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JAZZ NIGHT AT
THE LIDO I ADRIAN
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 UPCOMING SHOWS
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254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
THE MAHONES
LOS FURIOS
1
THE DOWNWARD SPIRAL COMEDY SHOW
FEATURING KATHLEEN MCGEE, & MORE
THE LOVERS CABARET: SIX WORD STORIES
A DANCE AND CHOREOGRAPHY EXHIBITION
THE ARISTOCRATS
TRAVIS LARSON BAND
LUCID AFTERLIFE shotgun, elysium
ECHOES, CRITICAL JUNCTION & MORE
FU MANCHU: 25TH ANNIVERSARY SHOW
WAINGRO
KABAKA PYRAMID & THE BEBBLE
ROCKERS B KENYON, DJ 151 & MORE
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more:
WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATIIE.COM
1
1
1
METZ
BIG UPS, DILLY DALLY
HIGH ON FIRE
PALLBEARER, LUCIFER, VENOMOUS MAXIMUS
COMEDY NIGHT: DAVE MERHEJE simon
KING, RICHARD THOMPSON, CHRIS GRIFFIN
RADFEST (FUNDRAISER)
JACKSEMPLE
WITH GUESTS
THE ATOMIC BITCHWAX buck wizard
BLACK PUSSY, MOS GENERATOR & MORE
CULT OF LUNA MINSK, SUBOSA, ANCHENTS,
BUSHWHACKER, IF WE ARE MACHINES, & MORE
BJ http://facebook.com/RickshawTheatre
eVJ ©rickshawtheatre [i2i] ©rickshawtheatre
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hidden toysrs  half chin
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"fey?  the Vancouver nights  dandi wind!
th  black ricB     greenbelt collective
the winks  aunts & uncles   tyr ana horse
organ trail  meow  my project:hlue
e  rock'"n   the jolts   leah abramson
kids these days
clover honey
the pack a.d.
the salteens collapsing opposites the nasty on
:rail vs. russia mt-48 the petroleum-byproducts
safety show  hermetic   humans   thee ahs   fun   108
death sentence  the ssris
k a r e n f ■ o s t e r ^€t. j e c t i v e
t h e o r g a n  w i t n e s s p r o t e c t i o n p r o g r a m
operation makeout  the basement suaeti
language-arts   crystal swells  hossar
the choir practice      in medias res  destroyer  motorama  the cinch
mystery machine   the r.a.d.i.o.  the saddlesores  brand new unit
ewoks
rs3dyr5iads
the   parlour
KtsncougBr
japandroids
steps
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the liuing deadbeats
the riff randells
the smugglers
s h a n e   t u r n e r   o u e r d r i u e
dintermitts
yizerdz
5y shindig
It's that time again. Don't miss the fun.
Submissions due August 2015.
Send 3 original songs to:
shindig.submissionsSgmail.com
WEBSITE/INFO/SPONSORS; http://shindig.citr.ca
 TABLE of CONTENTS
JULY-AUGUST 2015
ADRIAN TEACHER & THE SUBS - PG.10	
Adrian Teacher's solo debut, Sorta Hafta, is
far from a solo effort. Discorder sits down with
Adrian Teacher and a couple of his bandmates to
talk about collaboration, inspiration, and the realities of making music.
IRIS FILM COLLECTIVE - PG.l3 	
Local Iris Film Collective aims to present a diversity of experimental films and filmmakers to Vancouver's open minded film-goers. Whether projected from inside a theatre or outdoors in Falaise
Park Fieldhouse, this collective's programming is
innovative and worth checking out.
RAMZI - PG.l6 	
Through Ramzi, Phoebe Guillemot fuses MIDI
instrumentals, dancehall, and world music into
mutating rhythms. The synthetic biosphere which
Ramzi inhabits expands in upcoming tape Houti
Kush. Discorder sits down with Guillemot to talk
about Houti Kush and the ecology and inhabitants
of Ramzi's world.
MOURNING COUP - PG.20	
Chandra Metling Tallow sits down with Discorder to discuss her August full length release Baby
Blue, and how it has been shaped by health and
mobility issues, an interest in cognitive science,
and her personal contemplation on intergenera-
tional trauma.
WOOLWORM - PG.24	
Woolworm's wonderfully infectious EP Everything Seems Obvious was released this June on
Hockey Dad Records. Wool worm talk to Discorder about the new record's pop sensibilities, the
band's hardcore lineage, and what "blanket rock"
really means.
NOT JUST JAZZ- PG.51	
Sick Boss have perfected their own brand of
genre-bending, awe-inspiring, jazz-related music.
Sitting down with Discorder, the trio delves into
what it takes to play with various guests, in various styles, at the same time, and in the same place.
WHITNEY K - PG.54	
After moving back to Vancouver from Montreal,
Konner Whitney, is now going by the musical
moniker, Whitney K. With a new EP out this June,
Whitney's melodic, pop musings hide darker thematic undertones.
IN GOOD HUMOUR BEN MCGINNIS  - PG.27
REAL LIVE ACTION - PG.31
CALENDAR - PG.36
ART PROJECT HELSA AHMADI - PG.40
UNDER REVIEW - PG.44
HOMEGROWN LABELS BIG SMOKE - PG.58
DISCORDER REVISITED - PG.61
CITR PROGRAM GUIDE - PG.65
ADVERTISE: Ac space for upcom-c issues
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to
DONATE: We are part of CITR, a registered
can be booked by calling (504) 822-3017
#233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
ext. 3 or emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates
1 Zl with your address, and we will mail each
provide you with the content you love. To
avaHaoie upon request.
issue of Discorder right to your doorstep for
a year
donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to
Discorder, please contact: ecitpr.discorder@
citr.ca. To submit images. Contact: artd:rector.
discorder@citr.ca
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your
business, email distro.discorder@citr.ca We
are always looking for new friends.
Writers: Lydia Adeli, Evan
Brow, Slavko Bucifal,
Fraser Dobbs, Elizabeth
Holliday, Rohit Joseph,
Jon Kew, Julia Lehn, Erica
Leiren, James Olson,
Theano Pavlidou, Keagan
Perlette, Brody Rokstad,
Alysha Seriani, Nathan
Sing, Barnaby Sprague,
Ewan Thompson, Kristian
Voveris, Jasper D Wrinch
Photographers &
Illustrators: Olga Abeleva,
Sara Baar, Tara Bigdeli,
Josh Conrad, Jules
Francisco, Amelia Garvin,
Danielle Jette, Dana
Kearley, Justin Longoz,
Jaqueline Manoukian,
Jenna Milsom, Konstantin
Prodanovic, Emma Potter,
Max Power, Alison Sadler,
Alysha Seriani, Erin
Tanaguchi, Karl Ventura
Cover Photography by
Jaqueline Manoukian
Editor Alex de Boer
Art Director Ricky
Castanedo-Laredo
Under Review Editor
Jon Kew
Real Live Action Editor
Robert Catherall
Ad Coordinator
Nashlyn Lloyd
Proofreaders: Alex de
Boer, Ricky Castanedo-
Laredo, Jon Kew, Erica
Leiren, Nashlyn Lloyd,
Emily Ludington
Calendar Listings:
Sarah Cordingley
Accounts Manager
Eleanor Wearing
Student Liason: Joshua
Gabert-Doyon
Web Editor James Olsen
CiTR Station Manager:
Brenda Grunau
Publisher Student Radio
Society of UBC
EDITORIAL CUTOFF: June 29, 2015
©Discorder 2014 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published
almost monthly by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except
Shaw in White Rdck. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a
pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1 Zl, Canada.
 FOUR YEARS STRONG
Illustrations by Dana Kearley        /
It's my first issue as solo Editor-in-Chief
and I'm feeling sentimental. As a result, this
Editor's Note may read as more self-indulgent than I had intended. Oh well to impartiality, I've chosen to reflect. Let's all take a
couple minutes to think about me. Me and
my four year relationship with Discorder
magazine, walking a terrain that has changed
many times, but run a consequential course
in my life.
Meandering through the last year of my arts
undergrad degree at UBC, I began writing for
Discorder in October 2011. My first assignment from then Editor Gregory Adams, was
to review a halloween-themed EP. Although
a silly, pumpkin-patchy task, I directed all
my most masterful alliteration abilities into
my premier music review. Gregory gave me
a pass.
Graduated into the world of live show reviews, I walked nervously into the Electric
Owl that November. My subject was Grimes,
and unlike her performance, my review was
shaky at best. I honed in too much on my own
judgments and didn't succeed in saying anything significant. Regardless, I tried again a
couple months later. My two show reviews in
February were better.
Meanwhile back at Discorder headquarters, the EIC torch was passed from Gregory
to Laurel Borrowman. Laurel — lucky as
she was — had the delight of reading, and
probably gutting my first feature. Disheartened by my own unexceptional work, I was
determined to improve on my next feature.
I poured more effort in and my May article
on River Vintage was notably stronger than
my first.
I wrote a feature nearly every month for a
year after April 2012. My pattern of success
is spotty and self defined. I was (and probably still am) a sensitive writer and I didn't
deal with criticism very well. Alterations
to my work made without my consent antagonized me and I often responded to critique with resistance. My editors, therefore,
were irritating to me and certainly not more
knowledgeable than I was. I generally crafted
what I wrote very carefully, so suggesting it
was imperfect was a direct offense.
In April 2014, past EIC Jacey Gibb gave
EDITORS' NOTE
 me the opportunity to become a section editor at Discorder. Nervous and inexperienced,
I found myself suddenly on the other end of
the Google doc, holding onto the sensitivities
of unpaid, time-sacrificing writers. Discorder's contributors were now at the mercy of
my email phrasing and the contentious connotations of my critiques.
When Jacey stepped down as EIC this past
March, the other section editor, Rob Catherall, and I took over as collective interim-EIC.
I must say, I never thought I could be EIC (or
co-EIC). I mistrust my knowledge of Canadian Press standards and am still jarred when
a conjunction sits at the front of a sentence.
Regardless, the shared position was both an
honor and a challenge.
When Rob became too busy to stay on as
co-EIC at the end of May, I took over alone.
I don't really know if I earned the position, it
seems more like it fell on me. But whether by
capability or convenience, it's June 2015, and
I am the Editor of Discorder magazine.
Did I write this all for the sake of vanity?
No. Really, no. While putting together Discorder*s summer edition over the last month,
I have been struck by a number of observations and emotions.
Firstly, I realize can be a stern, blunt editor. "This doesn't make sense," is a comment
I make regularly, and it's a pat on the back
in comparison with my harsh appraisal of
writing that has not reached its potential. This
month I was intentionally, extra rigorous with
my edits, and the irony is not lost on me.
My other striking revelation is what stirred
me to write this very Editor's Note: Discorder has changed my life.
When I began writing for Discorder, I was
aimless, longing for creative direction, yet
completely lost without it. This magazine
was the platform from which I was reminded
that I am capable. Not at first, not painlessly,
but incrementally, and because of my own
commitment. I had forgotten I could create
something I was proud of, and now I know
I can. I didn't think I could be the Editor-in-
Chief of this magazine, and now I am.
By no means am I saying I've arrived as
a writer or editor. I just wish to articulate to
Discorder's generous contributors that I appreciate you and I believe you are capable
of doing exceptional work (though I may
express it roughly). Corny as it sounds, the
most significant thing you do can is realize
your potential. My work with Discorder gave
me that realization and it's something I hope
everyone finds, in these pages or elsewhere.
in
Alex de Boer
 STRICTLY THE GREATEST
60DDAMN HITS OF JUNE 2015
ARTIST
1 Supermoon*+
2 Faith Healer*
_     Adrian Teacher and
The Subs*+
4     Colleen
_     Godspeed You!
Black Emperor*
6 Ponctuation*
7 Braids*
8 Weed*+
9 Circuit des Yeux
. n   Suuns & Jerusalem
in my Heart*
11 Kathryn Calder*
12 Shamir
13 Softess*+
14 Kuzin*
15 late Spring*+
16 Moon*
_     Prinzhorn Dance
School
18 Nap Eyes*
19 Cheerleader
20 Zerbin*
21 Buffy St. Marie*
22 Tough Age*+
23 METZ*
24 Fountain*
25 Crosss*
ALBUM
Comet Lovejoy
Cosmic Troubles
Sorta Hafta
Captain of None
Asunder, Sweet and
Other Distress
la realite nous suff
Deep In The Iris
Running Back
In Plain Speech
Suuns & Jerusalem in
my heart
Kathryn Calder
Ratchet
Dark Power
Cavity Kill
Late Spring
Moon
Home
Economics
LABEL
Self-Released
Mint
Self-Released
Thrill Jockey
Constellation
bon sound
Flemish Eye
Lefse
ThrillJockey
Secret City
File Under. Music
XL Recordings
Self-Released
Canyon
Self-Released
Bruised Tongue
DFA
Whine of the Mystic    Plastic Factory
Bright Antenna
The Sunshine of
Your Youth
Darling
Power In The Blood
Plays Cub's Hot
Dog Day
Fontana North
Gypsy Boy
Mint
Sub Pop
Self-Released
Telephone
Explosion
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
26
German Army*
In Transit
Dub Ditch Picnic
27
Needs*+
S/T
File Under. Music
28
Pow Wows*
Broken Curses
Get Hip
29
The Population
Drops*+
Way Down
Self-Released
30
Vats
Excessive Days
Self-Released
31
Tanlines
Highlights
True Panther
32
Yukon Blonde*+
On Blonde
Dine Alone
33
Moon King*
Secret Life
Last Gang
34
Durrant, Melanie*
Anticipation
Melo-ds
35
Jerk in the Can*+
Bombs Away
Buttercup
Self-Released
36
Kappa Chow*
Collected Output
Self-Released
37
Palma Violets
Danger In The Club
Rough Trade
38
Hawksley
Workman*
Old Cheetah
Isadora
39
Stefana Fratila*+
Efemera
Trippy Tapes
40
Shilpa Ray
Last Year's Savage
Northern Spy
41
Speedy Ortiz
Foil Deer
Carpark
42
Blur
The Magic Whip
Parlophone
43
Toro Y Moi
What For?
