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 SEPT.2015
ID   51   9   3   2   t  (t  J
TV UGLY I OTHER JESUS I DEWAC ZINE
SA LUNA ! VIVO NEW ADDITIONS I JESSICA MACQUEEN
 UPCOMING SHOWS    RiC&SII A W
OOOiOiO
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
1
m
m
THE ATOMIC BITGHWAX black wizard,
MOS GENERATOR, SWEAT LODGE & MORE
MADBALL
ACQUITTED, YOUTH DECAY
CULT OF LUNA minsk, subosa,
BUSHWHACKER, IF WE ARE MACHINES, & MORE
KRISIUN & ORIGIN
AEON, ALTERBEAST, SOREPTION, INGESTED
ELIOT LIPP&GLADKILL
KERMODE
NAT JAY EP RELEASE PARTY
JASPER SLOAN YIP
THE CHAMELEONS VOX
INFIDEL, Ut
1
1
1
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more:
WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
CATTLE DECAPITATION king parrot; black
CROWN INITIATE, DARK SERMON, ZUCKUSS
JIM BYRNES & THE SOJOURNERS WITH
COLLEEN RENNISON
HUM & MINERAL
SEVEN NINES AND TENS
THE SUMNER BROTHERS ALBUM RELEASE
PARTY
MARTY FRIEDMAN
EXMORTUS, SKULL VULTURES
CHELSEA WOLFE
MAMIFFER
TOBIAS JESSOJR
WET
■1 http://facebook.com/RickshawTheatre
%2 ©rickshawtheatre ItSl] ©rickshawtheatre
 TABLE of CONTENTS
SEPTEMBER 2015
FRANCESCA BELCOURT - PG.08 •	
Local electronic pop artist Francesca Belcourt
is making (synth) waves in Vancouver's music
scene, thanks to her latest effort, Zongs. She sat
down with Discorder to talk about what it takes to
write a "zong," making music under an all-female
record label, and the colour that ties the whole album together.
TV UGLY - PG.50 	
Like a cast of close knit characters crammed onto
a couch, tv ugly talks with Discorder about the
September release of their new EP, UCLA Yankee
Cola. Inspired by episodes of the Simpsons and
their own camaraderie, tv ugly have come come
together to create a collection of catchy garage
pop tunes based on their shared musical tastes.
MESA LUNA - PG.l6  ■	
Meeting the individuals behind the ethereal debut
EP, Crux, Discorder chats with Vancouver duo
Mesa Luna about their creative approach to songwriting and the sonically textural and cathartic
tunes that have resulted.
DEWAC-PG.20  	
Discorder talks with the women behind the Downtown Eastside Women's Art Collective (DEWAC)
to discuss the September release of their first zine
project — a collection of contributions from women living in the DTES. During their bi-monthly art
workshops, DEWAC provides a space for a diversity of lived experiences, using art to enhance a
sense of safety and community amongst participants.
OTHER JESUS- PG.54	
With a tour underway and a new album under their
belt, post-punk trio Other Jesus sit down with Discorder to discuss how they've changed over the
past year. While their new album addresses poignant cultural issues, having fun is still high on
their list of priorities.
VIVO NEW ADDITIONS- PG.58 	
Discorder sits down with Shauna Jean Doherty of
Vancouver's VIVO Media Arts Centre to discuss
its monthly New Additions series. The series features video art submissions from all over the world
that respond to a particular thematic monthly call
out. Doherty discusses the history of VIVO, her
role and objectives at her position, the most recent
New Additions screening this August, and the upcoming screening this September.
DISCORDER REVISITED - PG.l3
FILMSTRIPPED    FRANK   &   THE   WONDERCAT
PG.24
ON THE AIR A FACE FOR RADIO - PG.27
REAL LIVE ACTION - PG.30
CALENDAR - PG.36
ART PROJECT JESSICA MACQUEEN- PG.40
UNDER REVIEW - PG.44
CITR PROGRAM GUIDE - PG.65
ADVERTISE: Ac space for upcoming issues
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to
DONATE:
A/e are Pa^oK;:TC a registered
can be booked by calling (504) 822 4342 or
Li.600-6133 University Bivd, Vancouver. BC
non-profit.
and accept donations so we can
.emailing acivertising@citr.ca. Rate? available
votlz'l with your address, and we will mail
provide yoi
with the content you love. To
upon request.
donate v:$i
.www.Citr.ca/donate.
CONTRIBUTE: to submit words to
Discorder please contact: editor.discorder@
citr.ca. To submit images, contact: artd;rector.
discorder@citr.ca
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your
■ate always looking fornew friends.
Writers: Slavko Bucifal,
Robert Catherall, Fraser
Dobbs, Erica Dolman,
Josh Gabert-Doyon, Jon
Hernandez, Elizabeth
Holiday, Gary Jarvis,
Jon Kew, Erica Leiren,
Jaqueline Manoukian,
Missy Martin, Mark
PaulHus, Theano
Pavlidou, Keagan Perlette,
Brody Rokstad, Ewan
Thompson, Kristian
Voveris, Jasper Wrinch
Photographers &
Illustrators: Sara Baar,
Josh Conrad, Kat
Dombsky, Eva Dominelli,
Michelle Fischer, Cristian
Fowlie, Danielle Jette,
Dana Kearley, Sharon Ko,
Jimmy Liang, Jaqueline
Manoukian, Gina
McKay, Naomi Nguyen,
Konstantin Prodanovic,
Lauren Ray, Michael
Shantz, Jamie Wu
Cover. Photography by
Sara Baar
Editor Alex de Boer
Art Director Ricky
Castanedo-Laredo
Under Review Editor
Jon Kew
Real Live Action Editor
Robert Catherall
Ad Coordinator
Nashlyn Lloyd
Proofreaders: Brit
Bachmann, Gord Badanic,
Ricky Castanedo-Laredo,
Rob Catherall, Natalie Dee,
Alex de Boer, Amanda
Hutchinson, Jon Kew,
Erica Leiren, Nashlyn
Lloyd, Graham McFie
Calendar Listings:
Sarah Cordingley
Accounts Manager
Eleanor Wearing
Student Liason: Elizabeth
Holliday
Web Editor James Olsen
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher: Student Radio
Society of UBC
]
EDITORIAL CUTOFF: September 1, 2015
©Discorder 2015 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published
almost monthly by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except
Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a
pen and write LL500-6133 University Blvd , Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1 Zl, Canada.
 EDITOR'S NOTE
IT'S THE PEOPLE I'LL MISS THE MOST
Illustrations by Gina McKay
The pages of Discorder are a quiet sketch
of Canadian arts and culture. In each issue,
the magazine speaks volumes — in the words
of contributors, through the advice and input
of editors — about individuals who are creating. These words, which contemplate and
consider creativity, become articles of creativity themselves. Reaching readers, they
transcend their home in print and online.
They facilitate a conversation that laps outward, enhanced by exchanges and interactions. In this place of some commonality, of
some reason to congregate or reach for the
same publication, lives community. As I step
away from my position of Editor-in-Chief to
return to school this fall, these communities
are what leave me most affected.
As a member of Discordefs masthead,
this most immediate circle of community has
been my closest. Putting together a magazine is certainly a bonding experience, and
undoubtedly the catalyst for friendships that
will exist beyond the ties of responsibility.
The next ring of community I've been
fortunate enough to forge into is that of Disorder's contributing writers. Though these
individuals do not necessarily know one another, they are part of a collective of journalistic and nonflction expression that works to
highlight the efforts of Vancouver's creative
class. Working with new and established
writers has been a challenge and a thrill.
There is power in the evolution of abilities
— from shaky to competent, from competent
to exceptional — and it is both perceivable
and rewarding to observe this development
over time.
Beyond the masthead and our revolving
crew of generous contributors lies the very
content we congregate to cover. The living
world of local arts and culture. Giving life
to my vast web of email back-and-forths, I
have had the pleasure of meeting some of the
EDITORS' NOTE
 people who fill our pages. Attending the show
of a musician or artist Discorder has covered,
means knowing I am supporting them both in
print and participation. Interacting with these
individuals in the tangible realm makes visible the ongoing conversation between the
writing we do, and the content we cover. It
becomes apparent that there is a dialogue that
exists between different artistic acts in the
city, giving perspective to a vastness of community.
This is my final issue as Editor-in-Chief.
And as I expanded on (in great detail) in my
previous Editor's Note, I have had a more-
than-meaningful four year relationship with
Discorder, as both a writer and an editor. As
I begin my Master's degree in Journalism
this September, I look forward to focusing on
my own pursuit of creative non-fiction, but I
hope to never walk away from these communities I've had the privilege of be included in.
The significance of connecting different demographics is just that. Bands, music
fans, and music writers will certainly overlap, but a dialogue is not always automatic. I
do not claim that Discorder solely initiates a
dialogue between these groups. I do claim it
helps facilitates a discussion. To Discordefs
masthead, contributors, and Vancouver's arts
and culture community, I hope the conversation always continues. And, it goes without
saying, it's the people I'll miss most.
m
Alex de Boer
s*
EDITORS' NOTE
   #%TI
IICTLY THE BREATES
T -^^^^_
^STI
IHUI
GteMWmSIF AUGUST 2M5
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
1     Tough Age*
1 Get The Feeling
Central
(Mint)
26  Mourning Coup**
Baby Blue
(No Sun)
2    Fake Tears*+
Nightshifting
(Mint)
27   Pinner*+
#2 Demo
(Self-Released)
3    Fountain*
Fountain II
(Self-Released)
28  Fist City*
Everything is a
Mess
(Transgressive)
4    White Poppy*+
Natural Phenomena
(Norman)
29  The Famines*
Too Cool & Other
Songs
(Pentagon Black)
5    Ora Cogan*+
Crystallize
(Hidden City
Records)
30  Circuit des Yeux
In Plain Speech
(ThrillJockey)
6     Shopping
Consumer
Complaints
(Fat Cat Records)
31   Jamie xx
In Colour
(Young Turks)
7     Dark Glasses*
Dark Glasses
(Gary Cassettes)
32   Braids**
Deep In The Iris
(Flemish Eye)
8     The Ballantynes**
Dark Drives, Life
Signs
(LaTiDa)
33   Colin Cowan & the
Elastic Stars*+
Spring Myths
(Self-Released)
9     Woolworm*+
Everything Seems
Obvious
(Hockey Dad)
34   Slim Twig*
Thanks For Stickin'
With Twig
(Calico Corp)
10   Old Man Luedecke*
Domestic Eccentric
(True North)
35   The Hussy
Galore
(Southpaw)
11   Buffy Sainte-Marie*
Power In The Blood
(Gypsy Boy)
36   The Backhomes*+
Tidaiwave
(Self-Released)
12   Walter TV*
Blessed
(Sinderlyn Records)
~_   Adrian Teacher and
TheSubs*+
Sorta Hafta
(Self-Released)
13   Ramzi**
Houti Kush
(W80p)
38   Crosss*
Lo
(Telephone
Explosidn)
14   Yukon Blonde*+
On Blonde
(Dine Alone)
39   Crystal Eyes*
No Man Is An Island
(Self-Released)
15   Supermoon**
Comet Lovejoy
(Alarum)
40   Renny Wilson**
Punk Explosion/
Extension
(Mint)
16   Frankie*+
Girl Of Infinity
(Self-Released)
41   She Serpent*
She Serpent
(Self-Released)
__   Lizzy Mercier
Descloux
Press Color
(Light In The Attic)
42  Various**
S.U.B. Pop
(CiTR 101.9fm)
18   Nap Eyes*
Whine of the Mystic
(You've Changed)
43   White Reaper
White Reaper Does
It Again
(Royal Mountain)              1
19   Stefana Fratlla*+
Efemera
(Trippy Tapes)
44   N.213's Group
Vision**
N.213's Group
Vision
(Isolated Now
Waves)
20   Jenny Hval
Apocalypse, Girl
(Sacred Bones)
45   Nervous Talk*+
Nervous Talk
(Hosehead)
21   Fake Palms*
Fake Palms
(Buzz Records)
..   Slow Down
Molasses*
Burnt Black Cars
(Culvert)
22   LateSpring*+
Late Spring
(Self-Released)
47   Rodney DeCroo*
Campfires on the
Moon
(Tonic)
23   Genderdog**
Neurosis Party
(Hockey Dad)
48  Blonde Elvis*
On Vanity
(Pleasance)
24   Grounders*
Grounders
(Nevado)
49   AHNA*+
Perpetual Warfare
(Choking Hazard)
25   Minimal Violence**
Heavy Slave
(Genero)
50   MacDeMarco*
Another One
(Captured Tracks)
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with
, found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver, if you can't find them, give CiTR's mu
tei! you how to find them. Check out other great campu
asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked {+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be
iic coordinator a shout at (504) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll
s/communit'y radio charts at www.earshot-online.com.
CHA
RTS
1
 m^^^^
CiTR HAS
GREAT
FRIENDS
WESTSIDE/UBC
AUSTRALIAN BOOT
COMPANY
15% off
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10% off
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and accessories
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10% off
ON THE FRINGE
HAIR DESIGN
10% off (does not stack with
UBC student discount)
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& EMPORIUM
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2 free lessons
  *
*
THEY RE NOT SONGS, THEY RE ZONGS
by Jon Hernandez II Illustrations by Danielle Jette
Photography by Sara Baar
*
"THAT'S WHY I CALLED IT ZONGS," SHE SAYS, "BECAUSE I DON'T REALLY THINK ABOUT THEM
AS SONGS. THEY'RE JUST SOMETHING WEIRDER THAN THAT TO ME"
When listening to the soothing synth
sounds of Francesca Belcourt's new album
Zongs, I couldn't help but wonder, "what
the hell is a zong?" I had sudden flashbacks
to high school house parties, where small
crowds of fearless teenagers would line up to
hit "the zong" — a gargantuan, voluminous
bong that was designed to put you on your
ass. Surely Belcourt couldn't be referencing the zong, could she? As it turns out, the
title of Belcourt's sophomore solo album has
nothing to do with getting blitzed, but it will
definitely take listeners on a trip.
