Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 2018-09-01

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0378940.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0378940.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0378940-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0378940-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0378940-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0378940-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0378940-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0378940-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0378940-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0378940.ris

Full Text

 wMMwia
i^DjJJ)^
UoL 351 jptot 06 I 3^jgue» 402
JJ
Sept
2018
jjj y y v z s a £
that magazine from CiTR 101.9FM
JLocal + JFree
_
 iiOOiii
254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
blueprint
UPCOMING EVENTS
UPCOMING SHOWS
GRANDSON
FAKE SHARK
J. RODDY WALSTON
& THE BUSINESS
THE PRESETS
BLOOD RED SHOES
BLACK JOE LEWIS
& THE HONEYBEARS
VENUE
VENUE
VENUE
VENUE
CADENCE WEAPON
FORTUNE
Oct 13
FATLIP
(OF THE PHARCYDE)
FORTUNE
THE GRAPES OF WRATH
THE GATHERING
VENUE
JAZZ CARTIER
WINDHAND
THE DODOS
THE GLORIOUS SONS
VENUE
VENUE
_
VENUE
COMMODORE
Nov 07
) MASCIS
(OF DINOSAUR IR)
Nov 08
NEEDLES//PINS
AUTOGRAMM
IMPERIAL
FORTUNE
GALLANT
(ALL AGES)
VOGUE
Nov 17
YOUNG FATHERS
ALGIERS
VENUE
THE FLATLINERS
GODFLESH
VENUE
VENUE
PLEASE CHECK OUT BPLIVE.CA
FOR ADVANCE TICKETS AND MUCH MORE
 TABLE Of COnTEIlTS
SEPTEMBER 2018
COVER I PHOTO OF ANDREA WARNER BY EMMANUEL ETTI.
ifeatutreff
08 - BORED DECOR
Guess what their favourite colour is
09 -  LAND LINE
They're not sorry anymore
16 -  ANDREA WARNER
The author of Buffy Sainte-Marie's biography
on music journalism
17 -  KATIE DUCK & BEN  BROWN
Improvisation, collaboration and mentorship
18 -   COMMERCIAL DRAG
We know where you're going this Sunday
Column* + £Dt&er 3>tuff
04 -  Campus Beat:
Collective Acts
at  the  Belkin Gallery
05 - Filmstripped:
Sean Devlin's
When The Storm Fades
06 -  Venews:
8EAST
07 -   "CAN  LIT GET YOUR  SHIT
TOGETHER"  RETRACTION
10 - Real Live Action
Ponderosa, live music
12 -  Art  Project
by Nada Hayek
13 -  September 2018 Calendar
14 - Under Review
Music, books, podcasts
20 - On The  Air:
Seeking Office
21 -  CiTR Program Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 -  August  Charts
ADVERTISE: Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To learn how
to get involved with Discorder
contact volunteer@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a
cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133
University Blvd. V6T1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute
Discorder in your business,
email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE: We are part of
CiTR, a registered non-profit,
and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you
love.To donate visit:
citr.ca/donate.
To inform Discorder of an
upcoming album release,
art show or significant
happening, please email all
relevant details 4-6 weeks in
advance to Brit Bachmann,
Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
comments, complaints and
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC//Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico//Advertising Coordinator:
Audrey MacDonald // Discorder Student Executive: Fatemeh Ghayedi // Editor-in-Chief: Brit Bachmann
// Under Review Editor: Sydney Ball // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch // Web Editor: Zoe
Power //Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Social Media Coordinator: Sydney Ball // Accounts
Manager: Halla Bertrand // Charts: Myles Black // Production Assistant: Muni Gholamipour, Savilla Fu,
Christina Dasom Song // Writers: Joshua Azizi, Brit Bachmann, Sydney Ball, Katherine Chambers, Evan
Christensen, Jake Clark, Clara Dubber, Leigh Empress, Dusty Exner, Erica Leiren, Lucas Lund, Lua Presidio,
Judah Schulte, Frances Shroff, Eli Teed, Sarah Wang, Jasper D Wrinch // Photographers & Illustrators:
Bryce Aspinall, Evan Buggle, Duncan Cairns-Brenner, Amy Brereton, Patricio Cartas, Emmanuel Etti, Jules
Francisco, Chase Hansen, Alistair Henning, Cian Hogan, Tifanie Lamiel, Rachel Lau, Nicolette Lax, Ewan
Thompson, Emily Valente // Proofreaders: Brit Bachmann, Sydney Ball, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Jake
Clark, Audrey MacDonald, Olamide Olaniyan, Zoe Power, Jasper D. Wrinch, Chris Yee.
Victorious
EDITOR'S NOTE
"Victory" defined by Merriam-Websteris.
1 - the overcoming of an enemy or antagonist
2 - achievement of mastery or success in a struggle or endeavor against odds or difficulties
What does victory mean to you?
At the end of every summer, CiTR / Discorder and partners throw the Victory Square
Block Party, a free outdoor music festival that for all purposes, has nothing to do with
"victory" except that it is the name of the park. When people consider the concept
of "victory" in relation to Victory Square, most associate it with war, the cenotaph
supposedly marking the exact spot where people would have enlisted for World War I when
that site was still a provincial courthouse. I read about it on Wikipedia, as one does, and
learned that it used to be called Government Square. The southwest corner of the park
was the location of the first survey stake by which L. A. Hamilton mapped out the street
system that is now Downtown Vancouver. And in that context, victory is not without a
colonial underpinning. I read that Victory Square was once West Coast rainforest and
that a small creek used to run through it.
As I write this, the Federal Court of Appeal has just ruled that in approving the Trans
Mountain pipeline expansion, the Trudeau cabinet did not adequately consult with
Indigenous nations or consider the consequences on West Coast marine life, and that
work on the project must stop. For many people, this ruling is a victory.
Since becoming Editor-in-Chief, the way I perceive being victorious has changed. It isn't
the publication of a single piece of writing, but the receiving of validation over time. The
fact that people continue to read the magazine and find value in the content we produce,
and that Discorder Magazine continues to publish in an era where magazines are phasing
out print, is a victory.
Victory belongs to those who endure.
In this issue of Discorder Magazine, you'll read about the collaboration between improvisational artists, Katie Duck and Ben Brown; Andrea Warner's experience writing Buffy
Sainte-Marie: The Authorized Biography; the founding of Commercial Drag; the News
Collective's podcast, Seeking Office; the making of Sean Devlin's film, When The Storm
Fades; and plenty of reviews of live shows, albums and books.
A+
BB
CiTR 191.9 FM +DISCORDER
xxxu m\} ■)})[>;
SUBMISSIONS ARE OPEN NOW
TO AFFLY SEND US fl DEMO OF ORIGINAL MATERIAL CONTAINING A
MINIMUM OF I SONGS AND YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION INCLUDING
E-MAIL AND FHOHE NUMBER TO:
SHIHDI0.SLiBMISSI0HS@0MfllL.COM
»» ALL ARE WELCOME ««
(SERIOUSLY, ANY GENRE)
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS:
SEPTEMBER 15
PRIZES INCLUDE STUDIO TIME, MASTERED TRACKS,
A FEATURE IN DISCORDER MAGAZINE, AND OF COURSE,
THE GLORY THAT CAN ONLY COME FROM
A BATTLE THIS EPIC.
} 1
©Discorder 2018 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR.
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiherh speaking Musqueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM.
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500-6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
_
 Discorder magazine | SEPTEMBER 201?
CfilUPUS BEAT
COLLECTIVE ACTS AT THE BELKIN GALLERY
words by Sarah Wang // illustrations by Emily Valente
FDITOR'S NOTE: Campus Beat is a new column dedicated to news / events / organizations
at the Vancouver campus of the University of British Columbia. Through this column, we will
I couer topics that also have broader appeal to our off-campus readers. UBC is more than just a
university; if s a melting pot of different communities, and we want to share it tuitJi you. For this Jirst
column, we are honoured to feature the Belkin Gallery—BB
Beginning with the Seventies:
Collective Acts opens at the Morris
and Helen Belkin Art Gallery on
September 4. Collective Acts is the third in
a series of four exhibitions, its works based
on archival research pertaining to labour
rights, protest, feminism and Indigenous
rights. With artist talks, workshops and
additional programming in the coming
months, the Belkin is setting the scene for
intergenerational knowledge exchange and
discussions around contemporary issues.
"In fact," says Curator Lorna Brown,
"there's very few works from the '70s in
the series." Beginning with the Seventies
came out of an opportunity to reconsider
and contextualize 1970s art, activism
and community archives. Brown, who
is also the Belkin's Acting Director, had
noticed increasing interest in work from
the decade, and the intersections of art
and cultural practices. As a writer and an
artist, aware of the limitations of archival
documentation from the era, she set about
to conceive a project based on informal
records and archives not widely accessible.
In Collective Acts, the works are tied to
themes of labour and self-organizing,
with an emphasis on women in
activism. Research by Lakota artist, Dana
Claxton and the ReMatriate Collective
focuses on the Service, Office and Retail
Workers' Union of Canada (SORWUC) -
many of them Indigenous women — and
their strike against Muckamuck Restaurant
from 1978-81. Heather Kai Smith (who was
also Discordefs art feature in May 2018) is
exhibiting drawings based on photos from
the Women's Encampment for a Future of
Peace and Justice, a group which actively
protested military violence in Seneca,
New York in the 1980s. Another section,
curated by writer and former Curatorial
Intern, Jordan Wilson, looks at the revival
of traditional weaving and the Salish
Weavers Guild, who adopted cooperative
working methods and gained widespread
recognition.
The first exhibition of the series,
GLUT, recreated the Vancouver Women's
Bookstore (1973-96), addressing notions
of performance and language. Several
of the bookstore's founders took part at
events during the exhibition. Similarly,
for Collective Acts, Brown anticipates the
participation of those who were involved
with the particular organizations, and who
are still around. These are prized encounters,
she explains: "You can read about it, but the
face-to-face interaction is pretty valuable, for
the people who were involved in the '70s and
[the ones] who came along later. It's a kind
of learning that is really interesting in the
context of the university gallery, to create
situations for that exchange to happen."
The Belkin functions as a site
of education and research in
addition to exhibitions, serving
UBC students and faculty, as well as those
VANCOUVERARTBOOKFAIR.COM
o
ouv
AAAAA/VAAAA
•\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
SEVENTH ANNUAL
*00*X
OCTOBER 18-21,2018
THE EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY
OF ART + DESIGN
BOOKS • MAGAZINES • ZINES • PRINT EPHEMERA
TALKS • PERFORMANCE • ARTIST PROJECTS
fY
^
I'unisiicoi.rMni \
VANCOUVER
Vancouver
A'icjallery
VANDOCL'MKNT
HzSuSI^
—  esse
GEIST       Langara.
across Vancouver. According to Brown, the
community archives of grassroots organizations "may not be viewed as the most
valuable resources," but through Beginning
with the Seventies, these collections are
given as much importance as archives
held in academic institutions. This is true
to the Belkin's prioritization of work that
challenges the status quo.
Brown also seeks to alter the gallery into
a site for production during Collective Acts,
with the introduction of a ribbon skirt
making station. Additionally, visitors will
find an interactive projection where they
can add to a network of artistic 'influencers.'
Care has been taken to make the gallery
"accommodating to bodies," transforming
it into a place people will want to hang
out. Much of the labour highlighted in the
historical records, and the works themselves,
suggests the ways material and cultural
production can feed into one another.
Beginning with the Seventies takes the '70s
as its starting point, yet, Brown maintains,
"it's also historically critical, looking at
these movements and the ways in which
they've failed as much as they've succeeded."
Through exhibition and programming,
Brown hopes to facilitate dialogue. Perhaps
the experiences of the past can lend wisdom
to art and the social activism of today.
"It's about generative moments or
catalytic moments," Brown says. "That's the
hope, anyway."
Beginning with the Seventies: Collective Acts
runs September -^December 2 with an opening
reception on Thursday, September 6. There will
be an artist talk with Christina UOnofrio and
Heather Kai Smith on September 29; a symposium
on November 2; a workshop with Christine
UOnofrio on November 3; and a concert with
UBC Contemporary Players on November 28. For
more information, including location and hours
of operation, visit belfeinubcxa.
