverse and offer a wide representation of the
Pacific Rim filmmakers. Be it animation, documentary or
fiction, the shorts selected for the tour are the highlights
of this year's festival. Only Lions in Waiting, directed by
Vancouver's Jason Karman, is a new addition to the festival,
as it was not screened at the festival in May, but was part of
its shortlist.
One of CineVic's goals with the Short Circuit Tour is
to support artists and raise voices that are often under-
represented. Lions in Waiting deals with LGBTQ+ themes
through hockey, but is far from the only film in the circuit
directly connected to queer representation. Additionally, the
New Zealand short ,Tama, tells the story of a Maori Deaf
boy's journey to connect with his hearing family and was
directed by Jack O'Donnell and Jared Flitcroft who
is deaf. Of the twenty-eight films screened at
the 2018 Short Circuit Film Festival, these
nine shorts touring throughout the
PNW offer an exciting and intersectional slice of the Pacific Rim's
independent film community.
CineVic's Executive Director,
David Geiss, highlights the tour
as an opportunity to "extend
our organization's reach"
and "increase the diversity
in filmmakers and audience."
While the tour will only reach
.'••'.;'.' the PNW — as a means to go
• '.".•   back to the festival's roots and
•.':   make it accessible for the selected
movie's filmmakers who are mostly
ocated in the PNW region — there are
;' •' plans for even further expansion in the
future to include more Pacific Rim countries.
The Short Circuit #PNW Tour will be stopping in
Vancouver on Thursday, November 8 at the Vancity
Theatre. For more info and tickets, visit www. cinevic.cal
short-circuit-pnw-tour-2018/
CATS 191.3 FM+DI5C0RDER
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3 BANDS
HEAD TO HEAD TO HEAD
7:30 OH THURSDAYS at the
HflSTIH&S HILL BREHIH& CO.
NOVEMBER 1
M0N500N  MOON
GARDEN  MICE
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NOVEMBER 08
RUSSIAN   TIM  &  PAUEL  BURES
SPOUSE
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FILMSTRIPPED I Short   Circuit   Tour
5
_
 Discorder magazine | NOVEMBER 201?
SHELF LIFE
AN INTERVIEWWITH
SUNNYNESTLER
words  by  Judah Schulte  //  photos  by
August Bramhoff  //   illustrations  courtesy
of  Sunny  Nestler
Sunny Nestler is a multi-disciplinary
artist, teacher, and biology
enthusiast. Throughout their
decades-long practice, they have produced
works in a range of mediums including
illustration, sculpture, installation and
publishing. Hailing from Arizona, Nestler
has established themself as a strong presence
in Vancouver's DIY art scene with their
contributions to art book fairs, frequent
gallery shows and the creation of a course
at Emily Carr University that uses scientific
method to inform artistic expression.
Like many extraordinary things, Nestler's
creative practice began in an ordinary way.
"I started when everyone else did, like age
two or three," says Nestler, "but around the
time when the school system squeezes [the
art] out of you, I enrolled in drawing classes
at the senior centre in my neighborhood."
Their interest in biology was also began
in childhood. Having lived in New York
prior to moving to Arizona, young Nestler
and their mother would try to make the
dreary rain more interesting by looking
at samples of it through a microscope. "I
couldn't believe it. I thought is was so cool
that it was there, but I didn't even know."
Looking through that microscope sparked
in Nestler an insatiable curiosity for the
natural world. They spent their early years
attempting to cultivate moss samples on
their mother's dinner plates, poring over
the illustrations in their collection of field
guides and exploring the patches of green
between the rows of houses in their suburb.
Though they may have been unsuccessful
in cultivating the samples of moss, Nestler
succeeded in cultivating within themself
a sense of wonder. Never stopping to let
it diminish, the spirit of exploration that
graces every child was preserved within
their art.
Nestler's work is molecular and playful
Made of myriad different shapes and
symbols, they have created a whimsical
world that is full of colour and appears
to be multiplying right in front of you.
Whether it's sculpture, textiles, illustration or animation, Nestler's collection
gives the impression of looking through a
microscope that contains in it a portal to
another dimension. That is not to say it's
all fun and games. True to actual biological
processes, Nestler's work also emulates the
strangeness of growth and decay.
Cinematheque presents
f
em
CH9 8-15
SM^GS^m'-W
21** Annual
■■ m.i—Annual •
European Union
Film   Festival
* Eurep* without tht |<tlag! ™ >^-
* Nor 23-Dae 4 *
P
KEMMldSW
•mm,, ms 6
s^mTaaa & mm + mm
"Harmony Korine has
made at least three indisputable
masterpieces of modern
American cinema."
- Olivier Pere, Cinema Scope
www.theCinema
theque.ca | 1131 How*
e Street
erhaps the most famous and
frequently appearing microorganism in Nestler's repertoire is
the Coneworm. The Coneworm, or coneus
longissimus, is a creature composed of
two or more parking cones stacked on
top of each other. According to Nestler's
body of work, in which they can be seen
mutating in multicoloured clusters, they
are a thriving species. "I've always had this
practice of looking at the smallest possible
unit of something," says Nestler, "so, if
I'm drawing a tree, I'll draw a leaf a bunch
of times to make sure I understand the
structure of the leaf before I start the whole
tree. I'm really interested in the repeatability
of modular units, what happens when you
disconnect them from their original context
and then repeat them infinitely. I'm using
this drawing method that is a semi-comical
analog to genetic mutation, where DNA
reproduces in a certain way. It's a plus that
they're also just a really good repeatable
modular unit; they're stackable, bendable,
they segment and they reference this
mechanism of natural mutation but also the
synthetic world."
There are, sadly, some things that
Coneworms cannot do. One of those
things is self-publishing books of art.
For that, Nestler relies on their ten years
of experience. In that time, Nestler has
drawn, printed and bound several of
their own publications. Their most recent
work, Undergrowth, was on display at the
Vancouver Art Book Fair after five years
in the making. Nestler's creations not only
populate pages of their own design, but also
those of publications such as Swampcone
Magazine, the forthcoming edition of SAD
Mag and Discorder.
Many would say that science and art are
separate subjects and, most of the time, they
would be right. Nestler seeks to show us that
if you look very closely, like, say, through
a microscope, the two fields are very much
connected, and art, as a process of endless
creation and recreation, is mutation.
6
SHELF LIFE | Sunny   Nestler
 8ios HaaMavon | snixogDm ™ino38i<i
EflUfAH
AN OPEN LETTER TO ALL WHITE STUDENTS IN NATIVE STUDIES AND QUEER STUDIE
WORDS BY AUTUMN SCHNELL w. ILLUSTRATIONS BY ALEJANDRA SANMANIEGO
I'm sitting in a lecture hall on the UBC campus and crying. I'm crying, because sc
can be so hard, friendships can be so hard and being a human can be so hard. Especia
your skin is brown. Especially when your sexuality is unknown. Especially when
confusing. Life can be so much harder than the white, middle class, cisgender pe,
that are continuously prioritized.
I was brought up in a middle-class, mixed race home. We had money. We owned a boatT
doesn't equate to whiteness. I am still Gwich'in.
These classes are so theory-heavy, that we sometimes we forget Indigenous people are
alive. Indigenous people are at the grocery store with you, Indigenous people are sitting
beside you at the library and sometimes we drink the same unethical coffee as you, because
we like it. We're here. We don't all hare the same stories. We don't all hare that laugh.
We weren't all in foster care.
^Fhis is about you. This is about me. This is about your expectation of me. If you don't
expect me to be a "real Indian" accompanied by porerty and a rez accent, then you expect
me to be able to speak to my Indian experience. You expect me to tell you about all the
ster parents that my mom had, all the Indian tacos, the powwows and the sexual harassment
nd hypersexualization. If you don't expect that of me, you expect me to be able to sit
hrough courses and listen to you talk about my people from your colonial deficit model.
Yesterday I saw one of the most influential plays of my entire life. Kamloopa, written and
directed by Kim Harvey, is an Indigenous feminist play focused around 2 sisters who are
diasporic and trying to learn what their Indian is.
The reason this play was so influential is because it is, well, feminist. There are no
characters who are men, no lore stories, no gendered denouncing, simply a story that has
Indigenous women as leads. Though it was not at all simple.
They were so unapologetic. They were sharing Native jokes, talking in accents, talking
without accents. They were themselves. They were people. They were Native people.
Most people think I'm white. Most people think I'm straight. Most people think I'm cis.
When they find out I'm a queer Indigefemme, everything changes. Suddenly, I'm expected to
fill awkward silence in lecture, do the land acknowledgment and talk about my Indigenous
experience. I understand why this is. I understand why this space is made. The problem is
though - this space is not made, it is expected.
I understand that you want to learn. Unfortunately, the time to learn is not in this
lecture hall where you talk about my people as "uncivilized." I will share when I want to
and I won't share when I don't want to. Most people in lecture halls don't understand that.
I'm paying 550 dollars to be here and "learn" (whatever that means), I'm not paying to be
the lecturer. I'm paying for someone to supposedly lecture away my ignorance. Whatever
that means.