I managed to catch up with Belcourt right
after her trip to Shambhala. Looking for a
day's rest before she made another long journey to the Discovery Islands, I'm sure the last
thing she needed was a reporter in her living room sticking an iPhone in her face; but
she toughed it out, and made me feel right at
home.
Belcourt forms one-half of the experimental synth-pop duo Mu (alongside bandmate
Brittney Rand), but this time around she's flying solo. Zongs is the second addition to Bel-
court's solo project, after Hush Hush, which
was released in 2013. As Belcourt will admit,
her new album is a bit of a passion product
— the result of some orphaned tracks that she
had written but still hadn't found a home for.
"A lot of these songs were things I didn't
think fit for the Mu project. Each time I tossed
one aside, the pile got bigger," Belcourt tells
me. "I was gonna go off-hand, maybe release
a few on my own, but as the pile got bigger,
I thought 'I wanna make something of this.'"
Later adding, "It's not fair to myself as someone who is making all this music to not show
it and give [the songs] the credit that [they]
deserve."
The London-born and B.C. bred artist never forgets where she came from. Each year,
she heads back to her hometown on Cortes
Island, playing acoustic sets for locals and
tourists alike. But her latest foray into the
world of recorded music is a bit of a departure from her previous work.
"A lot of it is much more stream-of-con-
sciousness," Belcourt says, comparing Zongs
to her work with Mu. "I thought less about
the structure. I wanted to be more loose with
some of [the songs]. You'll notice that, for
instance, the opening song doesn't really
have a chorus. That's why I didn't want to
use it with Mu, cause it doesn't have a pop
FRANCESCA BELCOURT
9
 '4K
iik
'4NI
structure that we always strive for. A lot of
the songs are kind of thin. The song 'Bloody'
just has maybe four tracks of synth, and my
vocals over top; they're just loose. It's more
of a sonic poem."
Belcourt's abandonment of traditional song
structure provoked her to look at this collection of music in a different light. "That's why
I called it Zongs," she says, "because I don't
really think about them as songs. They're just
something weirder than that to me."
Whether the album is made up of zongs or
songs, it's undeniably fantastic. After hearing the opening track, "Sketchy Cuddle," it's
pretty easy to recognize that Belcourt is immensely talented. The slow and melodious
track, elevated by its psychedelic tone and
Belcourt's soft vocals, is completely mesmerizing, and keeps you wondering where the
album will go to next.
Zongs quickens its pace with "In Between" and "Kinda Bad," but not until you
realize that Belcourt draws from a wide array of sounds and styles to create her own
exceptional groove. The highlight of the
album hits around the halfway mark with a
song titled "Meaning," when Belcourt drops
a beat with fellow Vancouver musician Os-
hea. Belcourt's lyricism rises to the top of
this song, highlighted by her repetition of the
phrase "there is no meaning;" a self-reflexive
jab at the very concept of making music.
Zongs proves Belcourt to be a unique local talent, although she isn't always sure how
her songs are going to turn out when she enters the studio. In terms of creative control,
Belcourt comments on how the handful of
collaborations throughout her album do not
undermine her authorship.
"It's nice to be in charge fully. It's empowering to be a woman, and be a producer, and
have people listen to you for once," Belcourt
tells me. "It doesn't happen as often. A lot of
women will contribute to people's music, but
it's not really collaboration if you're just singing over someone else's [track]."
Producing electronic music by female artists is part of the mission of Genero, the local
FRANCESCA BELCOURT
 4
*  *
 women's record label which is releasing Belcourt's second solo act. Belcourt easily comments on Genero's significance in combating gender standards in the electronic music
scene.
"[Genero's] creating a space for female
artists, especially in the electronic field —
there are less women making electronic music in the world," she adds passionately, "and
there's a reason for that. It's hard to get into
doing electronic music when you're a woman. It's nice to be part of a collective that are
overcoming that together."
Zongs will be the latest album put out by
Genero. And if you're particularly observant,
you might notice something special about its
presentation.
"Orange is a big part of Zongs. Everything's orange. The tape is orange. The design
is orange. I have orange on my eye [on the
cover art]. All the promotional stuff has been
orange. It's kind of like the thing that holds it
together," Belcourt explains. "Orange is such
a funny colour. When I was younger, I had a
friend, and we had this weird infatuation with
orange, and it was kind of something that defined us when we were in school together. I
just think it's such a functional colour — it
stands out. So I wanted to bring that back
into my life with this project. Because Zongs
stands out for me, in my life. This whole
project stands out."
Belcourt is decked out with orange and
white make-up on the cover of Zongs, and the
bright orange colour of the album's cassette
form makes it look like a miniature Rugrats
VfetS. Seeking to make the album stand out
by using this colour (a tactic that the construction industry caught onto a long time
ago), Belcourt is equally making a statement
about herself: she's bright, animated, and refreshingly unique — after all, there's nothing
that rhymes with Belcourt.
*
*
12
FRANCESCA BELCOURT
 DISCORDER REVISITED
GO FOUR 3! VANCOUVER'S UNSUNG POP HEROES
by Erica Leiren II Illustrations by Naomi Nguyen II Photo courtesy of Alex Waterhouse Hayward
You are never a prophet in your own country. How true.
It is 1991 and Gord Badanic, Roxanne
Heichert, and Steve Quinn — plus an often
rotating drummer — are Vancouver's Go
Four 3, a perfect radio-ready power pop outfit primed to blast from the launch pad at the
speed of light. Nurtured by epic talent-spotter
Grant McDonagh (owner of Zulu Records);
four years of hard gigging across the expanse
of Canada, playing venues and college campuses from Victoria to Halifax, and up and
down the U.S. West Coast, have sharpened
every arrow in this oh-so-talented quartet's
quiver. Go For 3 have survived things — like
hitting that black cow in their touring van one
dark prairie night — that would have stopped
lesser bands.
Go Four 3 are fully armed with songs to
kill for, chops to burn, and the fierce ambition
that has brought them this far. Their two full
albums and three video singles have made
them college darlings of music's new medium
— video. Erica Ehm, Much Music's top VJ,
loves the band and hosts them on her show
again and again, where the banter and their
camera-loving irreverence evoke the kind of
charm, wit, and silliness not seen since the
Beatles. They have multiple songs in heavy
rotation on Much Music, the new TV station
13
DISCORDER REVISITED
 all the kids are watching for their music fix.
Billboard magazine proclaims them "the next
big thing!"
Go For 3 travels all the way to London to
strike gold, where a record deal is so close
they can taste it! Thousands of miles from
home, in one shining moment, their entire
odyssey comes down to the crucial pivot
point: a choice between two hot Brit-Pop
producers, both wooing the gophers (as their
fans affectionately refer to them) with a deal
they hope will make them rich and famous.
It's between Dave Stewart of the Emythmics
or Joe Bloggs. Which one to pick?!
With benefit of hindsight, Stewart with his
track record of worldwide success, was probably the better bet. But the band is swayed in
Bloggs' favour by the fact that his recording
studio is more impressive.
At this crucial juncture, instead of taking
the band to world domination like they'd
expected, their producer/manager gets a divorce and loses interest. Go Four 3 is left
with only memories and the new name he's
foisted upon them: Thrill Squad. As Thrill
Squad, they release an excellent three song
12" in England and later self-release an EP
and one full length album. That is it for their
career.
But oh what a career it was. Seven years
and seven drummers worth!
The Go Four 3 saga began when bassist Badanic met singer Heichert at CiTR in
1983. Badanic's girl-group party band, the
Debutantes, had just lost its lead singer, so
he asked Heichert to try out. She did, and the
rest is history.
Go Four 3 had a mod sensibility (Badanic
and Quinn revered the Who, Jam, and the
Kinks). Original drummer Rob Tomkow,
was a pilot and "Go Four 3!" is aviation control tower speak for "ready to go — perfect
landing position." Very apt. Together, they
sparked off an energy and excitement that
was the crux of every live show. Heichert's
girlish, yet intense vocals were unique, evoking shades of '60s girl groups mixed with
punk. Badanic's monster bass riffs and concert-pianist-level keyboard playing enhanced
songs with spectacular baroque flourishes.
14
DISCORDER REVISITED
 Quinn slashed brilliantly at his guitar like
the second coming of Pete Townsend. The
drummers played big, bold, echo-y, and perfectly in the pocket. Together, it all sent shivers down your spine. Go Four 3 were one of
the best power pop bands Vancouver has ever
produced.
My first fave from their 1985 self-titled debut album (produced by Ron Obvious and Go
Four 3) is "In My Dreams." This track evokes
everything you are feeling in your early 20's
with Heichert's girlish vocals showcased at
their best. Their second album, Six Friends
has gems like "Right From Wrong" with its
strangler-esque keyboard intro and incendiary guitar solo, "Round at Number One,"
the super catchy dance inciter, and "Kaleidoscopes," with LA. paisley underground
influences.
The band always suffered for the fact that
they bestrode the chasm that existed then between mainstream and alternative music; a
gap that has since mostly closed. Although
Go Four 3 didn't quite grab the brass ring
when it swung round on the music-business-
merry-go-round, they wrote, played, and recorded great songs. One could say so much
more, but in the end, it is the art they created
together, not fame or money, that is truly lasting and worthy of another good listen today.
BonAppetit!
15
DISCORDER REVISITED
j
  POP DISCOVERIES
by Ewan Thompson II Illustrations by Kat Dombsky
Photography by Lauren Ray
"THERE IS A DRAWBACK TO TECHNOLOGY THAT YOU CAN HAVE THIS INFINITE OPPORTUNITY TO
MICROEDIT EVERYTHING TO SHIT, BUT IT ALSO GIVES YOU THIS OPPORTUNITY TO REALLY THROW
SOME PAINT AT THE CANVAS AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS."
I'm sitting on the sun scorched grass of
Jonathan Rogers Park with Vancouver electro-pop duo Mesa Luna. As we watch an
amateur Softball team play in the backdrop
of the city's skyline, we discuss the band's
formation, their ethereal self-released debut
EP Crux, and their pursuit to "discover" new
songs.
Consisting of Justice McLellan and Alex
Cooper, Mesa Luna formed in 2013 through
a meeting of the two musicians' minds and
computers. Both McLellan and Cooper had
spent much of their recent musical careers
producing music alone. "I just wanted to get
out there and start playing with people...I
was tired of being a lonely bedroom producer," explains Cooper.
Until the formation of Mesa Luna, McLellan had spent most of his musical career
fronting indie bands and professes that he
didn't think he would ever be in a full-on
band again. He instead had been gravitating increasingly towards playing a production role in music. When the pair were first
introduced to each other by a mutual friend
who felt they had a similar outlook towards
music, they simply discussed the technical
side of music production. Eventually though,
McLellan and Cooper moved onto the idea of
forming a band together. "We both had pieces
of the equation...it was more just coming together and bringing our computers together,"
explains Cooper.
17
MESA LUNA
 Initially, Mesa Luna's only conceptual inspiration was to be a project that was a little
different, and one that bridged the pair's
worlds together. Cooper says that he had been
making electronic music on his own terms
for a while, but had been wanting to find an
avenue to bring it onto the stage. Despite
the affinity that he has for the Victoria noise
scene that he spent much of his formative
years involved in, Cooper still felt connected
to pop music and the entire idea of having a
singer. Meeting McLellan allowed him to at
last explore his latent pop sensibilities.
Once this exploration was underway, Mesa
Luna went through an intense creative period
where 95% of what was written ended up being discarded. Each song is said to be a "discovery" as opposed to a conscious effort to
write entire songs in one session.
The band tends to write in a nonlinear fashion. Often Mesa Luna will experiment with
sounds that are at the outset, fairly traditional, but eventually become intentionally manipulated and mangled. McLellan says that
sounds often unexpectedly end up in completely different parts of a song from what
was initially intended.
"There is a drawback to technology that
you can have this infinite opportunity to mi-
croedit everything to shit, but it also gives you
this opportunity to really throw some paint
at the canvas and see what happens. That's
ultimately what I'm all about," says Cooper;
"finding new sounds, interesting sounds."
Originally, ideas for songs came from the
duo's respective "production comfort zones,"
but as the band has evolved so too has the
songwriting process. McLellan and Cooper
have now found enough common ground
with each other that they've increasingly
started their journey towards discovering
songs as a duo.
For Mesa Luna, this pursuit extends to the
live arena as well. Initially the idea of being a primarily electronic band concerned
McLellan: "I thought that [the songs] would
be stuck in some way... which actually kind of
worried me...but the more we played live the
more I realized that I can fuck with timing
and the way I interact with Alex." Cooper
feels similarly about their dynamic in a live
setting. "There's so much opportunity to play
with tension and repetition...you can feel the
18
L_
MESA LUNA
 room.. .1 didn't want to be just someone stuck
behind a laptop triggering clips, I wanted to
be live and responsive."
The result of numerous live shows and intense periods of experimentation and discovery was the band's debut EP Crux. McLellan
and Cooper were living together during a difficult time while the EP was being written.
The title of the EP is intended to reflect what
the duo went through during these difficulties. "It felt like I was at a tipping point...the
crux of all the drama" says McLellan. The
music was an attempt to find a solution to the
problems that both members were facing at
the time. Cooper says that the release has a
certain aesthetic, largely due to the foundation of the songs coming from a precarious
emotional space.