Columbia
44
No Joy*
More Faithful
Arts & Crafts
45
Purity Ring*
Another Eternity
Last Gang
46
Jim O'Rourke
Simple Songs
Drag City
47
Tasseomancy*
Palm Wine
Revisited
Healing Power
48
lsotopes*+
Nuclear Strikezone
Stomp Records
49
East India Youth
Culture of Volume
XL
50
Girlpool
S/T
Wichita
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked (+) are local. Most of these1 excellent albums can be
found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll
tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.earshot-online.com.
CHARTS
 CiTR HAS
GREAT
FRIENDS
(€
qJ
YOUR NAME HERE
(*]    M
IS A FRIEND OF CITR 101.9 FM
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(•)/    Q     O    *—•'«-»   O    O     \®
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FOR A FULL LIST OF BUSINESSES, VISIT US AT CITR.CA
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$6.99 wings, $11.99 pitchers
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10% off
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FRESH IS BEST SALSA
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GARGOYLES TAP+GRILL
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KOERNER'S PUB
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LIMELIGHT VIDEO
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LOTUS LAND TATTOO
10% off
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ON THE FRINGE
HAIR DESIGN
10% off (does not stack with
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10% off everything but
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10% off used, $1 off new
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10% off used vinyl
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No cover Saturdays
(excluding special events)
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1 free bag of popcorn
SAVE ON MEATS
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10% off
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~ ROUNDHOUSE
community arts &
recreation centre
WHAT
SETS YOU
OFF?
PARTY
JULY 23 7PM
visual art
dance
performance
j  media art
££  music
S  theatre
§  literature
hE  worshops
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H QUEERARTSFESTIVAL.COM and Little Sister's Bookstore
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a'
GETTING OLDER, GOING SOLO
Z?y Keagan Perlette
Illustrations by Amelia Garvin
Photography by Sara Baar
I text my mom on the bus as I make my
way to interview Adrian Teacher and the
Subs. I admit to her that I'm anxious about
meeting a very prominent member of the
Vancouver music scene because he's a real
adult. Teacher has played in many bands
around town, most notably Apollo Ghosts
and Cool TV. He's been self-releasing music
for ten years and it's apparent that he's both
a talented and diversely experienced musician. Just as Apollo Ghosts is alternative indie rock and Cool TV is firmly funk; Teacher
reinvents his sound yet again with his debut
solo EP, Sorta Hafta.
This EP, which dropped on May 5, is folksy,
reflexive, and very grown up. The lyrics are
heavy with perspective and experiential wisdom, without cynicism. Paradoxically, the
songs carry the tone of a teenage lyricist, but
their thematic content comes from the heart
of a world-weary adult.
The Subs are supposed to be Teacher's
solo project, but when I get to the Foundation
restaurant where we're meeting, there are
clearly three people at the table. He is joined
for some nachos (I assume — they've already
finished eating) by his band mates Amanda
Pezzutto and Robbie Nail, who play drums
and bass, respectively.
"It's just so much nicer when, you know,
Robbie throws down his version of what
I'm trying to get at and it's one hundred
times better," says Teacher, "And Amanda
keeps things simple where I come up with
something that's maybe too complicated for
a drum part. She'll always bring it back to
kind of a primal level. She's a good editor,
she calls me on my bullshit. It's always way
more fun to play with other people."
Teacher takes on the roll of host for a kind
of musical hang out with musicians he admires. Pezzutto and Teacher have worked
together on both Apollo Ghosts and Cool
TV, while Nail met the two more recently (a
misremembered meeting sometime last year)
and began jamming with Teacher. "I was like
ADRIAN TEACHER & THE SUBS
 4
I'M A THIRTY FIVE YEAR OLD WHITE GUY AND IT'S LIKE, I CAN'T FAKE
IT AND WRITE FROM ANOTHER PERSPECTIVE, I JUST HAVE TO WRITE
ABOUT MY LIFE AND THE BULLSHIT THAT GOES ON."
'Wow I gotta pinch this guy cause he's too
good!'" says Teacher of Nail, "I just started
playing him some of my songs that I'd been
working on and Robbie was like Til just
throw this juicy bass part on top of it.'"
"We'd be jamming and it was gold nugget after gold nugget. He's an excellent
songwriter," says Nail. The two make bashful eye contact and Nail says, "I always admired Adrian's music, Apollo Ghosts..." The
group's dynamic seems to be a mix of mutual
support, respect, and fan-like admiration.
"I'm kind of like old reliable," jokes Pezzutto, "I got roped into service years ago ...
and, again, with this [band] he was like 'Well
now I want you back for this one.'"
Pezzutto played drums in Apollo Ghosts
and then bass for Cool TV. Back on drums
with the Subs, Pezzutto's place in the band
is testament to* the laid-back organization of
Teacher's project. "For me it's just something
fun to do," she says, "If I wasn't playing in a
band I'd probably be playing Dungeons and
Dragons."
The move to solo work was a very practical decision on Teacher's part. "Logistically
it was just coming to the point where it was
just getting tricky to maintain the idea of a
band as a solid thing," he says. When the
goals of one band member change — a desire
for more practice time, or the possibility of
a tour — Teacher feels that it's just too frustrating to keep other members obligated to a
situation that's unworkable for them.
Generally speaking, Teacher finds it a lot
easier to go his own way. His strategy is to
bring talented friends along when they are
able to play gigs instead of trying to juggle
conflicting schedules.
ADRIAN TEACHER & THE SUBS
11
 During their upcoming tour across Canada,
the group will do some recording in Montreal
at a studio called the Bottle Garden. Nail will
fly back to Vancouver while Teacher and Pezzutto play SappyFest with another drummer
(Amanda will presumably take up bass responsibilities). On top of the five songs from
Sorta Hafta, the band says they've got ten
or so "nuggets" that they're working on and
will play on tour in preparation for possible.
recording.
Teacher describes Sorta Hafta as "a short
little thing for spring just to start it off." The
EP is pocket-sized in the sense that it clocks
in at around eleven minutes and provides a
cozy, easy listen that you're inclined to carry
with you everywhere. The first track, "When
Did I Get Older," sets the tone for the EP with
harmonic, faraway vocals and folk-rock guitar. "One Thing Your Money Couldn't Buy"
is the EP's gem. It's musically straightforward, rhythmic and nostalgic, with earnest
lyrics about the importance of the little beautiful things at the edges of everyday life.
"I had some rough things happen last
year," says Teacher. "It takes a few songs to
work through some sort of personal feeling...
It ended up being an album about mortality,"
Pezzutto says of Teacher's creative process.
To which Teacher interjects: "You want to
keep it youthful though, cause you don't
want to be labeled dad rock!"
By the end of the interview I'm feeling
stupid for being worried about speaking
with Teacher. His demeanor alone resists
the "dad rock" label with a kind of youthful
openness that I wasn't expecting from such
a well-loved musician. Teacher's adulthood
is exactly what makes this EP something
special. As Teacher articulates in summary,
"I try to write about common experiences ...
[like] a series of little photographs of some
small thing that people can relate to ... I'm a
thirty five year old white guy and it's like, I
can't fake it and write from another perspective, I just have to write about my life and the
bullshit that goes on."
After a thoughtful pause, Teacher remembers something: "Oh, I'm thirty six, sorry."
12
ADRIAN TEACHER & THE SUBS
 ft"
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•••».
EXPANDING CINEMA
words and photos by Alysha Seriani II Illustrations by Emma Potter
"Nowhere in its mechanical process does
the camera hold either mirror or candle to
nature." Those words come from Stan Bra-
khage, the celebrated experimental filmmaker, whose 16mm films were screened outdoors in Falaise Park this past March. Free
and open to the public, the "by brakhage"
screening marked the inauguration of the Iris
Film Collective's fieldhouse residency.
The Collective, which officially began in
January 2014, has hosted outdoor screenings
in public parks, on sides of buildings, and on
docks over the ocean.
So who are the people bringing Brakhage
and other films out in the open? If you're
interested in independent and avant-garde
cinema, you may know some of them from
the darkrooms at Cineworks, the projection
booths and program guides at the Pacific
Cinematheque, and the lobbies of gone-but-
not-forgotten micro-cinemas like Blinding
Light!! and Edison Electric.
Eight members and one auxiliary member,
this collective of artists and filmmakers is
Alex Mackenzie, John Woods, Sydney South-
am, Ryder White, Amanda Thompson, Lisa
G Nielsen, Zoe Kirk-Gushowaty, Ariel Kirk-
Gushowaty, and Simone Smith. According to
the collective's website, their "key interest"
is "in cine film — actual celluloid — at a
time when this medium is shifting to a post-
industry model."
"Like film, there are a lot of things that people are turning back towards doing for themselves," says one Iris member, Ryder White.
That extra effort to get what you're looking
for isn't uncommon amongst Vancouverites;
many of us now grow our own food, brew our
own beer, and make our own clothes. White
and fellow member Amanda Thompson meet
me at Bomber Brewing for this interview; a
fitting example of this return to local artisanal
rather than industrial creations.
The collective originates from a workshop,
put on by current member Alex Mackenzie in
early 2012, on expanded cinema. Explaining
what expanded cinema entails, White says
13
IRIS FILM COLLECTIVE
 THE IRIS COLLECTIVE TAKES ON THE CHALLENGE OF MAKING FILMS
AS ARTISTS, A MUCH DIFFERENT SYSTEM THAN THE HIERARCHY OF
A MAJOR MOVIE PRODUCTION"
"The term cinema generally describes a 1:1
relationship with viewer-to-screen. Think of
all your typical movies where you sit in the
dark and view one set of images. Expanded
cinema goes beyond the screen using multiple projectors or otherwise altering the space
or the light. Projector performance is expanded cinema, multi-screen, or projecting on a
surface that's not flat, live elements — anything that's beyond your typical proscenium
square."
The Iris Collective takes on the challenge
of making films as artists, a much different
system than the hierarchy of a major movie
production. So, as an independent filmmaker,
why bother to join a collective? White explains, "Even in our workflow — which is
more centred around the originator, where
one person is conceiving of the idea, filming it, developing it, printing it, and projecting it — there's still a lot that we can get
from communal exchange." Fellow member
Amanda Thompson adds, "In some ways it's
strength in numbers."
Their first official year together brought
plenty of experimental films into and out
of Vancouver. They presented Your Neighbour's Window Film Festival, a lo-fi presentation of short films in the backyards and
alleys of Grandview-Woodlands; they toured
their own films around the Gulf Islands, and
hosted artists from Quebec, Germany, Australia, and the USA. At that point it became
clear to the Collective that, as Thompson
recalls, "There's an appetite for what we're
doing here."
As Iris Collective celebrated their one-year
collective anniversary, they was selected by
the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation
for an artist studio residency at the Falaise
14
IRIS FILM COLLECTIVE
 Park Fieldhouse. "They have a bunch of old
former care-takers' houses in different parks
around the city," says White. This particular
one is theirs until 2017.
Nestled in the southeast corner of the
sloped park just off Rupert and Grandview,
the Falaise Fieldhouse is a nook filled with
projectors, editing tables, darkroom materials, and reels of celluloid. The kitchen window of the fieldhouse doubles as a projector
screen for their public screening of films in
their collections. White describes the Falaise
Park fieldhouse as "a raison d'etre" for the
Iris Film Collective moving forward.
Only a few months into their three-year residency, the Iris Film Collective has screened
films by Brakhage and works from their collection at the Falaise fieldhouse. They've also
since hosted artists like Roger Beebe, whose
work has screened at Sundance and MoMA,
and Berlin-based filmmakers OJOBOCA
(Anja Dornieden and Juan David Gonzalez
Monroy). Most recently, Iris presented new
work on B&W hand-processed 16mm by
members of the collective at Art Waste in
Crab Park, and hosted the Double Negative
Film Collective from Montreal. In the fall, as
a part of this "Collective Unconscious" series, Iris will also host collectives from Ottawa (Windows Collective) and Toronto (Loop
Collective).
"I think that the emphasis on making
film has become much more Do-It-Yourself," notes Thompson. "You have to take
responsibility for it now. There isn't a lab
down the street that will do everything for
you. I think there's more of an onus on the
filmmaker. You have to try a little bit harder."
Not only do the members of the Iris Film
Collective take on the growing challenge
of working on film in a digital age — they
also choose to share it with the community
through free public screenings, hands-on
workshops, and talks from internationally
influential artists. From now until 2017, Iris
will continue building this momentum. "At
the end of our residency, it should conclude
with a large-scale project that involves the
community in some way," says White. "So
if you live in the neighbourhood of Falaise
Park and you're reading this Discorder article, we're coming for you."
"We would really like to get film equipment into the hands of a lot more people,"
White continues earnestly. Thompson pipes
in on that note, "Or just an awareness and appreciation that film is not dead."
*For the Iris Collective's fall schedule visit
irisfilmcollective .com.
15
IRIS FILM COLLECTIVE
 .
 TARSIERS IN THE SUNSHINE
By Jon Kew II Illustrations by Jules Francisco
Photography by Tara Bigdeli
Vancouver is lovely in the Summer: another
day of drought, a scorcher, an uptick in forest
fire probability. I'm sitting in Mount Pleasant
on a domesticated parcel of land with Phoebe
Guillemot, the woman behind Ramzi. I bring
the subject of sarcasm in music up, looking
for a way to identify Ramzi's mutant dance
rhythms against her contemporaries. Guillemot speaks decisively, interpreting the hype
of non-spirited and formatted sound."I think
the best example is PC Music. At first they
were making a joke of the commercial, but
now they are totally what they make fun of.
I think my music is the opposite of that, because I put so much meaning into it. There's
nothing that is just for the hype or attention.
It's really personal. Even if it can sound absurd, it's the opposite of a joke. It's how to
express my vision of life."
Guillemot is a recent transplant to the Pacific Northwest from Montreal. With her new
album Houti Kush imminent on Vancouver's
1080p, and another likely to follow on Genero, Guillemot is feeling positive. "I had to
struggle the first month [of moving], but I've
been so lucky. I've felt more at home than
in Montreal. I was so sad there. People are
like 'how come you don't find it hard to
integrate?' For me it was easy thanks to my
music. I'm really grateful. Thanks to Ramzi I
was welcome already."
Ramzi is the form through which Guillemot explores world music and alien electronics, transformed into mutating rhythms.
