Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Mar 1, 2018

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0364396.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0364396.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0364396-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0364396-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0364396-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0364396-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0364396-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0364396-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0364396-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0364396.ris

Full Text

 ■■■■■■	
mmSU
mmmmm
 ooooooo
254 EAST HASTINGS STREET 604.681.8915
UPCOMING EVENTS
UPCOMING SHOWS
THE DREADNOUGHTS 11
YEAR PUNKSTRAVAGANZA
(NIGHT 1) WITH DAGGERMOUTH,
SLIP-ONS, THE STAGGERS &
JAGGS, RUSSIAN TIM AND PAVEL
BURES.ANTEATER
THE DREADNOUGHTS 11
YEAR PUNKSTRAVAGANZA
(NIGHT 2) WITH BISHOPS GREEN,
ATD, SOMETHING ABOUT REPTILES,
PADDY WAGGIN
	
Mar 17
Mar 17
Mar 27
Marf?
Mar 30
Mar 30
Apr 03
Apr 04
Apr 09
Apr 12
Apr 12
May 02
May 04
May 08
May 12
, •.-'./ jju; iiK'iriy j- JtffWiiriri-* 1 '*
THE CAVE SINGERS
IMPERIAL
GOOD RIDDANCE
SAGE FRANCIS & B. DOLAN
EPIC BEARD MEN
SEASONS FESTIVAL
FEAT. RAE SREMMURD. ZHU + MORE! (ALL AGES)
VENUE
VENUE
PACIFIC
COLISEUM
BATHS
TREEPEOPLE
FEAT. DOUG MARTSCH OF BUILT TO SPILL
CHROMEO
YOUNG GALAXY
BADBADNOTGOOD
88 FINGERS LOUIE
DIGITALISM
FORTUNE
VENUE
COMMODORE
VENUE
VENUE
VENUE
FORTUNE
ALICE GLASS & ZOLA JESUS
BORN RUFFIANS
PETER HOOK «^THE LIGHT
(NEW ORDER/|OY DIVISION)
BOB LOG III
RICKSHAW
FORTUNE
VENUE
FORTUNE
KING TUFF
MELVINS
FORTUNE
VENUE
'
ADVANCE TICKETS FOR ALL EVENTS AT BPLIVE.CA
WWW»OTW*W"'I TWX"*'-'
 TABLE Of COFITEFITS
MARCH 2018
COVER: man
UP BY EVAN BUGGLE.
iFeatwress
07 -   STEEL & OAK WOMEN
challenging a male dominant industry one brew at a time
08 -  MAN  UP
Vancouver's gender-bending drag celebrates 10 years strong
16   -  POETRY   IS  BAD  FOR  YOU
something else to get excited about at the Toast Collective
18 -  MAMARUDEGYAL
interview with Shindig winner / hip hop artist
/ krump dancer / mama MRG
19 -  KELLARISSA
wading out into Ocean Electro
Column* + £Dt|>er £>t«ff
04 -  Shelf Life:
DDOOGG
05 - Unceded:
Interview with Neegann Aaswaakshin
06 - Homegrown Labels:
agony klub
10 - Real Live Action
Live music
12 -  Art  Project
Coreena Lewis
13 - March Events  Calendar
14 - Under Review
Music, podcasts, books
17  -  Poem:
micihciy by Samantha Nock
20 - On The  Air:
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell
21 -  CiTR Program Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 -  February  Charts
ADVERTISE:Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words
to Discorder, please contact the
editor ateditor.discorder@citr.ca.
To submit images, contact the art
director at artcoordinator@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE:Sendina
cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133
University Blvd. V6T1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTED distribute
Discorder in your business,
email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE:We are part of CiTR,
a registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content
you love.To donate visit
www.citr.ca/donate.
To inform Discorder of an
upcoming album release,
art show or significant
Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
comments, complaints and
corrections via email.
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC//CiTR Interim Station Manager: Eleanor Wearing//Advertising
Coordinator: Audrey MacDonald // Discorder Student Executive: Tintin Yang // Editor-in-Chief: Brit
Bachmann // Under Review Editor: Maximilian Anderson-Baier // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D.