Passionately delivered and intelligently
written, it's sometimes easy to forget that
Crux is the band's debut release. "Church
Garden" is a perfect example of the band's
synthesis of McLellan's forlorn, emotionally charged lyrics alongside danceable pop
music. On the oneiric "Lost On Me," McLellan's indie rock roots show; his stripped down
guitar playing contrasts wonderfully with the
rest of the EP's chiming electronica. Perhaps
the record's highlight is its closer, "Don't Let
Go," which combines pulsating synth-pop
with tremulous shoegaze. McLellan eroorrs
and whispers his deeply personal lyrics over
each shimmering track, each song subtly exploring different textures and sounds.
Looking towards the future, the band says
that they plan to release videos to accompany
"Church Garden" and should be embarking
on a West Coast tour in the fall. The band is
also back in writing/discovery mode .With
Crux, it feels like Mesa Luna has released
their "sad EP" and their new material is heading in a more cathartic direction.
"It's like we've processed our sadness, and
now we're just angry," laughs Cooper. "I feel
like [we] both share this deep seated feeling
of discomfort and rage at the way the world is
and that's always gonna come out, but I think
that's great that it's able to come out over the
top of really danceable music."
In their pursuit to discover songs, Mesa
Luna have created a sophisticated and emotionally resonant pop record. Mounting my
bike and leaving Johnathan Rogers Park, I'm
excited to see where their expedition takes
them next.
Mesa Luna will be releasing Crux at the
Lido on October 24th. Check out their music
online at www.soundcloud.comlmesaluna
MESA LUNA
19
 THE DOWNTOWN EASTSIDE WOMEN S ART COLLECTIVE ZINE RELEASE
by Erica Dolman II Illustrations by Sharon Ko
Photography by Sara Baar
IN THAT MOMENT, I REFLECTED ON MY POSITIONALITY. I CONSIDERED HOW THIS SENSE OF UNCOM-
FORTABILITY IS STRUCTURAL
I have experienced the Downtown Eastside
(DTES) only in a tangential and superficial
way. When I enter this neighbourhood I feel
alienated, like I should be elsewhere, like this
space, along with Canada on the whole, is occupied. I know this is stolen land and that it is
my purpose as a white, privileged, cis woman
to consider my privilege in my every move. I
do not argue against my positionality. I recognize its prevalence and how my perspective
speaks only to my lived experience and does
not speak for anyone else's. What I mean by
"lived experience" is my first-hand account
of being a member of a minority or oppressed
group. In my case, that is being a woman in
a society that structurally oppresses women.
When I enter an area, especially one like the
DTES, these feelings resonate strongly.
I lock up my bike on the corner of East
Georgia and Main outside of Matchstick Coffee Roasters, where I meet Jenn McDermid
and Hanna Fazio. Both are organizers of the
Downtown Eastside Women's Art Collective
(DEWAC). McDermid and Fazio along with
Jessica Todd, who was not present, facilitate
a bi-monthly art workshop for self-identified
women of the DTES at the Carnegie Community Centre. DEWAC is releasing a zine
this September to showcase and circulate the
creative visual and written works produced
by women in the DTES.
McDermid and Fazio are facilitators at
these workshops, but also participate with the
women who attend. As McDermid describes,
"There's no hierarchy in terms of one person
being more knowledgeable about art than
anyone else." And speaking as workshop participants, McDermid and Fazio acknowledge
how everyone is "kind of in the same position" during these bi-monthly workshops,
as McDermid articulates. The sessions provide an equitable space where, momentarily,
structural barriers, such as low socioeconomic status, are transcended.
Artists are paid by DEWAC and each submission to the zine has either been created in
these workshop sessions or elsewhere. Both
20
DEWAC ZINE RELEASE
  McDermid and Fazio express their surprise
that some of the pieces had not received
recognition prior to their submission to the
zine. "Some of the artwork that was submitted was so beautiful... Many of the people
who submitted pieces went to art school, and
they probably know more than us," reflects
McDermid.
Having both worked with organizations
that are geared towards providing opportunities to resident in the DTES, McDermid and
Fazio are propelled by their own experiences
and stress the agency provided to participants
in each art session. "Our big thing," describes
Fazio, "is supplying resources for people,"
whether it be a space to debrief about life,
to collaborate on an art piece, or to share the
energy that is present while in the creative
process.
The importance of cultivating a safe space
highlights the lack of trust that has been expressed by some participants. This is often
the result of their work previously being
photographed without their permission, describes McDermid and Fazio. Aware of how
being taken advantage of relates to social and
economic vulnerabilities, DEWAC is committed to mitigating these problems through
their zine submission process and their facilitation of workshop sessions, which are both
open to discussing and addressing feelings of
mistrust. "Because this is our first zine, all
we can do is give our word... but we have
also gained trust from some of the women
who have started to come to our workshops
more regularly and we have gotten to know
and build relationships with them," explains
Fazio.
In tandem with providing general information about DEWAC, both McDermid and
Fazio illuminate a variety of misconceptions
that I had personally had about the DTES. The
first is their observation of the lived experience of impoverished women in the DTES.
McDermid considers, "When you're living in
poverty you might not have a lot of resources,
you can sometimes feel a little bored or antsy,
so to have the ability to have things provided
for you [during the art sessions], you can just
come and relax." The essentiality of cultivating a safe space is reinforced throughout my
conversation with McDermid and Fazio.
Uprooting a second misconception I had
about the DTES, McDermid and Fazio articulate how the DTES has a stronger sense
of community than other areas in the city.
Perceiving this through their experiences
working in the area, both women hope to
continue building relationships there. "And
we are kind of just rolling with that a bit,"
says McDermid.
This resonated with the feelings of un-
comfortability I had experienced while in the
area. Is that uncomfortability a result of being
accustomed to the way Vancouver is unac-
cepting of a variety of lived experiences? Is
the actual experience of living in the DTES
cultivated by the response the community
gets from people of middle and upper-class
socioeconomic standings?
In that moment, I reflected on my position-
ality. I considered how this sense of uncomfortability is structural, yet a part of my own
understanding of who I am in my community
and how others' experiences are much different, yet no less valid than my own. Each
experience is contributive to its respective
community. Sure, my feelings of uncomfortability are not unfounded, but how I make
meaning of them, how I react and go about
my daily life — that is what is important to
recognize. More than recognize, I must adjust to and try to keep these feelings in mind,
in my every move.
One thing that I find interesting are the
similarities and dissimilarities of lived experiences. We all have them. Art, especially
collaborative art like the DEWAC zine, momentarily transcends different lived experiences and creates a sense of support and
community.
22
DEWAC ZINE RELEASE
 "METALLIC MYSTIC MANDALA"
TARABALCOMBE
Tara grew up in East Van. She has always been interested in art, and has taken college
classes in Fine Art and Art History. After struggling with chronic pain for over a year, Tara
discovered that colouring mandalas and yantras helped to take her mind off the pain, and
was more powerful than any type of medicine.
23
DEWAC ZINE RELEASE
 FRANK AND THE
MNDERCAT.
3
FILMSTRIPPED
FRANK & THE WONDERCAT
by Selina Crammond II Illustrations by Melissa Fischer
For some, the end of summer is marked by
heading back to school, but for cinephiles,
it's marked by heading back to the movie
theatre. Now in its 34th year, the Vancouver International Film Festival (VIFF) runs
from September 24 through October 9. With
over 300 films to choose from, it's not easy
to know where to start. My first instinct is to
brush past the international heavy hitters that
make their way through the festival circuit,
and seek out the obscure and local/Canadian
films, which leads me to Frank and the V/on-
dercat.
Directed by Tony Massil and Pablo Alvarez-Mesa, both alumni of SFU's film
program, Frank and the Wondercat is a lo-
fi documentary about a curious duo from
Pennsylvania: Pudgie Wudgie (1986-2001),
a docile orange tabby and his owner, 80 year
old divorcee Frank Furko. Pudgie Wudgie,
looking somewhat like a cat version of Ber-
nie from Weekend at Bernie's ("Weekend at
Pudgie's?") made local headlines in the '90s
for his groovy attire — which included over
100 costumes, 50 hats, and 30 pairs of glasses
— and his tricks (the greatest trick of all being that he wore his costumes with ease). As
a predecessor to today's online cat memes,
Pudgie Wudgie's success culminated with
TV appearances on Maury and David Letter-
man.
It's clear from the fuzzy videotape footage and small-town newspaper clippings that
Pudgie Wudgie garnered all of the attention in
the past, but it's Frank who takes spotlight in
this film. Sporting a bright yellow tracksuit,
patterned shirts, and Buddy Holly glasses, he
talks candidly with the filmmakers about the
good times with Pudgie Wudgie, as well as
the not-so-good-times in his human relationships. The structure is simple: the narrative
is comprised by a series of interviews with
Frank, and although there are moments when
th^t starts to feel a bit repetitive, the film, not
unlike Frank, is modest and warm-hearted in
its approach.
At their worst these sort of "outside biop-
ics" can feel uninspired and act as a sort of
display case through which eccentrics are
24
FILMSTRIPPED
 gawked and laughed at. While at their best,
they offer an entertaining, yet respectful,
reflection of what it means to live a meaningful life, and lucky for us, Frank and the
Wondercat exemplifies the latter. More than
just a charming portrait, it's a rumination on
family, fame, and our long-standing relationship with felines.
There's a rich history of philosophers, artists, and filmmakers drawing inspiration from
felines. Chris Marker >- one of Cinema's
most celebrated experimental filmmakers —
often included images of cats in his films. In
Marker's 1977 essay film A Grin without a
Cat, the narration explains, "A cat is never on
the side of power." With this edict in mind,
maybe our collective fascination — both on
screen and off — with these small grumpy
creatures points to some sort of rebellious (or
innate?) desire to cheer for the underdog, or
in this case, cat!
As a short addendum, I highly recommend
you'that you also take time to explore at least
one of the ten short film programs (comprising of 8+ short films each) at this year's
VIFF. Continuing with the animal theme, a
couple notables are: Lewis — another feline
flick that is part of the Canadian Living shorts
program. Also tucked in the Canadian Living
program is a new film by Chelsea McMullan,
director of .My Prairie Home, about a sweet,
albeit bizarre small-town museum in Alberta.
You'll have to see it to figure out the animal
connection.
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.
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'Q.     ■•£•
IIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIII
25
FILMSTRIPPED
 _ .«JI
> THE FRINGE'S
OPENING NIGHT
TUESDAY SEPT 8
Aganaba
9:00pm
+ 11 DAYS OF FREE MUSIC
SEPT 10-20 '
On the Barefoot Wine & Bubbly Stage
at the Big Rock Brewery Fringe Bar
V;iz3 -~F - '
FEATURING
Adrian Teacher
JP Maurice
& the Subs
Supermoon
SAVVIE
and more!
vancouverfringe.com QHfifflg*   ■■jjl
SEPTEMBER   24   -   OCTOBER   9,   2015
VANCOUVER   INTERNATIONAL
FILM   FESTIVAL
OROGERS        TELEFILM
C    fl    N    R    D    fi
viff.org
 ^vws*
ON THE AIR
A FACE FOR RADIO
by Gary Jarvis II Illustrations by Jimmy Liang
Photography by Jamie Wu
In May CiTR gave the green light — or
should that be the red on-air light — to Erik
Coates. A political science major and this
year's CiTR Student Executive President,
Coates was given the opportunity to forge
ahead with his innovative approach to radio.
Coates' particular style breaks the mold by
blending eclectic music choices with random
interviews. For example, he recently interviewed his grandma! I met up with him at the
CiTR station to uncover the evolution of his
weekly radio show, A Face for Radio.
ERIK, YOU DESCRIBE YOUR SHOW AS A
MUSIC SHOW WITH INTERLUDES ABOUT
NOTHING, WHAT DOES THAT MEAN?
It's a bit of a play on the Seinfeld premise,
you know, a show about nothing. The idea
was to do a show with thematic monologues
but I wasn't able to do the monologues as well
as I wanted because I'd end up just sort of
rambling on. Let's say year end lists. I'd play
some music, I'd talk about the year end lists,
what my favourites were, what I thought other people's were and then more in depth asking what is the real point of this? Why does
it matter? How do we evaluate such things?
YOU WANT TO PUSH THE BOUNDARIES. DO YOU THINK THERE ARE LIMITS TO
WHAT YOU CAN DO AT CITR?
I think that CiTR is the perfect place because we support independent and different
programming. The limits are more of what I
can provide because I'm limited by my own
tastes, my personality, how I feel that day.
27
ON THE AIR
 YOU ARE PRESIDENT OF THE CITR STUDENT EXEC. DOES THAT HAVE AN IMPACT
ON YOUR SHOW?
Not really. I name drop sometimes, I'm not
above that. But I try not to do it too much because I think that anyone who's listening outside isn't really going to care that much and
if I play a song they hate they're not going to
keep on listening becauseTm the president.
WHAT INFLUENCES YOUR CONTENT?
Of course I want to play a certain level of
new music and I don't mean new as in just
come out but new to me. Every week I have
at least three or four new songs that I've been
listening to that week. On a recent show I
interviewed my grandma and aunt visiting
from Brazil and did the show completely in
Portuguese, playing only music that they're
into —■ old time Italian music that my grandma likes.
WHAT HAS BEEN THE RESPONSE FROM
LISTENERS?
I don't know really. I played a short story
on the show and that had positive reception. I talked to two or three pe6ple that day
who said that was cool. I think right now the
show's still at its beginnings. I'm not ashamed
to admit my shows are hit and miss especially
if the spoken word content is not as interesting as I'd like it to be.
WHAT ASPECT OF YOUR SHOW WORKS
9EST?