I don't care if you've "never met an Indigenous person before," I don't care if I'm
"not like the other ones," I don't care if I'm "smart and articulate," I don't care if
you "don't know where Treaty 11 is." Do a google search. Read some Chelsea Vowel. Look at
#nativetwitter. I'm not here to debunk your pseudo-Indian stereotypes. I'll educate you
when you pay me a salary.
Today, I'm emotionally drained and I'm sitting in a lecture hall with 70 other students
learning about Indigenous food sovereignty when there are (estimated) 300 homeless people
in my hometown, with a population of 3200. That's 10%. 10% of the population is homeless.
My mom texted me the other day that a thanksgiving Turkey is 100 dollars in Inuvik. T
same turkey in Metro Vancouver is 25-35 dollars. That is 4x inflation.
My people are starving.
My people are dying.
This colonial abuse is happening right now while I'm sitting here in this lecture hall.
Colonial institutions will never actually give a fuck about me.
So, no,
Today,
today I will not answer your questions. Today, I will not let you make me cry.
I will not allow for your white fragility to guilt me or permeate my thoughts.
Today, I will not consider you or allow for your settler futurity. Today, I
will go home and tell my mom that I love her. Today, I will burn sweetgrass.
Today, I will listen to Jeremy Dutcher and drink tea with my nehiyaw best
friend.
Today, you are not deserving of my time.
A
_
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | NOVEMBER 2018
ACTIVISM
ART & ARCHIVES
RECOLLECTIVE
WORDS AND PHOTOS BY TAMIE LOH // ILLUSTRATION BY ALISON SADLER
>~~7W\ RCHIVES LINK PEOPLE TOGETHER
V       I   from all generations — long-gone communities
■        I   of social movements in the past, new audiences
\J I   engaging with archival material for the first time
and future audiences-to-be. These multi-layered, multi-generational experiences and engagements form the core of
Recollective: Vancouver Independent Archives Week.
In anticipation of this year's Vancouver Independent
Archives Week, I sat down with two of the people behind
the event, Project Coordinator, Emma Metcalfe Hurst and
Archives Manager, Dan Pon, based at grunt gallery, to get
an inside look at what Recollective has to offer.
Recollective is the third iteration and a reinvention of
Vancouver Independent Archives Week, which runs out
of grunt gallery in collaboration with Western Front and
VIVO Media Arts Centre. This year welcomes last year's
collaborators, 221A and The Morris and Helen Belkin Art
Gallery, as well as new organizations, Artspeak and Rungh
Magazine.
Dan explains the name Recollective as "capturing [the]
notion where arts and archiving intersect with activism,
each of the participating organizations
will creatively respond to the events happening throughout
the week. Emma believes that their pieces will add another
dimension to the event, acting as creative, subjective and
nuanced documentation.
Dan states that, "the idea [behind the website] is so that
the project has a broader reach. We will have this platform
where we can have documentation for events and these
response pieces and details of the event will hopefully allow
folks that can't make it in person to experience it at least
on some level. [The website may also] act as a research
resource for wider arts [and] activist sectors, information
science or other communities."
In the case of most archives in artist-run centres, there
is no standardized framework of maintaining the
archive. Dan unpacks the difference between archives
of artist-run centres and institutional archives. "At grunt,
we're very fortunate to have [archival conservation] as a
central programming strategy. I manage the archives here
[...] but I don't have formal schooling of an archivist,
social movements, community networks, collective actions
[and] histories of resistance [that form] a decentered idea of
the archive."
Each organization will host panels, conversations and
screenings around their own archives, as well as feature
artists exploring tensions between archives, art and activism
within Vancouver and Canada at large. With each organization bringing a unique perspective, there will be no
bounds to Recollective's appeal.
An exciting installment to this year's Archives Week
is the launch of a website (archivesweek.ca — check it
out!), which will act as a collaborative repository for
documentation of events during Recollective. How meta, I
know. In addition, artists, activists and writers invited by
k
so there's many things that we do that are just in-house
systems that work for us. This is the case with many
artist-run centres. They just do the best with what they
know."
There are mandates these small centres can fulfill without
worrying about bureaucracies. Speaking to the gaps an
artist-run centre can fill, Dan says that, "What a small
organization brings is the ability to balance the desire to
preserve something and to keep it safe with the desire to
activate it."
Regardless of generation or the time and space, these
archival collections appeal to niche audiences, but remain
accessible, "[grunt] makes this material available [for]
people of different generations to see it and extrapolate the
'Recollectiue'
meaningfulness that they find in it, which may be totally
different from how it was perceived in the late '90s."
In looking at Recollective as an archival initiative where
art and social movements in Vancouver intersect, Emma
and Dan reflect on its core purpose and function in the
social fabric of this city.
"We see a lot of instances nowadays of the art sector
becoming more closely aligned with housing justice
movements, especially around the quest for affordable
space. We also know that the presence of arts organizations
has a role in displacement and affordability of space in a
given neighbourhood, street, building." Looking into the
past and future to unpack the present, Recollective seeks to
illuminate the inherent tensions and complicated relationships existing between art and activism.
Aiming to represent flexible approaches to the archive
in its many forms and interpretations, Dan notes
" [Recollective] offers an opportunity to be speculative
about how things turn out or different alternative histories
or speculative futures which are super important in activist
work, because their existence is predicated on imagining a
different and better future."
In a quest to gain global perspective, both Emma and
Dan hope that Recollective will put into conversation the
intersection of art, archives and activism on an international scale by featuring a second, more distributed part of
the series featuring international participants throughout
2019. "We are going to be inviting more national and
international participants to expand conversations around
independent archives into global contexts. Looking at
where arts, activism and archives meet in different places
around the world." With the sharing of experiences and
struggles in discreet places in the world, Recollective 2019
will surely resonate with the specific experiences felt here in
this multicultural city.
 ► thecdm.ca
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OCTOBER 2018
RAVEN CHACON /MASS MARRIAGE
OCTOBER 3/DEEP BLUE
There's a certain cleverness to the name of the venue: Deep
Blue. For one thing, its role as a hub for DIY, experimental
electronic music in Vancouver jives well with the technological
implications of its namesake — a groundbreaking chess-playing
supercomputer from the '90s — as well as much of the output that
comes from its studios and its after-hours parties.
But for me, given that I have only truly known Deep Blue
abstractly, as a name on event invites, experiencing the physicality
of its space was more striking. At the risk of sounding like a hayseed:
holy hell, look at how blue the building is
Speaking of physicality, I was at Deep Blue to take in a noise
show, which is a genre that arguably is best enjoyed in a live setting,
given how important the tactile and bodily experience of sound is to
noise performance. Organized by Deep Blue and Vancouver New
Music, the intimate night of performances featured works by Raven
Chacon and Mass Marriage (Melissa Paget's noise project).
Paget opened, playing a set drawn from her most recent Mass
Marriage tapes, namely Secrets, which was released this past June. It
reflected the project's progression from a sample-based and conceptual
mode to a greater focus on sound design and perhaps more song-like
structures — no doubt the natural progression of the addition of a Korg
synth to Paget's setup recently. A certain cinematic feel still runs through
her work, however, whether composed of samples from giallo films or
synth flourishes inspired by 70s and '80s genre film soundtracks.
abstracted forms of these sounds, fashioned from static and
overdriven mics, played through directional speakers (the sort used
in certain kinds of retail store displays, Chacon told me afterwards.)
More than anything else, an interplay between quiet and loud
segments emerged. Though not quite the movements of a single
composition, discrete as the segments were, a common thread
had been woven through them nonetheless. Even when Chacon
jolted the audience with feedback as his performance reached its
midpoint, he followed it with a flurry of shushing and gesticulating
— aggressive, but still quiet. The clear emotion and amorphous
meaning of it all seemed to crystalize: it seemed, at that moment,
the journey that was Chacon's performance had reached its
destination. —Chris Yee
ALIEN ORGANISMS ART SHOW AND ZINE
RELEASE
OCTOBER 5 / LUCKY'S COMICS
n  stack of merchandise greeted me as I entered Lucky's
Comics. Arranged on the front table, a collection of Kirsten
Hatfield's art books sat, their cover's filled with a bright purple
organic figure on a yellow background.
It was this moment that I got to see Sunny Nestler's art in person
for the first time. Even without knowing the title of the art show, the
zines did a great job in showcasing the theme "Alien Organisms."
Perfectly mixing together images of human cells and nebulas,
the figures offered a glimpse into an mystical world of organic
life unknown to this planet. "They are all kind of inspired by eel
structures in human bodies, plant bodies and the ocean — so a lot
of them have repeating patterns," said the artist. In the back part of
the store, there was a small room where the rest of the artwork was
displayed.
Photo from Alien Q
courtesy of Jayden
Following Paget's set was several minutes of pink noise that
provided an appropriate ambience for the interlude between the
two sets. Eventually, Raven Chacon took to the stage and took the
audience on a sonic journey.
Chacon, a composer and installation artist from Fort Defiance,
Navajo Nation and based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, was in
Vancouver to lead the Indigenous Youth String Quartet Project
workshop, presented by Vancouver New Music and the Native
Education College. At Deep Blue, however, Chacon's performance
was more in line with his installation art than his chamber works.