Wrinch // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Social Media Coordinator: Sydney Ball // Accounts
Manager: Halla Bertrand // Charts: Andy Resto // Production Assistant: Christina Dasom Song // Writers:
BB, Sydney Ball, Tom Barker, Ivanna Besenovsky, Mark Budd, Dusty Chipura, Esmee Colbourne, Christina
Dasom Song, Dora Dubber, Leigh Empress, R. Hester, Elizabeth Holliday, Jong Lee, Jonah Lee-Ash, Lucas
Lund, Samantha Nock, Nathan Pike, Jeremy Rawkins, Autumn Schnell, Indigo Smart, Hannah Toms,
Douglas Vandelay, Melanie Woods, Sophia Yang // Photographers & Illustrators: Janee Auger, Sara Baar,
Colin Brattey, Evan Buggle, Alistair Henning, Tifanie Lamiel, Alicia Lawrence, Paige Lecoeur, Jamie Loh,
Christine Phang, Lua Presidio, Alison Sadler, Rory Stobart, Jen Van Houten, Tintin Yang // Proofreaders:
Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Brit Bachmann, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Jasper D. Wrinch, Oliver and Friday.
©Discorder 2018 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR.
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiherh speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM.
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager©citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada
3!ti*t foftoto tap
EDITOR'S NOTE
I  am a settler of Italian, German and British ancestry. I grew up on Syilx land in the
Okanagan, and now live and work on the traditional territories of the Musqueam,
Tsleil-Waututh, Squamish people in Vancouver. There were many moments over
this past month — in conversations with colleagues, during the editing and verification of
articles, while rallying against injustices towards Indigenous people across Canada — that
I was made aware of my position as an uninvited guest here, and I am thankful for it.
As settlers, or non-Indigenous people, we sometimes allow fear to debilitate us from
being more active allies to Indigenous groups. Maybe we're afraid we'll pronounce a term
incorrectly and offend, or appropriate Indigenous culture and get called out. These fears,
when written down, are so trivial by comparison to the issues Indigenous communities
face as a result of ongoing, systemic racism and colonialism. It is time for settlers to be
less fearful, less fragile, and to mobilize our bodies towards supporting Indigenous causes.
For settlers, it's okay to get things wrong, just show up. Show up when there are actions,
rallies and protests. Sign your name to petitions. For white settlers in particular, your
skin grants you privilege and protection in this society that is not afforded to Indigenous
people or people of colour, but your privilege can be leveraged to draw attention to issues
affecting marginalized communities. I wish the answer to getting mainstream media
coverage or government support wasn't this prejudice, but it is.
In February, I dedicated some time to #SettlerCollector and #TrollCollector debates on
Twitter. For those unfamiliar with this initiative, these hashtags are a way of identifying
social media threads where Indigenous people are being harassed with violent, racist
remarks. Although this harassment has always existed, it got more heated when Indigenous
people began tweeting grief and anger towards the acquittal of Colten Boushie's murderer,
Gerald Stanley; Raymond Cormier's not guilty verdict in the murder of Tina Fontaine; and
the injustice for missing and murdered Indigenous women. Those being attacked use the
hashtags #SettlerCollector and #TrollCollector, and allies step in to redirect the aggression.
I noticed reoccurring hostility through statements like, "I was born here, and this land
belongs to me too," or "my ancestors worked hard to get to Canada and own their property,"
or "you're in Canada, respect our laws." Comments that rebut Indigenous land claims and
exalt Canadian institutions are just manifested colonialism doing what colonialism was
intended to do: erase Indigenous narratives and oppress Indigenous people. To settlers who
identify with these statements, even loosely, please seek out education. Indigenous Writes by
Chelsea Vowel is a great place to start, so at least debates can be framed within context.
This process of unlearning racism and becoming an ally is an ongoing one. Even
now, I feel incredibly insecure about this Editofs Note. Am I forgetting something?
Did I explain something wrong? Will someone accuse me of preaching? Probably, but
that's okay. I choose to sit with that fear and be humbled by it. This is one of the many
teachings I have learned by listening to First Nations, Inuit, Metis and ally speakers at
demonstrations.