4
CAMPUS BEAT|Collective Acts at Belkin Gallery
 8ios HaaMaTias | snixogDm ™b-ro38ia
fOISTRIPPED
SEAN DEVLIN'S WHEN THE STORM FADES
words  by Dusty Exaer  //   illustrations  by Rachel  Lau
photo  by Alistair Hermiog
■ 4 atching When The Storm Fades,
I audiences may find themselves
^^F   most compelled by a character
who isn't seen in the film at all; Ida, a
member of the Pablo family who didn't
survive Typhoon Yolanda, or Typhoon
Haiyan as it was reported internationally.
She is only spoken about by her family
members, mostly her sister Nilda.
"There is all this data about why women
are more likely to die in a natural disaster,"
explains writer and director Sean Devlin,
known for ShitHarperDid.com and his work
with the Yes Men. "One of the reasons is that
when facing life or death, the women are
generally the ones who are going to sacrifice
[themselves] for the family."
Such is the case with the Pablos, an actual
family who live in Tacloban, Leyte Island, the
same island in the Philippines where Devlin's
mother grew up. In 2013, Devlin travelled
there to make a short documentary after
Typhoon Yolanda and encountered the Pablo
family, who had lost everything. "I met the
family and fell in love with them, which made
me want to get to know them better and find
ways to share their story in a way that would
benefit them tangibly," says Devlin.
He did that by writing and directing
When The Storm Fades over the course of
two years, financed in part through crowd-
funding. Devlin calls the film "experimental"
in its direction, blending documentary
filmmaking, and improvised comedy
with two "voluntourists," played by Aaron
Read and Kayla Lorette. The documentary
aspect of the film was made with the Jemez
principles in mind, a set of principles that
guide democratic organizing, and in this
case, guided Devlin and his participants.
"The script, in the end, contained basically
no dialogue. The movie was almost entirely
improvised," he explains. "I didn't want to
be putting words in the family's mouths
— people can speak for themselves." As for
the part of the script that was more planned
out, Devlin enlisted professionals: "Aaron
and Kayla are two of the best improvisers
in the world. They've won awards for their
work, and I felt that improv was the best way
to approach [their scenes]."
Read and Lorette play two Canadians,
ostensibly in Tacloban to help rebuild the
community, but who are more interested
in taking selfies. The inspiration for
these characters is based on Devlin's
own experience as a volunteer in Ghana,
and even as a Filipino-Canadian in the
Phillippines. "The silly things they're doing
are mostly things I did myself in my early
20s," he explains. "I had never seen a film
that depicts white characters in a foreign
country being anything other than white
saviours, and I know that not to be true in
the real world."
Os with all of Devlin's projects,
environmental activism is a strong
pulse in this film. "I've been working
around climate change for over a decade
now, and when you start to look [...] at
the mess that has already been created
in communities like Tacloban, there are
no easy answers. Unless we consider how
complicated it is, we won't know how to start
on the right foot. Part of my interest with
the film was to tell a story that made space
for some of that complexity and nuance."
At its heart, When The Storm Fades forces
the viewer to face the devastation of climate
change. Devlin explains, "Every climate
change film I've seen is so bogged down with
overwhelming statistics and this picture of a
massive problem. I wanted to bring that down
to a human scale, to a family scale, that I
think people can feel some resonance with."
Half of the money crowdfunded towards
the creation of When The Storm Fades
went directly to the Pablo family to help
them get back on their feet, the rest went
to production costs. 50 per cent of any
potential profits will also go to the family.
"I'm interested in art that crosses boundaries
and doesn't just exist in sanctioned spaces
for creativity's sake," says Devlin. "Can the
financial [profits from] this production
actually make for a happy ending for this
family?"
By virtue of this film being created, the
answer is yes, though Ida's loss is still felt
by the Pablo family. Through a creative and
collaborative filmmaking process that prioritized the voices of the survivors themselves,
When The Storm Fades gives space for grief
and the commemoration of life. Devlin
poignantly captures the cost of climate
change and balances it with his own brand of
comedic satire.
When The Storm Fades will premiere at the
Vancouver International Film Festival, running
from September 27 to October 12 at cinemas across
the city. The Jull Jestiual schedule, including
screening times for When The Storm Fades
will be announced on September S. For more
in/ormation on Sean Devlin's documentary, visit
whenthestormfadesjcom.
FILMSTRIPPEDJ Sean Devlin's   When   The   Storm  Fades
5
_
 Discorder magazine | SEPTEMBER 201?
UEflEUUS
8EAST
words by Clara Dubber
illustrations by Jules Francisco
photos by Patricio Cartas
■ 4 here Selectors' Records was
I located in Chinatown, there is
^^r   now an art-space inspired by
its predecessor. It's 8EAST, a joint project
between the Unit/Pitt Society for Art and
Critical Awareness and the New Orchestra
Workshop (NOW) Society. The two
organizations aim to create "a social space
for culture," according to Kay Higgins,
U/P's Executive Director. Managed by
Higgins and Lisa Cay Miller, an avant-garde
composer and NOW's Artistic Director,
8EAST technically opened in July. But this
fall, it will fully come into its own when
it launches a retail component and begins
hosting more events.
U/P was founded in 1975 and NOW
Society in 1977, and while 8EAST is a way
of returning to their respective roots, the
organizations are approaching this venture
with independent motivations. Higgins
explains that for U/P, 8EAST represents
a combination of their present and past
by celebrating its move away from traditional gallery shows, and also celebrating
their activist spirit of the 1980s. For NOW,
8EAST is a return to having a designated
space for improvisational new music. Miller
sees it as a place to exercise "the daily
practice, which for [NOW] involves being
present and listening."
Though 8EAST resists the title of
"artist-run centre," it is inspired by
the energy of artists who founded the
first official ARCs in the 1970s. These centres
provided space for interactions that did not
necessarily have a purpose beyond experimentation and cultivating culture. While
influenced by ARCs, Miller maintains that
"it's valuable for 8EAST to not [become] an
organization." She continues, "I want to have
a [...] continuous discussion about how things
are working. [...] We can do that without being
an organization, almost easier."
So, how exactly can you interact with
the space? NOW will be hosting new music
events, as well as a listening station where
people may experience recordings. There
will also be a small shop for merchandise
created by artists working with NOW and
U/P as an homage to Selectors' Records. As
Higgins suggests, the shop atmosphere is "an
entry point that's not intimidating."
One of the first large projects at 8EAST
will be a community meeting series meant
to develop concrete plans for how artists'
organizations like U/P and NOW can best
use their resources and capacities to resist the
effects of displacement and inequality. This
includes acknowledging their own complicity.
Higgins considers it a step towards fulfilling
an obligation "to use whatever organizational
resources we have in a way that does not do
harm, and hopefully counteracts some of
the harm already done to our surrounding
community." Miller believes that their artistic
communities will recognize that they "have a
responsibility wider than just [themselves]."
U/P and NOW are choosing to participate
in complex discussions that are being had
by organizations across Vancouver that are
waking up to their culpability. As Higgins
explains, "[artists] have been using poor
neighbourhoods for cover and [...] been
giving very little back." She continues,
"Though artists are seen as a mid-stage
of gentrification, [they're] victimized by
it as well." In this, Higgins sees commonality between the precarity of artist centres
and the precarity of sensitive neighbourhoods. 8EAST is meant to act as a gathering
space for artists to learn how to engage in
these conversations with compassion and
accountability. Higgins acknowledges,
"There's so much to [...] engage with and
[we're] coming to it fairly ill-equipped."
As a starting point, 8EAST plans to offer
their space to activist organizations and
community organizers as an attempt to
minimize the violence of their presence.
Through 8EAST, U/P and NOW hope
that their communities will come together
in art and dialogue, and mark a new era of
artist-run.
8EAST is located at the corner of East Pender
and Carroll Street, and on the unceded territories
of the Musgueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh
First Nations. Visit 8east.ca for upcoming
programming.
6
VENEWSI8EAST
 ^miimiiiMMMMMitainmftthiTTimrTiflifhirmmtanniTVm^ ■
= In issue 401, Summer 2018, Discorder Magazine published an opinion piece by Keagan Perlette, a
= former student in the UBC Creative Writing Program, under the heading "Canlit, Get Your Shit
= Together."
= The article primarily concerned the response by UBC and the Canadian literary community to the
= allegations made against the former chair of the program, Steven Galloway, from the perspective of
= a student in that program.
t-^| iu.
= However, in discussing that issue, Ms. Perlette wrote, and Discorder published, statements that may   3i h
■ rE have been understood to mean that she had actual and direct knowledge that Mr. Galloway had
= committed assault against a student or students in the program. In fact, Ms. Perlette had no such
: direct knowledge regarding the allegations made against Mr. Galloway.
= Ms. Perlette and Discorder hereby retract without reservation those parts of the article that suggest
= she had such knowledge and apologize to Mr. Galloway for any harm the publication of those state-
: ments may have caused.
E Ms. Perlette and Discorder further acknowledge that this allegation against Mr. Galloway was inves-
E tigated by a former judge of the BC Supreme Court, who found these allegations concerning Mr.
| Galloway were unsubstantiated.
The article has subsequently been removed from Discorder's website.
IIIIIW4im4IWmHHHUW4WMII^mHWMIIIIIIIIIIIIIHW44H4m4l
■-rrijhrbi
Fsl'
^v.'jr
■
i^r
■■i-.-
j
■»"■ i
ST**'id
H
1
\jSm
A
_
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018
words by Elijah Teed // photos by Evan Buggle
illustrations by Bryce Aspinall
IT'S JANUARY; you and your three closest friends
are in a studio without heat or insulation; your
fingers are freezing, and your dad is behind the board
sipping tea, coolly recording your first album in
as few takes as possible. While it would be easy to
describe that experience as either heart-warming
or traumatizing, for Bored Decor, it was close
to perfect.
"It was very nice to have my dad record
the album for us," says Neriah Mair,
drummer for the band. "He's a huge snob,
like a massive snob, and he would not do that
for me unless he was into the music. So, for
me to feel like it was worth bringing him in was
really nice."
While the comfort of having someone so close to the
band record their debut LP, The Colour Red, was a huge boon,
the reality of recording in the winter demanded as short a
studio experience as possible.
"It was freezing cold," explains Nikolas Barkman, lead singer
and one half of Bored Decor's guitar players. "We recorded the
whole thing in two live sets [over two days]. Everything on the
album was probably done in three takes."
"We were trying to do it really quickly, to be honest," Mair
laughs. "We were trying not to waste any time."
Beyond the recording process, the idea of not wanting to
waste time seems to be Bored Decor's modus operandi. The
Colour Red is a miscellany of old material — the type of songs
that have been rehearsed and polished to the point that they
could be laid down live in only a couple tries. Sonically, it's
a joy to listen to, with the band entirely in their
element, ripping through the kind of tunes
you can't help but imagine jumping along
to in the front row of a show.
What's more, the addition of their
newest member, guitarist Colin
Osier, was very much a result of not
wanting to waste time either. With
the brief departure of pianist and
organ player Ryan Quist from Bored
Decor's line-up, Barkman and Mair felt
No Time     ,
„ Like The
Present
the need to bring someone else on board in short order.
"I had a feeling that Colin would show up and be a
really good fit," Mair explains. "It was instant — first
practice, first five minutes, it was very clear it was going
to work out."
Practically overnight, Bored Decor turned from a
three-piece into a four-piece, as Quist returned to
the band shortly after Osier's first practice.
"It was very comforting coming into a band
and having songs already be written," says
Osier. "I knew Neriah and Nik, and Ryan and I
got along well. The process of getting to know
them was very much fast-forwarded."
i
u
espite the immediate closeness and
camaraderie of the band, when it comes to
writing music, those attributes aren't
necessarily at the forefront of Bored Decor's creative
process.
"It's not the kind of thing where we're not nice
or anything, I just think we're all quite strange,"
Mair quips.
"I think there's an element of every one of us
individually having very different tastes," Barkman
adds. "[Our] music can be very weird, we're all over the
place in terms of influence."
It's a statement that rings true on The Colour Red. Guitar
lines that at first sound like they're from Tony Iommi's
personal catalogue quickly brighten into something more
Jonathan Richman-esque; Barkman's lyricism and vocal
styling, at times bluesy and warbling, can just as quickly pop
off with a punk punch. It's easy to see that Bored Decor
takes inspiration from all kinds of music, and they're
happy to admit it: from punk to pop, blues to
hip hop, and all the weird shit Quist listens to
that the band lovingly chides him for.
s
peaking to their writing process, the group
agrees that they still approach songs with
an ear for how they'll sound live, rather
than fixate on what they could concoct in a studio.
"There's a pretty big divide
between live music and
recorded music," says Quist. "If"
I was writing for recording, I
don't even know if I'd want to
perform those songs; it almost
wouldn't be the intended
medium."