There were percussive noises, sounding like planes or trains
or horses. The wind blew and birds chirped — or at least, the
Peering past the sea of heads — the room was packed with
people — I saw a series of colourful paintings, all of which shared
a similar, otherworldly vibe. One piece, with the blue and purple
background caught my attention first — perhaps because it was
argely than the others. It was full of different shapes and forms
reminiscent of jellyfishes and seaweed all tangled with together.
After a few moments, I started to imagine the figure as fireworks,
with the shards of colour on a dreamlike background, like the space
in the sky.
On the same wall, the other drawings were also extremely
successful in evoking the alien theme and the similar mystical
atmosphere, despite the variety of colours and images throughout.
10
REAL   LIVE  ACTION
While all of these smaller drawings shared a similar texture, their
backgrounds were varied enough to make each one unique enough
to stand alone. If I were to compare these drawings and their vibe to
something else, I would compare it to music to which people could
dance excitingly, because the drawings give the viewers room for
imagination for aliens or even space, which may return them to the
innocence of childhood.
On the other side of the gallery, there was this particular work
that attracted the attention of almost everyone in the room. In the
same style and feeling as the rest of the pieces, this one was made
in 3D, with layers of amorphous forms layered overtop each other
within the frame. Out of all of Hatfield's pieces, it looked the most
realistic, as if it was a glimpse at an actual alien organism.
—Jayden Hwang
QUIET CITY #51W/ KEIJI HAINO
OCTOBER 11 / FOX CABARET
Steady, electronic beats softly played in the background as I
walked into the Fox. A soft chatter resounded within the room.
The balcony, opposite the stage, held all those who were looking for
a clear view as the venue gradually became packed.
After the doors closed, a man sporting long, light grey hair
appeared on stage, his expression made undecipherable by bangs
hanging down to his black, opaque sunglasses. A silence fell
over the crowd and the background music quieted as the entirely
black-clad Keiji Haino readied himself.
Through partnerships with Powell Street Festival Society and
Send + Receive Festival, Quiet City put together the first Vancouver
appearance of the prolific Japanese experimental musician and
composer since his collaboration with Vancouver / Seattle post
metal act SUMAC, 2018's American Dollar Bill - Keep Facing
Sideways, You're Too Hideous To Look At Face On.
His performance began with minimal electronic tones. Moments
later, the Fox was filled with the sound of numerous overtones played
from Haino's guitar and the faint echoes of deafening scrunch notes
that he repeated in from time to time. Haino diversified the sonic
texture by adding a droning sound, creating a sense of fluidity in the
music. This sense of flow was emphasized through his movements
onstage, swaying smoothly to his fluid sounds.
He then ruptured the meditative atmosphere by adding short,
worded shouts and abrupt crunchy notes from his guitar, snapping
the audience out of its trance-like state. As Haino allowed the notes
strummed from his guitar to linger and decay, the audience crept
closer, their faces dimly illuminated by the blinding blue light on the
eft side of the stage. Their mouths were slightly agape, their eyes
were wide open and their eyebrows were scrunched together.
Just as an atmosphere of familiarity and stillness within the
sound settled on the room, Haino took out a reed pipe and blew
a single, airy whistle out of it. The whistle pierced through the
electronic beats playing in the background, sending a temporary jolt
through the crowd. Haino kept on whistling notes of varying tones,
a millisecond pause between each one. Several photographers near
the front stopped taking pictures — one of them even closed their
eyes. The audience remained motionless, their faces still holding
the same wide-eyed expression.
As his performance neared its end, Keiji Haino took a
minimalistic turn, lessening the variations of the electronic tones,
slowly dropping out the sounds he had so meticulously added
over the set. He finished his performance crouched behind his
electronics, his hands stretching over them as only a drone
continued. The audience responded with a deafening applause that
continued even as he left the stage. —Joy Astudillo
PUGS & CROWS ALBUM RELEASE WITH
MALCOLM JACK
WESTERN FRONT, OCTOBER 13TH 2018
The paper tacked to the door of the Western Front read plainly:
"CONCERT TONIGHT, 9PM." There was no mention of the
band — Pugs & Crows — or the occasion — the release of their
fourth LP, Uncle!.
Despite the minimal signage, an animated party was underway
upstairs. People young and old mingled in the performance space
and adjacent hallways, supplicated by familiarity, expectation and
a lively bar. With everyone gathered in the low-lit wood-panelled
Discorder magazine | NOVEMBER  2018
 concert hall, I felt as if I'd stumbled upon the meeting of a secret
society or perhaps an extended family reunion. In reality, the Uncle!
album release was something even more special.
Malcolm Jack opened the show with pieces from his upcoming
album, Mirror Moon. A veteran of the Vancouver indie-psych scene,
Jack masterfully created cavernous soundscapes with his acoustic
guitar, pedal rig and earthy musings. His pieces were well received
by the audience — whom he happily joined for a beer after his set.
Meanwhile, a projector screen and floor lamps illuminated the stage
as technicians prepared for the next performance.
After the break, the audience gathered patiently in their seats
to experience Pugs & Crows' collaborative creation. Joining the
group for the first time was lead-vocalist Marin Patenaude, whose
combination of folkish whimsy and jazz club know-how serves to
elevate the Pugs' already virtuosic style. Patenaude's effortless
allure, along with the group's transcendent synergy, made the
album sound extraordinary. As they played through the album,
carefully crafted visuals from multidisciplinary artist, Roxanne
Nesbitt, flashed behind them - telephone wires wafted along in
technicolour to jazz beats, then collapsed into distorted small town
scenes and guitar licks. The full effect was a stunning immersion
into the world of Uncle!
Band leader, Cole Schmidt had introduced the album not only
as a memorial to his own uncle, but to his mentor, Ken Pickering
as well, who listened to a copy of the album before he passed
away this summer. Many members of the audience had been at
a memorial service held for Pickering earlier in the day. Schmidt
recalled Pickering's wary assertion that "community" must not be
a buzzword — a sentiment that was manifested as a lyric on "Not
My Circus Not My Monkeys." Nights like this one prove the lasting
integrity of the term. Community is not a buzzword; community is
having every seat filled, with the overflow standing crowded in the
corners and doorways, mingled with collective memory and the
earnest celebration of good art. —Hannah Kruse
GLAM FEST 2018
OCTOBER 13 /RED GATE
I  must have walked past it five times
before I noticed the cracked-open door
and blackened noise leaking out onto the
daytime pavement. Pupils shooting open
to accommodate the sudden darkening, I
walked in, hoping that I hadn't come through
the wrong entrance.
At 7PM, the Red Gate Arts Society
was still rather quiet, all of the audience's
attention was drawn to the stage, where
Bored Decor was preparing for their set.
Playing with both the automated cool of
krautrock and the excesses of glam, their
music had a clockwork texture. On the
highly machinated "Hardworking Man,"
an undeniable tic-toe rhythm underscored
moments of wild passion: pianist Ryan
Quist nearly knocked his keyboard off
its stand during a particularly involved
instrumental section.
With two stages in adjoining rooms, the
first annual Glam Fest didn't leave much
time for breathing between sets. Once
a performance ended on one stage, the
adjacent room would begin shaking with
an equally intriguing sound. Here, Spesh
Pep, a group that hovers somewhere in
between glam, psych and pop, delivered a
set of entirely unreleased songs. All three
members employed their singing chops at
various points in the performance, each
having distinct proclivities and abilities,
and all together providing a diverse collage
of music.
The venue began to swell with people
smiling, sparkling and highly conversational.
It started to feel like a perfect microcosm
of a community: friends were common and
bountiful and a sense of camaraderie was carried long into the
night. As a newcomer to Vancouver, this buzz of familiarity made
me feel like I was being welcomed into a new city.
After making a brief trip to grab some food (at 9PM the
festival still had six hours left), I returned to find a full-blown
shift in the music. Since Prxncxss Aprntly's boisterous and
confident performance, Glam Fest had grown exponentially more
aggressive and noisy, with Alien Boys and Terrifying Girls High
School both exhibiting wonderful speed and technical prowess
throughout their sets.
One of the more absurd moments of the night came courtesy
of Rambone and The Wet Reality, whose frontperson donned
a Fishman costume and translucent cape. After calling out for
"Scottzilla," a member of their band who had not yet made it to
stage, they began their first song with the repeated declaration,
"There is no Scott."
It was the penultimate act of the night, Eric Campbell & The Dirt,
who delivered one of the most unique performances of the festival.
Taking cues from a wide array of influences — from traditional
western music to blues and punk — they commanded attention
with their strangely orchestral and elegant sound. It was the kind of
music that begs for the label cinematic with its ability to transport
you into its own unique reality.
Perhaps this was the festival's greatest success — amidst the
strife and toil of the modern social climate, Glam Fest created
its own little one night CBGB: a free, accepting, and ceaselessly
creative artistic community. No doubt next year will be even better.
—Tate Kaufman
III
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and
online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences.
Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
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MUSIC
Jonny Dylan Hughes
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JONNY DYLAN HUGHES
New Mind
(self-released)
August   9,   2018
music is sad these days, man. Sadness has not only
permeated  alternative genres, which have always had a
significantly higher tolerance for malaise and angst, but has also
found a place in mainstream, chart-topping pop music. In addition
to glumness, nostalgia, specifically for the 80's, has appeared
in full force. This has led to some delightful throwback sounds,
illustrative of the benefits that come with cherry picking the past.