In this issue of Discorder, you will read a transcript of a conversation between CiTR's
Indigenous Collective and INAC poster model, Neegann Aaswaakshin; a profile of
the gender-bending drag extravaganza, Man Up; an interview with Shindig winner,
Mamarudegyal; Steel & Oak's acknowledgment of gender inequality in the brewing
industry; a poem by Cree-Metis writer, Samantha Nock; and more. There are also reviews
of live music, albums, podcasts and books.
A+
BB
N J CiTR IGI.9FM
mm mrmi n mrFnwir
:ollec-
nt
r—ACCESSIBItlTY—I
COLLECTIVE
une into 'All Access Passl
I   WednesdavsA5BM.J
ARTS COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'The Arts Report'
Wednesdays from 5-6PM
GENDER EMPOWERMENT
COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'Intersections'
Tuesdays 2-3PM
INDIGENOUS COLLECTIVE]
Tune into 'Unceded Airwaves/
Wednesday 2-3PM
MUSIC AFFAIRS
COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'Word on the Street'
Tuesdays from 5-6PM
pOVSCOLLECTIVEn
Tune into 'Democracy Watcn
|    Thursdays from 5-6pm    I
SPORTS COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'Thunderbird Eye'
Thursdays from 3:30-4PM
UBC AFFAIRS
COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'UBC Happy Hour'
Fridays from 5-6PM
TO GET INVOLVED
CONTACT VOLUNTEER@CimC A
 SHELF LIFE
DDOOGG
words by Dora Dubber//images courtesy of DDOOGG
Discorder magazine | MARCH 201?
If you've never been to Lucky's
Comics, it's on Main Street just
north of King Edward, snug between
a midwifery and a grocery store. Inside,
it's long and narrow with more comics
and books stuffed onto its shelves than
you think that there could be. They
recentiy announced a collaboration
with Vancouver Comic Art Fair to
create Lucky's Lounge in a room at the
Roundhouse Community Centre. The
room will be converted into a space
where burgeoning artists and DIY presses
can show their work, curated by Lucky's
members Tom Whalen and Juli Majer.
DDOOGG, a small, experimental press
lead by Majer, Cristian Hernandez and Tylor
MacMillan, is one of the groups participating.
I first encountered DDOOGG at the 2016
Vancouver Art Book Fair. I remember because
I was struck by their tote design: an upright
dog in a top hat and bowtie, smoking a
cigarette, and carrying a skull while flipping
off something to their right.
DDOOGG started in 2015 when Majer,
Hernandez and MacMillan took a class
together at Emily Carr University of Art
* Design on artist collectives. The three
discovered a mutual interest in publication
and published their first zine by the end of
the semester. It was launched at Lucky's in a
reading room that featured work from other
local publications, visual art and hot dogs.
DDOOGG's publications take on a flexible
definition of what comics can be. Hernandez
describes the press as "cheap, sustainable,
occasionally collaborative, with minimal,
playful and amateurish design," and Majer
elaborates on its role as a local bridge between
fine art, critical thinking and comics: "Comics
are a very traditional and old form of storytelling. You can use certain formal aspects as
a guide to jump off of and create tension in
other areas. Create a new system of reading
with images."
Majer's fascination with the medium is
reflected in DDOOGG's roster. To name a
few, artists like Hayley Dawn Muir, Will
Dereume and Chandra Melting Tallow
have published under the press. And while
they all have unique bodies of work, there
is a distinct other-wordly sense to all their
styles. Hernandez attributes the press'
overall cohesion to the artists' collective
approaches to comics as "multi-layered
matrices of literary culture and visual
communication, and thus brimming
with potential for experimentation and
development."
But I don't think that quite captures the
singular element of DDOOGG There's just
something about Muir's shadowed blobs
and Majer's sensual teletubbies that makes
so much sense, and whether that's a similar
method or an indescribable energy, I'm
fully on board.
Collectively, the press started out
non-political. For the initial class
DDOOGG took together, they had
to produce a manifesto and they went
about it cheekily. "We weren't really
looking to advance any political agendas
at the time, so we just plagiarized a bunch of
intriguing and dramatic quotes from other
sources and replaced the subject with 'dog,'"
says Hernandez. But in light of Vancouver's
housing crisis, their priorities are shifting.