Barkman adds, "That's a
record-first, show-after situation, where I think we go in the
opposite direction."
To that end, Bored Decor are dedicated to the idea that
their live shows be more than four guys playing music
onstage. The notion of performance is one that they hope to
push further as time goes on, with Mair suggesting their ideal
show would comprise of 40 minutes of music with 20
minutes of other theatrics, but acknowledges the
hardships of trying to make that a reality when
you're playing short sets to new audiences.
In the meantime, the band continues
to find inspiration watching their peers
in action, citing shows from local acts like
YEP and Crack Cloud who can perform "so
seriously, yet so casually."
"It's funny because that's probably the thing
that's happened over the last year that has changed
us the most," Barkman opines. "It's not our own shows, but
seeing other acts and discovering new bands that really give
us inspiration musically, but also just through the way that
they carry themselves."
With no time to waste, Bored Decor are pursuing new
shows to play and new material to write. Just try and stay
warm this time, fellas.
Do yourself a favour and go see Bored Decor's album release show
at Red Gate on September 22, tuith openers Champion Lawnmower,
Watersports and Peggy and the Discount Country Band. There will a
subsequent dance party hosted by the wonderful women of D.AME..
'Bored Decor'
 8ios HaaMaTias | snixogDm ™b-ro38ia
EflUfAH
SORRYEDITH'S
LAST INTERVIEW
words by Judah Schulte
illustration by Amy Brereton
photos by Duncan Cairns-Brenner
POST-PUNK REVIVAL TRIO,
Sorry Edith, have been steadily
gaining a reputation since the
release of their debut EP, Goodbye
Frida, in 2017. Along with being finalists in
this past Shindig, CiTR 101.9FM's battle of the
bands competition, the group is releasing an EP
in September and embarking on a cross-Canada
tour with local legends, The Pack A.D.. To the
outside observer, these developments might seem
sudden, but the band — Aubrey Pedersen on vocals
and guitar, Kaylee Willier on keyboard and bass,
and Deona Zammit on drums — explain that a
lot of work and revision led them to where they
are today. They also shed light on why they have
decided to change their name.
Kaylee and Aubrey met through an act of
musical matchmaking. "[Our mutual friend]
knew that we both wanted to form a band, so she
connected us. She even paid the bouncer at the
door of The Cambie so we could jump the line. It
was like a blind music date," says Aubrey. Meeting
Deona at a house party soon after, the triad was
complete. Minutes into their first jam session,
they knew it was a match made in heaven. "We
were all shocked," explains Deona, "I hadn't played
drums in almost a decade." Aubrey adds, "It was
magic."
It was two years before they founded Sorry
Edith. In its early stages, the group underwent
several genre shifts influenced by two separate
lead singers that came and left. As a reverse
solution to the problem that most bands face, the
group came into its own not by adding a member,
but by taking one away. Aubrey explains, "We had
a show booked and a month before it, the lead
singer quit the band. We told the guy organizing
that we had to back out because our singer quit,
and he was like, Well, don't think you can do it
on your own, just you three?'" With their lineup
simplified, the group was left with what they
wanted: a hard hitting and emotionally-driven
sound. "We just get each other," says Deona, "and
to realize that is all we needed."
Shindig was a constructive experience for the
group. In the six-mo nth span of the competition,
they honed their performance skills and plugged
into the local music community. "For the longest
time we were just playing for our friends," says
Deona. Kaylee adds, "It was also really great to
hear the other bands starting up in Vancouver."
The trio's manager is Maya Miller, a member
of The Pack A.D. and an important figure
in Vancouver's music scene. "She saw us
play a show at Pub 340," says Kaylee. "A couple
months later, a band dropped out of a show [The
Pack A.D.] was playing, and she asked us to open
for them. It was a huge moment for us. I had
actually bought tickets to that show." Aubrey tells
a story about how Kaylee once jumped off the
stage at a Pack A.D. show, and when the laughter
subsides, she adds, "[Maya] knows the industry so
well and is always lighting a fire under us. We're
lucky to have her."
It was at that same show that the artists met
Jason Corbett, frontperson for ACTORS and
producer of their new EP. Dropping mid-September, the new material will contain much of
the high-energy rock that is synonymous with the
band's live sets, but delivered with more punch
and polish. One big difference will be the name
under which it will be released.
"The name Sorry Edith came from the idea of
an apology to women that came before us, and the
'Land Line'
hardships they faced. You know, Edith is an older
name," explains Deona. Though the band has an
obvious attachment to the name, both its meaning
and commercially as a brand, they have decided to
have a name that is familiar but still thought-provoking, just like their music. That name is Land
Line. "A lot of people will immediately think
of landline phones, which is good," says Kaylee.
"We want to inspire a nostalgic feeling; people
have told us our music is retro. But, the words are
separated, the lines of the land, which could nod
to a lot of things: borders, lines in sedimentary
rocks, maps. We like the ambiguity of it."
After three years of playing music together,
Sorry Edith has undergone many changes. Like
arrows on a map, their practice and effort points
to their greatest change yet; a new territory named
Land Line, and it's booming with promise.
Land Line plays CiTR/Discorder's Victory Square
Block Party on September 2. They are embarking on a
tour with The Pack AD., but you can stay updated by
following them on Twitter @LANDLINEvancity and
Facebook.com/landlinebandvancouver.
9
_
 Heal Hue
fiction
AUGUST 2018
PONDEROSA 2018
AUGUST 17-19 @ ROCK CREEK FAIRGROUNDS,
ROCK CREEK, BC
nt its most extreme, summer in Vancouver can reach just beyond
a comfortable heat. Rain disappears for weeks at a time, lawns
yellow and a smoky haze settles over the city, obscuring the mountain view.
Though the signs are there, summer in Vancouver is hardly a litmus test
for the catastrophic shift in the global climate — but follow the smoke that
hangs over our urban heads back to its source and the urgency sets in.
Just a few hours east of the city, nestled in the Kettle River Valley, the
town of Rock Creek marked its sixth year hosting Ponderosa Festival
(actually fifth — the festival was cancelled in 2015 due to wildfires). Known
for bringing together a diverse array of A-list and up-and-coming Canadian
artists in intimate showcases in the picturesque Southern Okanagan,
Ponderosa was one of the most comfortable, welcoming and impressive
festivals I've attended. And while I didn't see a single disappointing
performance over the course of the weekend — club sofa's Sunday
afternoon set guaranteed my attendance at their upcoming album release
show in Vancouver, and k-os's only show of the year was a truly chaotic
trip back to 2004 in the best way possible — the music was quite literally
overshadowed by the smoke pluming out of nearby wildfires.
On Friday afternoon, driving along the Crowsnest Highway, I left the
slight haze behind, travelling through the clear and crisp Manning Park and
straight past Princeton. As I crested a hill, just before the town of Hedley, a
thick cloud appeared on the horizon. Too detailed and too defined to be a
normal summertime cloud, I soon realized that it was a pillar of smoke, not
a cloud, that dominated the sky. Snaking through the mountains, the plume
grew larger overhead until finally the highway descended into a smoke-filled
valley. Like a curtain being drawn on the afternoon sun, the smoke
enveloped the landscape. The light dimmed and browned, and a fine ash
started drifting down from above.
The conditions only grew worse as I neared Keremeos. It was only 3PM,
but the sun couldn't penetrate the smoke. An orange glow peaked over the
mountains to the south with the faint flickering of flames slowly crawling
over the summits, the ridge of a fire 13,000 hectares and growing.
All the way to Rock Creek, the smoke lingered, causing the entire
region, and the entire festival to smell like campfire.
The festival carried on, though. Campsites were erected, blankets were
laid out on the grass and the music began. The morning chill lingered a
few extra hours, before a stagnant, indirect heat settled over the grounds.
At night, the stage lights extended out, casting crisp beams of colour into
the absolutely colourless sky. As entertaining as acts like Douse and Blue
Hawaii were, the music seemed only to serve as a distraction from the
obvious crisis looming just over those hidden hills. At Ponderosa, it was
impossible not to pay attention. —Jasper D Wrinch
SARAH JANE SCOUTEN /TWIN BANDIT
AUGUST 21 / FOX CABARET
History repeats itself. If you were to flip back in time to the September
2017 issue of Discorder, you'd find a curiously similar review. Here
I was again, alone at the Fox Cabaret, watching Sarah Jane Scouten
perform her sweet selection of folk and country tunes. As if the past year
hadn't even happened, the four-piece
band in support were even wearing
the same black shirts, embroidered
with the album artwork from Scouten's
latest release, 2017's When The
Bloom Falls From The Rose.
Like any good case of deja vu, the
whole scene seemed to be unreal,
as if I had stumbled onto a movie
set during the second take. I found
myself leaning up against the same
patch of wall as I had been the year
before, watching Scouten belt out
the situationally apt lyrics from her
two-stepping "Man In Love," with
lyrics, "'Cause you're not acting like
a man in love at all / And if I could I'd
undo the years."
After a few uneasy moments,
I forcibly removed myself from
reliving the past by moving up to the
balcony. As if I had broken out of the
timeline, the band began to play some
unfamiliar songs and brought a welcome sense of freshness.
As I described last year, Scouten's set was "a highlight reel of everything
country, roots and folk, from Dolly Parton-esque dancing numbers, to
somber ballads evoking Emmylou Harris," though this time around, her band
was lacking the "Andrews Sisters-style harmonies courtesy of the Scouten
sisters," as her sister, Anna Scouten, was not there. Regardless, the ease
with which the band evoked that distinctive '60s and 70s style Country &
Western was incredible to watch. With Sam Gleason's guitar solos emulating
a pedal steel, Elise Boeur's tasteful fiddling and James McEleney's walking
bass lines, the band perfectly filled out Scouten's sound. Playing both of my
favourite SJS songs, When The Bloom Falls From The Rose opener "Acre of
Walker downed a shot of tequila before diving into their tongue-in-cheek "I
Denied You," a song dedicated to Elliot's new husband.
With any good folk or country song, the pleasure doesn't come from
surprising musical turns or unexpected twists — the song structures, the
chord progressions, the themes are usually the same, or at least familiar,
from song to song. The pleasure instead comes from knowing what wil
happen and the feeling of satisfaction when it does. Like predicting the
future on a small scale, the musical resolve in a traditional tune makes it
worth revisiting. And so, waiting for the songs that I knew were coming,
the satisfaction was all the more sweet. Sarah Jane Scouten played her
timeless folk songs as I sat predicting the future, in my small way, that next
summer's show is bound to be even better. —Lucas Lund
SONIC SUMMER NIGHTS #3:
COLIN COWAN 8THE ELASTIC STARS/
BLUE J/THE GOOD, THE BAD AND
THE BANJO
AUGUST 22 / JONATHAN ROGERS PARK
:T
he southeast corner of Jonathan Rogers Park was a mosaic of
blankets, creeping up the steep embankment on the edge of the
field. Just out of range from about thirty hollering rugby players, the Sonic
Summer Nights stage was plugged in and lighted, awaiting the final show of
its three-part series.
Flanking the stage, two surprisingly inconspicuous solar panels rested,
facing upwards towards the smoky sky. Amazingly, those panels were the
sole source of power for the entire setup, the masked sun still managing to
charge one of Portable Electric's Volt Stack power stations with clean and
silent power. Just as much as the evening was a showcase of local music
talent, the show was a proof that there are more sustainable options than
noisy, fossil-fuel burning generators for special events.
First to the stage were The Good, The Bad and The Banjo. While it's
clear who The Banjo was, The Good and The Bad were toss ups between
the bassist and guitar player / vocalist. With a mix of originals and covers,
the folk trio from Maple Ridge were casual on stage, comfortably strumming
with little to no outward signs of enthusiasm or effort. And while they were
demonstrably capable musicians, the whole set seemed more akin to a
backyard jam session between friends than a public performance. The
most exhilarating moment of their set came when the sound of the bass
Blue  J
photo   coi
1
-
irtesy   of Frances  Schroff.
■0m^   ■        J^m
•1
1 r *l m» * m
•                                       IV
#48*
M I
Shells" and the soon-to-be-released "Show Pony," her set hit all the marks.