At the crux of these two tendencies is Jonny Dylan Hughes' latest
album, New Mind.
JDF is an Edmonton/Vancouver-based singer and house DJ,
operating in the latter capacity under the name of Slow Start. New
Mind is his sophomore release and given that it's been four years
since its conception in 2014, it's actually something of an unfair
accusation to say that New Mind is riding a downbeat trend. In
fact, it's more apt to say that the album's sound circumnavigates
the depression-pop that is currently dominating the charts. The
lyrics, sung by drummer Jay Arner, are forlorn and introspective,
dealing predominantly with disappointment, heartbreak and regret,
but the instrumental sound is not low-key or hazy. The production
is masterful and crisp, with glittering synths and rich drumlines
creating an insistent pace throughout. This is certainly a pop album,
but it's more Phil Oakey than Post Malone.
The quality of the tracks is generally good, but the album's
uniform production also works against it. Arner's vocal mood is set
at longing and regret for the entirety of the album, which would be
dreary if it wasn't for Hughes' soaring synths, making the vocals
emotive rather than mopey. "Daughters," right at the middle of the
album, is the high-water mark, with a vast, echoing bridge that
elevates Arner's vocals to operatic heights.
In many ways, this album sounds like the original songs on
the Drive soundtrack, and if that doesn't sell you, nothing will. Its
consistency is both a strength and a weakness, but with "Daughters"
sounding as good as it does, it's more a net gain than loss. If you've
got a thing for synthpop and self-reflection, this is certainly the
album for you. —Jake Clark
CLUB SOFA
Qpo        Club Sofa
(self-released)
September   8,   2018
Oream pop is a genre that often fails to excite me. Although
I enjoy its rather calming, vibey palette, I find that so many
artists sound the same, however, club sofa's self-titled debut does
not succumb to this. The Vancouver-based band offers a distinct,
yet simultaneously familiar sound, proving themselves to be masters
of the genre.
Upon initially listening to the album, a few things immediately
stood out. While not entirely rejecting traditional elements of dream
pop, many tracks have a level of energy that is not always present
in the genre, a key factor in the band's unique sound. Furthermore,
every bandmate is able to showcase their talent, especially through
extended instrumental features in tracks like "No Frills." Lead singer
Payton Hansen's versatile voice is one of the album's greatest
strengths. Not only does she wield a powerful voice with great
range, but she knows how to utilize this to great effect. In "Myspace
2009," she alternates between singing, speaking and shouting,
14
reminiscing about a summer romance and bad decisions with both
frustration and a self-deprecating humour.
Each song on the LP offers a distinct sound. The album's third
track, "Bed Song," is upbeat and groovy, while "Beach Bum Baby" is
quite minimalistic and provides Hansen yet another opportunity truly
show off her vocal talent. Another stand-out is the aforementioned
"No Frills," a short, but incredibly energetic song that almost forces
you to start dancing. Although each track is unique, nothing feels
out of place, a testament to the band's ingenious songwriting.
Thematically, Club Sofa cleverly combines a sharp sense of
humour with a genuine angst. Songs like "I Moved to Vancouver
and All I Got Was This Stupid Nicotine Addiction" and "You vs. My
Self-Esteem," despite their considerable tonal differences, are not at
odds with each other, but actually quite complementary due to their
blunt exploration of anxiety. "You vs. My Self-Esteem," for example,
opens with "There's a lot of things I shouldn't have said / Most of
the time it goes better in my head," a sentiment that most listeners
will find pretty relatable.
club sofa explores anxiety, love and heartache with an
empathetic frustration and a clever wit, backed by their inventive
interpretation of dream pop—a remarkable balance to perfect on
their debut. —Alexander Christensen
JOCK TEARS
bad boys
(Inky Records)
September   28,   2016
Bad boys, the first full-length from Vancouver pop punk band
jock tears, comes two years after their debut, sassy attitude,
and delivers an even sassier punch. The new record is out on
emerging Vancouver label Inky Records and celebrated its release
with a show at the SBC supported by goofy Portland punk band,
Mean Jeans, on September 29.
The first song of the album, "salt," opens with a catchy,
fuzzed-out guitar riff and Lauren Ray's animated vocals: "Girls have
it trickier than boys / Let's show them how to make more noise" — a
testament to feminist punk and a jab at male privilege that sets the
tone for the entire album. Later track "boys with bruises" follows this
up when Ray shouts "Misogyny makes me sick," succinctly hitting
home the album's (and the band's) attitude with the unapologetic
candor one comes to expect from jock tears' lyrics.
With only one of the album's 12 tracks breaking the 2 minute
mark, each song is a playful and quick jibe at bad boys — even Nei
Young, bad boys sports a song that pays witty homage to the rock
icon ("Keep on searching / For some cake to score / Not a heart of
gold / Like before") and a song that pokes fun at Kits Beach bros
("Bleach blond hair and he's ready to go") back to back, showing
the variety of men at their mercy.
The self-titled track slows down the noise for a quick inning with
its spoken word intro and jazzy bass line, opening up a wormhole
to the '60s. Ray's softly layered soda shop vocals are met with a
welcome exchange between clean-toned guitar and punk fuzz in a
yrical portrait of a sensitive jock. A couple tracks later, "handlebars"
feels like another nostalgic nod to '60s youth culture with kids riding
around on bicycle handlebars. The repeated line, "All the world
is speeding by / All I want is you to be my guy," introduces teen
romance, while the track still maintains the sense of bitterness and
rebellion intrinsic to punk.
All in all, the record plays through how I imagine the high schoo
diary of a cheerleader's punk alter ego would read, bad boys is
fed-up but upbeat, providing the "sweet & mean and everything
inbetween" mix that the band promises. —Robyn Bowes
DEAD SOFT
■ri.5.        New Emotion
*„!* *     (Arts & Crafts)
Uv&«\ October   12,   2016
Oead Soft is one of very few bands in my music library that
survived my wobbly transition from adolescence to adulthood
and likely the only local group to appear on my high school playlists
that hasn't since broken up.
In fact, the band is moving more quickly now than ever. They
played with The Breeders earlier this year and are now signed
onto indie label, Arts & Crafts, alongside acts like Timbre Timbre,
Broken Social Scene and Feist. As their debut to Arts & Crafts, New
Emotion doesn't disappoint. While the record is unlikely to blow your
mind, it will satisfy anyone who's a fan of Dead Soft's earlier work,
in particular, their 2014 self-titled EP.
The record opens hard and fast with "Kill Me," delivering the style
that Dead Soft does best right from the get-go. This sound—based
on Nathaniel Epp's laidback drone, Keeley Rochon's fuzzy bass and
Graeme McDonald's punchy drumming—is comfortingly similar to
their past work. This track will be a crowd-pleaser for the tried and
true Dead Soft fans, who might've heard the song onstage in the
past and will be glad to finally have it on a record.
You'll remember the vocal hook in the chorus of the EP's second
song, "Proof," but the track is otherwise less exciting than the
opener. It feels slightly more predictable and might blur into other
songs in Dead Soft's discography, particularly the melodic ballads
that usually fall between more upbeat moments on their tracklists.
The same applies to "I'm Afraid," a slower, more melancholy track
that gives listeners a bit of a break from the heaviness that normally
defines the band, but is equally unlikely to get stuck in your head.
I'm glad to say that "Down" will get you moving and shaking.
Of all the tracks on New Emotion, it's the one I'm most excited
to see live. The closing track, "Bones," nails the Dead Soft string
signatures—lower, noisier rhythm alongside a chirpy, bendy lead
guitar—and we finally get to hear Epp yell a little, a touch that would
be sorely missed if it didn't make it onto New Emotion.
The first and last tracks act as the perfect bookends for the EP,
sandwiching material that could otherwise be interpreted as less
engaging than their previous work. New Emotion is solid enough
to be listened to on repeat, but will also work if played in the
background. It would be nice to see them push their boundaries
further in the future, maybe opting to experiment with style and
structure rather than sticking to what's familiar and safe.
—Aly Laube
FILMS
UNDER REVIEW
Yang Yishu (directors)
LUSH REEDS
(China)
2018
Yang Yishu's Lush Reeds is about a journalist, Xiayin,
concerned with social stories in an inhospitable journalistic
climate. Motivated by repeat encounters with Gao, a refugee farmer,
she visits the countryside to report on suspect waste practices. This
synopses suggests that Lush Reeds is an investigative thriller, an
expose of corporate misdeeds in the countryside, far from the eyes
of regional authorities. But these are broad strokes and ultimately
misleading.
Yang Yishu, a professor of filmmaking and dramatic arts,
infuses her film with intellectual overtures —offhand remarks
about the transformation of Chinese tradition, and the
displacement and redevelopment induced by flows of capital.
But, Lush Reeds is an ambiguous and elliptical story, more about
alienation, more about Xiayin and her meanderings through a
ghost-city perpetually under construction, and a return to nature
Discorder magazine | NOVEMBER  2018
 _
suffused with menace and mystery.