She describes Ramzi as a paroxysm of dualisms: male/female, genuine/perverse, free/
captive, etc. The animal murmurs and tactil-
ity of Ramzi's music evokes lush biospheres:
places of refuge and wildlife, but also zones
of harshness and ecological intensity. Houti
Kush is caught between worlds, showing a
new side of this concept: "It's the least weird
of what I've done. It's almost romantic. The
A side is the Ramzi world being happy. The
B side, you feel the trip, the danger coming."
"With Ramzi I feel like I can get lost. It's
a world I keep expanding. I like the idea to
develop an allegory of what I think at a political perspective, this war between different forces: Aliens, Zombies, Children. The
Aliens are like greys, reptilians, the high political power. The Zombies are the masses,
controlled by the aliens, that try to invade the
natural world. Children and the animals and
nature are holding tight to defend. For me it's
17
RAMZI
 "RAMZI IS THE FORM THROUGH WHICH GUILLEMOT EXPLORES
WORLD MUSIC AND ALIEN ELECTRONICS"
just like how to preserve what we grew up
with." Guillemot continues, "I was really attached to my childhood. I grew up not just in
the city, but also in the country, and I was just
happy to be out, imaginative, to create... it's
just that now I give more sense to it. It's my
inner child talking as Ramzi."
Ramzi, the feral child who Guillemot compares to the Jungle Book's Mowgli, is joined
by her other alter ego on Houti Kush, Houti.
"When my computer got stolen in San Francisco, I was like 'Ramzi is dead,' a sign that
I had to move forward. Maybe I should be
called Houti instead. I thought I lost everything but I found my hard drive in Vancouver.
I was able to get my old project, so Ramzi
didn't die. But Houti stayed a bit. I [Houti]
started to sing with more autotune. It started
to be more feminine. So I was like 'OK Houti
is this new feminine presence in the Ramzi
world.'"
The bombastic samples of previous Ramzi
albums evince Guillemot's love for the language of dancehall. But Guillemot's own
voice, as both Ramzi and Houti, is more
prominent on Houti Kush than ever. Traces
of her touch proliferate throughout the entire
album: biological noises, but also a MIDI
emphasis, video game chirps and ringtones
floating throughout a synthesized jungle. The
album cover features Guillemot's visual art,
an alien CGI landscape stamped with a zodiac comprising silhouettes of baby animals
encircling a moon. Uncanny neoteny runs
through Ramzi's aesthetic. Past music videos
montage owls, tarsiers, creatures whose eyes
seem too large for their sockets. Ramzi itself
is described as assuming the form of a pygmy
tarsier, an animal threatened by deforestation
and safeguarded by cultural superstitions. "I
talk about it but I don't want to make it the
focus...I don't feel the need to talk about it
unless it's to produce new material with it."
Describing her process, Guillemot says "It's
really intuitive. I just get lost. I'm guided by
the sound I like and also feelings that I can
get through music."
There's a fecundity and possibility emergent in the Ramzi world. "We all get alienated sometimes...we act in automatic ways,
not felt ways of living or being. I'm playing with it, it's not something I'm obsessed
with." Guillemot muses again with the battlefield metaphor: "For me, my music is like
a weapon against zombies...a way to revive
humanity when you think it's lost."
The sun is insistent when our conversation ends. Dude Chilling is a fine park, but
there's something latent here. We exchange
doubts for Montreal and Vancouver, and surveillance, and talk about the animosity one
eventually develops towards their hometown. Still, we agree that pessimism doesn't
do much. "Travelling in Southeast Asia made
me see this music and life out in the streets
and everyone gathering. And it creates so
much more life. There's some lack of space
[In Vancouver] but there's a lot of potential
for more. So I'm really optimistic."
Sometimes you need a fresh pair of eyes.
The pygmy tarsier, in this case, is exemplary.
18
RAMZI
  ■Aa
 HEALING AND TIME
by Kristian Voveris II Illustrations by Erin Tanaguchi
Photography by Tara Bigdeli
I meet Chandra Ponyboy Melting Tallow
at Jericho Beach on a picture-perfect Friday
afternoon. Dressed in red from head to toe,
including a letterman sports jacket qualifying her for the cast of Cry Baby, Melting
Tallow's figure is brightly contrasted against
the pacific tones of the Burrard Inlet and its
mountainous background.
Choosing a cool and shaded spot by the
bird pond to have a conversation, we are
intermittently interrupted by visitors with
webbed feet. The little ones are clearly vying for a little more than just attention with
their cute baby eyes. A couple of kids out on
an adventure run by looking determined, as if
they are out to conquer something only their
eyes can see.
"I feel like in some ways my project with
music kind of feels like that," Melting Tallow
says, referring to the mysterious determination and excitement of the children running
around us.
Titled Mourning Coup, Melting Tallow's
experimental musical project has its roots
in the performance art projects that she embarked on while studying fine arts in Montreal. Her conceptual performance art progressed incrementally towards her music,
until she began to feel like the acts were becoming excuses for her to lipsynch in front of
an audience in a form of dramatic karaoke.
While in the early stages of Mourning
Coup's conception, an unreleased cassette
of her raw material was reviewed by national indie music blog, Weird Canada. On the
tape, rising above layers of warmly blurred
samples and keyboard melodies, Melting Tallow's ghostly, echoing vocals guide listeners
into a microscopic dream-world. The writer's
impatient sense of anticipation for the intricate web of ideas on this private cassette,
bleeds in between the review's lines.
It wouldn't be until this summer, five years
later, that Melting Tallow's first full length
album would materialize. Unfortunately, the
five year span between the album's start and
finish, was anything but one of abandon for
the project. As Melting Tallow began experiencing medical issues manifesting as seizures and mobility impairment, she started to
feel that the very nature of time had become
warped beyond her control.
This turn of events, which she initially saw
as a temporary interruption, took her life on
a completely different track. The confrontation with her bodily limitations that began
in 2010, pushed Tallow to pause her artistic
projects and academic studies.
Regardless, Melting Tallow began to accept her medical condition with bravery. "I
used to feel really upset," she says, "I felt
like I lost five years of my youth, but the reality is that people with chronic or mental illnesses 'lose' time by not being able to keep
up with the pace of life that is normal to the
majorities of people." She elaborates, "I'm
just learning how to adjust my life to the reality that this is something that will probably
always be there."
Melting Tallow began contemplating the
implications of her blunt, irreversible reality
as she read Dr. Gabor Mate's When the Body
Says No. Striving to regain a sense of coherence in her life, she directed her focus toward
the concept of intergenerational trauma, in
order to understand her origin as an indigenous person of Canada — which to her and
many others, is a collective experience.
"Intergenerational trauma happens [more
broadly] in humans and manifests in all
these different ways that create marginaliza-
tion." While the severe mental and physical
health issues that arose directly from forced
assimilation through the residential school
system are becoming increasingly widely
MOURNING COUP
21
 "MUCH LIKE HER INTEREST IN INTERGENERATIONAL TRAUMA, MELTING TALLOW'S PROCESS WITH MUSIC IS ENTIRELY SELF-DIRECTED"
acknowledged in public discourse, the study
of collective after-effects and their links to
chronic health issues are still nascent.
"I think learning about the intricacies of
what that looks like in the brain, the mind,
and the body, is going to be part of how to
lessen these obstacles," Melting Tallow
shares while explaining her resulting interest
in pursuing studies in cognitive science. "It's
just exciting that we're living in a time now
that we're seeing how these experiences are
manifested in the body."
As a musical project, Mourning Coup was
crucial for Melting Tallow to maintain a
sense of self during her medical struggles. "It
kept me sane, it gave me something to hope
for," she confesses. And this hope is audibly
evident in the otherworldly energy that Melting Tallow channels in her recordings.
The mental imprint of her experiences runs
deep in the finished version of her album,
Baby Blue. This full length release — which
is named in reference to a personal obsession
with the colour blue worn by staff in hospitals — is set to be released this August, by
Olympia's No Sun Recordings.
The album's complexity is particularly
apparent in "Master." Here, different layers
of Melting Tallow's vocals take on opposing, almost raging characters, while being
simultaneously soothed by a soft, yet mournful refrain. Moments of clarity rise over an
orchestrated chaos of warped synthesizers
and vocals, only to be swallowed again by
a swarming sound moving in tandem with a
change of tempo and timbre.
Much like her interest in intergenerational
trauma, Melting Tallow's process with music
is entirely self-directed, and exists as a result
of her personal experiences. After describing
how she taught herself everything she knows
in recording and production through trial and
error, Tallow reflects, "Once I figured one
way to do it, I stuck to it, which is something
I do with a lot of things in life."
Trying things out, experimenting with
instruments, and arranging elements in recorded sound is Melting Tallow's natural
way of interacting with her music. Although
Mourning Coup arose out of performance, it
has very distinctly moved towards production. Melting Tallow even aspires to produce
music for other musicians. "I want to be Phil
Spector, but not an asshole," she says jokingly, while trying to explain her conflicted
relationship with one of her main artistic inspirations.
When I ask her about her future plans,
Melting Tallow talks with the wide-eyed excitement of a child about all the projects she
would like to conquer. And while her first
work took her through a long and trying path,
her sight is already fixed on her second LP.
"The next one is not going to take so long,"
she muses.
22
MOURNING COUP
 .^':-
  WOOLWORM
BLANKET ROCK
by Ewan Thompson II Illustrations by Danielle Jette II Photography by Sara Baar
"INTEGRATING INFLUENCES FROM ANYWHERE IS PERMISSIBLE."
For four days in August 2014 the fuzzy
sound of Vancouver rock band Wool worm
resonated from a rattling cabin on Gossip
Island. Exclusively using money made from
performing and releasing the band's material, high school buddies Giles Roy (vocals,
guitar), Alex Pomeroy (guitar, vocals), and
Ben Purp (drums), along with Heather Black
(bass, vocals), came to this remote location
off the coast of Galiano Island to record their
latest EP Everything Seems Obvious.
After a minor delay on day one, involving a vital piece of recording equipment being essentially air-freighted to the island, the
four friends spent the remaining three days
having breakfast together in the morning and
recording work that is amongst their noisiest,
catchiest, and most lyrically honest to date
during the day.
Almost a year later, I sit with the band on
the roof of the house that Roy and Pomeroy
share (and of which Purp is a former housemate) as they reflect on the recording of the
EP. The band agree that the recording process
was an extremely organic one.
"We just wanted everything to come out
naturally... whatever comes out of you naturally to be what the song is" says Roy. "It was
just us being ourselves together." The band's
entire ethos seems to be one of absorbing the
world around them and letting it come out organically in their music. When asked about
who and what influences their unique brand
of pop-rock Roy simply replies "Oh, everything."
Formed in 2008 from the ashes of hardcore
and post-rock bands featuring Roy, Pomeroy,
and Purp, Wool worm was intended as an indie rock outlet for some kids who enjoyed
the heavier side of music. "For as loW as I
can remember," says Roy "I wanted to be in
a rock band/pop band." However, the formation of Woolworm was not a reaction against
hardcore, and all members still have an affinity for the genre (Purp plays in Vancouver
hardcore band Vacant State and admits that
he can't quite shake his hardcore dramming
style in Woolworm recordings).
To anyone who has seen one of Wool-
worm's live shows, or heard any of their recordings, this subtle bleeding of their heavier
roots into their lo-fi indie rock is apparent.
Pomeroy notes that one of Woolworm's
post-rock forebears was probably in retrospect "ripping off [instrumental metal band]
Pelican pretty hard... big amps, three guitars" and attributes similar projects to have
had subtle influences on the sheer density
of Woolworm's sound. Roy reflects that the
more sonically dense elements of their music
weren't necessarily intentional, but developed as the band acknowledge their roots and
that they are "just sort of good" at making
music that way.
Heavy music is not the only unusual influence to make an impact on Woolworm's
music. They somewhat jokingly use the term
"blanket rock" to describe their music, which
according to Roy is "rock music that sounds
warm but covers a swath of different sub-
styles". Each member is a rock/pop enthusiast and are not shy about their sincere love of
bands that could be considered embarrassing
("A lot of mid '90s Canadian rock seeps into
WOOLWORM
25
 our shit" laughs Purp). Integrating influences
from anywhere is permissible. Roy states that
the band are just as likely to be inspired by
the music of Hall & Oates as they are Guided
By Voices.
Pop music has always covertly influenced
Woolworm's sound, but Everything Seems
Obvious is their most outright pop recording yet. The EP is mostly bright and upbeat,
brimming with catchy hooks and choruses
that imprint themselves onto the listener's
brain. Roy's witty, self-aware lyrics are instantly memorable and are reminiscent of
the painfully funny vignettes Morrissey and
a young Rivers Cuomo have previously been
responsible for.
The 11 minutes of music on this EP are
Woolworm's most captivating yet. But this
full on embracement of pop sensibilities
doesn't mean the band have abandoned the
noisier elements of their music - they have
just incorporated them into these songs in a
characteristically organic way.
Roy's intimate sounding cadence on "Useless" (which is
reminiscent of a non-Mancunian Stone Roses era Ian Brown)
is juxtaposed over a clattering
bridge which subtly hints at
1990s alt metal. The inverted
punk of "Cassandra" (with
lead vocals sung by Pomeroy) is as catchy as it is mosh
pit friendly. Purp's emphatic
dramming and Black's uncomplicated bass lines give the EP
a punk undertone that becomes
amplified when these songs are
played live. The whole EP is
peppered with wailing noise
rock guitars that are congruous
with textured vocal harmonies.
The entire effect is of a band
that have successfully made
an infectious pop record, without compromising anything of
their own unique sound and
wide circle of influences.
As the evening draws to
a close, Woolworm tell me about a boogie
woogie riff they've been jamming at practices lately, a planned two song cassette that
they hope will catch some of their more pop-
minded fans off guard, and joke about evolving into a "stoner dad rock" band in twenty
years time.
"We have a special bond...just the four of
us friends playing music" says Black with a
smile. "It's just really great being in Wool-
worm" agrees Roy. A combination of close
friendship and a totally open and organic
approach to making music could see Wool-
worm turn into one the most enduring of
Vancouver rock bands. Woolworm's music
has the exciting potential to go in any number
of directions, due to their ethos of "stealing
from everywhere" and recording what feels
natural. Maybe we will see something like
that "stoner dad rock" set circa 2035.