Hernandez explains,"I believe artists realize
this, and are beginning to lend more of their
time, energy, and whatever resources they can
afford to solidarity-building with anti-displacement struggles and housing movements in the
city — not merely as individual art workers
nor members of creative collectives, but also as
common political agents — integrated into the
cooperative mobilization of communities that
strive against a city run by mercenary sociopaths (developers and landlords) and cowardly
sycophants (politicians and bureaucrats)."
DDOOGG has begun to open their studio to
other DIY presses and artists to publish explicitly political releases. Some of these include
Chinatown and the Persistence of Anti-Asian
Racism by Jannie Leung and Nate Crompton
released in 2017, and the forthcoming Art
Worker's Guide to Post-Olympic DTES and
Chinatown by the 2016 N.O.P.E. research
cluster at 221A
Their social consciousness is manifest
in DDOOGG's dedication to making space
through publication. "It is the best thing,"
Majer explains, "to help someone make
their ideas into a physical object and then to
distribute it." Since its conception, the press'
initiatives have provided space for artists and
community members online and in print,
and their hopes for the future show no signs
of wavering from that ethos.
DDOOGG will be participating in the
Vancouver Comic Books Fair and Lucky's
Lounge. Throughout 2018, they will be
publishing issue 2 of Moogie Mag in collaboration with Claire Newton, the Sth edition
of Freaker UNLTD, and William Dereume's
newest comics titled EggShell 2. More at shop,
ddooggca.
4
SHELF LIFElDDQQGG
 8I0S   HOHAM !   9rti5DpDlTI 19blODJiO
UNCEDED
UNCEDED AIRWAVES INTERVIEW
W/ NEEGANN AASWAAKSHIN
words by BB, interview by the Indigenous Collective //
illustrations by Tiffanie Lamiel
Image taken from CBC News, original photo of poster by Alyssa Jean / Facebook
On January 16, CBC posted one-side reporting on the imagery used in an Indian Status
Card campaign funded by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC). Criticism
was directed towards the models and the animals featured in the poster, for reinforcing
stereotypes about Indigenous people. Poster model Neegann Aaswaakshin faced the most
online criticism, with non-Indigenous and Indigenous people alike making visual comparisons
between Neegann and Disney's Pocahontas. Neegann, a lawyer and advisor for First Peoples
Group, was given the chance to defend her participation in a second CBC article published on
January 17.
Indigenous Collective Coordinator Autumn Schnell was asked to comment for the January
16 article, in which she remarked: "that picture made me feel very separate from the rest
of Canadian society." In the days following those CBC articles, the online chatter had the
Indigenous Collective as a whole considering the campaign and media coverage more broadly,
and they invited Neegann onto Unceded Airwaves.
The following is an edited transcript of the on-air interview, which was conducted by
Indigenous Collective members Autumn and Melissa, and broadcasted on CiTR 101.9FM on
January 31. The transcription picks up the conversation after discussing the poster, media
coverage and initial backlash.
Neegann: In one of [Hayden King's] books,
[there was] a powerful quote along the lines
of, "Your not the Indian I had in mind."
There could be two ways of interpreting that
statement: one being, some of us sitting in
this room — in casual street clothing — maybe
we're not the image of the Indigenous person
that mainstream society would like to see. But
then, the other interpretation of that statement
is that among our own community — among
Indigenous peoples — what do we expect each
other to look like? How traditional are we
expected to be? [...] And so, not only is the
external, non-Indigenous society attempting
to police our identities, we're starting to do it
ourselves, and I really think that's a dangerous
place to be in. It's important to celebrate our
difference, and talk about it, and find strength
and unity in that [...] Our communities have
really important issues to deal with, and
identity shouldn't be one that separates us; it
should be something that unifies us.
[...] Something that I think was lost and
missed in all the discussion about the poster,
is the issue of Indian Status. [...] The Federal
Government, since 1876, has been policing
and determining Indigenous identity by way
of legislation and these little cards. [...] The
government can give you one, and they can
also take it away. That was the biggest issue I
grappled with before getting involved in this
campaign. That was what I expected there to
be backlash about, not about what we looked
like in the pictures, or which animals were in
the background.
Melissa: [...] So it's almost like the controversy that came from [the poster] detracted
away from potentially more productive
conversations.
Neegann: I think so.