I think the music. Obviously taste — to
each their own. There's enough similarities
to other shows on CiTR, and differences, to
make it interesting but not too abrasive for
28
ON THE AIR
 lack of a better Word. Otherwise I would like
to know if people get my personality coming across on the show. I've had a few people
phone in. I think the best call I had was a guy
asking for the 1980s TV show Miami Vice
theme music. He said, "You seem like a cool
radio station, will you do this?" And I was
like, "You lucked out because my show has
no boundaries." I played it saying, "Here's
the Miami Vice theme music that a listener
thought would be cool to play because it was
a hit in the '80s." More of that would be great
because that was fun. Fun for me, fun for listeners.
If you want to hear a show grow on the air
this is it. Tune in to every Thursday from 10
to 11 a.m. for a variety of music and to learn
what exactly an interlude about nothing actually ifc.
29
ON THE AIR
 1   REAL LIVE ACTION,
'ill 11 i%
i!
AUGUST 201S
TOE, STARRO
JULY 6 / ELECTRIC OWL
JULY O/ ELECTRIC OWL
-Tve waited ten years tor this!'
• surprisingly packed Electric Owl on a     OJ left standin
he didn't think anyone would be up this early
in the morning to make it to their show. Early,
in this case, was just a little after 11:15 a.m.
l3y  the   looks  of the  makeshift  breakfast
JMoffday mkUt iWtnkdu^L^scclm lege&d-
never going to happen The band .who have off the restiviti,
never been to Canada before, let alone Van- th
corner, was talked about with hushed reverie ers charmed a r
Jjgfore their performance, like a temperamen- ass li
tal ghost or rarely-seen royalty was nearly in ritls, and dfe< ^
their midst. The latter was most certainly how a tasty
they were received after their a Ink
performance..."--Fraser Dobbs
*To read the rest of this re\ ieu . hecu    n , , to      s
vvwwMisi'order.at
JULY 11/ WEST 4TH AVE
4th Avenue is lisi
is better known as Zulu Recorc
one of its two rooms,
rentiy up for grabs. The
|        stranger to loss.
Over the past several years, the cit
I departures from venues such as 5
the Starfish Room, and the Zo|
|   >#ymrne a jbw. The weekend of July 11
er, was a celebration of the local arts.
fifth annual Khatsahlano street party sin
ing across 4th Avenue from MacDonald to
Burrard. With six stages and over fifty art-
[        ists playing this year, Vancouver!tes had the
chance to partake in a variety of free music
and entertainment, with much cretlit owed to
Zulu Records for curating the event.
To start the day, local outfit Skinny Kids took
to the Vine stage. Even before beginning
their set, lead vocalist Trevor Gray admitted
Co^
e into oth-
6ugh an amalga-
L towering,
ts includingivioon" and
pective jam "Psychedelic
pwan & The Elastic Stars
md eased listeners back
Jty of audience members
around the stage, whether
Ing more was anyone's
.rfcrd Stage, the Courtneys
dBflBarMraraies of short but undeniably
sweet anthemic summer tunes to a crowd
that was ushered close to the barrier. Jen
Twynn Payne's frenzied drumming and vocal
chants, paired with the fuzzy guitar of Courtney Loove and droning bass of Sydney Koke
REAL LIVE ACTION
 came together to create rolling waves of
noisy twee-punk heaven, proving the Court-
neys could have been imported straight from
the   'V>,.
In the middle of their show, Koke paused
to thank a member of the audience who had
emailed in a request for the band to play their
older song 'Insufficient Funds," to which
happily obliged. The tune, which lair-' .    .>v,   !.      «-*,us«   ■.-.age.   ^.»,  Lii^ih
the climax of their set, with the trio deftly
;y repetition of "You
'"irselfT' as the crowd danced
was
t want
ieJS;::;;:;|
no.
me.
ing to j
still brought t
Closing out my
While sound checking, keys player Katrina
f the
For Lease" sign hanging o
Zulu Records space was nctitkn.,.
y disappointed to rind out it wasn't, she
u particularly our local record stores.
Ltly working on their next album, the
Jipllow Support your local record stofe -we;
won't know how good we had it until it's
zam.-MissvMcu'tin
??*^ *? ^~*^^***
WHITE   VISITATION,   MINIMAL   VIOLENCE,
JIERVQUS OPERATOR
JULY 25 / AVENUE UPSTAIRS
"Hailing from Mexico City, Nick Guerrero's
White Visitation has built a reputation around
distilling an array of influences, from avant-
garde to house, into a stable of powerful tp~
nervations. With those influences, and beats
that owe a dense sound to experiments with
powerful rush of noise somewhere between
the om of jet engines and the drone of brass.
Des; zero's chosen
beats snapped with a prompt energy. And
while the set's colour was industrial, there
ii i i  i ♦ 11
it was powerful techno that never
sounded gawkish or trite, courtesy of Guer-
tll on the
mark, and W bite Visitation hit the crowd at
F.      .. ;,.y   ■
\ revii w, hi ad over to
i %  V mm       X
installment of the onal
if. Electronic A rl s  {I IS
c Montreal in '95, the entir
RoDson Square was converted from its ordinary public functions into a concentrated and
Over the past five years, the Khatsahlano
Street Party has quickly become a staple in
the Vancouver community. Imagining what
the festival, let alone the neighbourhood,
ild l6ok like without Zulu Records feels
* Wi ps packed
.AG's multiple levels and courtyard.
The stairs to the ice skating rink doubled as
an amphitheater for several music performances. These adaptations had been thoughtfully curated as the first new... form... of New
Forms Festival, which recently splintered off
L LIVE ACTION
 events i
World.
ast year's
While many were still lined up in a queue
snaking from Hornby to Homer street, cacophonous bits of Ramzi's live set were
already bouncing off the office blocks and
condos surrounding the square. The live
performance of Phoebe Guillemot's project
was no less cheeky despite the more public
setting. Her melange of jungle beats was interspersed by her vocal interruptions, landing somewhere between singing and MCing
the tribal party she was concocting. Her set
seemed challenging for the audience to engage with at first, but as inhibitions gradually
relaxed, it resulted in a highly mixed crowd
who were genuinely losing it.
Following up with a focused set was Attitudes in Error, manned by a duo seated |
fessionally at a complex workstation of ;
log equipment. Little else is publicized al
the cryptic project, whose members are also
responsible for the germinating record label,
Acting Press, born out of a Vancouver-Berlin
connection.
Unleashing their set with a powerful, dissonant wall of noise, they seemed to be challenging the event's theme by trying to open
up a rift in time-space that would swallow up
the pomp and self-importance of those who
were dressed in their Saturday night finest attire. For better or worse, that did not happen,
but their textural explorations melded synes-
thetically into Nicolas Sassoon's dissociative
visual projections that lit up the space behind
them in an exploration of moire.
Closing off the night was an extensive DJ
set from Anthony "Shake" Shakir, who began producing house music in its earliest
iterations as early as 1981. While a shaky
start gave a humanizing reminder of the decades that have transpired, Shakir progressed
through a historically diverse range of dance
music, mobilizing a floor filled with dancers
from just as many generations. Highlights
like the Talking Heads' "Once in A Lifetime" were woven tightly into a skillfully
interconnected selection along with cuts like
Ires' disco-nostalgia anthem "New For
U," or Pepe Bradock's filter-house stand
"Deep Burnt." Shakir's approach was meticulous, almost academic, as he made us<
the mixer and the two turntables in front of
him as an instr**
Even while
son Square
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2015 is tl
since 1995 in j
Art Symposiurr
Mongeau, is now „
culture of sound-art in
part of 1SEA 2015, Alain Mongeau curated
two MUTEK showcases, each with an attention for muh .ieau
was brief in sp
his piece the
the first night. I <
with cursory rese<
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speech. So
t millennial
The night's performances took the form of
audio-visual art pieces, in two cases the product of artistic collaborations.; iificiel (Alexandre Burton + Julien Roy) opened the .
with a performance of POWEr, initia
missioned in 2009 for the 10th anniversary of
MUTEK. The piece featured a custom tesla
REAL LIVE ACTION
 B-Litre courtesy of Lauren Ra
coil, with shocks of lightning synthesized
into myriad electronic textures, each strike
blown \ip nn-,,jv'cn
A stated theoretical interest is the de-sub-
jectiiication of sound ~ with affective associations giving way to the purity of transmitting energy. POWEr's first movement
was marked by this drive, furiously moving
forward to experience each strike's shock of
sound, motivated by uncertain beats towards
segments of nois >ken rhythm. The
second half, more romantic, moved in melancholic waves, with lightning arcs processed
into weepy melodies tonally reminiscent of
maudlin accordion music. It was a deflation
shuttered by a final pulse of lightning, showcasing artificiel's sense of humour and the joy
of their creation.
Set amongst a long table with acrylic panes
and thin beams, Nicolas Bernier's frequencies (synthetic variations) consists of Bernier's manipulations of electronic sound in
conjunction with their fixing to the aforementioned light structures. Scrapes and glossy
crackles of sound would create dim withers of light, whereas high-frequency drones
would find representation in stronger enlightenments. A stated intent of the project is to
lend physical presence to the play of frequen-
; at its best there was a jaw-dropping
o this arrangement. From impatient
tfures, Bernier could push to the in-
iJ lire power electronics, with
ght signalling the precision and
ties, and percussive rever-
k and Metametric's Omnis
n into ubiquity. Featur-
ng, and steady patient
runs over a massive drum, one derived a
meditative effect. The CGI visuals, moving
in accordance with the sound, would segue
from infinite sound-tunnels to breathing geometries, the impossibility of which lent a
kind of spiritual dimension. Bright acoustic
pulses and synth melodies made Omnis the
night's most affirmative music. But staccato
strings of piano, harsh walls of noise, and the
whole piece's irregular progressions, detailed
x mood, unified into a coherent visual logic and grace.
With text reading "a cluster of seismic readings and terrestrial frequencies culled from
a variety of locations around the Globe will
disrupt and impact the live performance,"
Kolgan's Seismik was an incredible piece of
drone. It ended the night much like it began:
with a veteran audio-visual innovator employing technology to invoke the sublime in
nature.
Radiographic topographies, digital overlays
of location from which seismic data was being derived, established a computer positivism that disintegrated into confusion, static,
and visual noise according to the drone's terrible weight. At times the audience saw gorgeous renditions of floating strata on screen,
and at other ssive inclines of rock
and vast vallc ments of sedation
read more lik uty. Shocks of
noise and terribU energy chal
lenged rational ma lid ground to
stand on, over an immutable and violent geologic turmoil.
Kolgan's performance, beyond its technical
innovation, and sweeping scope, edified the
death-fixed allure of nosier electronics. Each
performance   continued   to   point   towarJ
methods of understanding interdisciplin*
and  audio-visual juxtaposition. They
continue to be, amid the institutional con
sions that much radical music must make,
solutely vital for new creative minds. Henct
why I bootlegged the entire show, and will be
streaming it on my Soundcloud as a custom
work of art created from found audio.
—Jon Kew
HOMESHAKE / FREAK HEAT WAVES / MALCOLM BIDDLE
AUGUST 21 /BIL1 E CABARET
yet 1 found myself de* into the Bilt
more's basement. It's not the first time I've
REAL LIVE ACTION
 ever been a bar while the sun's out, but it did
remind me of a uniquely Vancouver phenomena: the early show.
As ! scanned the room, there were a few other
the stl
of Peter;
Having \
Makeout w
band, Sagar d<
ect, Homeshake, 1
life on the road w
411 e who I noticed matched
||wearing in anticipation
e return to Vancouver.
viae DeMarco in both
id DeMareo's touring
x\ to focus on his own proj-
las* war when he realized
at Homeshake's curl
and anyone eould|
list of current North
ed by Montreal maim
Dada PI a an M^
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that
since I
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elying on s\v*
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" I wrote
;e whei
vh nearly a
the patience of
en speckled along
. jping. 1 dy half a decade since
I've seen them live and as that first snare hit
snapped into the groove of "A Civil Servant
Awakening" it was evident their recent sum-
ar i a confidence booster.
Now expanded to a qulrtet, bassist James
iweedy had been replaced while a second
guitarist was added to the mix. The result was
bold and, once again, hypnotic as the four
filled the Biltmore with swirling, automaton-
like rhythms. Although Freak Heat Waves'
brandlings of hypnosis was the mechanical
antithesis of Biddle's freewheeling grooves,
watching as the sea of bodies in front of them
ebbed and flowed, completely spellbound by
the Victoria quartet's unique brand of 21st
century post-punk, was a nevertheless impressive sight.
As many prepared for the Cheshire Cat's
theme to continue through the night. Home-
shake frontrnan Peter Sagar took the crowd
by surprise when he prefaced their set: "Shh-
hh... we play quietly." Attempting to subdue
the ecstatic crowd's rumbling was foolhardy
at this point though.
Opening with the slinky "Cash Is Money "
ir pressed on. Persistent hushing came
n both himself and members of the audi-
yy
nee between songs as the sea of bodies con-
uied to cheer him as they writhed in a trance,
locked into Homeshake's sticky sweet
id Sagar's unassumingly charming
ooning. Processed through enough
"j him a helium-infused delivery,
i\ outfit sailed through a set com-
le best of last year's In The Shower
like "Making A Fool Of You," "She Can't
[ere Alone Tonight," and "Slow"
aterial from the forthcoming
, including the wobbling and
ist past the half-hour marker,
ident that the Ice Cream Social
er a series of shout-outs that included his
ind half-brother along with local rapper Young Braised, the stage quickly cleared
as the band made way for the bodies that
were determined not to be 5
—Robert Catherall
SNAILFEST, OF ,
AUGUST 22 / Rll
G NIGHT
HAW THEATRI
Vancouver's homegrowtrSnailFest held their
kickoff 1||sh on Augus the Rickshaw
Theatre, "the inaugural instalment, founded
by local cl||jgrt promoter^ Snail Productions, is an eigjiit day festival that boasts a
ititude of venues and a lineup ranging
i hardcore to indie pop. Luckily for me,
SnailFest's opening night concentrated on a
psyched up brand of rock and folk.