26
WOOLWORM
 IN GOOD HUMOUR
BEN MCGINNIS
by Evan Brow II Ilustrations by Josh Conrad
Ben McGinnis just wants to get better at
being a stand-up comedian. Self-described
as a "diminutive white nerd," his clean, observational style lands onstage with a low
energy, presenting jokes as if he's letting the
audience discover them on their own. His onstage 'character' is an underdog, what McGinnis describes as "a little bit of reality and
a little bit of an act."
I meet with McGinnis at Trees Organic, a
small boutique coffee shop two blocks from
Waterfront Skytrain Station. I get a mocha
that I consume almost immediately. He gets
an herbal tea that he barely touches. The dim
light, small black chairs, and beige walls mirror McGinnis' comedy quite well: not out for
flashy zest, but aiming for nicely delivered
content. As we sit down, he puts his hands together, hunches into an understated pose, and
maintains a slight resting smile as we begin
talking.
"I was the victim of identity theft recently.
And it's not so much the money they stole,
but it's just scary to think that's someone else
is out there blaming all their problems on my
father." That was the first joke McGinnis ever
told on stage and after its delivery, McGinnis
knew right away that stand-up was his passion. It's still the only form of comedy that's
stuck for him.
"With stand-up, the good thing is you're
on your own and you're only responsible for
your own acts and to a larger extent, your
27
IN GOOD HUMOUR
 own career," says McGinnis. "And if you
perform well, it's all on you and you get the
glory. With improv, I straggled ceding control to other people. I feel like a lot of the
people who do stand-up are kind of control
freaks and I relate to that. (Laughs) I don't
know if that's a good quality in me though."
McGinnis had wanted to be a comedian
since he was a teenager. It took ten years of
anxious anticipation for him to finally get up
on stage. When one of his friends decided to
try stand-up, that was McGinnis' prompt to
attempt it himself. In those early days, McGinnis felt like he faced hard barriers: not
knowing anyone in the scene, not knowing
how to get booked, and not truly feeling
like he belonged. His friend's decision to try
stand-up motivated McGinnis to face his
fear and sign up for a comedy course in 2006.
"The first time I performed was a showcase
at the end of the comedy class," says McGinnis. "So it was a very generous audience and
a very welcoming place to do comedy. If I
watch it now, it's obvious to me that I'm very
green and nervous and making mistakes,
stepping on laughs, and being uncomfortable,
physically on-stage. But the combination of
anticipation and terror and joy afterwards is
something that I've been chasing ever since."
As of 2006, McGinnis has only risen and
improved as a comic. His first paid gig w^s
at Yuk Yuk's in 2010, he filmed a half-hour
comedy special at the Waldorf in 2012, and
he performed at the NorthWest Comedy Fest
in 2015, igniting his love of festivals.
"You feel like a real comedian," says McGinnis. "You get a badge that says 'Artist' on
it, so that's very flattering. Usually you can
walk to the front of any line-up at the shows
and that's very exciting. Any person doing
stand-up in Vancouver probably feels disconnected from the big-time, so when you go to
comedy festivals you feel more connected to
that feeling."
In terms of his process, McGinnis likes to
be well prepared. He's a writer's comedian,
preferring to thoroughly craft and hone his
jokes before they see the light of day. When
he needs to build his act, he puts himself in a
certain mindset, an artificially created come-
dic fight-or-flight mentality.
28
IN GOOD HUMOUR
 "I try to fake the pressure of being in front
of a crowd," says McGinnis. "I don't sit at
my computer typing. I walk around my apartment and pretend I'm doing a set. I've found
out that that helps quite a bit. Because when
you write, something could be quite clever or
'writerly,' but with stand-up, you really have
to get rid of a lot of stuff. Only the funny
parts are important. All the stuff you think is
clever or well-written you can pretty much
throw out."
His comedy is rewarding for an audience
who buys into its subtle delivery. When he
hits on a good joke, he holds for attention
the way a kid who just made their dad laugh
would. As to what McGinnis wants in the future, he has simple needs: more of the same
and just to improve.
"I really just want to get better at stand-
up," says McGinnis. "It's the only thing I've
done that I haven't stopped doing or wanted
to stop doing. I've done a lot of other creative
stuff and it's never really stuck. I'd love to
be a headliner and develop a crowd for my
work. But my big goal is just to write better
jokes and get better at what I do."
McGinnis certainly knows what he wants.
His loyalty to the craft is his defining feature.
As interests go, McGinnis' number one priority is pretty all-consuming. Through all this
thought and conservation, only one sentiment
has remained: Ben McGinnis just wants to
get better at being a stand-up comedian.
*McGinnis will be performing at the Comedy Mix from July 2nd to 4th and you can follow him on Twitter at @ben_mcginnis.
I«*     '■*/«*
29
IN GOOD HUMOUR
 HEAL LIVE ACTION.
JUNE 2015
MUSIC WASTE, DAY II
JUNE 5 / VARIOUS VENUES
On Friday, June 5, 1 had the privilege of
doing a whirlwind tour of the Music Waste
venues around Vancouver. Like a kid in a
candy store I giddily gallivanted about town
and took in some great acts, and was reminded of the strength and diversity of Vancouver's music scene.
Starting off the evening at the ANZA Club
was guy/girl duo Still Creek Murder. They
were the most recent Shindig winners, and
it's easy to see why. They were catchy, they
were crashy, and they managed to produce a
wide range of sound, despite being only two.
A variety of intelligently written and thoughtful songs kept the set engaging, and 1 |adn"t
nearly gotten my fill oi them by the :
were finished their set. This is a band I will
see again soon.
Following wa.
have called it a
lightfuUy wei
dapperly dres?
clad back up
diminutive and unassuming girl stood in
front of her electronic equipment, wearing a
floral dress and brown oxfords .Her stature
was small, but the sound she made was hu«e.
The music was dark and gorgeous, like
something tragic being remembered, yet
something important and beautiful was being extracted from that memory. At times she
emitted primal screams that were then til
through vocal effects to create a terrify
beautiful cry into the night, lt was the
an ancient war film to as a pa shot
captures the aftermath of a bloody battlefield
■ accompaniment. This was definitely one of the
From me
he Red Gate for
* seriously deep
smerized by
%
 photo (pg.30 - 3) courtesy of Matthew Power
LEVITATION FESTIVAL
JUNE 5-6 / VARIOUS VENUES
Originating as Austin Psych Fest. the inaugural Levitation Vancouver was only the
second time the festival travelled beyond its
Texan home. Founded by the Black Angels as
a celebration of the psych-rock revival, it's a
broad church tor everything from norm-core
bedroom pop to grizzled heavy metal. After a
sweltering weekend in Stanley Park's Malkin
Bowl, could we tell apart our Dead Moons
from our Dead Meadows, our LA. Witches
from our Black Wizards?
By Saturday km it felt like Levita-
tion had a ed in Stanley Park,
s Dada Plan eased us
.. and strummed ditties.
i an equally feel good
mnk-pop that J
 Jgs rapid w
Three Wolf Moon. The
urse, firmly in
nsych thev
McBean's solos duel
with cranky elec
as Discord
in with sa
Seattle's
band, wi
onlv exi*
Work commitments meant missing Sunday
afternoon so 1 can't vouch for Inuk singer-
songwriter Willie Thrasher, or Joel Gion of
the Brian Jonestown Massacre. Though much
like the previous day, the Malkin Bowl's early evening line-up didn't deliver much psych
or rock. Curtis Harding has a velvet voice
m
and nice boots but it was essentially the kind
of music dads like. Beach Fossils were Pavement sound-alikes that were over-promoted
to third from top. And this was the Levitation
experience thus far: a psychedelic rock festival with a distinct lack of psychedelic rock
bands.
Thankfully, and |
band kick-started a j
Mascis of Dinosaur Jr on drum
to the
nearly
howevt
stretch*
Califoi^
tive '60s k
metal should ne
basement. Lesson
corduroy or bandanas
the plague.
)lf Moon. The     and settled somewhere between
and biker-metal. All of Witch i,
tily,      the Black Angels to close the <
,,-joon;      a much groovier and haunting
te line-up was    , blues. Sounding so much louder than the av-
utdoor festival set, "Indigo Meadow"
irticularly showed why they do psych-rock
vere a derh than anyone in the current wave.
With late night shows at the Rickshaw, Co-
alt, and Electric Owl, Sunday night
m. heavy repost to Levitation\s lights
moments. It was a tough call between
Rickshaw's Burger Records night and the
/ere a deriva-
rine's cfr~
their par.
aided like
Though all was forgiven with uJv
ful Dead Moon. The Portland trio, foi.
1987, transformed Stanley Park with j
knuckle-dragging blues. Husband-and-v
Fred and Toody Cole owned the stage with
minimal set-up and raw, ragged rock V roll
tat made it easily the show of the week-
td- As dusk descended, local heroes Black
Mountain took us into more expansive territory, a rare psychedelic moment as Stephen
ues won out witn tneir
di aught IPAs.
Ill
Opening at the Cobalt w&& Vancouver Island's White Poppy who delivered in spades
what Levitation was missing: shoegaze! Lost
in a dreamy squall of reverb, it was a delicious taster of her upcoming album, Nantral
Phenomena. Drug-pop being,a definite theme
REAL LIVE ACTION
 of the night, Gateway Drugs then came a
close second for Band of the Weekend, blowing us away with a colourful racket of Mazzy
Star meets My Bloody Valentine. By the time
Anciients closed the weekend over at the
Electric Owl, no one could hear themselves
think.
As a first-time event, Levitation Vancouver
did stretch itself thin at times. But the musical muscle of the late-night shows remains
the festival's strength, and may it be for years
to come. Next year let's hope they bring more
of that experimental streak to the green fields
of Stanley Park.—Barnaby Sprague
RITY RING / BRAIDS / BORN GOLD
SUE THEATRE/ JUNE 15
pgue Theatre vpgj^aeked for Purity
|ht show j lay, J une 15. Thei r
lity divided critics,
tey lost their unique sound
5ut Shrines and replaced it with
40 music. The night's show was
bd on colorful lights and special
i complemented tnto new mu-
ht it to life on stage. %,
as we waited for the lit
.■old.
i filled the floor
Popexperimen
npanied
ymbols
. Hoi thy
ssion setup whichjlncliided
If Monday night's show was a battle of
the bands. Braids would have taken home
first prize. The Montreal-based trio quickly
won over the crowd when vocalist Rapha-
elle Standell-Preston amazed concertgoers
with her wide vocal range. After performing their song "Blondie," off their newest
release Deep in the Iris, all hands were high
in the air earning them the biggest applause
of the night. And, with this one song, Braids
effortlessly stole the show. In addition, Austin Tufts brought some of the best drumming
I've ever seen, while Taylor Smith delivered
just as commendable work on the keys. It was
an intimate set blending mesmerizing vocals
and wild percussion. Like one concert-goer
said, "That was the shit."
No introduction1 was needed for Purity
Ring. The Edmonton-bred duo packed props
including flashlights arranged as an organ and
mirrored gloves. Vocalist Megan James explored her futuristic world in ropes of lights
while Corin Roddick stood in the middle of
the stage hitting his crystal-shaped drum set
to produce icy beats. A giant moon hovered
behind him, doubling as a drum for James to
bang during "Dust Hymn."
Wearing a two
der pads. James
ing back i
with shoul-
ss float-
show complir.--
electrontc and futuJt-pop. But although th
set wfc visually jahglhtaking, it app<
tfteygot too cau^htJfc in the spectacles
the end it felt n
11,?* w
if Leaving will
*io     ed ai
mented their oik
mtelf mo\ ie discordant noise lie
REAL LIVE ACTION
 Dead Moon photo (pg. 32 - 33) courtesy of Lauren Ray
NEXT MUSIC FROM TOKYO, VOL. 7 brand of hardcore, mixed with noise and
JUNE 17/BILTMORE CABARET thrash elements, could only work under its
contradictions: their MC, Kobara Sae, was a
Every year, the same too-weird-to-be-true tiny lady violently assaulting the microphone
story makes the rounds just before, and then with anger and fury, alternating between
hyperbolically during, the annual event that shouting and an almost rap-like rhythm; and
is Next Music From Tokyo. The tour, run by their stone-cold guitar player, Hino Tetsuya,
one Steven Tanaka, hand-picks the bes
was as calmly collected during the band's
Tokyo's underground music scene and then many outbursts as if Otori was better known
carries them across Canada on what has to for classical orchestra. From the word "go,"
be the most ambitious project in Japanese- Otori were animated, ferocious, and intimi-
Canadian relations in recent history. The sto- datingly funto listen to.
ry, as it so rarely does these days, gets better.
Tanaka, a Toronto anaesthesiologist, is the Motherc
sole organizer, promoter, tour manager, and ning (which *               NMFT tours have in-
translator for the entire tour, which is paid corporated i<              i degrees) with their hy-
for out of his own pocket. That's right —- one per-infused                'I pop music. Although
of the most unique musical opportunities in their first few songs>vere hard to get adjusted
North America comes from a doctor doing to, the band hit their stride in the, middle of
charity work. the set and finish:              : with an infinitely
charity work. the set and finish*              : with an infinitely
memorable grand fiqak\ Mothercoat blended
Atlantis Airport was the band that might jazz, dance, math, and progressive influences
have had the most in common with Vancou- into something beautiful and hilarious. Front-
ver bands, were it not for the language bar- man Gigadylan. wry .frequently added bi-
rier and the math/prog-rock infusions. At zarre synth and sequenced vocal effects to the
their heart a pop band, the group's strengths mix, was mesmerizing, even when his vocal
were in their cjlntinual stop-start dynamics      experimentations bordered on the ridiculous,
and  incredibldjlsynchronized Ireaks. Their *
front woman, Jfone, didn't do h|lf as good a
ob p*
p)ne, didn't do h|lf as good a And then  there  was IKARA.  hjgj
g as keyboardist Yoden did, true NMFT tradition saved th-,
e to take selfies w jfuhe crowd, and most unifying, for last
ith his instrumeti.\nd dance mslai
still-cold audience. It was silly 9^M Bfkation of true psyc
|ly impressive all at the same
truly the one with the best stage presence.
of thMr Aifieric&o contemporaries, that
>ass played by an even sexiei Fu-
in the best clam-rock outfit of
r licks to cam
octes between
yrics set really i
udix- competiti<
t the cians or tl
an end no
f uly-extended 45 minute
a three-hour endurance
;ee whether the musi-
'ould last longest. As
Lr\RIKARA's
tlv what all
 i
/
i
vie        be fu>c#iva|
Sept 17-20,201511h*ll WCII
KIESZA- - JOEY f   m
TOKVF-. -■' ^F ..yF-r IIAI
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DOE
THE DEARS • WIEG OK • LITTLE HURRICANE
KING-
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SUPERMOON
Comet Lovejoy
(Alarum Records)
It doesn't get more kitschy-cool than music
on a mustard yellow cassette tape, which is
exactly how Supermoon present their debut
EP Comet Lovejoy. The sound itself oozes
that same quirky yet utterly honest vibe
— it's a record to listen to in your coolest
friend's lamp-lit basement, or snuggling up
with your besties in the backyard under old
quilts.