All temporal confusion aside, the show wasn't all the same. Last year's
Bill Jr. Jr. were replaced by Twin Bandit, the Vancouver folk duo. Singing
almost exclusively in crisp and tight harmony, Jamie Elliot and Hannah
Walker set the mood perfectly. Each strumming a guitar, and with the
support of Scott Smith on pedal steel and Michael Rush on standup bass,
Twin Bandit sang their anachronistic songs of love, heartbreak and growth
from their upcoming record, Full Circle. The highlight of their set came when
disappeared without warning partway through a song. Had the power
source revealed a weakness? Did the relatively simple setup of the first
band overload the generator? As the rest of the band continued on with
the song, the bass player, along with the sound person troubleshot every
moving part, eventually swapping out the amplifier, bringing the bass back
to life. The power had not failed, and Portable Electric's demonstration had
not been embarrassingly derailed during the first act.
As the rugby players packed up behind, The Good, The Bad and The
10
REAL   LIVE  ACTION
Discorder magazine ! SEPTEMBER 2018
 Banjo followed suit, making way for the second act, Blue J. Less than one
week after releasing their debut EP, the indie pop quartet was as tight as
they could be, considering their music is about as mellow and relaxed as
music can be. Drummer Adam Fink's simple and steady beats synced up
perfectly with Mark Whiting's lazily driving bass lines, while Lindsay Sjoberg
and Justice McLellan filled out the atmosphere with synths and guitar. Over
the course of their set, the sun sank below the hazy horizon, and I felt the
closest I've ever been to being within a coming-of-age rom-com.
With the sun down, the final act took the stage. Colin Cowan & The
Elastic Stars ended the night at its most energetic, bringing out their
pysch-heavy brand of pop to the park. The ever-morphing Elastic Stars
were a four-piece this time around, with Colin Cowan on guitar and vocals,
Jenn Bojm on bass, Josh Zubot on violin and Johnny Payne on drums and
backup vocals. Bringing out tracks from all over Cowan's four seasons
records, as well as a few choice fragments of Deep Purple's "Smoke on
the Water," The Elastic Stars were far from polished, but the humour and
energy with which they performed made up for it.
With one final burst of a song, The Elastic Stars wrapped up the
evening and the crowd spread out along the embankment wrapped up their
blankets, marking the end of the Sonic Summer Nights. —Frances Shroff
POETRY IS BAD FOR YOU #8 W/ ROSALIE
/ CLAIRE GEDDES BAILEY /MONICA
MCCREA/SELINA BO AN/KIR AMOK/
SANTIAGO URENA
AUGUST 23 / TOAST COLLECTIVE
for me, poetry has always been something to study, to sit with alone
and pore over the carefully constructed language. I've always been
of the mind that poetry is this dense web of words with specific meaning
tucked away somewhere deep inside, and the duty of the reader is to
navigate through, in search of that clear meaning that makes the words
snap into place. Of course, I know that my view of poetry erases any
emphasis on the act of reading it aloud, of sharing it in specific time and
place, of the communal experience that comes from hearing rather than
reading. And I know that that emphasis on the oratory element of poetry
has always been essential to the form, that poetry predates writing systems,
that there is something more in the experience of poetry than can be found
in what is written.
So I went to the Toast Collective for the eighth edition of Poetry Is Bad
For You, a somewhat regular showcase of local poets reading their work
aloud, to get a glimpse at what poetry can be away from the page.
The Toast was full, but still cosy, with every seat filled by those eager
to hear what the night's six poets had to say. With a brief introduction
to the series and land acknowledgment by co-host Eirinn, the first poet
stood up on stage. Santiago Urena started by saying that they had one of
Bach's Cello Suites stuck in their head. "Just pretend that it's playing in the
background as I read." Santiago went on to read a few long poems that
dealt with crying in public, childhood queerness and what would happen
to the world if humans were to disappear. Imbued with a sense of somber
magic, only emphasized by a soft but commanding voice, Santiago's
reading was the perfect way to get the night started.
Next up was Kira Mok, who stated right off the bat that this was their
first time reading in public. Cheered on by the warm audience, Kira dove
into a markedly different style than Santiago's: short, image-heavy bursts of
poetry — only a few sentences per poem — that explored themes of inter-
generational trauma and visceral depictions of psychosis. The thematic
heaviness was beautifully counteracted by Kira's light and mostly deadpan
comments between each piece.
After a short intermission and a shuffling forward by the audience,
Selina Boan got up to read. Her third poem was the highlight of the
evening. What started as a found poem, bringing together various
headlines and clippings from articles about the Trans Mountain pipeline
expansion, became a collage of personal and familial snippets of narrative,
while Selina slowly counted up the billions of dollars spent buying the
expansion project, trying to "flip a pipeline like a house."
Monica McCreawas up next, another first-time reader, whose poems
were varied in style and length. Their self-admitted "assignment for school"
titled "Instructions for a Straight Man Desiring a Queer Woman," was at
once a passionate derision of toxic masculinity and a declaration of the
power and magic of queerness. Monica's final piece, "Femme," was a
thematic echo, detailing their relationship with the femme identity.
Beginning with a list-like poem called "My Body," chronicling the many
ways in which she, intentionally or not, abstains from self-care, Claire
Geddes Bailey's reading was measured in an incredible way. Her second
piece, another highlight of the evening, was more akin to prose than any
8ios HaaMaTias | 9nhD|>Dm ™b-ro38i<l
poems shared thus far. It was a fragmented, autobiographical narrative
careening through ideas of homesickness, artistic creation and unfulfilled
past relationships, presented through a series of understated but rich
images of encountering moose on the shore and hearing from a friend
about them seeing a person laying down on the unstable ice of the North
Saskatchewan River. Claire's unwavering voice exuded a kind of quiet
confidence that made for a truly remarkable experience.
Finally, Rosalie wrapped up the night, with a selection of poems more
markedly in the Slam tradition than any of the preceding readers. Their
quick and emotionally saturated diction made for a poignant set of poetry
including an ode to Funky Winkerbeans, a meditation on the weight of a
name in relation to their Acadian heritage and a response to the apathy of
older generations towards those trying to make a better world.
As I walked away from the Toast, having finally been a part of a collective
poetic experience, I understood a little better. If I were to have read those
same pieces, I would've had a very different idea of what those poets were
trying to say. Hearing their inflections, feeling the mood in the room twist
alongside the words, seeing how the people around me responded to the
poems, I knew that a new world of poetry had been opened up to me. Poetry
may be bad for me, but it sure felt good to be a part of it. —Lucas Lund
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and
online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences.
Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
W EST WAf» $ t,
A4USK FEf TiTAL
TIER,.
BLOOD ORANGE • KALI UCHIS • RHYE
POPPY • ANGEL OLSEN • HONNE    '
j KELELA • ANDYSHAUF • SOPHIE f
CIGARETTES AFTER SEX • SABA
CHAD VAN GAALEN • METZ • ELLA MAI   fQ!
RAVYN LENAE • MUDHONEY • BAD GYAL J
ASAP TWELVYY • ODDS • WE ARE THE CITY^
TEI SHI • PELL • DUCKWRTH • BUDDY
FATIMA AL QADIRI • RON! SIZE • JO PASSED
MARGARET GLASPY • JENNIFER CASTLE • JORDAN KLASSEN
MILK & BONE • NEHIYAWAK • BULOW • JOHNNY BALIK
KALLITECHNIS • CLOSE TALKER • W00LW0RM • COMMON HOLLY
AUTOGRAMM • OHMME • JASPER SLOAN YIP • LUCA FOGALE
IS - GDLDSTEPZ • DIANA BOSS - NEI
COMMON DEER • SUPERMOON • ACKEETECUMSEH
i THE DEAD FIBRES • JADE MONET • JENNYBANAI • ABRAHAM
BULLET BILL - BIZ DAVIS - DJ OENZILL ^
AAA**
AAAAA?
TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT: WESTWARDFEST.COM  T1CKETFLY.COM * RED CAT RECORDS
VOGUE THEATRE ORPHEIM THEATRE BILTMORE CABARET f OX CABARET ■ RICKSHAW THEATRE VENUE RIO THEATRE FORTUNE SOUND CLUB IMPERIAL
MRG   fisSS  &*. mmm straight £
■^^^H
REAL   LIVE   ACTION
11
_
  *****
I
£o
es
@
Is
PQ   ,_,
£ s
o
^
-  bfl
CQ
s
4-t
3
o
4J
cd
cd     .
"—'    CQ
CD
-H
O
cd   -3
* g
CD
"—'   rH
* s
cd +j
es
o
q
CD
rH
£H    (p
^    rH
3
a   |
PQ
a
cd
o  ^
rH
O
q
*     CD
rH     O
8"
•H   cd
o
SH   M
cd   CO
o
CQ
CD
4J
bo
"cd   W
^
q
+»   +j
CQ
3    rH
•^   q
t3
O
w   cd
cd
+»   cd
n ■*
rH
-H
O     CD
o
h   -H
(D   fl   £
o
4J
-C   q
gH
O     o
^     CD    u
CJ
cd
o  g
P-i    o
cd 3E
Co
es
*!
o    w
CO   wj       1
=8   I-,
CD
CQ     h.
OS
da     +>
a ^         =8
•^    t5
vS
O   "3    CD    rH             X
■^ a
1»
^
H
o S~ 2      a
Co
es
*=     §!
© ■ va.P
@
w
Co
es
<»
Co
es
t»
Co
es
w
»5
*!
.KM'
j « ce
d o «$ ■
a m a
Xi   T3    cq --^
S a R
w> to j«; <h
co S o ^
f* x:   ° 'd i
iiInK^
r/i   ^ (lj
I
«
<:
o
N
Sc
CO
S3
CO
t-H
«
<;
S
n
O
<<
a
N
CO
P>4
O
I-H
<
w
o
2J
CO
l-H
P>4
o
N
»>
<<
O
Sc
rn
o
o
<<
P>4
«
1—1
o
*s:
M
W
s     »
_
 Under
HeotetD
MUSIC
i..
ADRIAN TEACHER AND
THE SUBS
Anxious Love
(Self-Released)
May   9,   2018
ftrrfausLove
I hat makes a summer song or album is debatable, but evoking
^^r   "a subtle word, a gentle nod, beers that come with sliced limes"
over an upbeat groove almost certainly fits the bill. This line, situated in the
opening track of Adrian Teacher and the Subs' latest EP, Anxious Love,
forecasts the album's breezy, charming lyricality, befitting the seasonal spirit
of its May release.
Opener, "Hello Everyone" sets the tone with an overall '60s British
Invasion guitar-pop sound, some disco grooves courtesy of bassist Robbie
N and Teacher's relaxed, harmonic tenor. Lyrically, the song is an address
to the audience at avenue past, establishing the convivial self-awareness
that characterizes Anxious Love. "Modern Art" takes this lyrical cleverness
further, combining percussionist Amanda P's driving drumline with a quip you
might expect from a high school teacher: "And here's the scary part / Modern
art, modern art." Another standout song, "Pop Medicine," combines the
album's most power-pop arrangement with lyrics describing a youthful state
of perpetual intoxication ("Like a cicada/ Buzzing all the time") giving way to
desire for personal growth. The core of self-reproach makes the song a fitting
counterpoint to the lackadaisical nostalgia of "Hello, Everyone."
In terms of influences, Teacher's pop sensibilities, low-key vocals and
lyrical cleverness all speak to the enduring appeal of Ray Davies and Nick
Lowe. The album art, a bold pink backdrop with an assortment of detailed
sketches in blue (courtesy of comedian and artist Aaron Read), is literally
illustrative of the band's capacity for incisiveness and depth within cheerful
pop arrangements. Teacher's subtle lyrical touches and gentle nods to pop
masters make the album a charming listen through and through. So if you
see fit to crack the beer and slice the lime, Anxious Love is certainly worth
your time. —Jake Clark
PRIMP
Half-Bloom
(Self-Released)
July  13,   2018
The first words you hear on Primp's debut album Half-Bloom are "You
can go away," but by the time I reached the closing track, I was glad
I had stayed. This Vancouver-based alternative garage rock band brings a
collection of songs that are both relaxed and fun.
Half-Bloom stays consistent throughout its eight tracks with distorted
guitar and tight drumming that combine into a warm, melodic, lo-fi sound
that keeps your head nodding. The instrumentals are accompanied by
dreamy, soothing vocals that feel familiar even on the first listen. "Fonky"
features a catchy guitar riff that continues across most of the song, but the
mellow vocals keep it from getting repetitive. This is followed by "Growing
Down," a short but hard-hitting song thanks to its aggressive guitar and
fast-paced drumming. The grunge influence in this track stands out from
the rest of the album and serves as its energetic peak.
The album then begins to calm down with "Think about U." The track dials
in on anxieties propelled by a relationship, as vocalist Aly Laube sings "Now
you're calling back and I'm having a heart attack." Along with the repetition of
the words "Think about you," the track conveys a charming innocence.