First up were '60s style psych-folksters, the
Great Speckled Fritillary. Even though their
REAL LIVE ACTION
 Maoiik & Metametric photo (pg .30-31
9:00 p.m. set lacked more than a handful      the former had cancelled their set. The band
of audience members, frontman Shaun Lee      wove their way through a largely instrumen-
seemed undeterred and had wrapped himself tal show peppered at times with vocalizations
in an oversized red cape before beginning the by Jacob Scouten, though it was Novotny,
show. Through their blend of deliciously dis- once again, that stole the show, drawing out
cordant harmonies and particularly shrill gui- expansive, elongated notes of his lap guitar,
tarwork, the Great Speckled Fritillary guided Even though some of the crowd did md up
the crowd into a nine song psychotropic ducking out early before the bar
trance. Highlights included sinister occult- their final song. Outside Dog endt
like vocalizations over jams like "Knights kickoff bash of Sm !1
In Silver Shorts" and "Her Majesty." both of —Missy Martin
which were particularly reminiscent of the
gypsy punk style of Gogol Bordello. Closing
out their set with "Croak Of The Lock," the
Great Speckled Fritillary set the bar high for
the coming acts.
Finally, it seemed, late night concertgoers had
begun their ascent into the Rickshaw, packing a much more respectable sized crowd just
in time for The Wandering Halls to take to ihe
.stage. The trio brought with them a psychj|j
§ut desert rock feel, constructed thro
roning, sludged out guitar, relentless drumming, and verbed out vocal wails that echoed
throughout the theatre. Vocalist and multi-
instrumentalist David Novotny could be s«d8
juggling his singing while he bounce *
tween a lap steel guitar and hunched over
harmonica, which provided a twist to t
dark, introspective sound. By the time the
Sand hit their tune "One More Shake For The
Road," the crowd had obviously fallen for the
smoky charm that is the Wandering Halls.
eVan.com: Part of a network of concei
updated and populated with details 1
of informed members of tl
Integrated with Icc^i
Vancouver Mu&
-    ■
Vancouver Band Direct
and the
VmnGGUwmr Music $#Pg
6 Resource Director
& Community 8rwm $|j
Next up were Jive Hand ,jj|lttnd drawing on
twin prog-folk project Magic Family. Bo^fng songs tinged with
bluesy, alt-country tones, Jive Hand rolled
through what was easily the most explosive
set of the night, exuding a kaleidoscopic
Wild West vibe that got the crowd out of the
seats of the Rickshaw and <
crowning jewel of ther
the roarin; nieajgwuiic-u uciwccu
Ihew Magic and Madison Sheane o»y"
rumbling, acidic tune "Hot Dogs jfe Red
Wine."
Even though it was originally intended for Sh-
Shakes to clos% out the first day of SnailFest^
it was Outside Dog who ended the night -
CONVf
fSEPTEMl
11AM-SPM-ADMISSION S3
REAL LIVE A'
 MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
1
King Gizzard &
The Lizard Wizard,
Mild High Club,
Sh-Shakes 0 The
Biltmore
Atomic Bitchwax w/
Black Wizard, Sweat
Lodge 0 Rickshaw
International Pop
Overthrow 0 Fair-
view Pub
International Pop
Overthrow e Fair-
view Pub
Mikal Cronin 0 The
Biltmore
Paal Nilssen-Love
(The Thing) & Ken
Vandermark, Von
Bingen, J P Carter
& Jonn Brennan 0
VIVO
10
DaM-Funk© VENUE
14
15
Red Vienna, Mi'ens,
TBA 0 The Astoria
16
Punk Rock Karaoke
0 The Cobalt
17
Supermoon, Uptights,
DJ Freaky-guchi Q Big
Rock Urban Brewery
(as part of Vancouver
Fringe Fest)
Blonde Redhead, Day
Wave 0 Imperial
21
Toro Y Moi with
Astronauts, Etc.
0 Commodore
Ballroom
22
Grounders, Fake
Tears, Soft Serve <
The Media Club
23
Colin Stetson &
Sarah Neufeld 0
The Biltmore
Front Line Assembly, Weird Candle,
Comaduster 0
VENUE
24
Slim Twig, Energy
Slime, Gal Gracen 0
The Media Club
Passive, Mi'ens, TBA
0 The Astoria
28
Godflesh (UK), Prurient ©VENUE
29
Shamir 0 Fortune
Sound Club
 FRIDAY
Babes In Tbyland, Fea
® The Biltmore (Early
Show)
Mad ball, Acquitted,
Youth Decay 0 Rickshaw
International Pop Overthrow 0 Fairview Pub
11
| Jiffy Marker (7" Release), Needles//Pins,
| Stress Eating 0 SBC
Restaurant
B-Lines (Last Show
Ever!), Mormon
I Crosses, Knife Pleats
® Hindenburg
18
I ATD, Dead Quiet,
Oldage, Store 0
SBC Restaurant
Modest Mouse 0
Malkin Bowl (Early
Show)
25
Uncle Acid And The
Dead beats, Ruby
Hatchet, Ecstatic Vision
0 Commodore Ballroom
The Sumner Brothers
I Album Release With
Special Guests Big Top 0
The Rickshaw
SATURDAY
The Melvins 0
VENUE
International Pop
Overthrow 0 Fair-
view Pub
19
- Hayden, Chad Van-
Gaalen, Samantha Savage Smith 0 Imperial
- BOG, Brass, Weirding 0
Hindenburg
- Taxa, Merit, Flagpolers,
Might As Well, Sugar
Pill© 333
26
Chastity Belt,
Strange Wilds 0
The Biltmore
Autechre 0 Imperial
SUNDAY
Victory Square Block
Party 0 Victory Square
On An On, Dosh 0 The
Cobalt
13
The Younger Lovers, Non
La, Genderdog, Human
Loser 0 Black Lab
20
 vancouverartbookfair.com
lllllll
BOOKS
MAGAZINES
ZINES
PRINT EPHEMRA
TALKS
PERFORMANCES     Vancouver Art Gallery
ARTIST PRClECTS 750 Hornby Street
Straight    *£      cmauazinc
»MM*RftSft
bomb     esse     6 GEIST
(don't worry)
YOU CAN
STILL
SUBMIT
^y shindig
New deadline is September 18
SHiNDiG is CiTR's annual battle of the
bands, spanning 13 weeks from October
20, 2015. AIL styles are welcome. For details
and prizes, check out citr.ca/shindig.
SEND US THIS
• A minimum 3 song demo
of original material.
CD/MP3/Bandcamp/
Whatever. Rough
mixes Absolutely OK.
We'll get the idea.
• Contact information
(Email + Phone number).
• Bio, photos or other
information are not
required but we
will look at them if
you send them in.
Please email all the above to
shindig.submissions@gmail.com
by September 18. 2015.
Or, put everything in an
envelope! Drop off or mail:
SHiNDiG! c/o CiTR Radio
#3500 - 6133 University Blvd.
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
Canada
 CiTR
101.9fm/ CITRxa
WE HAVE AWESOME VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES!
At CiTR 101.9FM. UBCs community radio
station, you can be trained and participate in:
Sports broadcasting
Independent news journalism
The music industry
Arts journalism
On-air show hosting
Live sound and live radio
broadcasting
Digitization and archiving
Production for radio
Promotions and outreach
You can also volunteer for Discorder, CiTR's
own magazine, where you can:
• ' Contribute live show or album reviews
• Write feature stories about
Vancouver's music scene
• Contribute illustrations,
• Take photographs, either of bands or
at concerts
And if all that wasn't enough for you.
CiTR offers work-study opportunities and
practicum placements for students(at UBC
and beyond) interested in a multitude of
fields.
WITH
9 contact: advertising@dttr.ca
 COPING
JESSICA MACQUEEN
A Discorder Art Project
   .
I     i
F||||
r)\[ iy #"
 EVERYTHING IS GEOMETRY
2015
(Arachnidiscs/No Love)
While the Toronto label, Arachnidiscs, is
known for its noise-drone artists and various
other cool oddities, their imprint label No
Love is aimed at folks who prefer something
a few degrees closer to popular college radio. By choosing what is considered a relic
by many, Arachnidiscs/No Love have joined
the chorus of indie labels who are returning
to the cassette format largely due to the LP's
unsustainability for small batch producers.
It is quite a fitting scenario for Everything is Geometry, a two person band with
a revolving cast of characters, whose latest
release, titled 2075, questions the sustain-
ability of us humans in general. EIG's sound
is a perfect format for the DIY cassette aesthetic. Their website proudly boast of analog
exploits with various four track or tape machines mentioned. Keeping it real, the album
was conceived over vast distances by sharing cassettes from the east and west coast of
Canada. The result is a surprisingly intimate
collection of downer-rock gems with a few
protest songs for good measure that sound
like they were played in the same garage and
recorded in one take. Clocking in at under 20
minutes with a total of 12 songs, EIG tend to
get right into things, and refreshingly avoid
choruses or any hope for the future really.
"Sh&ke, shake, shake, shake, shake your
head / In 50 years, we'll all be dead." The
wail comes midway through the track "Car-
pinteria" and echoes a consistent theme
about the inevitability of our species. While
it may not work out for us humanoids, the
earth will carry on with mathematical precision. 2015 reminds us that our shit stinks really badly, though we tend to ignore it. On
"Once and Once and Once," EIG refers to
the complacency and comfortableness with
which humans have grown accustomed to
living. "Some things will change but I know
it won't / We'll be right here to welcome you
home." The message, whether it is delivered
from boyish raspy whispers or higher pitched
girl riot wails, is clearly in desperate need of
getting out. 2015 is a good year, and tape, to
make it happen.—Slavko Bucifal
FOUNTAIN
Fountain 2
(Self-Released)
Fountain aren't Victoria's best-kept secret anymore. Since their self-titled LP, this
band's infectious post-punk anthems have
been loitering in the heads of Vancouverites
daily, in between their rare but rewarding
mainland appearances.
The logically though unoriginally named
Fountain 2 is largely a continuation of the
themes the band explored last year with a
more refined edge and even catchier tracks.
With a smattering of weirdness in the form of
instrumental jams and experiments breaking
up the larger vocal tracks, Fountain 2 manages to stay symmetrical with its predecessor
without giving too much away. Although the
vocal-backed songs are so much more exciting and jubilant than their instrumental cousins that it's a shame to think some of them
might have been vetoed from the record to
44
UNDER REVIEW
 flif;
it:
1111|
Hi mt
accommodate the interlude pieces.
Without a doubt, Fountain's high-energy,
post-punk, art-house vibes are contagious.
There isn't a single song that doesn't threaten
to plant the band's trademark chanted choruses in the listener's head for weeks. In the
case of these islanders, "more of the same" is
high praise. Many of the tracks on Fountain
2 have been honed over years of live shows,
and the extra diligence paid on each song
pays off immensely.—Fraser Dobbs
GENDERDOG
NEUROSIS PARTY
(Hockey Dad Records)
Don't worry if listening to genderdog's
neurosis party leaves you feeling a bit confused. It's supposed to. "genderdog likes to
hide under the bed and has no heart," the
trio's bandcamp reads, "genderdog has no
ears no soul no ffriendess no hope no future no family JUSTKIDDING haha genderdog loves you JUST KIDDING, haha...
mmggghhh rugg balgh ruff."
The band gives the impression of not
knowing exactly what they are either, but
that's exactly the point. The group's first
release, a seven-song bomb of post-punk,
peeks into a messy mind plagued by a host
of issues. Insomnia, sexuality, depression,
anxiety, and broken hearts make up the guest
list at this neurosis party. Though this might
seem like heavy subject matter to cover in
just over eight minutes, genderdog's snappy,
cutesy approach keeps the party light.
Tagged as "semi-easy listening" and "punk-
lite," the songs are well-produced and the
sound is clean, more so than many Vancouver
releases of a similar scale. This approach is
effective and intentional, as they never let the
listening become too easy. Coaxing with melodic vocal lines only to interrupt with bratty
yelps, genderdog marries the punk aspects of
their short-burst energy with calculated technicality, creating a sound that keeps you just
a bit on edge. They also get playful, throwing
in odd elements like slide-whistles to throw
you completely off balance.
The album's centerpiece and longest track
"forget" shows this approach of oppositional
playfulness outside of sonic choices, featuring hard-hitting lyrics beneath the twee
scrappiness. The lyricism flip-flops between
silliness and depth, and though it might take
a few listens to get the full weight of their
more serious exhortations, these listens are
worth it. It is the bringing together of these
disparate elements through which genderdog
creates something truly neurotic.
The key to understanding genderdog might
be in the album's closer and title track, as
we're asked "it's all in my head, is it a party?" The answer is yes, or specifically an exuberant and defiant "the more the merrier, neurosis party!" genderdog unabashedly gives
their neuroses a voice without apologizing
for them, looking mental health stigma in the
face and shouting at it full-voice with a smile.
They celebrate their messy-mindedness and
invite you to do the same. It might not make
much sense, but at least we're partying together.— Elizabeth Holliday
45
UNDER REVIEW
 1
i
MINIMALVIOLENCE
Heavy Slave
(Genero)
Finding potency in its discursiveness, the
debut from Minimal violence (a collaborative project comprising of Ashlee Luk, also
of Lie, and Lida P) is marked by a certain
internal motion. Calling this a dance album
would ignore how effectively details in the
sound are rendered through the balancing of
elements.On "Linguistic Hardcore" (a nod to
Cosey Fanni Tutti), we get rich synth tones
over industrial aggression and a nervy hi-hat
loop that evolves in the presence of obscured
vocals. "Wax Palms (Bodyheat)" layers sharp
industrial loops before a hypnotic melody
slips everything into backwards motion.