The audience enters Lush Reeds through screens of blue: a
flash-forward to a twilight journey, through the bush near the film's
conclusion, workers on an unfinished bridge that stretches across
the Yangtze into a haze, a shoe by the side of a river. The shoe
is an artefact of suicide, one of the hazy details that constitute a
series of meanderings and subtle aggressions.
We do understand that Xiayin has come across the scene,
and that the shoe belonged to one of her colleagues. Though her
response is subdued, this death weighs heavily on Xiayin, and
much of the film consists of her passive emotional conflicts. Yishu
makes canny choices, often shooting Xiayin outside herself with the
camera encountering her by surprise in a hallway, or placing her
outside of the frame, only visible in a window's reflection.
References to feminist labour, right to the city and the rural/urban
divide position, Lush Reeds as a political film. But, Yishu is most
committed to the existential and phenomenal, as the film's surreal
turn in its second-half makes clear. Lush Reeds' first half can be
oppressive, but Yishu demonstrates throughout her sharp mind for
images the vivid internal life of its protagonist.
Lush Reeds is not a hopeful film with answers to the questions it
poses. Its title (suggesting growth and rejuvenation) is suffused with
irony. It situates Xiayin in a landscape of patriarchal revanchism,
environmental destruction and global capitalism. It challenges the
intellectuals who theorize freedom while they remain insensitive
to the struggle around them. It is a clear-eyed portrayal of internal
ambiguity, where alienation follows the urbanite to a compromised
pastoral. Lush Reeds does provide a yearning desire for sense in
an insensate world, and at its highest points the film captures that
moral act of searching, even as it contends with a bitter realism.
—Jonathan Kew
To submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please
email Under Review Editor Sydney Ball at ur.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1.
Years of
Discorder Magazine
October 29 - November 22,   2018
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HAPPY H@WU
WEE»AY:
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UNDER REVIEW
15
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | NOVEMBER 2018
CAITLIN
FFRENCH
words by Issa Braithwaite // illustration by R. Hester
photos by Coltrane Yan
U
£AITLIN FFRENCH IS A LOT OF
THINGS: teacher, seamstress, forager, weaver,
sculptor, painter, witch, designer, chemist, dyer
and knitter (I think I got it all). Her art is her
story and through her work, we get to see a little more of her
with every release.
Caitlin shuffles her handmade water colours around
her Vancouver studio, situated between a dog boarding
kennel and band studio space. We have found one of the
quieter moments to talk, despite the faint barking in the
background."It's brutal."
"Autumn is chaos time," says Caitlin — she's either
"in the wild everyday harvesting dyes" she will use for
the entire year, making paints, "applying for grants," or
trying to figure out her next trip to Iceland — the land that
"haunts" her.
That 'haunt' is real and reflected in her work. Caitlin's
most recent project, her sixth book Hiraeth, is a collection
of knitting patterns shot in some of her favourite places —
Iceland, Vancouver and the coast of Oregon. However, it is
the meaning behind the title that carries her art, body and
spint."Hiraeth is an intense longing for place or home, one
that you might never be able to return to, or never existed,"
she explains. That feeling brought Caitlin to "vast, empty
and brutal" Iceland three times, and it's that feeling that
has brought this final book closer to the dark, beautiful
aesthetic she strives for. Hiraeth is what allows her to fully
explore her art.
Caitlin's connection to the land is foundational to her
work and much of it is inspired by her upbringing on a
farm. However, she hasn't always been this appreciative of
the serene. "As a kid growing up on a farm, I thought I was
going to live in the city forever, but now realizing it's slowly
killing me."
The fruit orchard is where her dad grew the food and
her mother and grandmother made clothes. She admits she
"used to think it was dorky," but it's this perspective that
she taps into to create the work. Caitlin's understanding
of how something is made is equally or more important
than what she makes. "Everything being made by hand just
really makes sense to me. Buying and consuming things that
aren't ethically made doesn't make sense."
Os Caitlin refills her coffee, she begins to tell me
about the concept that, along with Hiraeth, drives
her work: "clothing scarcity." It's an idea she works
into her entire practice and teachings. Caitlin explains that
Buyin
arerit ethi
make sense.
as a people, we need to familiarize ourselves with these
ideals, the same way we understand food scarcity. "We
think about blueberries in the winter, but no one thinks
about the cotton t-shirt, the water and the people who
make it... it takes 3,000 liters of water to produce a cotton
t-shirt, but only eight liters for a linen shirt."
Caitlin's perspective and self-awareness is what shapes
her art and it's that which allows her to bring her whole se
into her pieces. "The art is more genuine, it's more real and
I'm doing the work, it is the truest."
For Caitlin, it's simply not enough to look at pollution,
water usage or artificial dyes — we, as a collection of
people, need to take a more holistic view of our world and
change our values."We are polluting places we will never
see... I get the happiness when you get something new,
but do you need that happiness at the expense of another
human?" It's being more intentional in understanding the
processes we are a part of from beginning to end, which is
why she changed her method of painting years ago.
"I stopped using acrylics. Painting with plastic didn't
make sense to me... sitting in a studio, buying tubes of
paint and just painting doesn't feel like that's where the
world makes sense for me."
There is a physicality to her art. Everything that it
takes to create her colours — the hours, the sweat and
the alchemy, coupled with the bruises and "falling into
ditches." It's what makes her art uniquely hers. "Painting
comes a little harder because there is an added level of
specialness."
Caitlin enjoys and appreciates being a part of this specia
history and community and feels sharing the knowledge
that she has built over her nearly two-decade career is
not only important, but essential. "I look at myself like a
strange island, because I'm adopted and I will never have
children... The knowledge that I know, when I die it'll
be gone." This propels her to travel around Canada and
abroad, both to learn and to teach these arts, which are
passed on how they are practiced — hand to hand. "Always!
have the willingness to be humbled, to listen to other folks   Ji*g^
and to always learn more."
To view Caitlin's work, find out about upcoming
workshops and learn more, visit caitlinffrench.com
is
"Caitlin Ffrench'
 8ios HaaMavon | snixogDm ™ino38i<i
EflUfAH
LORETTA SETO
WORDS BY KATHERINE CHAMBERS
ILLUSTRATIONS AND PHOTO BY MATTHEW
^fcr  OR LORETTA SETO, ART IS
^^_   A FORM OF CONNECTION.
^B       An avid reader turned professional
^^       writer, Seto has explored the arts since
childhood. Seto remembers feeling compelled by
storytelling from a young age: "My mom had one
of these really old, electric typewriters that we had
at home that you plug in. Every key you would tap
on this thing would deafen you. It was so loud —
Clack! Clack! Clack! — but I would be fascinated
by the fact that I could type on this thing and create
words on a page, and that I could write sentences
and paragraphs and then create little stories. I was
really drawn to that for some reason."
Out of her childhood passion for stories came
an undergraduate degree in Creative Writing and
a job in publishing, but it was her completion of
an MFA in the Creative Writing program at UBC
that convinced Seto that she could rely on writing
as a career. Now comfortable in her identity as a
writer, Seto has worked on screenplays, published
a children's book, Mooncakes, and has spent the
past decade or so writing for theatre. She has
produced two plays including Dirty Old Woman,
which was well received at both the Vancouver
Fringe festival and during its run at The Cultch.
Her third play, The Ones We Live Behind, is
produced by Vancouver Asian Canadian Theatre.
Although Seto finds
writing for theatre
more challenging
than screenwriting,
she admits that
"There's something
about theatre that
you can't replicate in
film." Seto credits the
difference between
theatre and film to
"the immediacy of the
face-to-face." Seto's recent, most powerful experiences as
an audience member occurred when watching a play: "It's
the immediacy of having live performers in front of you.
Things are happening in real time. There's this vitality that's
going on that's different than if you're sitting in a movie
theatre and relaxing with your popcorn." Seto understands
the significance of face-to-face interactions, especially in
a society that seems to be devaluing them: "You can't
replicate that," Seto says, "it's hard to have a substitute for
that kind of connection."
Relationships and connection have been a recurring
theme in Seto's work, albeit unintentionally.
Emphasis on familial relationships is an area in
which Seto's own life has influenced her work: "My parents
are Chinese immigrants who came from China in the 1950s.
Even though we were brought up in 'the Canadian way,'
they also instilled in us a lot of core Asian values and often
that means focusing on family."
Seto's most recent play, The Ones We Leave Behind, is
no exception to the thematic trend of Seto's work. The play
is the story of a young woman, Abby Chung, who is tasked
with finding the next of kin of an elderly woman who
passed away and was undiscovered for several months. As
she solves the woman's mystery, Abby begins to uncover her
own family's story. Although a work of fiction, the premise
of the play came from a newspaper article Seto read several
years ago: "It was just a short news item that I read about a
man who had died in his home, and nobody discovered him
for three years. He was only discovered because apparently
some debt collector or somebody had come by because
he owed them money or there was some need to get in
touch with him, and I thought, 'wow, nobody's missed him
enough to try and figure out what happened to him, why
is he not calling anymore, or why is he not showing up
anymore?' And that just started my storyteller brain going:
how did this happen? Who was this man? Who were the
people who used to know him who aren't really in touch
with him anymore and how did it get that way?"