The album begins with the track "Grounded," a well crafted song featuring an extremely catchy guitar line, showcasing the band's
acute pop sensibility. This opener makes it
clear that the band are a formidable musical
unit. If you need to get "Grounded" out of
your head, fear not. The next song, "Tragedy," is just as contagious, with lyrics rhymed
so cleverly you'll never forget them: "To
document my memories /1 teach myself photography /1 watch a documentary / of someone else's tragedy."
In "Powersuits," possibly the best track
on the EP, Supermoon sing "I left a light on
for you / So that you could find your way
home / In the dark." The lyrics repeat for the
entire song, up until the heartbreaking last
line which reveals "But if I hadda known /
You weren't coming home / Well I wouldn't
have wasted / All that energy." "Powersuits"
is pure poetry, it's meaning multifaceted: sarcastic and raw all at once.
"I've Been Told" sounds like a fantastic
live jam with angsty danceability. "Cowardly" takes a dark turn with flat vocals
and a heavy bass line, while the final track
"Burnout of My Dreams" hearkens back to
"Grounded" with a plucky guitar riff at its
core. As the EP comes to an abrupt close, the
silence is almost jarring. The party is over.
You can't hit replay fast enough.
Comet Lovejoy serves up rock-infused pop
straight from the same corner of the Internet
inhabited by the likes of Tavi Gevinson's cult
of Rookie. They're the kind of sounds that
emanate from that virtual space where ripped
tights, blunt cut bangs, the linked arms of
best friends, and the coolest girls in the world
reign. —Keagan Perlette
DARK GLASSES
SIT
(Self-Released)
When they say 'don't judge a book by its
cover,' they hadn't come across Dark Glasses' new self-titled record. One glimpse at the
album artwork — a painting of a bouquet of
flowers almost swallowed by darkness — reveals a detailed representation of the sound
within.
The four-piece lo-fi post-punk band hailing
from Victoria wade their way through shadowy instrumentation, eerie vocals, and low lit
44
UNDER REVIEW
 atmospheres, occasionally bursting through
with bright and beautiful moments. The very
beginning of the very first track stands as a
beacon of light in Dark Glasses' gloom; a
crescendo of lightly distorted guitars skitter across one another, bright notes rolling
and bouncing back and forth, only to cease
suddenly, making way for a clean and quick
drum beat. After a few moments, the bass and
the guitars kick back in, shifting the tone of
the track from gleaming to gloomy.
Almost halfway through the record, Dark
Glasses once again illuminate with their
shortest track on the record, instrumental
"Robber." Oscillating synths that sound
straight from Tarkovsky's Solaris swell and
recede for less than a minute, clear and devoid of any of the record's haze.
But for the most part, Dark Glasses wallows in darkness. Vocalist Declan Hughes
rarely reaches upwards or downwards for
notes, settling in to a monotonic croon.
Drummer Adam Martin shifts between
tight, rapid fire delivery, to lethargic beats.
The notes on Caleb Kramer's guitar generally land a near quarter note off from the expected mark. Bassist Rob Coslett lets the low
end get lost beneath it all. On the penultimate
track, "Blindness," the gloom of the record is
exemplified with its groggy rise from a low
end drone into a detuned guitar rattling overtop a slow and steady drum line.
Yet, from the glittering guitar lines of "In
Vogue," to the saccharine lyrics of "You
Know It's True," Dark Glasses choose the
moments to irradiate their post-punk blackness carefully. More often than not, Dark
Glasses sounds as if the band was in the
process of tuning up when they hit record,
but flashes of artistry and expertise rise up
through its murky depths .—Jasper D Wrinch
{*# seems  £t
OBVIOUS
WOOLWORM
WOOLWORM
Everything Seems Obvious
(Hockey Dad Records)
The '90s grunge movement is one of the
most addictive scenes to have come out of the
last decades. The sweet sounds of a screeching guitar line and a drum kit being smashed
to absolute shit will never fail to be a killer
combination.
The resurgence of '90s grunge rings loud
and clear throughout Woolworm's new EP
Everything Seems Obvious. The band's sixth
release is a four track seven-inch, which
packs a serious punch. Each song picks up
immediately where the predecessor left off,
creating a high energy and high impact release, just in time for summer.
Woolworm's first release since 2013, Everything Seems Obvious is expertly crafted
to build quickly and make a statement. The
opening track "Useless" combines fuzzy guitar lines and frontman Giles Roy's washed
out vocals to set the scene for '90s revival/indie rock. A standout track is definitely "Cassandra," a massive not-quite punk track with
45
UNDER REVIEW
 an addictive hook. Roy belting "Don't wait /
Don't wait / Don't wait for me" over a repetitive and crunchy guitar lick creates the initial
appeal. However the bones of the track are
made by bass player Heather Black, creating
a full bodied sound and making her the real
star of this track. The final track of the EP, "I
Truly Do Not Mind," exists mostly as a callback to "Useless," but gives the EP an overall
cohesiveness.
Woolworm have been shoved to the front
of Vancouver's independent music scene for
a reason — they have been champions of the
'90s revival/indie rock resurgence. Everything Seems Obvious makes it — should I
say — pretty damn obvious that they deserve
to be in that spotlight. Woolworm grasps the
balance of crunchy guitars, smashing cymbals, and thundering bass making their latest
release tangibly good. —Julia Lehn
FRANKIE
Girl of Infinity
(Self-Released)
Frankie's debut EP titled Girl of Infinity is
like a journey with the simple comforts of life,
namely golden sunsets and fresh baked cookies. There is something endearing and enduring about a simple musical array featuring a
pair of great harmonic voices which serve
as a focal point. While Francesca Carbon-
neau and Nashlyn Lloyd combine for most
of the EP's gorgeous harmonics and layered
melodies, the accompanying instrumentation
is equally impressive as it is diverse, moving
from the ultra dreamy "Atmosphere" to a few
degrees towards Sleater Kinney in "Someone
Once."
There is a range of emotions and sounds
on the EP that is typically indicative of bands
that have been playing music together for decades. Frankie are just in their infancy, but
they sound relaxed and established through
all their musical complexities. In fact, the real
beauty and strength behind Girl of Infinity is
that each track would sound equally fantastic
with just a couple of acoustic guitars, and of
course the spot on harmonies.
So the EP is versatile. It is also interesting.
The typical themes of love lost or love gained
are refreshingly absent from Girl of Infinity,
as its prose tends to lend itself to the idea
of dreaming big and moving forward. And
speaking of golden sunsets and fresh baked
cookies, Girl of Infinity has a sort of live
feel to it: like you are at an outdoor festival
thoroughly enjoying the scenery and various
delectables before the sound booth operator
presses the record button as the four-piece
take the stage. If infinity seems effortless,
so too do the songs on the EP. Carbonneau
and Lloyd's voices never seem strained or off
kilter, but are in perfect flow with each other
and their bandmates. With a debut EP of this
depth, Frankie's path to infinity might just be
within grasp.—Slavko Bucifal
ISLAND EYES
ST
(Legwarmer Records)
There is something curiously magnetic
about it: pushing the play button for the debut
album of Island Eyes (formerly Wand) manifests an auspicious premonition. And it is one
that proves to be more than rewarding. Island
Eyes seems like a topographical prototype;
the artist carves his landscape with dream-
pop lines and coats it with phosphorescent
powder of electronic frequencies. Moreover,
Derek Janzen's dramatic vocals, layered with
their distinct trembling and sobbing texture,
and also his intense lyrics, contribute the
three-dimensional element of outbreaks in
this otherwise demure scenery.
46
UNDER REVIEW
 "O, your violent clouds / Are a wind in this
house / Where your flames have gone out /
O, I'm afraid of this heart / I'm afraid of your
ghost /I'm afraid of your love." These are
the last words heard on the cassette, a temporary ending in a story of loss, agony and
wandering that unfolds through the album's
nine songs. In the track "Every House Is On
Fire", there is a new-wave, disco-noir essence. The emotional distress and traumatic
experiences,described in the the album's lyrics, are washed in laid-back or vibrant, almost
playful synth vibes: a contradiction and healing process leading ultimately to catharsis.
"I heard your voice inside the room /as
all your storming clouds came in for you /1
called your name, I called on high / But everybody's houses are on fire." Surrounded by
burning homes and roaring skies, the hero
tries to escape the demons and whispers of
the past. Isolation appears to be a self-fulling
prophecy. But even into this vortex, human
will and inner strength do not fade away. "I
won't run, I won't hide / In the dark of the
night / Now I know, you were right / I'll remain in the light of the sun."
Island Eyes' original album art, created by
Courtney Loberg, completes the transmission of its reality's atmosphere. The mystical
scenes impressed upon the J-card reflect a
feeling that something profound is about to
happen. A war between the sun and the moon?
A giant light forces alliance against the total
darkness? The question is a double reminder:
the synthesis of human nature is structured
with these same components of the universe
and human relationships are governed by the
same laws that rule the interactivity between
cosmic forces.
Derek Janzen returns with a new name and
a chance to reinvent himself; and he succeeds.
He remains loyal to his ability to produce
dreamy sound waves, but this time through
transcension; Island Eyes is full-grown, focused, and introspective. It is a work of art
made in Victoria.—Theano Pavlidou
ND
V4WCH
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DADA PLAN
The Madness Hides
(Self-Released)
Malcolm Biddle's more experimental side
is alive and well with Dada Plan's sophomore record, titled the Madness Hides. Flirting with free jazz elements and a psychedelic
pop backbone, Malcolm Biddle (a.k.a. Malcolm Jack) shines the infamous blue light on
the subject of our obsession with personal
devices, again. And in keeping with the precedence set from their debut, the Vancouver 5
piece have created another work of equilibrium, smartly balancing accessibility with artful, bizarre noise. Oh, and there's the doom
and gloom which is appealing to be sure.
The Madness Hides challenges our blind
automaticity of technology, and does so
without a love story to get in the way. It is a
performance that stays true to character with
quirky lines and quirkier synth parts. "I want
47
UNDER REVIEW
 to live on a page / Post pictures from an incidental cage." Biddle questions whether anything online is actually meaningful and balks
at the ever-present exchange of rather uninteresting and useless data (dada?).
If there is a flaw in his dystopia, it is the
western tint with which his bias exists. While
we use it to promote entertainment and share
pictures of perfectly brewed espresso, half a
world away social media is being used to raise
revolutions and reclaim democracy. There is
a deliberate vigour or colour that is missing
from Bliddle's reflections both in song and
prose. The Madness Hides, in some ways,
replicates our digital ebb and flow where everything seems washed in a soft acid brush,
dulling the senses of anything real. "What
Happened to our world /It was so informative I know/ It vanished in the world / It left
just boring things in its glow." Part spoken
word, part poetry, part dystopia, and all psychedelic saxophone, Dada Plan's sophomore
effort is very listenable for an art record. But
that's not the point. It is also enjoyably debatable, though we might be too busy changing
our profile status to notice.—Slavko Bucifal
TWIN RIVER
Should the Light Go Out
(Light Organ Records)
In the three years since their first EP, Rough
Gold, Twin River have undergone some
significant changes. The first is a new-and-
improved lineup: adding Malcolm Jack, Rebecca Law Gray, and Dustin John Bromley
to the guitar-and-vocals twosome of Courtney Ewan Bromley and Andy Bishop. The
second is an almost complete genre overhaul.
Though some tracks hearken back to the
muted, twangy, country-folk guitars of their
first release, Twin River have approached
full-length Should the Light Go Out from a
very different angle, incorporating wiggly
atmospheric synths and fast-paced pop-rock
with occasional doo-wop vocals and surf
rock guitars.
As Ewan Bromley told the Georgia
Straight, "I don't really listen to a lot of slow,
sad stuff anymore. It's more fun to play in a
synth-y rock band, and more fun to listen to."
This literal change of pace is the most immediate difference for past listeners, as opener
"Bend to Break" jumps into an upbeat drum
and vocal combo that doesn't quit until the
final chords.
This speed is perhaps a bit ambitious for
the traditionally slow-moving group; Ewan
Bromley seems to have trouble keeping up
with the whiplash tempo of "Bend to Break,"
leaving the song feeling more anxious than
worthy of a thrashy dance floor. These tempo
issues recur throughout the album, likely tied
to the heavy-handed use of reverb, making
the vocals and instruments feel like they're
lagging behind.
This suggests that Twin River might be best
served focusing on the strength of their synth
tones before cranking up the speed dial. The
strongest tracks, "He's Not Real and He Ain't
Coming Back," "Golden Man," and "Secret
in a Seance," allow Gray's synth work and
the choice reverb on Ewan Bromley's vocals
to create some particularly moody magic.
Still, the title question begs to be answered:
Should Twin River's light go out, or has this
debut LP given us reason to ask for more?
Though the album may have fallen short of its
genre-expanding intentions, it must be taken
as an offering from a talented group playing
around with new sounds. Twin River clearly
aren't afraid of a little exploration and reworking, and as they keep trying new things
and having fun, they will likely be back soon
48
UNDER REVIEW
 with a more polished and focused release. If
the light were to go out now, it would certainly be too soon.—Elizabeth Holliday
ADRIAN TEACHER AND THE SUBS
Sorta Hafta
(Self-Released)
There is no genre of music safe from Adrian Teacher's ever-widening reach. As his new
project, Adrian Teacher and the Subs, effortlessly proves with the no-second-wasted EP,
Sorta Hafta, Teacher is just as adept at tackling the softer sides of folk and psych as he
was the art-punk veil of Apollo Ghosts or the
funk-infused frenzy of COOL TV.