Heavy Slave relies on some techno tropes,
sure, but the album is genre-bending and multivalent, and that's where it takes on weight
conceptually. Textured encounters between
sounds gives them shape and form — a process of reification, making sound an object
in time. Multiple timelines, intersecting narratives, and distorted temporal passages are
fruitful ways to think about Heavy Slave's
wager on time as something beyond tempo.
Textual allusions are also vital here. Traces
of the human voice on this album (always indecipherable) evoke this, along with some of
the issues of legibility and otherness raised
in Anne Carson's "The Albertine Workout"
(from which the duo derive the question
"What makes a slave heavy?").
Carson's poem details a set of parallel relationships. The first relationship involves
the fictional character Albertine, the narrator's object of desire in Proust's In Search of
Ij?st Time. The narrator imprisons Albertine
in his home, but ultimately is left with only
frustration and ennui. Albertine is, the narrator assumes, a lesbian, and is generally unresponsive to the narrator's desires, although
he manages to force himself upon her. Eventually, Albertine escapes and subsequently
dies in an accident. The second relationship
— between Proust and his chauffeur, Alfred
Agostinelli — serves as the real-life inspiration for the first. Their relationship is less
documented, but it is clear that Proust was
infatuated. Agnostinelli was also killed tragically in an accident.
The porousness of fiction and real life
confounds the already leaky set of relational
dynamics in Carson's text. Similarly, Heavy
Slave offers many configurations of time all
at once: time organized along lines of desire;
time organized along lines of trauma; felt
time and real time; time shared and time insular. Ultimately, as a collaborative and conceptual piece, this album rests on discursive
re-imaginings.—Josh Gabert-Doyon
MOURNING COUP
Baby Blue
(No Sun Recordings)
The first time I met Chandra Ponyboy Melting Tallow — Mourning Coup — I instantly
felt drawn to her energy. It was a beautiful
summer day, and we had met up at the beach
to take pictures for her feature in the July/
August issue of Discorder.The day we spent
together was easy going, and Melting Tallow
even offered to read my cards. I could gather
that she was an artistic spirit, very sweet and
humble. I presumed that her music would be
a direct channeling of her soft-spoken energy.
But as I dove into the album I realized that
there was also a deeper darker element to her
and her work.
At that point I hadn't heard any of her
songs, which then consisted of a few tracks
released on an EP with only five copies back
46
UNDER REVIEW
 f
F|
in 2009. After taking time off to focus on her
health and wellbeing, Baby Blue came to fruition just over five years later. With time well
spent ensuring that she was completely satisfied with her work, the album was released
off No Sun Recordings.
Comprised of nine tracks, Baby Blue is
a progression of emotion that begins on a-
brooding and electronic tone, shifting gears
towards a vibe that is a little more pop.
Tracks like "I Will Never Die" and "Somni-
um" are experimental in nature, with synths
echoing throughout and chant-like vocals
layered in, serving a certain ambiguousness.
The album's fourth track "Two Black Eyes"
is reminiscent of an '80s sad synth love song,
the sort of style set forth by the likes of the
Smiths. The album changes pace with the
title track "Baby Blue," the first song to introduce guitar chords, in conjunction with an
electro-pop beat. "Burn One For the Saints"
continues on this wave with danceable light-
hearted synth beats and vocals that are more
distinct than some of the previous songs.
From beginning to end, Baby Blue is a
uniquely orchestrated melange of tracks, hitting all of the notes on an emotional spectrum. Mourning Coup's experimentation
with instruments and vocals allows the mood
throughout to fluctuate from somber to triumphant, transpired out of a journey of self-
discovery.— Jaqueline Manoukian
n
A1. fNTRO
A2. PfXEL PLANT
/ HOUND DAWG
A3. HEARTLAND
A4, INTERLUDE I
A5. NERO
A6,TUGG!NG    |
81.GHOSTJAR.
B2. INTERLUDE -If
B3. EDMONBO^B
B4.EF£MER{A)
I
s
EFEMERA
STEFANA FRATILA
Efemera
(Trippy Tapes / Summer Cool Music)
Imagine a crack in the ordinary course of
events, a mutation of time: genes falling out
of the past. The present and the future merge.
There they are, George Maciunas, Yoko
Ono, and Nam June Paik sitting on the floor.
They try to breathe new life into the Fluxus
manifesto, sourcing their inspiration from the
constant stream of pixels and audio data projected all around them. The walls are playing Stefana Fratila's latest album, Efemera:
its Neo-Dada character constitutes the ideal
background for the gathering's purposes.
Fratila (composer/lyricist/performer) picks
from a sound cornucopia of different origins,
textures, dynamics, and lifespans that obey
one rule: anarchy.
Close your eyes and you can touch the antique clock's winding keys in "Pixel Plant,"
the drops of metallic water hitting the sink
in "Heartland," the cello scratches and the
stretching muscles around the theremin's
spine in "Ghostjail." You can smell the oils
oozing from the salt rubbed on your neck in
"Tugging." You can taste the intention behind
the sometimes out-of-tune vocals. But you
cannot always be certain of where on earth
they are coming from. A girl or a woman? Is
it a high priestess mumbling prayers or a poltergeist casting spells? Soundwise, Efemera
brings out a pattern of disorder defying any
conventional aesthetics; like in "Interlude II,"
where balkan-esque drumbeating is stitched
47
UNDER REVIEW
 with threads of western electronic noise. Lyrically, the album is also built upon absurdist
contrasts but in a manner of primeval eroticism and modern mysticism that trim off any
of its rough edges. Read between the words
of 'Efemera to discover timeless messages
about humanity and existence. The scattered
hints of irony will guide you through.
Stefana Fratila's new album is a multi-
sensory experience, weird and chaotic. In
this way, by rebelling against conventional,
standard, or common music elements such
as melody or harmony, it can open the door
to the anti-art Art. Of course, nobody can be
totally sure of what the artist has in her mind,
even when she writes down the album's title.
Efemera is a homophone of the word ephemera meaning things lasting no more than a
day; Efemera is a cactus full of psychoactive
agents, the effects of which can last more
than a day: you're gonna love it or hate it,
nothing in-between.—Theano Pavlidou
TOUGH AGE
/ Get the Feeling Central
(Mint)
Tough Age is no stranger to musical awe-
someness. After frontman Jarrett K.'s band
Korean Gut dissolved, he looked to his, talented friends to build a new project. Their
second full-length release is straight up well
made, cool music. Its lyrical depth and killer
musicianship make it a record to be reckoned
with.
I Get the Feeling Central is louder and
rougher than the band's debut album, Tough
Age. K.'s vocals have become more aggressive, while Lauren Smith's bass lines have
become twice as lush and badass. Penny
Clark's adept guitar skills haven't waned in
the slightest as she holds down super catchy
surf-rock riffs and Chris Martel's drumming
absolutely shines on this record.
Tracks like "Warm Hair" and "Landau,
Luckman & Lake" are instrumental and romantic, while "50 Girls 50" and "New Orleans Square" are show-ready jams made
for moshing. Only "Guilt" breaches the five
SJ IE itl * I
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minute mark, the band being obvious fans of
the pocket-sized pop song. These songs may
be short but frivolous they are not. Tough
Age comes back again with honest, even sad
lyrics, set with a very high level of musical
skill.
In "Castigation," the lyric "No one can
promise they will always be your friend" delivers a blow straight to the gut. In the same
track, K. sings woefully: "I never want to be
alone," just before a frenzied guitar shred that
ends the song. "Snakes & Ladders," a chugging, high energy rock track that could be a
hit single, is catchy and sonically exciting.
But, the lyrics — including the glum repetition of "I'll see you later" — evince a desire
for emotional expression and a fearlessness
when conveying emotional subject matter.
This is a theme that spans the whole record.
The title track, "I Get That Feeling Central,"
is a sonic departure from the rest of the album, incorporating an electronic component
that is reminiscent of eight-bit sound, with
a simple chromatic guitar line throughout.
Here, true to form, K. sings "Burned out, no
potential /1 feel inessential."
I Get the Feeling Central is yet another
success for a band already confident in their
own sound and thematic content. It is the
party/melancholy dichotomy of Tough Age's
music that makes I Get the Feeling Central
stand out as a great album to add to a fantastic
discography.—Keagan Perlette
L
48
UNDER REVIEW
 VAPID
Lake Of Tears
(Self-Released)
Birthed in the now legendary "Emergency Room" era of Vancouver punk rock that
brought us bands like Defektors and White
Lung, Vapid happened almost by accident. In
2006, Caroline Doyle and Chris Moore had
instruments they didn't know how to play.
They enlisted Ben Phillips to teach them,
who taught himself to play the drums in the
process. Then in walked Katie Doyle, fresh
out of musical theatre school. Armed with a
voice to kill, she took the mic and a band was
born in the truest punk fashion. With singles,
an album, and a ton of shows, Vapid has definitely made their presence known.
Their second full length Lake of Tears has
been ready for quite some time, just collecting dust while life happens and labels meander. The band finally decided that the songs
were too good to waste so they have dusted
it off, releasing the album themselves, and
rightly so.
Recorded by Hayze Fisher (New Values),
Lake of Tears is a collection of well written
and well produced songs by a solid, evolving
band. From the first track, "Dangerous Liaisons," things seem cleaner and poppier than
past releases. But the vigorous essence of the
band is still present. "Crystal Waters" really
exhibits the strength and character of Katie
Doyle's vocals while "1983" glides off on a
wonderful, dark new wave tangent carried by
Caroline Doyle's deep, steady bass line.
The scrappy "L.A.G.GA.R.D." and rambunctious "Wild Party" remind us where
Vapid came from and will especially appeal
to fans of their classic 2008 single, "Do the
Earthquake." Vapid then manage to bring
everything together as the wonderfully melodic chorus of "White Lines" collides with
a shower of guitar riffage. "Be Bad" is just
pure punk rock and "Walk Away" is another
well conceived mid-pace rocker that really
speaks to the band's cohesion.
Lake of Tears has been a long time coming.
And the band has seen many changes since
the album's initial inception, with Moore
leaving, Phillips taking on multiple duties,
and Bryce Dunn (Tranzmittors) offering his
talent on the kit for a few songs. But thankfully, Vapid has pulled through the changes
and come out on top. Lake of Tears is worth
the time and effort. It is a well-wrought album by an evolving, exciting band that is
anything but vapid.—Mark PaulHus
cl
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THE SECOND COMING OF OTHER JESUS
by Jasper Wrinch II Illustrations by Michael Shantz
Photography by Josh Gabert-Doyon
THE BAND HAS BUILT BOTH THE SKILLS AND THE CONFIDENCE TO WRITE, RECORD, AND PERFORM A
GROWING CATALOGUE OF LOUD, CATCHY, AND OFTEN SATIRICAL POSJ-PUNK SONGS.
For many privileged people in the city,
traveling along East Hastings can be anything from eye-opening to downright disturbing. Having long been home to a diversity of
Vancouver's disenfranchised demographics,
human struggle is clearly evident along the
thoroughfare, while a thriving culture of art
and music exists barely out of view.
To most, the marquees of the Rickshaw
and the Astoria are about the only musical
landmarks on the street. Though to a small,
tight-knit, and ever-energetic community of
artists and musicians, Hastings Street is a
Mecca of creativity, strewn with warehouse-
fronted venues, galleries, studios, and the
like. Of these discrete and lively art spaces,
the Red Gate holds a place among the most
active and creative, serving as gallery, venue,
studio, and rehearsal space.
And it's at Red Gate where Discorder sits
down with Other Jesus, Vancouver post-punk
trio and Red Gate mainstays. Settling into the
worn couches next to a stage set up for their
tour-commencing concert later in the evening, Foamy Bottomeater, Tuna Turner, and
Urethra Franklin — bassist, drummer, and
guitarist, respectively — discuss their views
on being part of that community and their career as a band, amidst a torrent of jokes.
"For me it's just sort of natural to work in
this kind of scenario and build something
together in a community of like-minded
people," explains Franklin. "Often what you
want to have doesn't exist already."
Undeniably, the band has thrived amidst
the Red Gate community. Forming, rehearsing, and performing in the space, the Red
Gate gives Other Jesus the freedom to creatively excel, although, as Turner says, "We
don't put any pressure on ourselves."
For Turner, the community serves as motivation to create. "I always feel more inspired
by people who are directly around me, than
people that I don't know personally. I feel
like we've got a lot of really cool bands in
Vancouver, and I feel like we feed off of each
other, especially in the Red Gate."
The community's support has definitely
given incentive for Other Jesus to evolve
over the course of their still short career. Not
even two years old, Other Jesus have released
one record, Bachelors of Art, and are set to
50
OTHER JESUS
  release their debut full-length album, Everything is Problematic, this September 19.
With a quick pace of musical output, Other Jesus believe their musical abilities are
evolving just as quickly. "We definitely got
better at our instruments; I think that's the
main thing," says Bottomeater.
Having started playing their instruments
with the purpose of forming Other Jesus, the
band has built both the skills and the confidence to write, record, and perform a growing catalogue of loud, catchy, and often satirical post-punk songs. As Bottomeater says,
"We're just better at playing music now."
She describes how on Bachelor of Art, "We
wrote the songs, and then recorded them right
away," whereas on the new record, "We wrote
the songs over a longer period of time."
When asked what's different about their
new album, Franklin explains, "The first [record] was just kind of like a foot in the door to
have something because we'd never recorded an album before." With the new record,
Franklin says, "[Other Jesus] is a tighter band
in general." Turner doesn't waste her words
in stating that Everything is Problematic is
"completely professional... to summarize,
this new album is just better music."
Though Other Jesus lacks neither the confidence nor the work ethic to succeed, they
insist on their band's dependence on Vancouver punk band Lie for their success. "If
you play Lie's album backwards, it's our album forwards," claims Bottomeater jokingly.