Despite its serious subject matter, The Ones We Leave
Behind is not a heavy play. The play has a strong element
of humor in it, which Seto notes is true to the variety of life:
"It's very human to try and find humor even in the darkest
situations [...] it's so easy to get bogged down by darkness
and tragedy and sadness; that is part of life, I'm not taking
away from that."
Seto reflects that it was a conscious decision to change
the gender of the central figure of her story from the male
in the newspaper article to the female we encounter in The
Ones We Leave Behind. The image Seto had in mind when
imagining the story was that of an elderly woman and Seto
'Loretta Seto'
is glad that the central presence on the stage is female.
Although her stage is filled with diversity, Seto does not
view art as resistance. On the contrary, Seto believes that
art is about connection. Reflecting on the increasing rarity
of face-to-face connection, Seto observes that its lack "takes
away from the joy of being human." Seto's art is perhaps
a testament to the joy that we find in connection and in
each other and she is tapping into society's craving for this
joy when she says that "[art] is welcoming. Come in; come
into the world and see yourself in there or see your family
member in there or your friend. We are more alike than we
are different."
H
_
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | NOVEMBER 201?
~JW\  S A CHILD, Quinne
£      I   Rogers would have — and
■        I   occasionally still has — violent
\J I   nightmares in which blood
thirsty monsters would hunt her down and
try to devour her. Faced with this recurring
dream that she couldn't escape, she had to
develop a way to survive.
"I would pretend to be a monster to
blend in so that they wouldn't eat me," she
tells me during our interview in Volcano
Sushi on Hastings Street. The tactic
worked: "They just thought I was one of
them and I snuck away."
Rogers, who makes experimental
synth-pop under the name Ivory Towers,
brings these nightmares to life on
"somnambula / dreamfasting," a song that
uses her dream-world experiences with
monsters as an allegory for her attempts at
befriending a group of mean, but popular
girls back in high school.
"I thought the same thing: if I befriended
them, maybe they wouldn't eat me," she
says. "It didn't work though. It's a survival
mechanism" — befriending those who could
harm you — "but maybe not a very good
one. But it did work a lot in my dreams!"
"somnambula / dreamfasting" is just
one of the many songs about survival from
Rogers' excellent new EP, Queller. In her
previous releases, Rogers' music brimmed
with political anger against the privileged
and the powerful — "eat-the-rich, burn-it-
all-down fury," as she describes it. She's
still angry, but she's also starting to realize
that anger isn't the healthiest way to cope
with the pains of 2018's political climate.
"This stuff can really cut deep, depending
on what rights are being attacked that day
or what horrible things are happening in
the world," she says. "We need to survive,
but also we need to be able to stop
sometimes and make sure you're taking
care of yourself."
for her stories of survival, Rogers
was inspired by the natural world
and all of its peculiarities. She
developed a fascination with birds after
installing a bird feeder on her patio last
year and she came up with the concept
behind her EP's opening song, "Sand
Witches," while observing chickadees
taking seeds from it. "I was imagining them
in their little nest when it rains and they're
protecting each other and keeping each
other warm," she says, "that's what I want,
that nice domestic thing of creating that
with someone, like a partner or a friend.
Having somewhere where you're protected
and safe."
Likewise, "Marshmallow" developed
out of her own personal research into
marsh mallow plants. "I was thinking of
your inner self as a little marshmallow and
how you need to make sure that it doesn't
get burned," she says, "you have to take
care of it."
Then there's the cover art, where
she's dressed in all-white but bearing the
threatening, bright red eyes of a wood
duck. Her eyes look like something out of
a horror movie rather than the face of a
duck, but for Rogers, the natural world is
just as scary and inspiring. "I was reading
about these moles [that] have a bite that's
poisonous. "They get these grubs and they
bite them and the grubs are paralyzed,
but still alive [...] so they're getting eaten
and if they wake up, they just bite them
again." That's a horror movie!"
monsters, birds, marshmallows,
self-care — there's a lot going on
in these seven songs. Electronic
noises and fluorescent keyboards dominate
the mix, but Rogers makes it all sound as
organic as possible. A song like "Celaeno"
might be driven by a dark, brooding drone,
but its horrors are heightened by samples of
whale sounds and bird calls permeating the
background. Musically, it's perhaps easiest
to compare Queller to Grimes' work circa
Visions and Darkbloom, but its moments of
protective warmth amidst electronic experimentation also bring to mind Vespertine,
Bjork's 2001 opus of domestic comfort.
Rogers had her first musical breakthrough as one half of the industrial,
feminist post-punk duo MYTHS, whose
2011 self-titled album remains an unsettling, uncompromising and exciting listen.
MYTHS even toured with Elite Gymnastics
and Grimes herself back in 2012, where
they performed as an opening act as well as
Grimes' backing band.
However, Rogers found MYTHS to be
a constraining project. "It was politics
and feminism, that's what the content
was and that was it," she says. Politics
are still present throughout her music,
but breaking off into her Ivory Towers
project in 2015 gave her a chance to
make something more personal and
experiment with different sounds
and song structures.
With her first two EPs, Endling
(2014) and Vile (2016), Rogers
began to embrace the left-field
pop that she's always loved, but
never got to make in MYTHS.
Vile's "Hel's Belles," in particular is
a stunningly beautiful work of art-pop,
but on Queller, she leans further into
accessibility and ends up with her strongest
release yet.
That's not to say that Rogers is no
longer interested in challenging her
listeners. "Sand Witches" might be filled
with pop hooks and cutesy atmospherics,
but it also opens with a giant squelch of
noise. "The first EP I put out, people were
like 'it's so experimental, it's borderline
unlistenable.' But I want to be experimental and listenable."
Rogers remains committed to dismantling
power abuse as well. She might be in awe
of nature, but it's through this appreciation
that she expresses her environmentalist,
anti-pipeline politics. While she sings
about domestic comfort, it's for the sake of
protection from today's political horrors.
Once again, the personal remains political.
f
'luory Towers'
 8ios HaaMavon | snixogDm ™ino38i<i
EflUfAH
l~JW\ FRUIT SALAD IS A CONCOCTION
#11   OF NOURISHING, sticky and sweet fruits,
■        I  most of which traveled many miles to meet in
\J I   a bowl of elaborate colours and flavours. The
fall sunshine met Softieshan and I at Crab Park on a lively
Saturday, where we partook in a juicy and fruitful conversation, literally and figuratively.
Softieshan is a Vancouver DJ, event coordinator and
a queer woman of colour. Her aura is fully charged and
People of colour are often conditioned to act or
project in a certain way to avoid societal stigma.
Through her own experiences, Softieshan acknowledges that being black in Vancouver can be very isolating
and exhausting. One way she combats this reality is by
altering the dominating elements that comprise these spaces.
As a queer woman of colour in a city with minimal
diversity, Softieshan puts the safety and experiences of
marginalized people first. "A safe space to me is a space
the music that I play or by just being a black woman taking
up space in a venue that is predominantly non-black,"
expresses Softieshan,"making space is fucking showing up!"
Her "soft" and intersectional presence fosters a contagious comfortability and the best part about it is she shares
it. Only starting to DJ two years ago, Softieshan has a
hunger for advancement and innovation seen through
her resident DJ positions and her leadership role in
Intersessions. "Intersessions is an organization that was
founded to teach women, people
of colour and people in the queer
community how to DJ. It was
a response to DJing being CIS,
heterosexual, male-dominated,"
explains Softieshan. Intersessions
events are all accessible and by
donation or free.
I v  hen Vancouver
III  Intersessions
^W^w    coordinator and
co-founder, Rhi Blossom, moved
to Montreal, Softie was offered
the position as the Vancouver
Coordinator. "I learned how to
DJ at the very first Intersessions
workshop that happened ever.
Now, it's my job to coordinate
different workshops and find
teachers for them," and in doing
so, Softieshan encourages others
to reshape and manipulate space.
"I feel like the only way to change
the music scene in Vancouver is to
give more people who normally
wouldn't have access to this
equipment access to it and access
to learning."
T
radiating, which is no surprise as it has recently become her
job to create uplifting environments. As a DJ, Softieshan's
femme and queer-friendly, hip-hop and rap-infused
sets challenge the male-dominated spaces that comprise
Vancouver's nightlife scene.
So, that Saturday in Crab Park, Softieshan and I made a
fruit salad. We cut up apples, kiwis, dragon fruit, bananas,
strawberries and a watermelon. Every fruit came with a
question and Softieshan chose watermelon first. "My sister
was talking about how when she was little, she felt like
she couldn't eat watermelon even though she really liked
it, because people would make racist jokes about it. So I
picked the watermelon first, because it's fucking good and
I'm not ashamed to eat it," admits Softieshan.
where the people working in it have a zero tolerance policy
for racism and sexism," she says. Softieshan expresses
the need for venues to be responsible for their own social
infrastructure by requiring that they are safe and welcoming
to diverse audiences.
"A couple parties that I play at use the "buddy system,"
where there's a team of people who are hired and trained
in NARCAN and de-escalation," advocates Softieshan.