The two biggest highlights on this album are the final tracks. "Blue"
begins with soft vocals that contrast with rebellious lyrics like "I'm going to
scream / 'Til my face turns blue" reminding listeners of youthful outbursts
with an uplifting guitar progression. "I Know Now" features a deep baseline
that is complemented by an accompanying guitar riff that meshes together
into a trance-inducing, distorted groove.
Half-Bloom is honest, youthful, and has enough personality to define
14
itself amongst other similar garage albums. Although the distorted guitar
can sometimes be overbearing and runs the risk of drowning out the
soft vocal melodies, it never persists long enough to impede the songs'
meanings. This album will certainly be an easy addition to your late-night
playlists. —Evan Christensen
PODCASTS
Hosted by Dina Del Buccia and
Jen Sookfong Lee
CAN'T LIT
May 2.014 - Present
Can't Lit is perhaps the closest a podcast can come to a live recording
of a book group. Hosts of Can't Lit, Dina Del Bucchia and Jen
Sookfong Lee, are authors and active members in Vancouver's writing
community. Del Bucchia, who began the podcast with Daniel Zomparelli in
2014, is a Creative Writing professor at the University of British Columbia
and a senior editor at Poetry is Dead magazine. Sookfong Lee joined the
podcast in June of 2017, coming with radio experience from working on
CBC programs, including On the Coast and The Next Chapter. Del Bucchia
and Sookfong Lee approach hosting with all of the playful humour that
characterizes Can't Lit, without losing the engaging, candid conversation
that makes the podcast lively and accessible.
Can't Lit portrays the "unseen" sides of Canadian literature; both the voices
of those who are underrepresented, and the lighthearted side of a frequently
serious genre. Hosts and guests capture the ever-increasing diversity that is
characterizing Canadian literature, focusing on the experiences of women,
members of the LGBTQIA2S+ community, Indigenous authors and people
of colour. It's not rare to find an episode where you'll only hear the voices of
women and non-binary folks.
Playing as a jingle-like theme song at the beginning of each episode,
the subtitle to Can't Lit is "Talking About Books and Stuff." By opening each
episode with a segment called "What's Happening," the hosts ensure they
remain down-to-earth by talking as much about their personal lives and
recent news as they do about writing. The episode of Can't Lit from July 30,   '
featuring Andrea Bennet, discusses far more "stuff" than it does "books."
The three writers chat about dogs and former jobs before their conversation
takes a more serious note as it turns to family, balancing work and children,   q
and the importance of honest journalism. By contrast, the previous episode,  •
featuring Samantha Marie Nock, a Cree / Metis writer, is an intimate and
honest conversation largely focused on the process of writing. Nock shares
the vulnerability and raw emotion behind some of her work, and discusses
her experiences reading her poetry aloud.
The hosts and guests featured on Can't Lit communicate a love for
writing without glossing over its demanding, challenging and emotional
aspects. Can't Lit is illuminating, entertaining and manages to feel genuine
through its entirety. Listening to it is like watching a documentary about a
well-loved icon: it exposes the life behind the authors to whom readers have
grown attached, and the energy and chaos behind Canadian literature.
—Katherine Chambers
BOOKS
Maureen Medved
BLACK STAR
(Anvil Press)
April  15.   2.018
Oel Hanks is arrogant, entitled and self-involved. Worst of all, she's
an untrustworthy narrator. There are moments when her ambition
is relatable, but for the most part, she attracts more pity than admiration as
a protagonist. As a result, depending on the reader's temperament, Black
Star can be difficult to get into.
Black Star by Maureen Medved is a novel about a prickly academic
on the verge of tenure, as well as on the verge of insanity. The story
follows philosophy professor, Del Hanks as she carefully manages and
manipulates professional and personal relationships, and slowly cracks
under the pressure to publish a second book. In the first few sentences of
Chapter 1, the reader is introduced to the linchpin of Hanks' insecurities: a
recently hired, younger professor with viral Internet fame. "Everything was
perfect until Helene LeBec infected our university. A lesion of carcinogenic
proportions capable of rotting and destroying departments and even entire
institutions of higher learning."
Hanks' flare for the dramatic — or rather, Medved's dark wit — is this
novel's redemption. There are times when Hanks doesn't understand
what's happening to her, and the reader's understanding is obscured as
a result. Yet, the story is thrust forward by interpersonal relationships and
caustic interactions that are as hilarious as they are cringe-worthy. As the
protagonist's grip on reality slips, Black Star's genre blurs into a crime-
thriller, psychologically suspenseful and hard to put down.
BlackStaris about an exaggerated, toxic academic environment, and
how one professor's ambition unwillingly puts her at the centre of betrayal
and sexual exploitation. It's like classic cautionary folklore for wannabe
university professors, a story you would tell your friends and family to
dissuade them from entering the dark forest of tenure-track. Little Red
Riding Hood-philosopher and the Big Bad Wolf-colleagues, or vice versa.
In this sense, I imagine that Black Star is especially entertaining for
people already established in academia and / or the literary world, those
who can discern the absurdity and laugh. For those on the periphery, Black
Star may push them further away. —Leigh Empress
Stop
Wincing
We're Fine
UNDER REVIEW
Cristina Holman
STOP WINCING /WE'RE FINE
(Artspeak)
April   24,   2.018
I hen was the last time you gave yourself the treat of cracking open
^^r   a new book of poetry? Cristina Holman's new chapbook, Stop
Wincing / We're Fine introduces via 17 short pieces, a talented and highly
entertaining new voice in poetry or for that matter, in any style of writing
coming out of Canada's West Coast. You don't need to be a poetry fan to
love this, nor do you need to take yourself too seriously to appreciate it.
Stop Wincing / We're Fine is a product of the Artspeak Studio for
Emerging Writers' 2017/18 session and is beautifully bound by Vancouver's
Moniker Press. Holman is one of six talents shepherded by program
director / poet and UBC Creative Writing lecturer, Sheryda Warrener.
The object itself is cleverly designed with a two-sided cover in bright
neon orange, one side titled "Stop Wincing" and the other, "We're Fine."
There is no indication of which is the front and which the back — it reminds
me of the punk pop band Buzzcocks' singles, where one side is labeled
Side A and the other Side One, no preference intended.
On the page, the poems appear visually rhythmic, engaging both the
reader's eye and intellect. Holman's observation plays upon a cascade of
ideas with seemingly effortless verbal calisthenics, at times calling to mind
Lawrence Ferlinghetti's poem, "Constantly Risking Absurdity (#15)."
"my father says my brother thinks I'm smart
my mother says fog
makes her feel like a lobster in a cosmic pot
I sip my mix of mercury and argon"
(from "Neon:Smart")
As with music, poetry is meant to be heard aloud. Not yet having had
the opportunity to attend a reading by the poet, I can only imagine how
hilariously some of these would go over. This is virtually poetry as stand-up
material: The Button-Down Mind of Cristina Holman.
These lines are from her poem "On Normalcy and Snack Practices:"
"Guarded, on the subject of coffee,
a coworker confesses he has
ten-cup days but today is a twelve-cup day.
On main I meet a woman
who ends calls to her mother
with a quick "Hail Satan!" before the click."
Discorder magazine | SEPTEMBER 201?
 I laughed out loud frequently while enjoying this chapbook, and yet there
are moments of deep consideration of existential questions, as conveyed
in the poem "Matters." Ostensibly about a sailing mishap, it explores
the ultimate question: what is the meaning of existence? With the poet
self-talking her way from nihilism and fear through hopeful surrender, and
finally, acceptance and exaltation:
Mattering or not it is vast. I strong-arm my attention to it,
catalogue
the strangers that perplex me. And if I am vexed,
III turn from the slumping NOTHING, open up and yell
EVERYTHING) EVERYTHING] EVERYTHING.
as I run from it."
—Erica Leiren
To submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please
email Under Review Editor Sydney Ball at ur.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1.
GALLERY
PATIO & LOUNGE
THE SUMMER
DRINKS LINE-UP
NON TO FRI
-IOPM
6133 UNIVERSITY BLVD
VANCOUVER, BC V6TIZI
New Rest
HE LAST MOVIE   Sept 21-
COLD WATER   Sept 21-24,26 E
www.theCinematheque.ca | 1131 Howe Street | 604.688.8202 | Straight
1660 EAST BROADWAY
SEPTEMBER
HIGHLIGHTS
WWW.RIOTHEATRETICKETS.CA
SEPT
5
STORY STORY LIE
BACK TO SCHOOL EDITION
SEPT
6
FAST TIMES AT
RIDGEMONT HIGH
SEPT
7
DEGRASSI HIGH
SCHOOL'S OUT
SCREENING & REUNION
WITH PAT MASTROIANNI & STACIE MISTYSYN!
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
DAZED AND CONFUSED
SEPT
12
THE GENTLEMEN HECKLERS
PRESENT
BATMAN AND ROBIN
SEPT
13
15
WESTWARD MUSIC
FESTIVAL
SEPT
14
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
SETH ROGEN IN
PINEAPPLE EXPRESS
SEPT
17
FREE SCREENING/
THE BIG LEBOWSKI
#LONGLIVETHERIO
SEPT
19
THE ACTIONALS COMEDY CO. PRESENTS
IMPROV AGAINST
HUMANITY
RUSH WEEK REVELRY!
SEPT
21
23
DAN SAVAGE'S
HUMP! FILM FESTIVAL
SEPT
21
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
WES CRAVEN'S
THE HILLS HAVE EYES
SEPT
24
ANIME MONDAY!
SATOSHI KON'S
PERFECT BLUE
(REMASTERED]
SEPT
26
THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW
A #DNDLIVE COMEDY EXPERIENCE
THANK YOU
VANCOUVER!
LONG LIVE
THE RIO!
ISIT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA FOR A COMPLETE CALENDAR OF EVENTS.
8ios HaaM3T<j.38 | 9nixDgDfn i9bio3z\a
UNDER REVIEW
15
_
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018
Befriepdipg
Buffy Saipte Marie
words by Joshua Azizi
photo by Emmanuel Etti
illustrations by Cian Hogan
II
POP CULTURE, FEMINISM, AND
ART MAKE ME HAPPY," reads
the mantra on Andrea Warner's website.
Although many people rind enjoyment
in these fields, few have dived into them as deep as Warner
has. In her time as one of Canada's most prominent music
journalists, she has explored popular culture with a love for its
works, and an equally passionate critical eye.
In her work as both a freelance journalist and a staff writer
at CBC Music, Warner has profiled the careers of Tegan and
Sara, interviewed Inuk throat singer, Tanya Tagaq, parsed
the love life of Leonard Cohen and examined the prevalence
of sexual assault at music festivals. In 2015, Eternal Cavalier
published Warner's first book, We Oughta Know: How Four
Women Ruled the '90s and Changed Canadian Music, an
exploration of how popular culture at large reduced the
music legacies of Alanis Morissette, Sarah McLachlan, Shania
Twain and Celine Dion into sexist, one-dimensional stereotypes. Shortly after its release, Warner started Pop This!
podcast with CBC On the Coast reporter, Lisa Christiansen,
on which the two chat about and analyze everything from
cheesy romantic comedies to rockstar memoirs.
September 2018 is the release date for Warner's most
ambitious project yet: a biography of Cree folk legend and
Indigenous rights activist, Buffy Sainte-Marie. Considered
an "unsung hero" by Warner, Sainte-Marie first garnered
international acclaim in 1964 with It's My Way!, an album
that established her among like-minded artists like Joan Baez,
ti
Toe focuseb as mucb as bumanlji possible on
making space for toomen artists anb non-binaru anb
trans artists in tbe coverage tbat J get to cboost'
Carole King, Neil Young, Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell (who
wrote the forward for Warner's book). Warner realized early in
her career that the music industry could be sexist and discriminatory, and that white men were more likely to be canonized
than artists of other genders and cultural backgrounds.
Through Buffy Sainte-Marie: The Authorized Biography,
Warner continues to disrupt the patriarchal canon and give
the spotlight to a more diverse array of artists.
"I get Bob Dylan's popularity, I'm not stupid," Warner says.
"He's a great talent, but there are, like, 70 books about Bob
Dylan, and there was one about Buffy. And I thought that
was incredibly unjust."
Warner studied journalism for two years at Langara
College, during which she moved to New York for one
summer and fulfilled one of her childhood dreams: interning
at Soap Opera Weekly. The years since have seen her write
for publications and media organizations such as The Georgia
is
Straight, Westender, Exclaim!, Pitchfork, The
Globe and Mail and CBC Music.