As with all of Teacher's releases, Sorta
Hafta unravels against the grain of its audience's expectations. EP opener "When Did I
Get Older?" would feel at home, if slightly
less rambunctious, on the last Ghosts record,
Landmark. Teacher has an inherent ability to
craft beautiful pop masterpieces with an ear-
infecting melody, a skill that he also puts to
use elsewhere on the record, notably in "Let's
Call In Sick" and its calypso rhythm, and
the beautiful soul-searching chorus of "One
Thing Your Money Couldn't."
What's most surprising though, and also
most deeply rewarding, are the elements of
classic and folk music defining the difference
between Adrian Teacher and the Subs and his
previous projects. "Old Graffiti" is a straight-
up sing-along with call-and-response vocal
work between Teacher and Julie Doiron. And
"Thriftin' On A Sunday" would be at home
in a Volkswagen camper's cassette compartment.
Teacher has crafted something beautiful
and new on Sorta Hafta. Long-time fans
may still be pining for the energy and antics
of Apollo Ghosts or COOL TV, but the Subs
have something refreshingly close to the
heart in their new EP.—Fraser Dobbs
, .......:. mm  ., ..     .
wmimmwmmmmmmmm.:
THE BACKHOMES
Tidal Wave
(Self-Released)
The title and album cover of the Back-
homes' sophomore release is a perfect pairing to the mood and tone of the band's latest
set of songs. An impending eclipse over a
vast oceanscape that adorns the cover reflects
the sense of otherworldly grandeur and mystery enclosed within.
The Victoria dream pop dup display complete clarity of artistic vision as Tidal Wave
crests and washes over the listener only
to slowly recede back into the ether. Kees
Dekker and Aimee van Drimmelen possess
an evocative flair for their craft as the tracks
feel organic yet opulent.
Tidal Wave itself flows almost like a single
musical suite as certain ideas are reprised and
built upon as the album progresses. Opener
"That's All" slowly unfolds like blooming flora as layers of guitar, a circular bass
and drum rhythm, and a piano melody are
UNDER REVIEW
49
 gradually added to the droning synth intro.
The Backhomes' approach is psychedelic
but decidedly modern, as a track like "Solid
Gold" mixes surf rock with a '90s era techno
beat in a bizarre yet successful marriage of
two seemingly contradictory styles. For a
DIY production, the studio craft at work is
flawless and an improvement over the slight
muddiness in thf> mix of their previous record, Only Friends.
The Backhomes have succeeded in creating an experience for the listener. Tidal Wave
is beyond a collection of new songs. It is a
lush and panoramic sonic journey. Try not to
get lost.—James Olson
NAP
Uncharted
(1080p)
1080p have a reputation for delivering
genre-defying electronic music that teeters
between the boundaries of experimental and
dance-inspired rhythms. NAP's debut album
Uncharted manages to preserve the ' 1080p
sound' while also providing a breath of fresh
air to the local electronic scene in Vancouver.
community who has truly done it all: from
being a member of several garage bands to
an independent filmmaker, as well as being
a founder of Student Loan Records. Rincon
brings his DIY ethics and knack for the unconventional into Uncharted. Rather than
striving for any sort of 'pure' genre, NAP
hybridizes several electronic sub-genres that
some may say have no right being played in
the same room, let alone the same track.
Tracks like "Urban Fare" and "Don't Forget the Records" are more atmospheric, ambient tracks, which you could easily imagine being the soundtrack for a Utopian sci-fi
world. Just a few tracks later and you have
noise-fueled industrial tunes like "GSM" and
"Soul Divine," for which after a few listens,
you may unexpectedly find yourself dancing
or at least nodding your head.
By trying to do everything, Rincon doesn't
quite succeed at mastering a particular sound
or sub-genre of electronic music. For example, "Worms" misses the mark on its experimental sound and comes off as unnecessarily
long and a bit excessive in its drones. With
Rincon's wide approach on Uncharted there
are bound to be a handful of tracks to be enjoyed for anyone who's into electronic, but
you might be better off finding an artist who
has spent considerable time focusing on the
genre you enjoy most.
However, if you embrace Rincon's experimental ideals and DIY spirit, then you ought
to give NAP's Uncharted a listen. You'll be
impressed at NAP's ability to combine so
many electronic sub-genres in one album and
still make it a listenable and cohesive experience.— Rohit Joseph
NAP is the production alias of Daniel
Rincon, an active member of Vancouver's
50
UNDER REVIEW
 NOT JUST JAZZ
by Jasper D. Wrinch II Illustrations by Jenna Milsom
Photography by Konstantin Prodanovic
"I think people see us as musicians who
have a certain amount of training, a certain
amount of technique, a certain amount of
ability, and so they say 'You play jazz,' but
I don't really like to think of it as exclusively
jazz," explains Dan Gaucher, drummer and
one third of genre-spanning local band, Sick
Boss. With a weekly event showcasing improvisation, formidable musicianship, and
albeit, a respectable dose of jazz among other
genres, Monday nights at the Lido revolve
around Sick Boss.
With the energy of a technically astounding and musically riveting performance still
lingering in the air, Gaucher, along with bassist James Meger, and guitarist Cole Schmidt,
sit down with Discorder in the lively Lido
directly after one of their impressive Monday
night sets to discuss their band, their shows,
and their views on Vancouver's music scene.
While the Lido has only had its doors open
for a little over a year, Sick Boss has had
the Monday night time slot booked solid for
nearly nine months. "I think I was drinking
a beer, and then I thought, this would be a
really good place to do something like this,"
explains Schmidt on the origins of the weekly
shows. "Then I went over and talked to Matt
[Krysko, owner of the Lido]. He pulled out
the calendar, and said, 'When do you want
to get started?'" Ever since, the trio has explored new musical ground every Monday
night.
"It's been a really great opportunity to sort
of experiment with stuff, to kind of try different things and see how people react," imparts
Gaucher. Having a secure gig every week
with the freedom to play what they want,
Sick Boss are free to venture off the beaten
path with their music. "We're pretty comfortable up there," says Schmidt. "Another big
part of what's going on is Matt encourages us
to freak out."
Running analog psychedelic video projections overtop of the band performing, Krysko
keeps the trio striving to move further and
further into noise and freakiness. "Matt kind
of said to us, the freakier the better," explains
51
NOT JUST JAZZ
 Gaucher. "And we've basically been trying
to break him ever since... He still hasn't complained yet. He's still on board."
While some nights settle into more rehearsed, composed pieces of music, oftentimes, Sick Boss dives deep into improvisation and noise, matching the paranoid, hazy,
and nearly hallucinatory projections that accompany them.
It's hard for both the audience and the band
to ignore the visual aspect of the Monday
night shows. "Especially the nights that are
all improvised, there's something about the
visuals that allows us to access a certain momentum," says Meger. "It kind of provides a
sort of through line... Matt is always keeping
things in motion."
In addition to the striking and surreal visual show that accompanies their sets, Sick
Boss often has some help with their musical
exploration through a diversity of accompanying artists. "The three of us play every
Monday with different guests," says Meger.
Varying from internationally renowned jazz
musicians, to local independent music icons,
Sick Boss is rarely without a guest feature in
their lineup. In the month of June alone, the
trio has been joined by Tony Wilson, notable
Vancouver jazz guitarist and composer, and
Colin Cowen, member of Vancouver's Dada
Plan, the Elastic Stars, and Acid Witch.
And because of the constant flow of people
through the stage, Sick Boss has developed
a certain level of comfort and poise playing
together. "There's a confidence you get playing with all those different kinds of people. I
mean, I have the feeling when I get up there
with you guys that we can make something
good," reveals Meger to his bandmates. It's
a sentiment that is shared by Gaucher: "Everyone's different personality brings different
things out of all of us... I don't think we'd be
where we are with [Sick Boss] if we didn't
have all those guests."
With a torrent of styles, sounds, and guest
musicians at their disposal, the trio move far
beyond what is commonly called "jazz" with
heir live shows. When one uses the word
jazz to describe the sound of Sick Boss, entire
aspects of what they do are ignored. While
characteristics of the genre are certainly identifiable at times within their music, the band
traverses a much wider musical scope.
"In one set, we might reference jazz and
folk and rock and even electronic music
and noise and soundscapes," says Gaucher.
Though the three of them all share a history
of jazz training, jazz performance, and esteem for the genre, Meger calls themselves
"a bit of an anomaly" within the jazz scene,
as well as the city's music scene as a whole.
On their weekly shows, Meger explains that
"It doesn't feel like it has much to do with
the jazz scene, or even the rest of the scener
to me."
For Gaucher, "There's a lot of great things
about [jazz], but it doesn't really explain the
whole thing." Despite their Monday night
shows often being labeled as jazz nights, "it's
easier to sort of talk about it as improvisation
and that's what we do, really."
Regardless of whether or not you choose
to view them as a jazz trio, Sick Boss consistently delves deep beyond musical boundaries, blurring borders between genres, and
scenes. A big part of their ability to cross
those musical lines is the venue, according to
Gaucher.
"You can talk about Sick Boss all you
want, but we wouldn't really exist without
the Lido." A hub for independent Vancouver
music and culture, the venue gives the band
the freedom to play what they want, and the
atmosphere enables the audience to become
fully immersed in what the band is going to
be. And, as Gaucher aptly puts it, "The exciting thing is that we literally have no idea
what it's going to be."
52
NOT JUST JAZZ
 <r ?   (- y..^/
 WMTHEfK.
KOKO NO MORE
By Lydia Adeli II Illustrations by Karl Ventura
Photography by Tara Bigdeli
Koko no more, now it's Whitney K. I sit
down with Konner Whitney, formerly known
by his alternative pop ego Koko, at Reno's
restaurant near Main and Broadway. We
have a few beers and chat about the June 23
release of his new EP Pony, and his recent
move back to Vancouver from Montreal.
I ask Whitney about the name change and
he responds: "Koko is an asshole, I don't
want to be that guy anymore, I'm over it."
This means that his new musical moniker
Whitney K is taking a different path, and a
fresh start. Not wanting to be tied down to
the past, Whitney says, "Koko to me, makes
more sense as what it was initially in the beginning. .. I feel it can't go anywhere beyond
that."
With Whitney back in Vancouver, we can
be sure that the city will influence the mu-
sicality of his songs once again. He tells me
how every city brings a different element to
his music. "Before moving to Montreal, the
music I was writing was about Vancouver. I
really like it when songwriters do that. You
need to talk about where you are. I never felt
like I really had a connection with Montreal."
I acknowledge that Whitney has a love
hate relationship with Montreal - and noticing my questioning look - he reassures me
that he has no beef. "Don't get me wrong, I
like Montreal... I just can't live there. I wish
I liked it. If I liked it it would be great. It's
cheap as shit. People are pretty open. I just
pick up on the vibe here more than I do in
Montreal." He also goes on to say that since
he's been back, he's experienced Vancouver
in a different way, exposing himself to things
that he had been blind to before.
Released by Montreal-based label, Egg Paper Factory, the new Whitney K EP is named
Pony because, according to Whitney, he just
likes the name, and the album is small, just
like ponies are. Yet despite its nonthreaten-
ing, cutesy title, Whitney explains that since
he's been back in Vancouver, he wants to
make "more aggressive music again — more
intensity, no distortion, just more intensity."
As our conversation continues, Whitney
shares some words of wisdom. He says he
54
WHITNEY K
 WHITNEY K
55
 "THE QUIRKY, FUN POP MELODIES ON PONY MAKE ME THINK THAT
THE ALBUM'S TONE IS AN ILLUSION THAT CONTAINS SOMETHING
MORE SERIOUS/'
would tell his younger self "not to be too hard
on [himself]. I'm telling myself that now.
You realize what your limits are. There's that
realization of who you are."
This personal journey is evident in Whitney's new EP, which imparts feelings of insecurity that we can all relate to. Such sentiments echo through Pony, and are particularly
strong on track, "We Just Came Out." Elaborating on the backstory of this song Whitney
reflects, "In that moment in my life, I just felt
this party scene is a disillusion, almost like a
parody, where people are no longer with you,
but laughing at you... it's just about getting
sucked into that."
I think back to a comment he made earlier about how Pony is for "anybody and
everybody." Whitney's personal and musical
reconstruction is exemplified through the dichotomy of his music with its light, upbeat
melodies and dark lyrical undertones. He
tells me how he couldn't have written as upbeat a song as "Pony" a year ago.
When asked if there are any artists he
would like to work with, Whitney replies with
a typical nonchalant response that continues
to spark my interest towards him. "There's
not really anyone I fantasize to work with...
I can't think of any specific person" He does
admit that he would like to work with someone from a different creative medium. "That
would be cool. I'd like to be someone else's
stooge for a change."
Fast forward a week, and it's Friday night.
I'm sitting at the Astoria, waiting for Whitney K to come on stage. Since our meeting at
Reno's he's had a clean shave and is wearing
a toque, a baggy shirt with shorts, raised up
socks, and sneakers. When we speak, I ask
him if he's nervous and he says, "of course,
I'm always nervous." He tells me nerves are
good though, and the one time he didn't have
nerves, it wasn't a good show.
As I sit there watching Whitney K set
up on stage, I start chatting with a girl sitting beside me. Turns out she is Whitney's
neighbour. "He's an amazing lyricist," she
raves about him, and casually mentions that
they've had some deep conversations, but
doesn't elaborate on what. It piques my interest, realizing she knows things about him that
I should never know, and never expose. The
quirky, fun pop melodies on Pony make me
think that the album's tone is an illusion that
contains something more serious.
That's what I love about Whitney K's
Pony. It reminds me a bit of Lilly Allen; a
fuck you that juxtaposes an uplifting melody
with dark emotions. At the end of the day our
only salvation for tragedy is to make light of
the situation, and I think that's what Whitney
K has so brilliantly achieved with Pony.