Events such as Pep talk, which Softieshan and two other
female DJs organized, prioritize safety and inclusion over
profit, creating what she calls "a different kind of party."
Her current position as a resident DJ at multiple venues
around Vancouver has enabled her to create a community
through knowing the venues safety policies and becoming
friends with the staff. "I have the ability to shape spaces by
"Softieshan"
hrough finding connection
in her own community,
Softieshan is now
embracing the act of saying
"no," which means letting go of
people and environments which
no longer serve her. "I think
it's really difficult, specially as
women, to say no in situations
even when I know saying yes
doesn't totally serve me. I'm
trying really hard to do my own
thing and to create and align with
people whose values align with mine," she admits. These
communities exist within the interconnected space between
individuals who have a similar experiences and a vision for
change. As Softieshan traverses through what was once a
barren land for folks like herself, she inspires those like her
to see their own own potential through the abundance of
her fruits.
Looking for a safe space? Follow ©softieshan on Instagram
and Facebook, and keep watch for intersessions events in
Vancouver.
V
_
 Otl THE AIR
DELIBERATE NOISE
words  and photo  by  Jana Rolland  /   illustrations  by  Fatemeh Ghayedi
nina Panini hosts one of CiTR's most recent additions, Deliberate Noise. Nina
creates a weekly show centered on playing punk music and supporting Vancouver's
live scene, complemented by Special Guest Clare's witty banter. Discorder recently
had the opportunity to interview the pair.
What  is Deliberate Noise?
TIP: It's a music show. I wanted to focus
on playing local bands, especially punk or
rock music. The point is playing good stuff,
highlighting shows that people can see and
getting people into the local music scene.
C: I think that everything is in service of
that, in a way, and banter makes it a little
more human.
TIP: Yeah. We're kinda just normal, we're
people, we're students. We don't have a ton
of expert knowledge of the scene, we're not
in bands, but we do live here, so we have
general knowledge of venues and bands. We
think that we have good music taste and
[we] want people to like the scene as much
as we do.
So with the  show you hope  to
encourage people  to get  out  in the
scene more.
TIP: Mhm, and recognize how much good
music there is, even though a lot of it is
underground and not always easy to find.
There's a lot of good stuff here.
C: People often move to Vancouver and
they have a sense that it's pretty dead.
TIP: The whole "No Fun City" thing.
C: It's weird, because there is quite a lot
going on, it's just a little discreet. It's good
to have something that can curate and
deliver. If you like the music that's on the
show, you listen every week, you'll have a
curated package of things you can go to.
Since  this  is a heavier genre,   is
there  ever anything you listen to
that  you think   'maybe we  shouldn't
put  this  on the air?'
TIP: We pretty much don't care. We played
a song called "Eighth Dick" and I was like
'ehhh, no it's fine.'
What happens is Nina, halfway through
a song, [will be] like, "should I not have
played this?," but it's only until they're
actually shouting "dick in a jar" that she's
like 'actually...'
TIP: laughs No, we don't play anything
super hardcore. When I say we play punk
music, it's very very on the pop side of the
spectrum. I'm never super concerned that
no one will be able to handle it. I try and
play some pop and some punk, but mostly
keep it in the middle so it's pretty accessible
to people.
Anything else  you'd like  to talk
about?
C: The Bathroom.
TIP: Oh yeah! So every week we do a
"toilet seat cover" halfway through the
show. It's where I like to highlight a great
public bathroom in Vancouver, because,
you know, we all gotta go —
Discorder magazine | NOVEMBER 2018
tfllE ND#
OF
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
You get  discounts at  these
FRIENDS  OF  CiTR  + DISCORDER locations.
C: Bathrooms are one of the great joys of
life.
TIP: Yeah, like you'd see a great bathroom
and you just kinda want people to know
about it. It's a toilet seat cover [because]
I talk about a bathroom and then I play a
cover song. That's kinda the only segment
we have on the show. It excites me every
week. I got the idea for it from Beatroute.
They would review bathrooms around
Vancouver at the end of every show, but
they stopped doing that a couple years ago
and I really miss it.
Deliberate Noise airs every Tuesday from 2
-3 PMon 101.9 FM and citr.ca.
©
IP1IP
THE BILTMORE CABARET
10% off at the bar
eomm€R€iJiL
AUDIOPILE RECORDS
10% off
STORM CROW TAVERN
10% off
DCKUIKJCKUH
BEAT STREET RECORDS
10% off used records
THE CINEMATHEQUE
One small bag of
popcorn per person
per evening.
DEVIL MAY WEAR
10% off
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
RART EMPORIUM
10% off
VINYL RECORDS
10% of New and Used
20
ON THE AIR IDeliberate   Noise
AUSTRALIAN
BOOT COMPANY
15% off Blundstone and
& R.M. Williams Boots
THE BIKE KITCHEN
10% off new parts &
accessories
BANYEN BOOKS K SOUND
10% off
RUFUS GUITAR SHOP
10% new instruments
and accessories.
RUFUS DRUM SHOP
10% new instruments
and accessories.
STORM CROW ALEHOUSE
10% off
BOOKWAREHOUSE
10% off
(VISIT:
CiTR
. C a/friends
for more   info. )
 o
\>
ilS
(D
O
mmm
C^\
"DISCORDER MAGAZINE RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERY DAY!"
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6AM
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BREAKFAST  WITH  THE
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CONVICTIONS &
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GOODIE
POP DRONES
THE SHAKESPEARE
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THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
DELIBERATE NOISE   UNCEDED AIRWAVES
120BPM
120BPM
THUNDERBIRD EYE
COMEDY ZEITGEIST
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
SEEKING OFFICE
MIXTAPES WITH
MC & MAC
U DO U RADIO     THE REEL WHIRLED
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
K-POP CAFE
ASTROTALK
120BPM
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
TOO DREAMY
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
&>aturt>ap
CiTR GHOST MIX
THE SATURDAY EDGE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
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CODE  BLUE
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CiTR GHOST MIX
YOUR NEW SHOW
SHOOKSHOOKTA
THE ROCKERS SHOW
LA FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
6AM
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THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
INTO THE WOODS
ARTS REPORT      DEMOCRACY WATCH   WORD ON THE STREET
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
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LATE
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YOUR  NEW  SHOW
YOUR  NEW  SHOW
FLEX  YOUR  HEAD
MEDICINE
SHOW
EXPLODING  HEAD
MOVIES
SAMSQUANCH'S
HIDE-AWAY
MIX CASSETTE
CRIMES & TREASONS
NINTH WAVE
THE JAZZ SHOW
THE SPENCER    ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
LATU SHOW        ANDREW WILLIS
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
CiTR GHOST MIX
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YOUR NEW SHOW
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NO DEAD
AIR
NASHA VOLNA
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SKALDS HALL
CANADA POST ROCK
YOUR NEW SHOW
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MORE THAN HUMAN
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INDIA
TECHNO
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DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOWTO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
a
[<-hey, this kind of cell means this show is hosted by students
They are also highlighted in the spot colour on the guide,
you can't miss it.
_
 ■ monody
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
3AM-11AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththebrowns
@h otmail.com
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B in spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming @citr. ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ rutstiay
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
3AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the LGBTQ +
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmaii.com
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM,  ROCK / POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY/
DISABILITY
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communityiivingradio@gmaii.com
• DELIBERATE NOISE
2PM-3PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Love rocking out to live music,
but don't feel like paying
cover? Tune in for the latest
and greatest punk, garage
rock, local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
contact: programming@citr.ca
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming @citr. ca
TUES 5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope,
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES &TREASONS
3PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
Malik, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
• THE SPENCER LATU SHOW
TUES 10PM-11PM, TALK/ POLITICAL
COMMENTARY
The Spencer Latu Show is a
progressive politics show that
speaks truth to power. We
provide much needed coverage,
and media criticism of stories
at the municipal, provincial,
national and international
level from the perspective of
two progressive working class
students; Spencer Latu and
Ajeetpal Gill. We are based
out of UBC in Vancouver BC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room.
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/POP
Jayden targets audiences in the
Korean community in Vancouver
to introduce the News on
Korea, Korean Culture while
comparing other Asian Cultures,
playing all kinds of Korean
Music(K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie,
R&B,etc),talking about popular
trends in the industries of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows,
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave
or Hallyu), the news about
Korean Entertainment Industry,
what's going on in the Korean
Society here in Vancouver and
conversations with c
Contact: programming@citr.ca
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
2PM-3PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
third season! This team of
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
folks produce a weekly show
on Indigenous issues, current
affairs, entertainment, culture
and news - all centering
Native voices. Come make
Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Foiiow us @uncededairwaves S
facebook.com/uncededairwaves
120BPM
3PM-4:30PM, music
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
4:30-5PM, TALK/SPORTS
CiTR Sports treat you to
interviews with UBC's top
athletes and Olympians,
off-field stories of the
accomplished sportspeople.
T-Bird Eye is your weekly
roundup of UBC Thunderbirds
sports action with hosts Eric
Thompson, Jake McGrail,
Liz Wang, and Jacob Aere.