Warner is no stranger to the topic of
gender in music journalism. Not only has
the field been male-dominated, but it hasn't
always taken women musicians seriously
either. She explains, "The idea [proliferated]
that they weren't as important as their male
counterparts, which I find really frustrating,
and obviously just wrong and sexist and utter
bullshit. So, in the last eight years, I've focused
as much as humanly possible on making
space for women artists and non-binary and
trans artists in the coverage that I get to
choose."
Warner put this gendered treatment of
women under the microscope in We Oughta
'Andrea Warner'
Know. Even though Morissette, McLachlan, Twain and Dion
are four of Canada's best-selling musicians, Warner says they
were treated like jokes and mocked incessantly in the media.
In the book, she turns the lens around and examines her own
opinions of these artists when she was younger — though
she loved Mclachlan and Morissette, her teenage hatred of
Dion and Twain was fuelled by an internalized misogyny she
hadn't realized.
"The world and the media had shaped a lot of my ideas
of how a woman should be, and a lot of those were shaped
by misogynistic dudes writing about these women," Warner
says. "We need to like spend some time figuring out why we
tear down women in ways that we do not tear down men."
for her biography of Sainte-Marie, Warner conducted
over 60 hours of interviews to get a detailed understanding of the different periods of her life. Though
she hasn't always been a household name, Sainte-Marie has
been ever-present from the '60s to now, and not just through
music. She worked in tandem with the National Indian
Youth Council and supported their efforts, and spent time
in the 1960s Greenwich Village counterculture scene. In
the 1980s, Sainte-Marie began developing the Cradleboard
Teaching Project, a curriculum for Indigenous children to
learn about their history. She earned a reputation for her
pacifist politics and participation in protest movements such
as the American Indian Movement (AIM) — as a result, the
Johnson and Nixon administrations blacklisted her from
American radio.
"She's so special, I love her so much," says Warner. "I
didn't fully understand how adjacent she has been to so
many cool, interesting pivotal moments in our culture."
Warner then begins listing a number of Saint-Marie's
public appearances over the second half of the twentieth
century, which include performing a benefit at the
AIM's 1969 Occupation of Alcatraz and paying for their
clean water, starring in Sesame Street from 1976-81, and
surviving a shooting attempt during a protest at Gresham,
Wisconsin in 1974.
And then there is Sainte-Marie's discography, which
stretches from the plaintive folk musings of It's My Way!
to the warped, electronics-infused hymnals of 1969's
Illuminations to the powwow electronic rock of 2015's Power
in the Blood. Warner considers Sainte-Marie to be one of
the "Big Four" in Canadian popular music — alongside Joni
Mitchell, Leonard Cohen and Neil Young — even if many
critics haven't given her the recognition she deserves.
"The fact that people don't know how varied her discography is, and how deep and intensely inventive it is is a fault
of music journalism."
But the world might finally be waking up to Sainte-
Marie: Power in the Blood won Canada's prestigious Polaris
Music Prize, and in 2017, Pitchfork placed
Illuminations at #66 on their list of the best
albums from the 1960s.
Although Warner has a number of other
book proposals in mind, for the moment, she's
iust overwhelmed with gratitude to have had
Lhe opportunity to write about Sainte-Marie.
"It's such a privilege to be able to write a
book like this one — like, write a book with
Buffy and be so immersed," she says. "She's
such a part of me now and that's never going
to go away. I'm such a better human for that."
Buffy Sainte-Marie: The Authorized
Biography ttn.ll be published on Greystane Books
"Ms month. It is launching with a free party at
the Fox Cabaret on September 24. On October 21,
Andrea Warner and Buffy Sainte-Marie will be
in conversation at the closing event for Vancouver
Writers Fest. You can follow Andrea Warner on
Twitter @_AndreaWarner.
 8ios HaaMaTias | snixogDm ™b-ro38ia
EflUfAH
KATIE DUCK & BEN BROWN
DOIflG THE WORK
words by Brit Bachmann // illustrations by Tif anie Lamiel // photo by Alistair Henning
*l do not have a career
in 2018.
I have a rumour
that the internet
by the x90s,
made more
accessible/
■^^ HIS IS KATIE DUCK, an improvisational
M dancer, choreographer and teacher based in
^^^L Amsterdam. Her rumour, as she puts it, spans 40
^\   years. Though originally from the Los Angeles
area, Katie "realized that [she] was never going to be a
successful capitalist" and moved to Europe in 1974. Since
then, she has travelled extensively to host workshops and
perform alongside established and emerging musicians. This
month, Katie's in town.
What brings Katie to Vancouver is Ben Brown.
"Katie lives her art. She is. There is no separation between
her practice and who she is. As soon as you start talking to
Katie, you know her politics. At no point is she going to teach
a dance class. She's going to teach Katie, including all her
capacities as an artist."
Ben Brown is a locally-based percussionist wearing many
hats. An improvisational musician, formally trained in jazz
and classical, his accomplishments include an extensive
discography comprising many bands; invitations to
residencies, workshops, collaborations and private studies;
and performances at venues ranging from concert halls
to living rooms. From 2013-16, Ben hosted Music and
Movement Mondays (MAMM), a regular series that saw
musicians and dancers come together for improvisation
sessions. Ben has had an ongoing mentorship with U.K-based
percussionist, Dame Evelyn Glennie since 2015. In 2014-15,
Ben travelled to Amsterdam to work one-on-one with Katie
for the first time.
"She's constantly working. Her whole thing is do the
practice, do the work, all the time. When I go to work with
her, there's no formal structure, I just enter into her life.
And her life is work," explains Ben. "There's a really integral
community of improvised musicians and dancers [in
Amsterdam], always together, music and dance."
When asked why she chose to mentor Ben, Katie begins
with praise: "Ben is an open visionary artist. His enthusiasm
to move his work towards a music theater platform was
infectious. He brings a child-like curiosity
to anything you toss at him. He is an
outstanding improvisation drummer. That
he has a wish to collaborate with dance, text
and performance art shows a potential for
how he is going to create work."
That said, the decision wasn't necessarily
a conscious one. "I don't know if I ever
agreed to mentor Ben," she explains, "I
started to share the work."
Katie's approach to mentorship, as
with all aspects of her practice, means the
stripping away of convention. As an artist
who is constantly travelling and assuming
the role of teacher, the relationship of
mentor-mentee is more about the discovery
of likeminds around the world.
"That stage of being mentored disintegrates to colleague, eventually. With some
of these relationships, there is a period of
abandon, where the artists need to kill the
mentor. In other cases, there is a smooth
transition from mentor to colleague. The
aim is to be a colleague, to leave the hierarchical leadership roles behind and get to the
work. [...] I like being this age as an artist and
teacher and mentor."
Reflecting on their time together, Ben reinforces the
notion of mentorship as camaraderie: "With Katie, a
mentorship means that I go over to her house and drink
wine and we make a really nice soup together. She talks and
I listen. And sometimes I talk a bit, too. We could be doing
anything because I learn from her no matter the activity —
rehearsals, workshops, performances or talking."
On September 28, Katie will be performing CAGE
with Ben and fellow improvisational musicians
Roxanne Nesbitt and James Meger at the Scotiabank
Dance Theatre. Written in 2014, CAGE is a score that Katie
performs where invited, the content evolving with each
iteration and live-audience reception. It contains four texts:
"The Institutionalization of Fucking Everything," "Love and
the Lack of," "Death" and "The Anatomy of the Vagina."
Taking its name from the avant-garde composer and theorist,
John Cage, it intentionally challenges the divide between
stage and audience. "[CAGE] begs the public to engage," Katie
explains, "It is a hopeful moment for me as an artist, that the
public [be] moved but never impressed."
The texts are used differently each time, but the tension
point remains the same. "I wanted to publicly say the word,
'vagina,'" says Katie, "I wanted to say this word in different
cultures, in different languages, and monitor the tension in
the room in the aftermath of saying the word, Vagina.'"
When I ask if CAGE is intended to be performed with
women collaborators, its Vancouver date being an exception,
Katie pushes back: "I have not intentionally eliminated men
to collaborate in CAGE. [...] I suppose it is because feminism
is implied in CAGE that women ask me [to collaborate] more
than men." Katie's feminism is intersectional, expanding,
"The vagina does not belong to woman. It is a place where we
all come from in one form or another."
There is a stated irony to Katie's practice that while she
rejects traditional economic structures as "distractions from
'Katie Duck & Ben Brown'
the work," grants fund this trip to Vancouver and other
places. It is not ideal, says Katie: "These economic structures
perpetuate a need to win awards with an unavoidable need to
compete." When artists are competing for the same funding,
it limits their opportunities to build community. Katie has
worked to create her own sustaining economic structures
through touring, taking jobs in academies and a summer
course in Amsterdam. "It is wonderful to make a living with
something you love. It's a shame that it is wonderful. It
should be normal," explains Katie. "We should not have to
battle so hard to be artists."
Though at different stages, living in different countries,
Katie and Ben are similar in many ways. Speaking to what
drives him, Ben says, "I do art to connect with people. [...]
The beauty of doing so many different disciplines [is that]
you can thread them together and find the commonality."
He continues, "Katie does that so beautifully. It's always
real. Always genuine and full of humility, never for the
sake of being different. Or for the sake of being hard
or challenging. It's always been an extremely personal
exchange. That's also my goal."
On September 23, Katie Duck will be hosting a workshop with All
Bodies Dance at the Roundhouse Community Centre. On September
25, she will be performing with Sawdust Collector at Gold Saucer
Studios. On September 26, she will be performing with Invisible
Taste at China Cloud. And on September 28, you can catch CAGE at
the Scotiabank Dance Theatre. Tickets are $30 or $24 for students.
V
_
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018
words by Lua Presidio
illustration by Nikki Lax
photos courtesy of Chase Hansen
GVERYONE EXPECTS A DRAG SHOW
to be at least a little "out there," but not many
people are prepared to be greeted by a very tall
human figure in a bright green morphsuit with
padded hips wearing a Barbie one-piece. And that is what
defines Commercial Drag, a show for anyone and everyone,
including aliens.
Commercial Drag happens every Sunday night at The
London Pub in Chinatown. Each week
there is a new theme, new guests, but at
every show, performers are challenging
the boundaries of what it means to do
drag. This is a safe space where drag
doesn't conform to stereotypes and
gender fluidity is a staple.
Commercial Drag started as a monthly
show in Kitsilano called Sleepy Girls.
In the words of the show's founder
and host, Dust, "it was always a place
we could always be a little more
vulnerable with our drag, and with the
way we presented ourselves. It was an
opportunity for us to be more genuine
with our audience, and it evolved and
became this weekly monster. And the
weekly monster attracted groups of
drag performers who wanted to work
together." After one year of Sleepy
Girls, Commercial Drag was established
in February 2018. It has featured a
number of debuts, as well as long-time
performers.
Orri^ing at the venue may seem a little strange at first,
as unlike most drag shows, the audience is greeted
by the performers already in drag. Dust explains that
one of their goals with Commercial Drag is to take some of
the aspects they didn't enjoy about drag shows, and turn them
around: "An example would be that in drag shows elsewhere,
before the show, the music would be really, really loud. So,
I couldn't really talk to my friends, and what I wanted to do
[at Commercial Drag] was to have people connect with each
other. That's why my show says dinner at 8:00 [and] show at
9:30, to give people a chance to come in early and interact
with each other in a setting that has low music. And then,
there's the [portion] that is just the show." Indeed, many
audience members are not new to Commercial Drag, and the
show is a weekly gathering of friends.
At the show on August 12, the theme was "Ugly Drag in
Space," and contrary to most nights, Dust was not the host,
giving the spotlight to their drag-daughter, Anne Xiety.
Ugly Drag is a theme done once per month that attempts to
take the pressure off perfection. There is no ideal makeup,
no training required. It's an open space for drag expression
in whatever form it takes. According to Dust, it is a night to
have ridiculous amounts of fun. Although the atmosphere at
The London Pub was light for "Ugly Drag in Space," there was
some anticipation about what was to come, and no one was
disappointed.
*
The show started on a hilarious note with Anne Xiety
attempting to take sips of her drink through the morphsuit.
Throughout the night, her attempts became more and
more ridiculous between sets. The first on stage was Scout
Supernova doing an Alien-inspired cat and mouse lip-sync
routine that ended with silly string sprayed everywhere. The
act was followed up with breakdancing drag king, Owen.