There's something else — I don't want to
give too much power to it — but we live in
a society where there are so many human
rights and community issues that we have
to deal with: gender identity, race issues,
oppression, and power issues. [...] This
conversation [around the poster] worried
me in that it will just contribute to people
who are already polarizing themselves. I
see so many comments, even from our own
communities, people saying, "Oh, everything
offends everyone now, everyone has to be
so politically correct, we can't do anything
anymore." [...] People are going to be quick
to trivialize those standing up for what they
believe is right and hurtful and needs to be
discussed.
[...] I hope CBC Indigenous has taken some
learnable moments from all of this, because
their initial report — I think a lot of [CBC]
and APTN — gets to be very sensational. It's
very reactionary. We have a huge problem
with lateral violence and gossiping, [...] and
it's starting to be reflected in how our own
Indigenous media groups are reporting stories.
Melissa: [...] I think that's a good point
because when you think about that initial
piece by the CBC, they didn't have your voice
in there at all. [...] There is so much power in
media institutions to frame how the conversations play out.
Autumn: And it could have been so
different. I mean, people are probably still
going to say rude things, but [CBC] could
have changed the way the masses saw it.
To listen to this entire episode of Unceded
Airwaves, including a discussion between
collective members about the interview, visit
citr.ca/radio/unceded-airwaves for archived
content. Unceded Airwaves broadcasts weekly
on Wednesdays from 2-3pm on CiTR 101.9FM.
100
MAR 8-APR 4
(CONTINUING THROUGHOUT 2018
OPENING NIGHT
THURSDAY, MARCH 8
6pm: Reception & Refreshment;
7pm: Wild Strawberries with Ir
9pm: Smiles of a Sumr
WILD STRAWBERRIES, SMILES OF A SUMMER NIGHT, CRISIS, THE MAGICIAN, THE PASSION OF ANNA, FARO DOCUMENT,
FARO DOCUMENT 1979, THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY, WINTER LIGHT, THE SILENCE, ALL THESE WOMEN, A LESSON IN LOVE
www.theCinematheque.ca | 1131 Howe Street | 604.688.8202 | Straight
UNCEDEDIUnceded Airwaves interview with Neegan Aaswaakshin
A
 Discorder magazine | MARCH 201?
HOMEGROWN LABELS
AGONY KLUB
words by Sophia Yang // photos by Colin Brattey
44
c
ommunity curator," "content
creator," "Chinese-Canadian."
These are all labels that KC
Wei, founder of agony klub, identifies with,
but not without questioning and challenging
their meanings.
Earning an MFA from Simon Fraser
University in 2012, KC has found her niche
blending together music, art and writing
under her loosely designated label, agony
klub. "A common thread through all of those
disciplines is writing, and that's what agony
klub is focused on, or at least, the starting
point," KC explains.
agony klub, the label, was born from the
monthly art rock? series that KC has been
organizing at the Astoria since September
2015. Through art rock?, KC introduces
"popular esoteric," a new age term centered
around making popular things strange again.
But it's more than just that, KC explains,
"There's a political responsibility I feel in
making art. I want it to do some good in the
world, be a space locally that can feel new
and out of the routine, that doesn't need to
become something other than itself."
She admits that planning shows once a
month was hard at the beginning, but the
intention has never changed, agony klub
and its productions have always been about
appreciating diverse genres of music, from
the loud to the barely audible, art rock? is
all about offering a space to break the rules,
and to surprise. "The agony (i.e. doubt) and
precarity is something I welcome, I suppose.
[...] I like the uncertainty, it's always very full
of potential. No matter which way it swings,
it always ends up back in the middle to fill up
again," says KC.
Besides creating and releasing music,
KC also writes about music. In
addition to producing a semi-consistent publication called AK, KC edits
Whitney Houston, et ah, an anthology of
writing on popular music, with the second
volume coming out in March. "In Whitney
Houston Vol 2," KC explains, "all the writers
went to a personal place, and I think that is
really powerful. Something that is popular
is supposed to be generic enough for a mass
audience to consume, but when we can
identify our own selves in it, then there's
some alchemy at work worth exploring,
whether it be critical or celebratory; often it's
both."
In this forthcoming issue, Steffanie Ling,
KC's coworker at VIVO Media Arts Centre,
wrote a piece on the parallels and cynicisms
of K- Pop to American pop music. Steffanie
also happens to be KC's partner in publishing
Stills, a starter zine that reviews films.