Contact: Twitter | @CiTRSports
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC,
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco uvermedicinesho w@gmaii. com
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too) and relished in the merging
of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-10PM, hip hop/ r&b/ soul
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
10PM-11PM, TALK
Listen to your favorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• CONVICTIONS* CONTRADICTIONS
THURS, 8AM-9AM, TALK/COMEDY/
SOCIAL OBESERVATIONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society, shown through social
observational comedy. To boot,
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
• GOODIE
gAM-g:30AM, talk / interview
Goodie is an interview show
with the do-gooders who are
using business, innovation
and creativity to make positive
change in the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• COMEDY ZEITGEIST
g:30AM-ioPM, talk
Comedy Zeitgeist is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr(3>gmaii. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Rocke t From Russia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
• K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners an
introduction to music &
entertainment in Asian Cultures,
especially, Korean, Japanese
and Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
• DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
• FLASHBACK WITH
ALEC CHRISTENSEN
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM-7:30.
TALK/MUSIC/ARTS & CULTURE
Each episode, join host Alec
Christensen and friends
as they discuss the pop
culture and politics affecting
Vancouver and beyond.
Contact: Twitter | flashbackaiec
NO DEAD AIR
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion:
experimental electronic and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook | NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30PM-gpM, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautonomy, com
■ TRitiay
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraitentacies@hotmaii. co m
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse<3>canadaiandshow. com
• SEEKING OFFICE
8AM-9AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
On October 20th, 2018,
Vancouverites will vote in a
new mayor, city council, park
board and school board.
This is a change election,
in the midst of Vancouver's
worst housing crisis. With a
fractured right and a divided
left, CiTR's News Collective
brings you unique coverage
of the issues and individuals
seeking office. Seeking Office
is available for download on
iTunes, Stitcher or where
ever you get your podcasts!
Contact: @CiTRNews
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM, rock/pop/indie
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery and a 'IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
whaf s happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@g maii.com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP/SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on each other
and leave mix tapes and love
letters in each other's lockers xo
Contact:
Facebook \ @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp ://nardwuar. com/rad/con tact/
• WORD ON THE STREET
5PM-6PM, ROCK/INDIE/POP
Hosted by the Music Affairs
Collective, every episode is
packed with up-to-date content
from the Lower Mainland music
communities including news,
new music releases, event
reviews and upcoming events,
interviews with local musicians
and industry professionals and
discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7:30PM, TALK/COMEDY
Every week Jack, Tristan and
a special guest randomly
select a conversation topic
for the entire show; ranging
from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-gpM, r&b/soul/inter-
IMATIONAL
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and future.
This includes jazz, soul:
hip-hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
There are also interviews
with local and international
artists. Truly, a radio show
with international flavour.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skaids_Haii
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock:
drone, ambient, experimental:
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citriatenightshow@gmaii.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
Contact: codebiue@pauinorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact:
mantraradioshow@gmaii. com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavoina@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy:
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmaii.com
SOCASTORM
3pm-9pm, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoN #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
Sbit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79. We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ suntiay
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM,  INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
SPM-gPM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmaii.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
SPM-gPM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem.
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmiieymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
i5vant>°f
tOSTTOUS
■ STUDENTPROGRA
ECLECTIC
Marks any show that is
produced primarily by students.
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citrca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9 FM OCTOBER CHARTS
artist
fflmtn
ilabei
«
Jock Tears*+#
Bad Boys
Inky
i
I   2
Carlo*#
Carlo
Self-Released
I   I
Smithy Ramone*+#
Cursed EP
Gary Cassettes
I   *
Sarah Davachi*#
Gave in Rest
BaDaBing!
I   3
Claire Lynch#
North By South
Compass
I   *
catl*#
Bide My Time Until 1 Die...
Beast Records
I   J
Low#
Double Negative
Sub Pop
I   •
Nicholas Krgovich*+
Ouch
Tin Angel
I   »
Mitski#
Be The Cowboy
Dead Oceans
1   «
The Shit Talkers*+#
1 Scream EP
Self-Released
l«
Jeremy Dutcher*
Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa
Self-Released
e
Chain Whip*+
Chain Whip
Self-Released
I»
Old Soul Rebel*+#
Demo
Self-Released
m
Fake Fruit#
Sack Lunch Demos
Self-Released
1   «
Dumb*+#
Seeing Green
Mint
»
Dilly Dally*#
Heaven
Dine Alone
Ii
Kellarissa*+#
Ocean Electro
Mint
M
Courtney Barnett#
Tell Me How You Really Feel
Milk!
|U
Sugar Brown*#
It's A Blues World (Calling
All Blues!/
Self-Released
M
Fortunate 0nes*#
Hold Fast
Old Farm Pony
|n
Gentle Mind*+#
After Earth
Self-Released
n
Gaye Su Akyol#
Istikrarli Hayal Hakikattir
Glitterbeat
Is
Watermelon**
S/T
Self-Released
I
i*
G0T7
Present: You
JYP Entertainment
la
Land Line*+#
Goodbye Frida
Self-Released
B
Wallgrin*+#
Bird/Alien
Heavy Lark
l»
Empress 0f#
Us
Terrible
»
Rita Braga#
Bird On The Moon
Lunadelia Records
h
Tim Hecker*
Konoyo
Kranky
«
Lou Phelps*
002/Love Me
Last Gang
Ii
Ray Bonneville
At King Electric
Stonefly
m
Bored Decor*+
The Colour Red
Self-Released
1*
Sunday Wilde & Reno
Jack#
Two
HWY11
»
Club Sofa*+#
Club Sofa
Self-Released
1*
Gina Sicilia#
Heard the Lie
Blue Elan
»
Terry Blersh*
Play It All Day
Self-Released
N
Amnesia Scanner
Another Life
PAN
»
Joani Taylor*+#
In A Sentimental Mood
Cellar Live
l«
The 427's*#
Stay Gold
Stingray
41
Garbage Dreams*+#
Demonstrations
Self-Released
1*
Rachel Beck*#
Rachel Beck
Self-Released
®
Widdendream#
In The Night
Self-Released
1*
Kat Danser*#
Goin' Gone
Black Hen
«
Bob Moses*+
Battle Lines
Domino
I  *
Shemekia Copeland#
America's Child
Alligator
4!
Lonely Parade*
The Pits
Buzz
I«
Forma
Semblance
Kranky
M
Coeur De Pirate*#
en cas de tempete, ce jardin
sera ferme
Dare To Care
1*
Natalie Prass#
The Future and the Past
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Orquesta Akokan
Daptone
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GRANTS NOW
AVAILABLE FOR BC'S
MUSIC INDUSTRY
CAREER
DEVELOPMENT
Supporting sound
recording, marketing +
music videos for BC Artists
Deadline:
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LIVE
MUSIC
Supporting BC-based
live music events
Deadline:
November 14,2018
MUSIC INDUSTRY
INITIATIVES
Grants to grow BCs
music industry
Rolling intake until
March 1,2019
 AmplifyBC
APPLY + LEARN MORE AT    creativebc.COITI      QQQ creativebcs
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ADVERTISING@CITR.CA
LET'S SWEETEN THE DEAL,
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EST.,
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ft
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
Nov  1
THE SADIES
Wise  Hall
Nov 2
BIRDTALKER
Fox Cabaret
Nov 3
Nov  5
CITY OF THE SUN  ICEAGE & BLACK LIPS
Fox Cabaret      Rickshaw Theatre
Nov 5
TANK AND THE BANGAS & BIG FREEDIA
Commodore Ballroom
Nov 6
CLOUD NOTHINGS
Imperial
Nov  8
TWDY
Rickshaw
Nov  9
CROOKED COLOURS
Fortune Sound Club
Nov 16
ANDRE NICKATINA
Harbour Events Centre
Nov 20
JORJA SMITH
Orpheum Theatre
Nov 24
SHALLOU
Fox Cabaret
Nov  17 Nov  18
ALL THEM WITCHES  DEAP VALLY
Rickshaw
JL
Rickshaw
Nov 23
JULIEN BAKER & PHOEBE BRID6ERS W LUCY DACUS
Commodore Ballroom
Nov 26
MURS
Fox Cabaret
Nov 28
WINGTIP
Fox Cabaret
Harbour
Nov 29
6LACK
Convention Centre
Nov 29 Nov 30
STIFF LITTLE FINGERS  MAGIC SWORD
Rickshaw        Fox Cabaret
Dec 2
WAFIA
Wise Hall
Dec 3
HOW TO DRESS WELL
Wise  Hall
Dec  4
JMSN
Fox Cabaret
Dec  8
CONNER Y0UNGBL00D
Fox Cabaret
Dec  12
ALLEN STONE
Commodore Ballroom
Dec  12
FUCKED UP
Fox Cabaret
Dec  8
THE SOFT MOON
Fortune  Sound CLub
Dec  9
EZRA FURMAN
Wise  Hall
Dec  12
Dec  14
POLO & PAN     LIL UZI VERT
Imperial  I Pacific Coliseum
Dec 16 Jan 16
I KURT VILE AND THE VIOLATORS I    BAS
Commodore Ballroom      I Fortune
Jan 21
WILD CHILD
Fox Cabaret
Jan 27
SNAIL MAIL
Imperial
Tickets  & more  shows at   timbreconcerts.com

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