Brunch, a Brazilian drag queen with a beard who debuted at
Commercial Drag four months prior, had a Born This Way
meets American Horror Story feel to her performance, which
ended with her biting into Tommi Horror's neck and spilling
fake blood all over the stage. Annita D's performance was
more subtle, with an onstage costume change and a perfect
lip sync to a mash-up of music with Star Trek excerpts.
Amazing performances followed amazing performances,
however, the highlight of the night was Awesome Bitch's
Commercial Drag debut. She was dressed in a custom pink
caped pantsuit and made it rain fake money with her face
printed on it.
"Ugly Drag in Space" was Dust's first show as an audience
member. Although they had mixed feelings about not being
on stage — "holding the audience," as they put it — they
plan on carrying their new perspective into future shows:
"Feeling the energy of the audience and experiencing what
the audience experiences is going to be so powerful for me
because I'm always up on stage and I just always make the
"Commercial Drag'
assumption that we are all having a good time and that
everything is good. But, I think that there are little things
that can make the experience better for the audience and I'm
excited to bring back what I observed."
In one word, Commercial Drag is unique. It is a
community beyond drag that brings together people
from diverse backgrounds. It is the ethos of the show,
Dust's own words leave a powerful resonance:
"Our show is a place where everyone can do drag. We have
non-binary people, genderqueer people, bisexuals, women
identifying people, we have gay men being women, we have
women being men, everything. All of drag collides, we have
such a diversity at Commercial Drag, and that is something
that I really, really push. It's very important and dear to my
heart because the world is not black and white. It is a mosaic,
and that is what created our country and that is what is going
to make our future. I really view Commercial Drag as a place
that anyone can feel welcome."
And, indeed, it's hard not to feel welcome in a place you
know you can be anything you want to be.
Commercial Drag happens every Sunday at The London Pub, just
$5 entry. Follow Sleepy Girls Productions on .Facebook for updates
and upcoming themes, and Instagram @commercialdrag.
 _
 Otl THE AIR
SEEKING OFFICE
interview  by  Sydney Ball  //   illustrations  by Ewan Thompson
photo  by Emmanuel  Etti
I  may be an outsider, but working at CiTR 101.9FM, it's easy to see
the tight-knit camaraderie of News Collective under the watchful
eye of Alex de Boer, CiTR's Current Affairs Coordinator. As
delightful as their bond is, it has been a special treat to see the work
that the collective has done with their new podcast series, Seeking
Office. I get a kick out of the interviews with politicians who aren't
expecting any difficulty from student and emerging journalists, and
I can tell that they have caught a few of the earlier interviewees off
guard. As the summer has progressed, many candidates for Vancouver's
civic election have wised up and learnt not to dismiss this plucky
group of volunteers as they look for transparency from their potential
political representatives. The following is an interview with Alex.
What is Seeking Office?
Seeking Office is a new podcast about the upcoming Vancouver
civic election. It's made by CiTR's News Collective, produced by
me. We have interviews with politicians, we have interviews with
experts and some sort of narrative storytelling in there. It's meant
to make the civic election interesting and to provide some social
and historical context for where we are now, to equip people with
the knowledge they need to vote and move forward actively with
intention on how they want their city to be.
Were you just thinking at the end of last school
term like, "I love working, I can't stand not having
another thing to produce?"
Yeah, I guess so. *laughs*
I just thought, with local journalism suffering
as it is, there's a notable drop in local coverage.
As newsrooms shrink, the first thing to go is their
City Hall reporters. We're seeing across Canada
and America, less coverage of civic governments, so
being that there's an election in October, [the News
Collective] just saw this as an opportunity to make
engaging content and get some practice at creative, non-fiction storytelling and to provide a service that's needed in Vancouver.
There's really nowhere you can go to get consistent coverage of
what is happening. If you want to pay attention to the civic election
you really have to be on Twitter — which a lot of people aren't!
Have there been any interviews that didn't go how you were
expecting?
A recent one was with the president of a new civic party, Coalition
Vancouver. His name is Peter Labrie, and he's a former board
member of the NPA (Non-Partisan Association). I did an interview
with him about why he left the NPA and joined Coalition Vancouver,
what this party was all about and why they describe themselves as
being a centrist party despite being fiscally conservative. So at the
end of the interview, I said goodbye without asking a final question
I had wanted to ask because I had gotten too afraid. [It was about] his
Twitter page — he had a number of off-colour...*looks for the right
word to characterize the tweets*
I would say they are poor-bashing.
Yeah. There are a few straight-up misogynistic tweets, as well. I
want Seeking Office to be as objective as possible. Obviously there is
no such thing as objectivity, but I do want to be approaching all our
interviews and content with hard-hitting questions that are fair and
are bringing to light things that the public deserves to know.
I ended up calling him back. He's the president of a new party who
describe themselves as centrist — because he's saying that he's socially
progressive — even though he's retweeting things that are essentially
hateful and condemning of the poor and those who are drug users.
So I called him back and I asked him about this tweet. I think it was
Discorder magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018
tft\EN0£
OF
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
You get discounts at these
FRIENDS OF CiTR + DISCORDER locations.
worth it and I tried to stay as neutral as I could.
Accountability interviewing is scary but it's important
and can produce really rewarding information. There
are so many people that feel that when we're trying to
process what's going on politically, you just wish you
could ask this person about that. You've got an opportunity to get at something that most people don't, and
they deserve to know because these are their politicians
who they might elect to represent them in office. So it's
really a privilege to do this work.
You know a lot about audio production and narrative
storytelling, but you're kind of experiencing some
things for the first time with Seeking Office. Do you
find that you can share with the News Collective members the
experience of being new to journalism and new to accountability
journalism?
I have a degree in journalism from UBC, but in the past I
haven't done accountability interviewing, it was mostly arts and
culture writing. I think something valuable that I bring is a certain
earnestness and a willingness to ask dumb questions, because I am
newer to this type of journalism and I think there's not enough
of that in journalism, especially radio journalism — asking clarifying questions and really pressing people if you don't understand
something. So I think my weakness can be my strength.
I think the News Collective volunteers watching me is valuable.
Just to say that, if you're prepared, you can call someone up and ask
tough questions. You can talk to anyone. Half the job of being a
reporter is just showing up. Hopefully that's a lesson that the News
Collective and maybe listeners are learning.
You can hear all episodes of Seeking Office by subscribing to the podcast an
iTunes or Stitcher, or hear past episodes online at citr.ca/radio/seeking-office.
And make sure to -note in the municipal election on October 20.
m ji i n
ANTISOCIAL
SKATEBOARD SHOP
■ 10% off
THE BILTMORE CABARET
■ 10% off at the bar
DANDELION RECORDS
S EMPORIUM
' 10% off used records
EASTVAN GRAPHICS
■ 10$ off
EAST VANITY PARLOUR
■ 10% off any service
FAS IN FRANK
■ 15% off
LUCKY'S BOOKS S
COMICS
■ 10% off
NEPTOON RECORDS
■ 10% off
RAG MACHINE
■ 10% off
RED CAT RECORDS
■ 10% off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
'A free DIY button with
any purchase over $5.
The Regional
TRUE VALUE VINTAGES
I FOUND GALLERY
■ 10% off
WOO VINTAGE CLOTHING
■ 10% off
THE WALLFLOWER
MODERN DINER
20
eoimnf rcmi.
AUDIOPILE RECORDS
■ 10% off
BOMBER BREWING
■ 10% off
BONERATTLE MUSIC
■ 10% off of accessories
THE CANNIBAL CAFE
■ 10% off
noii-alcoholic items
HIGHLIFE RECORDS
■ 10% off
JO CLOTHING LTD.
■ 10% off
MINTAGE
■ 10% off
PEOPLE'S CO-OP
BOOKSTORE
■ 10% off
THE RIO THEATRE
' $2 off regular Rio
Theatre movies
/ select events
STORM CROW TAVERN
o q t> e r
BOOK WAREHOUSE
■ 10% off
BAND MERCH CANADA
■ 15% off
PANDORA'S BOX
REHEARSALSTUDIOS
■ 10% off Hourly
Studio Rentals
0
BEAT STREET RECORDS
' 10% off used records
THE CINEMATHEQUE
'One small bag of
popcorn per person
per evening.
DEVIL MAY WEAR
■ 10% off
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
S ART EMPORIUM
■ 10% off
THE PINT PUBLIC HOUSE
■ 20% discount to
guests on food bill
SIKORA'S CLASSIC
RECORDS LTD.
' 10% off of Merchandise
VINYL RECORDS
' 10% of New and Used
uiic
AUSTRALIAN
BOOT COMPANY
'15% off Blundstone and
& R.M. Williams Boots
THE BIKE KITCHEN
'10% off new parts &
accessories
BANYEN BOOKS SSOUND
■ 10% off
FRESH IS BEST
ON BROADWAY
■15% off
GRANVILLE
ISLAND BREWING
■ 10% off food / 10% on
merchandise (not beer)
KOERNER'S PUB
■ 10% off food
ON THE FRINGE
HAIR DESIGN
■ 10% off
RUFUS GUITAR SHOP
' 10% new instruments
and accessories.
STORM CROW ALEHOUSE
■ 10% off
TAPESTRY MUSIC
' 10% off in-stock
music books
UBC BOOKSTORE
• 10% off general
merchandise(clothing,
giftware, stationery,
general books)-i^ptiouB apPij-.
ON THE AIR j Seeking Office
(VISIT:
CiTR
. C a/friends
for  more   info. )
 o
\>
ilS
(D
O
mmm
C^\
"DISCORDER MAGAZINE RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERY DAY!"
sponfcap
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
T'RANCENDANCE
GHOST  MIX
BREAKFAST  WITH  THE
BROWNS
3 PM
4 PM
ROOM TONE
SYNCHRONICITY
PARTS UNKNOWN
120BPM
Cue*tmp
PACIFIC PICON"
QUEER FM
YOUR NEW SHOW
MORNING AFTER SHOW
ttftetmetfftap
CiTR GHOST MIX
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
POP DRONES
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
DELIBERATE NOISE   UNCEDED AIRWAVES
120BPM
120BPM
Cfmratmp
CiTR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
GOODIE
FINDING THE FUNNY
YOUR NEW SHOW
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
JFrifcap
AURAL TENTACLES
CANADALAND
SEEKING OFFICE
MIXTAPES WITH
MC & MAC
U DO U RADIO     THE REEL WHIRLED
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
K-POP CAFE
ASTROTALK
120BPM
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
TOO DREAMY
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
&>aturt>ap
CiTR GHOST MIX
THE SATURDAY EDGE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
POWER  CHORD
CODE  BLUE
&>unt>ap
CiTR GHOST MIX
YOUR NEW SHOW
SHOOKSHOOKTA
THE ROCKERS SHOW
LA FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
5 PM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
INTO THE WOODS
ARTS REPORT      DEMOCRACY WATCH   WORD ON THE STREET
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6 PM
7 PM
8 PM
9 PM
10 PM
11PM
12AM
1AM
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
YOUR  NEW  SHOW
YOUR  NEW  SHOW
FLEX  YOUR  HEAD
MEDICINE
SHOW
EXPLODING  HEAD
MOVIES
SAMSQUANCH'S
HIDE-AWAY
MIX CASSETTE
CRIMES & TREASONS
NINTH WAVE
THE JAZZ SHOW
THE SPENCER    ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
LATU SHOW ANDREW LEWIS
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
CiTR GHOST MIX
CiTR GHOST MIX
YOUR NEW SHOW
CiTR GHOST MIX
FLASHBACK
w/ ALEC
CHRISTENSEN
NO DEAD
AIR
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
Cl RADIO
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL
COPY / PASTE
AURAL TENTACLES
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SKALDS HALL
CANADA POST ROCK
YOUR NEW SHOW
CiTR GHOST MIX
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
SOCA STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
TRANCENDANCE
10 PM
11PM
RANDOPHONIC
THE AFTN SOCCER
SHOW
12AM
1AM
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
OF INSOMNIA
CiTR GHOST MIX
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOWTO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
a
[<-hey, this kind of cell means this show is hosted by students
They are also highlighted in the spot colour on the guide,
you can't miss it.
_
 ■ mono/iy
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8AM-11AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththebrowns
@hotmail.com
ROOM TONE
11AM-12PM, TALK/MOVIES/
SOUNDTRACK
Room Tone is a talk show
focused on Filmmaking that
invites guests weekly to
discuss their slices of reality
on set, tips, past/future
projects and love for the craft!