As I watched him perform my favourite
song on Pony, "We Just Came Out," it seemed
as if he went into his own zone that night at
the Astoria. I thought to myself as his eyes
glazed over the audience, their heads bobbing
up and down, drinking their beers — what if
Whitney looked at us? What if those lyrics
magnified an emotional eruption within him
while performing under his typical nonchalant facade that he so well personifies?
56
WHITNEY K
  HOMEGROWN LABELS
BIG SMOKE
by Julia Lehn II Illustrations by Justin Longoz
Photography by Jaqueline Manoukian
"I completely disagree with Vancouver being the 'No Fun City.' We may be isolated
but it's easy to find fun stuff - If you know
where to look."
Adam Sharp imparts his optimism on me
during our interview as I finish my pint, gently setting it down. Founder of one of Vancouver's newest record labels, Big Smoke,
Sharp definitely knows where to look. The 28
year old is no stranger to Vancouver's independent music scene. Prior to the label's establishment, Sharp was a member of Mercy
Years and since then, has started a new band,
Altona.
This summer alone, Sharp has started planning an indie night called MARKET, put together a local indie-rock compilation called
the Vancouver Connection, Vol. I, and finished a Canadian tour promoting Altona's
first release on Big Smoke. I sat down with
Sharp at the Black Lodge one evening to discuss his success, what it means to be indie
these days, and where he plans to take his label from here.
Starting a record label was always in the
back of Sharp's mind. "I have always looked
a little deeper into where the music I listen to
is coming from — whether that be the place it
stems from or who the people making it are,"
Sharp explains.
Looking deeper has taken him to the back-
end of the music industry, and this interest
have led him to gather experience by working with record labels and music companies
across North America. "I worked at Mint
Records for a year as a marketing intern and
did some booking with them. Then I left for
New York to work for a production company.
When I came back to Vancouver I interned
at the Feldman Agency." Sharp explains. The
positions he held worked well with his personality type, so the creation of Big Smoke
was the obvious next step.
Sharp's goal with Big Smoke is no simple
aspiration — he is striving to challenge what
it means to be indie. "I think that indie gets
thrown around so much and everyone has
a slightly different opinion of what indie
means. And I think it's really cool how that
has happened, in the way that punk has become a way of life more than just a sound,
I think indie is the same. Although I cannot
58
HOMEGROWN LABELS
 describe it right now, I can hear it and see it."
Vancouver's independent music scene has
come a long way since indie just meant "independent." You could blame the internet for
that, but Sharp argues that maybe indie has
evolved into a buzzword. "I think that indie
and independent are two different things, but
still pointing in the same direction. That's going to be the point of our event, MARKET.
To see how broadly we can expand the genre
spectrum whilst still having appropriately cu-
rated lineups each month."
MARKET will be Vancouver's newest
indie night. Once a month, three artists will
play equal length sets, with no obvious head-
liner. MARKET will be different from the
Fox Cabaret's indie night ("Heaven: Classic
Dance Party") because of its emphasis on
live bands without a dance party to send off
the night.
Sharp stresses that "the focus is very much
on three specific bands a month and creating
a friendly, welcoming community. The hope
is that you can show up, watch three bands,
and then go on to whatever else you want to
do that night."
Sharp has confidence that creating a community with MARKET will change our city's
attitude toward attending shows. "People
come out to see one band for the night, or just
the band that they are friends with, and then
leave. The audience fluctuates a lot depending on what band is on, or when the dance
party is. MARKET will hopefully eliminate
that." All Sharp has left to do is find a venue,
which he says he may have accomplished tonight, but doesn't want to jinx it by telling
me.
The first night of MARKET will be on
August 14, and will double as the release
party for Big Smoke's first vinyl release, the
Vancouver Connection, Vol. I. Sharp's goal
while curating the compilation was to include something for everyone, while maintaining an eclectic collection of the local indie scene. Included on the compilation are a
wide range of local artists, from underground
59
HOMEGROWN LABELS
 heavyweights like Woolworm and Dead Soft,
to indie-folk bands like Alea Rae, or indie-
pop such as Reef Shark.
Sharp admits that despite doing his best to
be an eclectic music lover, he consistently
leans towards indie-rock and alt-rock. This
will be reflected in Vancouver Connection
Vol I, but also in terms of which bands Big
Smoke would like to put out music with in
the future.
When Sharp was 18, a friend got him into
emo and alt-rock, and these roots have stuck
with him. Sharp explains, "I grew up in England and it wasn't such a faux-pas to be into
emo. Being introduced to emo was the first
time anything really resounded with me. If
I'm forced to choose a genre I will probably
lean more towards the indie rock, alt rock,
more emo-y stuff. I've wanted to start this label for a long time and it seems like the right
time for me to jump into it."
Regardless, when asked what his top five
favourite records are, Sharp provides an answer spanning multiple decades and genres:
Hospice by the Antlers, The Devil and God
Are Raging Inside Me by Brand New, Sgt.
Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band by the
Beatles, Icky Mettle by Archers of Loaf, and
Come Fly With Me by Frank Sinatra. His list
has nearly as much diversity as Vancouver's
independent music scene has to offer. Sharp
agrees that this is true and adds, "It's about
time that people pay attention to what is happening in Vancouver. I have some friends in
New York that have said good things about
our music scene. It's very DIY, which has
lead to a really loyal and connected group
of people creating and consuming it. I think
most people are in it for the long haul, and for
good artistic reasons."
The Vancouver Connection, Vol. 1 is
available for preorder now at bigsmokevan-
couver.bandcamp.com i
60
HOMEGROWN LABELS
 DISCORDER REVISITED
VAN HALEN PRACTICED IN MY GRANDMA'S GARAGE!
by Erica Leiren II Illustrations by Olga Abeleva
I'd never heard of Van Halen. We were in
Pasadena over Christmas vacation in 1977/78
to visit Grandma Anna and Grandpa Haakon
and to see the Rose Parade, a family tradition.
We'd lived in Pasadena during my Grade one
through four years, when Dad wrote for the
LA Times, a plum job, because he could get
us free tickets to Disneyland! Home was a
beautiful little sun washed, craftsman-style
house near the parade route on Colorado
Boulevard.
New Year's Day was a big deal in Pasadena, starting with the parade, then a big
smorgasbord at my grandparents'. Grandpa
built the house on Cooley Place, and it was
the gathering place for our whole family. In
the backyard he'd made a beautiful garden
courtyard for Grandma and planted it with
lemon trees. She loved lemon trees. Oranges
too. Back in Norway, these had been rare
treats, so trees flowering and fruiting in the
backyard year-round must have seemed just
like heaven. She told me once, she never
wanted to feel cold again, and in Pasadena,
you didn't have to.
Grandma's blackand white cat Sylvester
was a familiar sight in the back garden. He
guarded the spot by the screen door, languidly sunning himself on the stoop or looking
expectantly inside to the cool, dark interior
61
DISCORDER REVISITED
 where Grandma might be cooking up something delicious for us to eat, like lefse, a favourite Norwegian delicacy. Lefse is like a
very thin potato pancake. Grandma would
spread ours with butter and sugar, then roll up
and throw them to us nonchalantly, as though
the? skill and effort of preparing this time consuming treat were nothing at all.
The tame box tortoise was another magical
feature of the garden during our years growing up in Pasadena. She (he?) was usually to
be found in the front yard, rambling freely
and delicately nibbling greenery like a connoisseur. Sometimes we'd feed her a piece of
j.uicy lettuce, which she seemed to like. If it
got very hot, she would rest under the giant
jade plants which stood like friendly sentinels
at the entrance to the driveway. The tortoise
would appear in the yard in springtime and
be spotted now and then. When the few rainy
weeks of November heralded winter, she
went off to hide, only to rerappear the next
spring, her shell grown a little bit larger. She
was dry and dusty in a pleasant sort of way
and she let us touch her hard shell, sometimes
withdrawing, then coming out slowly to resume her perambulations with a meticulous
rolling gait. We loved the gentle tortoise and,
though we never knew where she went, she
returned with every spring.
One day during our visit, we were standing
out back near the garage, when our youngest
uncle, Robin, appeared with an armload of
t-shirts and LPs and began proudly handing
them round to my three sisters and me. The
loot was from his friends' band that he was
helping out.
The t-shirts were mostly black, with a big
flying "VH" logo on the front; the album cover had photos of each band member taken at
the Whisky A Go Go. The record was called
simply Van Halen, a name that was new to us
young, innocent Vancouverites.
We were like, "Cool! Thanks! Who's Van
Halen?"
Had we been a few years older and still
living in Pasadena, we definitely would have
known who Van Halen were... the hottest
thing in the LA Club scene and just about
to release their very first album. The t-shirts
Robin was giving us were for their first world
tour, supporting Black Sabbath and Journey,
and the records were advance copies of their
62
DISCORDER REVISITED
 debut album. It would come out two months
later, totally catch fire, and sell 10 million
copies. The band, of course, would go on to
world-wide domination, with our 22 year old
uncle along for the ride! We didn't have a
clue at the time.
that the world's newest guitar hero could really shine. Uncle Robin was a big burly guy
and he got the touring nickname "Rudy," because after concerts he had to be the "rude"
one standing at the door making sure the
backroom wasn't overrun.
When they were wood-shedding and still
a local phenomenon, Van Halen practiced in
my grandparents' Pasadena garage. Grandma
told me the guitarist's pretty and nice girlfriend, Valerie Bertinelli, would come along
to watch them practice. She starred in a popular TV show. I wonder if she ever got to try
lefse?
Truly, it is hard to imagine the force of
nature that was early Van Halen being contained by anything, much less a suburban
Pasadena garage, while honing the songs for
one of rock 'n' roll's greatest debut albums
ever. David Lee Roth's California-god looks,
killer sense of humour, and belly-dance
moves were made for a bigger stage. Van
Halen were F-U-N and they took it straight
from Pasadena to the world.
I still remember the first time Robin called
us up with tickets when the band arrived in
Vancouver. So exciting! Return of the conquering Hero!
It was September 26, 1978, at the Pacific
Coliseum, near the end of Van Halen's first
world tour. He got my three sisters and I great
seats, and we stood the whole time. They
played the entire album and every song was
better than the last. I was 17 and it is still the
best rock 'n' roll show I have ever seen (and
I've seen Nirvana.) David Lee Roth's antics
made you scream involuntarily.
A few years later, Robin came through
with Motley Criie, but that's another story...
Later, when the band got huge, Uncle Robin toured the world with his friends in Van
Halen as their guitar tech. Pretty cool when
you think of what an epic and terrain-changing guitarist Eddie Van Halen was. My uncle
was the guy tossing Eddie his next guitar on
stage and making sure it all went perfectly so
 This year CiTR and Music Waste present the
Victory Square
Block Party
on
September 6th
2pm-9pm at Victory Square Park,
it's free
Save the date
toe** go to ifcpphofw Mflgutnt A OTR10L9FM
Check back for more...
 CITR 101.9FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER RECOMENDS LISTENING TO CITR ONLINE
AT CITR.CA EVERY DAY
6:00"
2:00"
CITR GHOST
MIX
BREAKFAST
WITH
THE
BROWNS
PACIFIC
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QUEER FM
VANCOUVER:
RELOADED
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MOON
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SUBURBAN
JUNGLE
CITR GHOST
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THE REEL
WHIRLED
THE™""1
COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
CITR GHOST
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CITR GHOST
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MOONGROK      MOONGROK
• ROCKET FROM
LANGUAGE TO RUSSIA
LANGUAGE
SYNCHRONICS
PARTS
UNKNOWN
MORNING
AFTER SHOW
SHINE ON
POP DRONES
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
A FACE FOR
RADIO
TRANSITION
STATE
DUNCAN'S
DONUTS
THE SECTOR
UP ON THE
ROOF
THE SCREEN
GIRLS
THE CATS
PAJAMS
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE
CITR GHOST
MIX
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS...
CLASSICAL
CHAOS
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KEW IT UP
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WIZEMEN       VIBES & STUFF     ASIAN WAVE
SOUL
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12:00"
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SHOW
DISCORDER
RADIO
FLEX YOUR
HEAD
INSIDE OUT
CRIMES &
TREASONS
NOD ON THE
LIST
ARTS REPORT
SIMORGH
NEWS 101
SHARING SCIENCE MOONGROK
ARE
YOU PEANUT
INNER    AWARE BUTTER
SQUANTCH'S     SPACE
HIDEAWAY
FOLK OASIS
THE
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MATT
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SYNAPTIC
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LATE NIGHT
SHOW
CITR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
 DIFFICULT
Bepi Crespan Presents... SUN 7am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-
up/collage and general Crespan© weirdness. Twitter: @bepicre-
span. Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca
CLASSICAL
Radio Free Thinker TUE 3pm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular extraordinary claims and subject them to critical
analysis.
Cited! WED 11:30am
This is a radio program about how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower. Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project" on CiTR.
  All Ears                                                                    MON 6pm
Classical Chaos                                                       SUN 9am (Alternating with UBC Arts On Air.) All Ears is an advice radio pro-
From the Ancient World to the 21 st century, join host Marguerite gram targetted to the UBC community. We try to answer your
in exploring and celebrating classical music from around the questions and address topics sent via social media and over the
world. phone. Interviews and segments relating to campus life will be
  featured, all in our attempt to better our community and sup-
TA L K P'y positive feedback.
Aloud                                           Alternating Thursdays 1pm Extraenvironmentalist                                             WED 2pm
Aloud features authors and literary critics reading, analyzing and Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth,
discussing their favourite short stories. Every month we invite a Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of sus-
prominent Vancouver-based author or critic to share one of their tainable economics and our global ecological crisis,
favourite pieces of short fiction on air. The show—one hour in
length—begins with the guest reading selections from the story Arts Report                                                            WED 5pm
and ends with an engaging discussion of the work with Aloud Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film, theatre,
host, David Gaertner—a UBC postdoctoral fellow with a PhD in dance, visual and performance art, comedy, and more) by host
Literature. Theme and interstitial music provided by Vancouver Jake Costello and the Arts Reporters,
musician Jason Starnes with support from UBC's First Nations
Studies Program. Read more at aloudliterature.tumblr.com and UBC Arts On Air                        Alternating Wednesdays 6pm
follow us on Twitter @Aloud_Lit. Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual interviews with members of UBC Arts world. Tune in for programs,
AstroTalk                                                                THU 3pm people and personalities in Art
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the night sky with
a new topic every week. Death Stars, Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red Sexy In Van City                                                   WED 10pm
Giants, the Milky Way, G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars... Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality.sexyinvancity.com/category/
The Sector                                                                FRI 8am sexy-in-vancity-radio.