You may have noticed, there is a thread
that links KC's projects and agony klub
releases: a fixation on pop culture. This is
especially apparent in agony klub's print
catalogue. "Pop culture is, for the most of
us, what triggered our awakening as young
adults," says KC She continues, "because
agony klub has zero ambition to climb the
career ladder of criticism, and has nothing
to answer to except for this idea of 'making
the popular esoteric,' I think it frees up a lot
of room for writers to experiment honestly,
and to get at the core of something that's
usually an aside. And these asides can hold
rigorous ideas and critiques, but also be light
and stylistic in a way that don't really fit
academia and journalism."
0^11^ side-project of KC's is a
documentary about the Vancouver
music scene. Thus far, it is comprised
of footage from art rock?, Red Gate's
Halloween cover show last year, other music
events, and some interviews with local
personalities.
What's next for agony klub? Vancouver
band Puzzlehead, dubbed 'clowncore' and
self proclaimed "needing at least one French
word" in their online bio, will be releasing
a cassette with the label on April 1. Later in
2018, KC's own project, hazy — which she
nonchalantly describes as "shoegazey and
dreamy, abstract and complementary" —
will be releasing a split vinyl with Eshuta.
hazy will also be going on a small Western
Canadian tour with Winnipeg band, The Pine
Lincolns this spring.
It was so easy to chat with KC and
cross-pollinate recommendations, that an
hour-long discussion flew by. With all the
disciplines agony klub finds itself producing,
you're bound to catch KC in action, and with
passion.
The next installment of art rock? will be
Tuesday, March 20, featuring Cave Girl,
Echuta, Valsi, and DJ Owen Ellis, art rock?
will conclude in late April with a special outdoor
show at Robson Square — more details to be
announced soon. For more on agony klub, visit
agonyklub.com.
homegrown labels! agony  klub
 8I0S   HOHAM !   9fti5DpDfn 19blODJiQ
HUTAH
STEEL G OAK
WOMEN
ACTIVISM
words by Melanie Woods // illustration by
Alicia Lawrence // photos by Christine Phang
■ 4    hen you think of craft beer, you might think
I of bearded men in flannel shirts rambling on
^^F   about hops. But one group of women at a New
Westminster brewery are working to change that narrative.
This winter, the female employees at the Steel & Oak
brewery came together to create a charity brew to support
WAV AW. And they say this is only the beginning.
Steel & Oak's Heather Prost - who also works at WAV AW
— says a beer-based project to support sexual violence services
was inspired by the dangers women in licensed spaces often
have to face.
"We're coming into spaces with alcohol and we drink and
we're sometimes blamed for the things that happen to us if we
are under the influence," Prost says. "So to be able to brew a
beer where partial proceeds are being donated to a rape crisis
centre is so huge and it gets the conversation started."
Prost says the idea came about after she attended a
woman-focused beer festival last spring. She along with
another female coworker brewed a beer for the festival called
the Argonaut, named after Maggie Nelson's memoir The
Argonauts, which was her favourite book at the time.
"There were so many really good comments about that beer
and the festival in general, and I went to [Steel & Oak owner]
Jorden Foss and said, We really need to do something more,'"
she says. "And he was very interested in that."
From there, it was just a matter of sorting out details. Prost
says femme-identified staff at Steel & Oak worked out every
aspect of the beer collectively and brewed it together with the
assistance of head brewer, Eric Moutal.
"And we landed on Zusammen, which is a cardamom fig
stout," she said. "Zusammen means 'togetherness' in German.
We are a German-inspired brewery so we wanted to pick a word
that was German and embodied what we wanted to get across."
The brewery hosted a charity event in December 2017 and
will donate its proceeds along with partial proceeds of all
of the bottle sales to WAV AW. Prost says the project has
already raised $3,000 to support services including one-on-one
counselling, group therapy, the 24-hour crisis line, Indigenous
community outreach to survivors of sexualized violence.
Kat Davidson, who also helped with the Zusammen brew as
part of the Steel & Oak women, says that projects like this are
ultimately about opening up dialogue around difficult topics.