From Directors/Producers, to
Cinematographers, Production
Designers, Actors, Composers:
Writers, Editors... anyone!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNCH RONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B in spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to
find their feet, practice their
chops, and rep CiTR's playlist.
Get at us if you want this airtime
--> programming@citr.ca .
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
;, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
8AM-10AM, talk/politics
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmaii.com
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM, ROCK/ POP / INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY/
DISABILITY
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communityiivingradio@gmaii.com
DELIBERATE NOISE
2PM-3PM,  ROCK/ POP / INDIE
Love rocking out to live music:
but don't feel like paying
cover? Tune in for the latest
and greatest punk, garage
rock, local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
contact: programming@citr.ca
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to
find their feet, practice their
chops, and rep CiTR's playlist.
Get at us if you want this airtime
--> programming@citr.ca .
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
TUES 5PM-6PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope:
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
8PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
TUES 10PM-11PM, TALK/ POLITICAL
COMMENTARY
The Spencer Latu Show is a
progressive politics show that
speaks truth to power. We
provide much needed coverage:
and media criticism of stories
at the municipal, provincial,
national and international
level from the perspective of
two progressive working class
students; Spencer Latu and
Ajeetpal Gill. We are based
out of UBC in Vancouver BC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room:
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/ POP
Jayden targets audiences in the
Korean community in Vancouver
to introduce the News on
Korea, Korean Culture while
comparing other Asian Cultures:
playing all kinds of Korean
Music(K-POP, Hip Hop, lndie:
R&B,etc),talking about popular
trends in the industries of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows:
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave
or Hallyu), the news about
Korean Entertainment lndustry:
what's going on in the Korean
Society here in Vancouver and
conversations with guests.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• UNCEDED AIRWAVES
2PM-3PM, talk/cultural
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
third season! This team of
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
folks produce a weekly show
on Indigenous issues, current
affairs, entertainment, culture
and news - all centering
Native voices. Come make
Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Foiiow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to
find their feet, practice their
chops, and rep CiTR's playlist.
Get at us if you want this airtime
--> programming@citr.ca .
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
5PM-6PM,TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC:
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM:
eclectic/live INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco u vermedicineshow@gmail. com
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too) and relished in the merging
of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-10PM, hip hop/ r&b/ soul
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH ANDREW LEWIS
10PM-11PM, TALK
Listen to your favorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSUAy
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• CONVICTIONS & CONTRADICTIONS
thurs, 8am-8:30am, talk/comedy/
social obeservations
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society, shown through social
observational comedy. To boot
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
8:30AM-gAM, TALK / INTERVIEW
Goodie is an interview show
with the do-gooders who are
using business, innovation
and creativity to make positive
change in the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• FINDING THE FUNNY
9AM-g:30PM, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumbir.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Rocke tFromR ussia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored bydonuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
• K-POP CAFE
Jayden gives listeners an
introduction to music &
entertainment in Asian Cultures:
especially, Korean, Japanese
and Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B.
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to
find their feet, practice their
chops, and rep CiTR's playlist.
Get at us if you want this airtime
--> programming@citr.ca .
Contact: @CiTRRadio
progra mming @citr. ca
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
FLASH
Each episode, join host Alec
Christensen and friends
as they discuss the pop
culture and politics affecting
Vancouver and beyond.
Contact: Twitter | flashbackaiec
NO DEAD AIR
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
JAZZ FUSION / POST ROCK
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion:
experimental electronic and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook | NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30PM-gpM, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ TRlUay
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraitentacies@hotmaii.com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
87AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: j'esse(8>canadaiandsho w.com
8AM-9AM, talk/news/politics
On October 20th, 2018,
Vancouverites will vote in a
new mayor, city council, park
board and school board.
This is a change election, in
the midst of Vancouver's worst
housing crisis. With a fractured
right and a divided left, CiTR's
News Collective brings you
unique coverage of the issues
and individuals seeking office.
Seeking Office is available
for download on iTunes:
Stitcher or where ever
you get your podcasts!
Contact: @CiTRNews
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM, rock/pop/indie
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary:
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion:
mastery and a 'IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Damawill bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
whaf s happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@gmaii. com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP/SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on each other
and leave mix tapes and love
letters in each other's lockers xo
Contact:
Facebook | @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter \ @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30pm-5pm, music/interviews
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp://nardwuar. com/rad/con tact/
5PM-6PM, rock/indie/pop
Hosted by the Music Affairs Collective, every episode is packed with
up-to-date content from the Lower
Mainland music communities including news, new music releases:
event reviews and upcoming events:
interviews with local musicians and
industry professionals and discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM- 7:30PM, TALK'COMEDY
Every week Jack, Tristan and
a special guest randomly
select a conversation topic
for the entire show; ranging
from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-gpM, r&b/soul/inter-
IMATIONAL
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and future.
This includes jazz, soul:
hip-hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
There are also interviews
with local and international
artists. Truly, a radio show
with international flavour.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock
drone, ambient, experimental
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
■ SATURUAy
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citriatenightshow@gmaii.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
Contact: codebiue@pauinorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact:
mantraradioshow@gmaii.com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavoina@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy:
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmaii.com
SOCA STORM
8PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
Papayo!!#SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
8bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79. We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ sunuay
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmaii.com,
Twitter | @nwtpoclcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmaii.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
gPM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Antherrr
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmiieymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
tOSTTOlJS
Marks any show that is
produced primarily by students.
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citr.ca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9 FM AUGUST CHARTS
artist
0ibum
ilabei
1«
Sigh*+#
DEMOS
Self-Released
i
12
Exco Levi*
Narrative
Silly Walks Ent.
i
1 *
La Kasquivana
Rebeldia Radikal
Self-Released
i
1 *
Tirzah#
Devotion
Domino
i
1 »
Mitski#
Be The Cowboy
Dead Oceans
i
1 *
Spesh Pep*+
Like A Volcano
Self-Released
i
1 »
Bernice*#
Puff: In the air without a
shape
Arts & Crafts
i
1 •
Renee Rosnes*+#
Beloved of the Sky
Smoke Sessions
i
1 »
Sore Points*+
Demo
Self-Released
i
1   "
Human Music*
Human Music
Self-Released
i
ii
Rachel Cribby*#
The Blue Green Red EP
Self-Released
i
B
lie*+#
Hounds
Mint
i
li
Cursed Arrows*#
Rebirth
Self-Released
i
M
Wasted Breath*+
Extinction
Self-Released
i
1   «
Juice*+
Demo 2018
Self-Released
i
»
Wallgrin*+#
Bird/Alien
Heavy Lark
i
1   »
Neko Case*#
Hell-On
Anti-
i
M
Fear of Drinking*+
Live in Zurich
Self-Released
i
l«
Gentle Mind*+#
After Earth
Self-Released
i
^
Fountain**
Acid Bath From The Jaded
Jungle
Self-Released
i
It.
Lonely Parade*
The Pits
Buzz
i
2
Mamarudegyal MTHC*+#
MRGEP
Self-Released
i
|H
Baby Cages*#
Bitter Melon
Self-Released
i
U
Deanne Matley*#
Because 1 Loved
Self-Released
i
lm
Chances*#
Traveler
Outloud
i
u
Les Poules a Colin*#
Morose
Self-Released
i
l»
Random Recipe*#
Distractions
Self-Released
i
2a
Raine Hamilton**
Night Sky
Self-Released
i
la
Kele Fleming*+#
No Static
Self-Released
i
»
Alex Cuba*
Lo Unico Constante
Fontana North
i
!«
Echuta*+
Even If Long Winded Waits
Agony Klub
i
»
Echo Nebraska**
Hold Up To The Fire
Park Sound Studios
i
h
Body Lens*#
Body Lens
Terrific Kids
i
a
Allison Au Quartet's
Forest Grove
Self-Released
i
l»
Blank Banshee*
Blank Banshee
Self-Released
i
3S
Joija Smiths
Lost & Found
RCA
i
|»
Gogo Penguin
A Humdrum Star
Blue Note
i
Ja
David Vest*
David Vest
Cordova Bay
i
1*
Witch Prophet*#
The Golden Octave
88 Days Of Fortune
i
«
Delta Blip*#
Delta Blip
Out Of Sound
i
1 *
Haley Blais*+#
Let Yourself Go
Self-Released
i
®
In Mirrors*+
Escape From Berlin
Italians Do It Better
i
1*
Bonjay*#
Lush Life
Mysteries Of Trade
i
«
Kim Beggs*#
Said Little Sparrow
Out Of A Paperbag
i
1 *
Ought*
Room Inside The World
Royal Mountain
i
-«
Esmerine*#
Mechanics Of Dominion
Constellation
i
I*
Fortune Killers*#
Temper Temper
Self-Released
i
*
Curtis Salgado & Alan
Hager
Rough Cut
Alligator
i
1*
The Oh Wells*+#
Roll With The Punches
Self-Released
i
I  SD
Essaie Pas*#
New Path
DFA
P
5f §
En   >h
% 3
T3
q
o o
b I
.-a "^
B -e3
■§ B
■n <U
e2 S
. <u
--J CU
s <tt
^ ft
3 S
t-j u
■a s
C3 Xh
Xl Sh
W o
-a 'fl
a ft
rt cU
a *
r9 Xi
8 g
Sin
s £
* 8
a a
s >
a -J
.23 j>
5 «
.2 S
■a aj
C3 >
u £>
0) <^
"3s "^
CD I—I
xi &
*3 j
o
a
o
^3 Q 'S
cu    u   "rt
B
tu
•3 xl
a «
u
(U
S Q
"«  ft s
ca   o  >
c J     .2
fl
Xl
xl    5
ft   ?
C3
fl
ft
s
o
cu ,o
cu fl
r-H d
ft u
SUBSCR/a^
tmCORDFR
I WOULD LIKE AN
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION
(that's $20cnd For Canada, $25cnd for U.S.A.)
ti WOULD LIKE T©
COMBER   M fc
WITH A DONATION      ■
(hey, thanks!)'	
TOTAL:
Send this form with some cold hard cash or a cheque to-.
DISCORDER MAGAZINE, LL500- 6133 UNIVERSITY BLVD. VANCOUVER, B.C. V6T ill
p,DVERT/5£-
3filJlliiT?l>i».«lM
LET'S SWEETEN THE DEAL,
MAKE IT A COMBO
Bst,
Talk to-.
ADVERTISING@CI TR. CA
_
 JAPANESE
BREAKFAST
X
RST AID
KIT
\^i
&  #
at
I
lURTNEY
BARNETT
\
UPCOMI
SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
Sept 9
ANDREW W.K.
Imperial
Sept  9
THE GROWLERS
Commodore Ballroom
Sept 10      Sept 12
TREVOR HALL      ISLAND
Imperial    Fox Cabaret
Sept 18
TOE
Imperial
Sept 19
DEVOTCHKA
Imperial
Sept 20
BIG THIEF
Imperial
Sept 21 Sept 23
SYLVAN LACUE THE MATTSON I / ASTRONAUTS, ETC.
Fox Cabaret The Wise Hall
Sept 23
JON HOPKINS
Imperial
Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26
PARQUET COURTS RYLEY WALKER JAPANESE BREAKFAST
Imperial Wise  Hall Imperial
Sept  29
YUNGBLUD
Fox Cabaret
Sept  29
DOJA CAT
Fortune
Sept  30
ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER
Wise Hall
Oct 2
FIRST AID KIT
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Oct 3
FLINT EASTWOOD
Fox Cabaret
Oct 4
IDLES
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct 5
JEAN-MICHEL BLAIS
St. James Hall
Oct 4 Oct 4
SHANNON & THE CLAMS  THE CHURCH
Wise  Hall Fox Cabaret
Oct  5
PR0T0MEN
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct  7
TY SEGALL AND WHITE FENCE
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct 6
KIKAGAKU M0Y0
Imperial
Oct 9 & 10        Oct 9     Oct 9
COURTNEY BARNETT    SHAME    JAY ROCK
Vogue Theatre   IWise Hall I Imperial
Oct 10
EARTHLESS
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct 11
NICK LOWE
Imperial
Oct 12      Oct 13     Oct 13
DEVON WELSH    TENNIS     THE SCORE
Wise Hall
Biltmore  Fox Cabaret
Oct  16
Oct  17
THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS
MCSO
Imperial
Commodore
Oct 17 Oct 19
THE WEATHER STATION  GRUFF RHYS
Fox Cabaret       Fox Cabaret
Tickets  & more  shows at   timbreconcerts.com

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0378940/manifest

Comment

Related Items