"There's a loophole with the copyright law."
This playful banter isn't exclusive to their
group dynamic. Everything is Problematic
continues to engage in the same tongue-in-
cheek take on artistic and musical pretentiousness that their first record addressed.
However, Everything is Problematic pokes
fun at more than just art-gallery snobbery, as
the band takes greater aim at radical leftist
politics, particularly in their album title.
"The album name actually comes from
an article written by a McGill student," says
Bottomeater. "It was just talking about how
we all operate in a small segment of society... and the politics of that society [make]
everything problematic."
The work she refers to is Aurora Dagny's
2014 article "Everything is Problematic"
from the McGill Daily, which addresses the
dangers of getting caught up in the group
mentality of anti-oppressive politics. While
the article touches upon markedly engaging
and controversial views on social justice and
the culture that surrounds it, Other Jesus are
quick to employ these concepts jokingly.
Additionally, there is a literal element to
their album title. "It's how the songs ended
up on the album," explains Bottomeater. To
clarify Turner points out, "There's a fuck up
in each one of them. Everything is problematic."
With self-depreciation and self-respect
running equally strong amongst themselves,
Other Jesus are clearly at home and comfortable with what they've become over the few
short years they've been playing together.
52
OTHER JESUS
 OTHER JESUS
53
  CRAMMED ONTO A COUCH
by Keagan Perlette II Illustrations by Dana Kearley
Photography by Konstantin Prodanovic
IT DAWNED ON ME THAT THEIR KIND OF MUSICAL COMPATIBILITY SHOULD COME AS NO SURPRISE,
SINCE THEY SEEM TO BE STARRING IN THEIR VERY OWN, REAL-LIFE TV SHOW.
I am greeted at the front steps of the house
tv ugly use as a jam space by blaring guitar
and a very friendly, very fuzzy, grey cat. The
music stops, and Dan emerges into the yellow light. When Alie, Rage, and finally, Gal,
settle into the couches on the porch in the
warm night air, I get the low down on how
the four musicians — each multi-instrumentalists — came to form the garbage pop punk
project that is tv ugly and what's behind their
first EP, UCLA Yankee Cola.
"We started playing Simpsons trivia," Rage
and Alie chorus. Gal and Dan came into the
picture through a member of Dan's other
band, Thee Ahs. "[She] was like 'Why aren't
you in a band... you should make a band with
Alie!'" Gal recalls. Because all members rotate instruments like a Rubik's. Cube, there
was no pressure to fill any of the roles and
the group came together pretty organically.
The four didn't actually hang out together
until the band was formed, a fact I find inexplicable, but one that tv ugly seems to take
in stride.
"I think we all had a mutual love of pop
punk" Alie says, laughing. The four list Sum
41 (UCLA Yankee Cola is all killer, no filler), and the Pixies as top influences. "We all
don't like the same stuff, too," says Gal. With
a collective snicker, the group sites Phish as
a band that they will never be interested in
sounding like.
"We're a really pop culture oriented band,"
says Rage. The name tv ugly, as well as the
title for the EP are Simpsons references. "I'd
been sitting on that band name for a long
time," Rage says, "[It's from the episode]
where Moe gets plastic surgery and there is
a flashback to him trying out for a soap opera
and they make reference to this concept of
like, being 'TV ugly' which is where you're
just attractive enough to play an ugly person
On TV."
The band's new merch t-shirt features Ross
Geller from Friends, a classically "TV ugly"
guy. Not every member of the band was
stoked on the design, but it seems like that's
the only rough patch in tv ugly's path as band
mates.
"It's easy with tv ugly because our practices don't take that long and we don't argue.
It's really productive," Gal explains. In fact,
the ease with which the band creates together
seems miraculous. "We usually all write our
own parts, like one person will come in and
have the backbone of the song ... and then we
all just build around [that]" says Alie. "It's
surprisingly easy ... I've never not liked a
part that someone has made up," adds Rage.
TV UGLY
55
 It seems like all four members have a sixth
sense for what the vision of the band is, and
what the other three members will be into
playing. Gal elaborates, "I don't think any
of us are going to come to the band with a
song that we know we're not going to want
to play." As Alie explains, "people take it in
directions you maybe didn't expect them to,"
and in this way, the band is united by their
mutual musical taste rather than specific pre-
discussed ideas about genre and sound. "I
think we also kind of like it to be a little bit
eclectic," she adds, "[We] like every song to
be a little different from the next one."
UCLA Yankee Cola is about as eclectic as it
gets for a six song collection. The first track,
"QC," is straight up pop (very reminiscent of
Alie's other band, Supermoon). "Werewolf-
ing" moves into darker territory with grungy,
distorted guitar. The third track, "Night Before," jolts when Gal's punk vocals come in
instead of Rage and Alie's female surf pop
voices, which dominate the rest of the EP.
"Shit Eating" is a song to mosh to, while
"Slow Thighs" is more of a laying in bed lament. The final track "Trash Party" is a dance
song with Riot grrrl roots that ends the EP
with a bang.
tv ugly's sound is the unfiltered result of
what the four members are experimenting
with. "I love power chords," says Dan, "In
Thee Ahs we don't play power chords, which
I like too, but I just love straightforward
music and I feel like our songs are just so
straightforward." Building on this Rage says,
"I think it's safe to write a straightforward
jam... Then there is so much room for people
to make it [something different]."
The camaraderie on the porch between
the members of tv ugly is both adorable and
admirable. When discussing their upcoming
tour, Alie says, "I like playing car games. I
like playing 20 Questions." Rage is quick
to shout, "I like playing 20 Questions also!"
tv ugly also love the Food Network show
Chopped, and they spend a few minutes devising an in-car version of the cooking challenge in which competitors have to make
meals with strange ingredients. "Are we
going to actually chop people?" Alie asks.
"How is that going to work?"
When I left tv ugly to their band practice,
I realized that the title sequences in both
Friends and the Simpsons feature the main
characters sitting on a couch. And there they
had been, sitting on a couch in the spotlight,
just like on one of those shows. It dawned on
me that their kind of musical compatibility
should come as no surprise, since they seem
to be starring in their very own, real-life TV
show. And, given the longevity of their predecessors and their current good ratings in
Vancouver's music scene, hopefully there
will be many renewed seasons to come for
tv ugly.
UCLA Yankee Cola will be released by
Vancouver s Alarum Records on a to-be-announced date in September.
56
TV UGLY
  ^	
NEW
s
vivo Vancouver!
by Brody Rokstad II Illustrations by Cristian Fowlie
Photography by Jaqueline Manoukian
HOPEFULLY MORE VANCOUVER VIDEO ARTISTS WILL TAKE NOTE OF THE EVENT AND START SUBMITTING THEIR WORKS TO HELP PUT VANCOUVER BACK ON THE MAP IN THE GLOBAL VIDEO ART
COMMUNITY.
Since 1973, VIVO Media Arts has been
supporting and promoting the video art community across Canada. Starting out as the
first video exchange library in the world, the
organization has since launched many programs and services that help artists develop
and share their works with the world. One
of its latest creations is the New Additions
Series — a monthly video series that showcases video works from all over the globe.
Each month a call for submissions goes out
online with a focus on a particular theme,
after which a selection of works are chosen
for screening at VIVO's East Van Media Arts
Centre.
After attending the eighth New Additions screening on August 12,1 got to sit
down with Shauna Jean Doherty, the Distribution and Outreach Manager for Video
Out at VIVO. Apart from having a delightful
name, Doherty has an impressive list of credentials. She has a BA with honours from the
University of Toronto with a double major in
Book and Media Studies and Semiotic Theory and Communications, and has an MFA
in Art Criticism and Curatorial Practise from
the Ontario College of Art and Design. In addition to her work at VIVO, she also curates
events in Toronto, writes art reviews, and is
the Vancouver correspondent for Daily Serving, a California-based art criticism publication. In other words, she knows her shit.
Doherty is an excellent conversationalist. Sitting down with her immediately
reveals the passion and excitement she has
for her new role at VIVO. "It's just really
nice to be getting people out on a regular basis to VIVO and growing the video community. We're getting exposure for international
artists and their videos as they come into the
collection, and we're getting some real traffic in terms of artists submitting their works."
The New Additions Series isn't just about
growing the video community in Vancouver
alone — one of the objectives of the series is
to continue to promote video content all over
the world. "Ideally we'll have curators and
possibly festival programmers coming out
to see what we have newly in circulation, so
that they can rent these works to screen them
elsewhere."
VIVO has always had a political
element present in its mandate, and as such
Doherty intends to continue this tradition
58
VIVO NEW ADDITIONS
 59
VIVO NEW ADDITIONS
 Sn
%
 with the New Additions Series. "Since its
beginning, Video Out has centered on social
activism, feminism, labour issues, etc — and
so in the future I definitely want to look at
activism and try not to be very fearful of collecting works that are truthful about political
issues. It's really important to me to keep in
the back of my mind how Video Out started
and not to forget these roots."
Each monthly call for submission
generates quite a response, and Doherty typically goes through 60-80 submissions. That's
a lot of content, and when asked what someone can expect to see at a New Additions
screening, she says the variety of responses
makes things unpredictable and exciting.
"Each New Additions screening is different
because the calls for submission are so different — and since the works are from all over
the world, it's hard to say or anticipate what
someone might see at a screening. They'll
see works that are everything from challenging to funny. Some works are really glossy
and professional looking, while others are
more raw... .so it's a real variety."
The title theme for the past screening on August 12 was "In a Queer Time and
Place." It featured an array of videos that
touched on the myriad of issues surrounding the LGBTQ+ community. The videos
had a range of qualities — they were candid,
sincere/humorous, introspective, and touching. I found myself quite moved more than
once at the screening. Doherty really enjoyed the event as well. "The submissions
for Tn a Queer Time and Place' were the
most imaginative of any program we've had
so far, which is really interesting. It's like
this group of people are interested in creating
new mythologies because the ones that currently exist aren't sufficing to describe their
experience of the world. I found that really
touching and really cool."
I ask Doherty if there's anything she
would like to see more of at a New Additions
screening, and her response is concise: "I
wish there were more Vancouver-based submissions." She hopes that her time at VIVO
can help change this. "Taking on the position
of Distribution and Outreach Manager, I really wanted to grow Video Out's collection of
Vancouver video artworks, especially since
we have such a strong historical collection
of Vancouver works, and Vancouver has an
incredible history of strong video art makers,
and I am interested in contributing to that history by taking up contemporary works, but
they're just not coming in for some reason."
Hopefully more Vancouver video artists will
take note of the event and start submitting
their works to help put Vancouver back on
the map in the global video art community.
The next event — ninth in the series — will take place on September 16. This
screening is titled "Personal Performance:
Video as Autobiography" and has a directive
for self-interrogation. You can bet that that is
going to generate some interesting responses.
Submissions will feature one individual, a
camera, and essentially anything they wish
to share about themselves with the world —
there's bound to be some pretty truthful and
striking works. Doherty has gotten more responses to this call than any other so far. She
predicts that the submissions will be quite
personal, which makes choosing which submissions get screened difficult. "It's going to
be, I think, very intense because it may be
so confessional or diaristic and I'm going to
be there, assessing the value of these revelations." I don't envy her in her task.
Considering the immediacy and intimacy
of video art as a unique medium for self-
expression, this September's autobiographical theme is sure to be especially compelling.
For anyone who is a student of the human
condition, VIVO's New Additions Series is
a monthly event that will provide stark food
for thought.
Check out the next New Additions screening — "Personal Performance: Video as Autobiography" — at 7:00 pm on September
16, at VIVO Media Arts Centre, 2625 Kaslo
Street, Vancouver.
61
VIVO NEW ADDITIONS
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SQUANTCH'S     SPACE 'N'JAMS
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OF LIFE
NEWS 101
STRANDED
AFRICAN
RHYTHMS
MANTRA
CHTHONIC
BOOM!
NASHAVOLNA
CRESCENDO
SOULSHIP
ENTERPRISE
MORE THAN
HUMAN
FOLK OASIS
MOON GROK
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
SKALDS HALL
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CANADA
POST ROCK
COPY/PASTE
THE MEDICINE
SHOW
WHITE NOISE
SYNAPTIC
SANDWICH
RANDOPHONIC
TECHNO
PROGRES-
SIVO
BOOTLEGS &
B-SIDES
TRANCENDANCE
G4E
2:00
3:00
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GHOST
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4:00"
6:00	
CITR
GHOST
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CITR
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AURAL TENTACLES
CITR 707.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
  — Extraenvironmentalist WED 2pm
DIPflCULX Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth.
 —,- . — ~.~ Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of sus-
Bepi Crespan Presents... SUN 7am tainable economics and our global ecological crisis.
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut- Arts Report WED 5pm
up/collage and general Crespan© weirdness. Twitter: @bepicre- Reviews, interviews, and coverage of local arts (film, theatre,
span. Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca dance, visual, and performance art, comedy, and more) by host
       -•••—  Jake Costello and the Arts Reporters.
CLASSICAL
••- ••■••••■••—■•— •    UBC Arts On Air Alternating Wednesdays 6pm
Classical Chaos SUN 9am Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual in-
From the Ancient World to the 21 st century, join host Marguerite terviews with members of UBC Arts world. Tune in for programs,
in exploring and celebrating classical music from around the people and personalities in Art
world.  •  	
  The Community Living Show THU 9am
TA LIC Thls show is produced by the disabled community and show-
 ~  cases special guests and artists. The focus is for a positive
AstroTalk THU 3pm outlook on programs and events for the entire community.