Discussing the world of social justice, non-profits, charities and
activism. Join Ethan for in-depth interviews, examinations of The Reel Whirled                                                       THU 8am
nonprofit missions and causes, and discussions of everything The Reel Whirled is an hour long escapade through the world
from philanthropy to progressive politics. of cinema, be it contemporary or classic, local or global. From
our perspective as the UBC Film Society, we talk about film in-
Synchronicity                                                      MON 12pm tellectually, passionately and goofily. With select music from
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling our cinematic subjects, we pull your Thursday mornings into fo-
good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that help you re- cus, from bleary eyed to sharp and worthy of the silver screen,
member why you're here: to have fun! ubcfilmsociety.com | chairperson@ubcfilmsociety.com
News 101 FRI 5pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and community newscast. Every week, we take a look back at the week's local, national and international news, as seen from a fully independent media perspective.
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded TUE 8am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest features, background
on current issues and great music.queerfmradio@gmail.com
The Community Living Show THU 9am
This show is produced by the disabled community and showcases special guests and artists. The focus is for a positive
outlook on programs and events for the entire community.
Originally called "The Self Advocates", from Co-Op Radio CFRO,
the show began in the 1990s We showcase BC Self Advocates
with lots of interviews from people with special needs. Tune in
for interesting music, interviews and some fun times. This program is syndicated with the NCRA (National Community and
Campus Radio Association) across BC and across Canada. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael Rubbin Clogs and Friends, communi-
tylivingradio.wordpress.com | communitylivingradio@gmail.com
| Community Living Radio Show | @clivingradio
| #communitylivingradio
 The Matt & Ryan Show Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
the Matt and Ryan show featuring Ryan and Matt. An hour and
a half of pure fun and good music. Matt and Ryan take calls,
give advice, and generally tell you what's up. The phone lines
are open.
Language to Language MON 11am
Encouraging language fluency and cultural awareness.
White Noise SAT 8pm
Need some comic relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half an
hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he delves
in to the most eccentric corners of radio for your listening
pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show featuring a Q
and A with the creator, actors and a guest comic every week.
whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
HIP HOP
Sharing Science
WED 6pm
REGGAE
The Rockers Show
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
SUN 12pm
ROOTS / FOLK / BLUES
Blood On The Saddle Alternating Sundays 3pm
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
Pacific Pickin' TUE 6am
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman. Email: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
Folk Oasis WED 8pm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on
our local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since 1997.
Email: folkoasis@gmail.com
The Saturday Edge SAT Bam
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African, Latin,
and European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@mac.com.
Code Blue SAT 3pm
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
SOUL / R&B
Soulship Enterprise SAT 7pm
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz, and
afrobeat tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as
the world's foremost funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people named Robert Gorwa and/
or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III.
African Rhyhms
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
FRI 7:30pm
Nod on the List TUE 11pm
"Nod on the List is a program featuring new urban and alternative music, sounds of beats, hip hop, dancehall, bass, interviews, guest hosts and more every Tuesday at 11pm.
scad s_i nternationa l@yahoo.com
facebook-So Salacious"
Crimes & Treasons TUE 9pm
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill ish. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Trinidad Jules & DJ Relly Rels.
Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca.
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
Vibes & Stuff TUE 4pm
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop artist all in
one segment. All the way from New Jersey and New York City,
DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing the east coast to the
west coast throughout the show. We will have you reminiscing
about the good ol' times with Vibes and Stuff every Wednesday
afternoon from 1:00pm-2:00pm PST.
E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail;com
EXPERIMENTAL
More Than Human SUN 7pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past, present,
and future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
Pop Drones WED 10am
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl underground. Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage rock all
the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
Kew It Up WED 3pm
Fight-or-fiight music. Radio essays and travesties: Sonic Cate(s)
chism / half-baked philosophy and criticism. Experimental,
Electronica, Post-Punk, Industrial, Noise: ad-nauseum
LATIN AMERICAN
La Fiesta Alternating Sundays 3pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with your
hostGspotDJ.
The Leo Ramirez Show MON 5pm
The best of mix of Latin American music.
Email: leoramirez@canada.com
ETHIOPIAN
Shookshookta SUN 10am
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and personal development.
   Trancendance SUN 10pm
CHINESE / KOREAN Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack,Trancendance
  has been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001.
Asian Wave WED 4pm We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but also
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to sortie of the best mu- play Acid Trance, Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even some
sic from the Chinese language and Korean music industries, as Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic Trance Anthem, es-
well the latest news coming from the two entertainment pow- pecially if it's remixed. Current influences include Sander
erhouses of the Asian pop scene. The latest hits from established van Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace
artists, rookies only just debuted, independent artists and classic Ventura, Save the Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older influ-
songsfrom both industries, can all be heard on Asian Wave 101, ences include Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,
as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of unsigned Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Platipus Records and Nukleuz.
Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM. Email: djsmileymike @trancendance.net.
 :.  Website: www.trancendance.net.
RUSSIAN
 . jl  Inside Out TUE 8pm
NashaVolna SAT 6pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community, Radio Zero FRI 2pm
local and abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca. An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams from
  New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatever
else. Website: www.radiozero.com
Rhythmsindia Alternating Sundays 8pm Synaptic Sandwich SAT 9pm
Featuring     a     wide     range     of     mu- If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-
sic from  India,  including  popular  music from bit music/retro '80s, this  is the show for you!
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop Website: synapticsandwich.net
and regional language numbers.
 •  The Late Night Show FRI 1230am
The Late Night Show features music from the underground
  Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which progresses to Industrial,
Simorgh THU 5pm Noise and Alternative No Beat into the early morning. Following
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy for the the music, we then play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
Persian speaking communities and those interested in connecting to Persian oral and written literature. Simorgh takes you
through a journey of ecological sustainability evolving within
cultural and social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting Persian
peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
Inner Space Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
Dedicated to underground electronic music, both experimental
and dance-oriented. Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
Mantra SAT 5pm
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers, chants and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of the
worlds sacred sounds - traditional, contemporary and futuristic.
Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com
DANCE/ ELEC1 €
Copy/Paste THU 11pm
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll be heard
on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full hour DJ mix by
Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud rap to new jack
techno and everything in between.
Techno Progressivo Alternating Sundays 8pm
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house and
techno.
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul to
dubstep and ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist
for 'Canadian college radio show of the year 2012' Pioneer DJ
Stylus Awards. Soundcloud.com/doe-ran and search "Doe-Ran"
on Facebook.
ROCK / POP / INDIE
Canada Post-Rock FRI 10pm
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now resides on the west
coast but it's still committed to the best in post-rock, drone,
ambient, experimental, noise and basically anything your host
Pbone can put the word "post" infront of.
Crescendo SUN 6pm
Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning and
building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE,
Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet ride that
you couldn't irrjagine in your wildest dreams. Besides overselling his show, Jed will play an eclectic set list that builds throughout the hour and features both old classics, and all the greatest
new tracks that the hipsters think they know about before anyone else does.
 Dave Radio with Radio Dave FRI 12pm       Soul Sandwich THU 4pm
Your noon-hour guide to what's happening in Music and Theatre       A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into one show,
in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk. From Hip Hop to Indie rock to African jams, Ola will play through
a whirlwind of different genres, each sandwiched between an-
Discorder Radio TUE 5pm       other. This perfect layering of yummy goodness will blow your
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to hear       mind. AND, it beats subway,
excerpts of interviews, reviews and more!
The Shakespeare Show WED 12pm
Duncan's Donuts THU 12pm       Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear. Kick back with
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan,       gems of the previous years,
sponsored by donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
Up on the Roof FRI 9am
Spice of Life Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm       Friday Mornings got you down? Climb Up On the Roof and wake
The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. The       up with Robin and Jake! Weekly segments include improvised
Spice of Life brings you a variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math       crime-noir radio dramas, trivia contents, on-air calls to Jake's
Rock and anything that else that progresses. Join host Ben Life       older brother and MORE! We'll be spinning old classics, new fa-
as he meanders whimsically through whatever comes to mind       vourites, and lots of ultra-fresh local bands!
on the walk to CITR.
Breakfast With The Browns MON 8am
Samsquantch's Hideaway Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm       Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop. blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural delights.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com. Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
Parts Unknown MON 1pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best enjoyed when poked with a stick and
held close to a fire.
The Cat's Pajams FRI 11am
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super awesome and
cool radio show featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock,
lofi and more from Vancouver and beyond!
The Burrow MON 3pm
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a nice blend of old
'classics' and newer releases. Interviews and live performances
The Permanent Rain Radio Alternating Thursdays 1 pm
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus on
the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an hour
of lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a variety of artists who have been featured on our website. What website?
thepermanentrainpress.com
Chthonic Boom! SUN 5pm
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the
spectrum (rock, pop, electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
The Morning After Show TUE 11:30am
The Morning After Show with Oswaldo Perez every Tuesday at
11:30a.m. Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The morning after what? The morning after whatever you did last night.
Eclectic show with live music, local talent and music you won't
hear anywhere else.
Hans Von Kloss' Misery Hour
Pretty much the best thing on radio.
WED 11pm
Down the Rabbit Hole
Alternating Wednesdays 1pm
ECLEC1
Transition State THU 11am
High quality music with a special guest interview from the
Pharmaceutical Sciences. Frank discussions and music that
can save the world
Shine On TUE 1pm
An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from the Vancouver
underground and beyond, connected through a different theme
each week. Join your host Shea every Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
Suburban Jungle WED 8am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for an
eclectic mix of music, sound bites, information and inanity.
Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.
Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6pm
Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive action over
apathy.
Peanut Butter'n'jams Alternating Thursdays 6:30pm
Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and Jordie.
You'll hear interviews and reviews on eats and tunes from your
neighbourhood, and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9pm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR Lounge.
Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the
country and around the world.
Aural Tentacles THU 12am
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual and
the weird, or it could be something different. Hosted by DJ
Pierre. Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
-i
 FemConcept FRI 1pm
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content relevant
to women's issues (interviews with campus groups such as the
Women's Center, SASC, etc.). Musical genres include indie-rock,
electronic, punk, with an emphasis on local and Canadian Artists.
Nardwuar FRI 3:30pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot doc.doot doo!
Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
The Medicine Show FR111 PM
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets and entertainment industry guests whose material is considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and promote independent original, local live music and art.
Randophonic SAT 11pm
Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversal jukebox which
has no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even
space-time relevance. But it does know good sounds from bad.
Lately, the program has been focused on Philip Random's All
Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records you
probably haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
Stranded FRI 6pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting sounds, past
and present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with
him as he features fresh tunes and explores the alternative musical heritage of Canada.
WizeMen MON 4pm
Join your hosts Dan and Austin for an exuberant adventure filled
with drama, suspense, action, romance and most importantly
wisdom. Our musical tastes span across genres and each week
there is a new theme!
G4E Alternating Tuesdays 12-2am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from around the
world, a thought and a dream or two. Reggae, House, Techno,
Ambient, Dance Hall, Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise,
Experimental, Eclectic.
CINEMATIC
Student Special Hour
Students play music.
TUES 2pm
BVP Radio Alternating Wednesdays 1 pm
BVPradio is BlankVinyl Project's radio show companion on CiTR.
It features musicians from UBC and its surrounding community.
Interviews, performances live on air, and advice to developing
bands.
A Face for Radio THU 10am
A show about music with interludes about nothing. From Punk
to Indie Rock and beyond.
Exploding Head Movies MON 7pm
Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from television and any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange old goodies that
could be used in a soundtrack to be.
' ?   ■ .-    i
The Jazz Show MON 9pm
Vancouver's longest running prime-time Jazz program. Hosted
by Gavin Walker. Features begin after the theme and spoken in-
tro at 9pm.
July 6: A rare album for pianist/composer Bill Evans as it is with
horns. Trumpeter Tom Harrell and saxophonist Larry Schneider
are added to his basic trio. "We Will Meet Again" is a gem.
July 13: Guitarist Jimmy Raney has always been revered by Jazz
guitarists but is often forgotten by fans. Here he is tonight from a
rare album with valve trombonist Bob Brookmeyer. His individuality and sound will surprise you. "Jimmy Raney and Co."
July 20: Trombonist Julian Priester is from Chicago and played
with Sun Ra and others before coming to New York. Here is a
great album from his early New York days called "Keep Swingin'"
with tenor saxophone master Jimmy Heath, pianist Tommy
Flanagan and bassist Sam Jones plus drum great Elvin Jones.
Swingin'!
July 27: A younger and somewhat forgotten figure these days is
pianist Marcus Roberts. Here is his fine album from the 80s with
tenor saxophonist Charlie Rouse in one of his final dates plus
Wynton Marsalis and again drummer Elvin Jones. "The Truth is
Spoken Here".
August 3: A killer recording from the New York in the late 50s.
Alto saxophone master Lou Donaldson with a legendary ensemble with trumpeter Donald Byrd, trombonist Curtis Fuller and pianist Sonny Clark etc. "Lou Takes Off!"
August 10: TBA.
August 17: Trumpeter and Modern Jazz Pioneer Dizzy Gillespie
in a live recording with his State Department Big Band full of
all-star players. One of the greatest big bands in Jazz History
from June of 1957.
August 24: A studio recording by tenor saxophonist Stan Getz
and his Quartet with a very young Gary Burton on vibes. This
same band played in Vancouver in 1964 at Isy's Nightclub on
Georgia Street and wowed anyone who was there. This date
was done just before the Vancouver date. "Nobody Else But Me"
August 31: One of the finest Jazz interpretations of the music
from "Showboat" by trumpeter Kenny Dorham at his best along
with tenor saxophonist Jimmy Heath and others. Jerome Kern's
great music as it's never been heard before.
■    I ETRY	
Skald's Hall FRI 9pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald.
Interested in performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds_Hall.
 Sports Is Fun
THU 3:30pm
Rocket from Russia TUES 10:30am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international
and local punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in
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