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the night sky with Originally called "The Self Advocates", from Co-Op Radio CFRO,
a new topic every week. Death Stars, Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red the show began in the 1990s. We showcase BC Self Advocates
Giants, the Milky Way, G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars... with lots of interviews from people with special needs. Tune in
for interesting music, interviews, and some fun times. This pro-
The Sector FRI 8am gram is syndicated with the NCRA (National Community and
Discussing the world of social justice, non-profits, charities and Campus Radio Association) across BC and across Canada. Hosted
activism. Join Ethan for in-depth interviews, examinations of by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael Rubbin Clogs, and Friends, commu-
nonprofit missions and causes, and discussions of everything nitylivingradio.wordpress.com | communitylivingradio@gmail.
from philanthropy to progressive politics. com j Community Living Radio Show | @clivingradio
| #communitylivingradio
Synchronicity MON 12pm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling New Era Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that help you re- Showcases up and coming artists who are considered "under-
member why you're here: to have fun! dogs" in the music industry. The show will provide a platform
for new artists who are looking to get radio play.
News 101                                                                 FRI 5pm Hip-Hop music from all over the world along with features of
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and commu- multi-genre artists,
nity newscast. Every week, we take a look back at the week's local, national and international news, as seen from a fully inde- Language to Language MON 11am
pendent media perspective. Encouraging language fluency and cultural awareness.
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded TUE 8am White Noise SAT 8pm
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual commu- Need some comic relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half an
nities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest features, background hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he delves
on current issues and great music, queerfmradio@gmail.com in to the most eccentric corners of radio for your listening
pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show featuring a Q
Radio Free Thinker TUE 3pm and A with the creator, actors and a guest comic every week.
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we exam- whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
ine popular extraordinary claims and subject them to critical
analysis. Sharing Science WED 6pm
Cited! WED 11:30am REGGAE
This is a radio program about how our world is being shaped ••-••■  	
by the ideas of the ivory tower. Sometimes, in troubling ways. The Rockers Show SUN 12pm
Formerly "The Terry Project" on CiTR. Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
All Ears Alternating Mondays6pm ROOTS / FOLIC / BLUES
All Ears is an advice radio program targetted to the UBC commu-  •- - - ■■•• —	
nity. We try to answer your questions and address topics sent Blood On The Saddle Alternating Sundays 3pm
via social media and over the phone. Interviews and segments Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country,
relating to campus life will be featured, all in our attempt to better our community and supply positive feedback.
 Pacific Pickin'                                                          TUE 6am Pop Drones                                                           WED 10am
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl un-
the lovely Andrea Berman. Email: pacificpickln@yahoo.com derground. Ranging from d.i.y. bedroom pop and garage rock
all the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
Folk Oasis WED 8pm	
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on Kew It Up                                                                WED 3pm
our local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since 1997. Fight-or-flight music. Radio essays and travesties: Sonic Cate(s)
Email: folkoasis@gmail.com chism / half-baked philosophy and criticism. Experimental,
Electronica, Post-Punk, Industrial, Noise :ad-nauseum
The Saturday Edge SAT 8am       ;• ■—   — ~	
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African, Latin, L AT IN AMERICAN
and European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues, song-       •—* •	
writers, Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@mac.com. La Fiesta ,                                    Alternating Sundays 3pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with your
Code Blue                                                               SAT 3pm hostGspotDJ.
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp honks,       	
blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul. The Leo Ramirez Show MON 5pm
Email:codeblue@paulnorton.ca The best of mix of Latin American music.
  Email: leoramirez@canada.com
S 0 UI  I R ^ I \  - • 	
- -  ETHIOPIAN
Soulship Enterprise SAT 7pm       	
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz, and
afrobeat tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as
the world's foremost funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people named Robert Gorwa and/
or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III.
African Rhyhms
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
FRI 7:30pm
Nod on the List TUE 11pm
"Nod on the List is a program featuring new urban and alternative music, sounds of beats, hip hop, dancehall, bass, interviews, guest hosts, and more every Tuesday at 11pm.
scads_international@yahoo.com
facebook-So Salacious"
Crimes & Treasons TUE 9pm
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill ish. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Trinidad Jules & DJ Relly Rels.
Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca.
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
Vibes & Stuff TUE 4pm
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop artist all in
one segment. All the way from New Jersey and New York City,
DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing the east coast to the
west coast throughout the show.
E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail.com
EXPERT %L
More Than Human SUN 7pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past, present,
and future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
Shookshookta _   SUN 10am
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and personal development.
. y
Asian Wave i WED 4pm
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the best music from the Chinese language and Korean music industries, as
well the latest news coming from the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop scene. The latest hits from established
artists, rookies only just debuted, independent artists and classic
songs from both industries, can all be heard on Asian Wave 101,
as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of unsigned
Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
P. N
NashaVolna SAT 6pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community,
local and abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca.
Rhythmsindia Alternating Sundays 8pm
Featuring a wide range of music from India, including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop,
and regional language numbers.
Simorgh THU 5pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy for the
Persian speaking communities and those interested in connecting to Persian oral and written literature. Simorgh takes you
through a journey of ecological sustainability evolving within
cultural and social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity
 of tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator in the sto-
ryland; the contingent space of beings, connecting Persian peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
SACRED
Mantra SAT 5pm
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers,
chants, and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of the
worlds sacred sounds - traditional, contemporary and futuristic.
Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com
DANCE/ ELECTRONIC
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul to
dubstep and ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist
for'Canadian college radio show of the year 2012'Pioneer DJ
Stylus Awards. S6undcloud.com/doe-ran and search "Doe-Ran"
on Facebook.
ROCK / POP / IN!
Canada Post-Rock FRI 10pm
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now resides on the west
coast but it's still committed to the best in post-rock, drone,
ambient, experimental, noise and basically anything your host
        Pbone can put the word "post" in front of.
Copy/Paste. THU 11pm
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll be heard       Crescendo SUN 6pm
on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full hour DJ mix by Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning and
Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud rap to new jack building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE,
techno and everything in between. Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet ride that
you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams. Besides oversell-
Techno Progressivo Alternating Sundays 8pm       ing his show, Jed will play an eclectic set list that builds through-
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house, and out the hour and features both old classics, and all the greatest
techno. new tracks that the hipsters think they know about before any-
       one else does.
Trancendance SUN 10pm
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack, Trancendance       Dave Radio with Radio Dave FRI 12pm
has been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001.       Your noon-hour guide to what's happening in Music and Theatre
We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but also       in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk,
play Acid Trance, Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic Trance Anthem, es-       Discorder Radio TUE 5pm
pecially if it's remixed. Current influences include Sander       Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to hear
van Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace       excerpts of interviews, reviews, and more!
Ventura, Save the Robot, Liquid Soul, and Astrix. Older influences include Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,       Duncan's Donuts THU 12pm
Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Platipus Records and Nukleuz.       Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan,
Email:   djsmileymike   @trancendance.net.       sponsored by donuts, http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
Spice of Life Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
Inside Out TUE 8pm       The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. The
Spice of Life brings you a variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math
Radio Zero FRI 2pm       Rock and anything that else that progresses. Join host Ben Life
An international mix of super fresh weekend party jams from       as he meanders whimsically through whatever comes to mind
New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatever       on the walk to CiTR.
else. Website: www.radiozero.com
Synaptic Sandwich SAT 9pm
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-
bit music/retro '80s, this is the show for you!
Website: synapticsandwich.net
The Late Night Show FRI 12:30am
The Late Night Show features music from the underground
Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which progresses to Industrial,
Noise, and Alternative No Beat into the early morning. Following
the music, we then play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
Inner Space Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
Dedicated to underground electronic music, both experimental
and dance-oriented. Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
Samsquantch's Hideaway Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
Parts Unknown MON 1pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best enjoyed when poked with a stick and
held close to a fire.
The Cat's Pajams . FRI 11am
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super awesome and
cool radio show featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock,
lo-fi and more from Vancouver and beyond!
 The Burrow MON 3pm
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a nice blend of old
'classics' and newer releases. Interviews and live performances
The Permanent Rain Radio Alternating Thursdays 1 pm
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus on
the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an hour
of lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a variety of artists who have been featured on our website. What website?
thepermanentrainpress.com
Down the Rabbit Hole Alternating Wednesdays 1pm
The best in indie and alternative music from around Canada,
the UK and everywhere in between! Join Stu as he talks about
new releases and gigs in the area and interviews some of the
hottest acts around!
Muzak for the Observant THU 2pm
A program focusing on the week's highlights from CiTR's Music
Departments Plus: live in-studio performances and artist
interviews!
Transition State THU 11 am
High quality music with a special guest interview from the
Pharmaceutical Sciences. Frank discussions and music that
can save the world
Shine On TUE 1pm
An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from the Vancouver
underground and beyond, connected through a different theme
each week. Join your host Shea every Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
Soul Sandwich THU 4pm
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into one show.
From Hip Hop to Indie rock to African jams, Ola will play through
a whirlwind of different genres, each sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of yummy goodness will blow your
mind. AND, it beats subway.
The Shakespeare Show WED 12pm
Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear. Kick back with
gems of the previous years.
Up on the Roof FRI 9am
Friday Mornings got you down? Climb Up On the Roof and wake
up with Robin and Jake! Weekly segments include improvised
crime-noir radio dramas, trivia contents, on-air calls to. Jake's
older brother and MORE! We'll be spinning old classics, new favourites, and lots of ultra-fresh local bands!
Breakfast With The Browns MON 8am
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural delights.
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
Chthonic Boom! SUN 5pm
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the
spectrum (rock, pop, electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
The Morning After Show TUE 11:30am
The Morning After Show with Oswaldo Perez every Tuesday at
11:30a.m. Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The morning after what? The morning after whatever you did last night.
Eclectic show with live music, local talent and music you won't
hear anywhere else.
Suburban Jungle WED 8am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for an
eclectic mix of music, sound bites, information and inanity.
Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.
Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6pm
Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive action over
apathy.
Peanut Butter'n'jams Alternating Thursdays 6:30pm
Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and Jordie.
You'll hear interviews and reviews on eats and tunes from your
neighbourhood, and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9pm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR Lounge.
Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the
country and around the world.
Aural Tentacles THU 12am
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual and
the weird, or it could be something different. Hosted by DJ
Pierre. Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FemConcept FRI 1pm
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content relevant
to women's issues (interviews with campus groups such as the
Women's Center, SASC, etc.). Musical genres include indie-rock,
electronic, punk, with an emphasis on local and Canadian Artists.
Nardwuar FRI 3:30pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo!
Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
The Medicine Show  , FRI 11PM
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets and entertainment industry guests whose material is considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and promote independent original, local live music and art.
Randophonic SAT 11pm
Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversaI jukebox which
has no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even
space-time relevance. But it does know good sounds from bad.
Lately, the program has been focused on Philip Random's All
Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records you
probably haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
Stranded FRI 6pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting sounds,
past and present, from his Australian homeland. And journey
with him as he features fresh tunes and explores the alternative
 musical heritage of Canada.
G4E Alternating Tuesdays 12-2am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from around the
world, a thought and a dream or two. Reggae, House, Techno,
Ambient, Dance Hall, Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise,
Experimental, Eclectic.
Student Special Hour
Students play music.
TUES 2pm
AFaceforRadio THU 10am
A show about music with interludes about nothing. From punk
to indie Rock and beyond.
CINEMATIC
Exploding Head Movies MON 7pm
Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from television and any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange old goodies that
could be used in a soundtrack to be.
y >.
The Jazz Show MON 9pm
Vancouver's longest running prime-time Jazz program. Hosted
by Gavin Walker. Features begin after the theme and spoken intra at 9pm.
Sept 7: Tonight we celebrate the 85th Birthday of one of Jazz
music's living masters with a classic Sonny Rollins recording
called "Newk's Time". Sonny as the sole horn with a burning
rhythm section with the great Philly Joe Jones on drums!
Sept 14: It's back to school time on The Jazz Show and by tradition we present the classic Leonard Bernstein recording "What
Is Jazz". Musical examples by great Jazz stars and an analysis of
what Jazz is and what it isn't by Maestro Bernstein.
Sept 21: The "back to school" idea continues with alto saxophone
master and narrator Julian "Cannonball" Adderley giving us a
brief overview of the History of Jazz from it's beginnings to 1960
when this recording was done. Despite it's age, it is still enlightening and relevant.
Interested in performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds_Hall.
SPORTS
Sports Is Fun
THU 3:30pm
PUNK
Rocket from Russia TUES 10:30am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international
and local punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in
brokenish English. Hosted by Russian Tim. Website: http://rock-
etfromrussia.tumblr.com. Email: rocketfrom russiacltr@gma.il.
com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.comRocketFromRussia.
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar.
Generation Annihilation SAT 12pm
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the noncommercial side of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The
Foat" Kraft. Website: generationannihilation.com. Facebook:
facebook.com/generationannihilation..
•;.C"\
Power Chord SAT 1pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Flex Your Head
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989.
TUE 6pm
The Absolute Value of Insomnia SAT 2am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not on your agenda, your reveries.
Sept 28: One of the great bands in Jazz History and one of their
finest dates. Drummer Chico Hamilton leads his Quintet with the
great Charles Lloyd on flute and tenor saxophone and Hungarian
guitar virtuoso Gabor Szabo and others. "Passin'Thru" is edgy
and creative and fun!
Little Bit of Soul MON 4pm
Old recordings of jazz, swing, big band, blues, oldies and
motown.
1 \ I PI
Skald's Hall FRI 9pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald.
 Study and _
go abroad *
STUDY • TRAVEL • WORK • VOLUNTEER
TUESDAY
OCT 6
VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER
CONVENTION
CENTRE
2 pm - 6 pm
SEMINARS start at 1 pm
/.studyandgoabroad.con
Illustrtions by Josh Conrad
SUBSCRIBE TO DISCORDER!
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CHECK OUT DAVID LOVE JONES' AFRICAN RHYTHMS RADIO
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