"We know, especially as women or femme-identified people
that violence against us that is gender-based — that is, sexual
— crosses all boundaries and goes into all communities," she
says. "And it's easy to know that when you're living it. I think
it's difficult to see that sometimes when you don't experience
it or you only stay within one community."
Davidson says projects like Zusammen are a step towards
challenging patriarchal structures.
"When we create events and we create spaces where
everybody's able to come together, I think we start a process
of undoing and we start to challenge structures," Davidson
said. "You see a lot of collaboration beers, but what you don't
see sometimes is how people come together and help each
other out. It shows us that you can be successful and you can
do things well, but you can do it from a place where you're
collaborating and coming together."
Prost agrees that collaboration is key, and says that's why
the Steel & Oak women are already discussing the next charity
brew project.
"The event was so wildly successful, we will be doing it
again. All of the women were very excited by it," she said.
"We will be doing another charity brew. I would love to do
something around Pride."
Ultimately though, Prost acknowledges that the beer
world won't change overnight.
"I think the beer world is still very
white and it's still very male. And there are
lots of women and femme-identified folks
that do work in the beer industry, but we're
largely in the service positions. So moving
forward, I would love to see more diverse
hiring practices, more non-male people
encouraged to go to [brewing] school," Prost
says.
Prosts hopes more activist beer projects
like Zusammen will pop up around the
Vancouver beer community.
"I'm hoping that Zusammen is one of
many events that the women at Steel & Oak
can throw and hopefully more breweries will
do similar initiatives and continue to give
back to their communities," she says. "Queers
and Beers is a really cool fun event and I
think more things like that need to happen."
According to Prost, there are already a few
"cool beer-related things" happening around
International Women's Day this month.
"Steel & Oak Women'
Big Rock Urban will host a fundraiser for WAV AW on
March 7, the day before International Women's Day, and
Steel & Oak will brew a special cask of a new beer for the
International Women's Day Dinner at R&B Brewing on March
For more information on the Steel & Oak Women, go to
steelandoak.ca.
7
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | MARCH 201?
m
^y
CHEERS TO ANOTHER TEN YEARS
words by Elizabeth Holliday // illustrations by Alison Sadler // photos by Evan Buggle
mainstream ideas of drag invoke gender performance
along binary lines: men playing women, women
playing men. But the Vancouver drag scene is rife
with binary-breaking performances. Turning 10 this year,
Man Up is one of the city's best-known monthly events for
what Host and Producer Paige Frewer describes as "broad-spectrum gender drag."
"The basic premise of drag and of gender politics is
that gender is performance," says Frewer, who performs as
Ponyboy, "you can create whatever character or whatever
gender expression you wish irrespective of your biological
body, and give it to the audience however you want to."
But this all-encompassing presentation of gender has
not always been at Man Up's core. It has undergone many
changes, and as its anniversary approaches, they are facing
down another: the potential closing of their cherished venue,
the Cobalt. But with some sparkle, spectacle and a sense of
humour, Man Up's trajectory is marked by a resilience in the
face of difficulty that is as much a part of their story as their
many successes.
Man Up's name came from a desire to take "a problematic,
oppressive phrase that is prescriptive about gender and
reclaiming it [...] making it accessible and articulated queerly,"
Frewer says. This reclamation began in the most appropriate
of places: a birthday party. In 2008, Frewer asked to host a
birthday and fundraiser for themselves while working at Lick,
Vancouver's last lesbian bar. To help put together the event,
they were connected with Sammy Samosa, an experienced
drag performer and producer. "It was my first time trying
drag, I didn't know anything about the community at all. And
then over the next month, Sammy started chatting with me
saying, 'I've been brainstorming bringing a drag king monthly
back to Vancouver.'" Man Up began two months later.
In the beginning, Frewer explains that Man Up had a "very
pro-lesbian, pro-woman, pro-reclaiming female masculinity
vibe." Performers were trans men. It began as a drag king
competition, with the winner returning the following month
to defend their title.
But over the 10 years of its mounting, the focus and
format have shifted. With a variety show style, Man Up has
organically moved towards a more expansive gender drag:
"[it's] something that the community and the performers have
just infused into it and asked for," Frewer reflects. Man Up's
mission statement, if it could be said to have one, is now in the
spirit of "celebrating and embracing all bodies and all gender
expressions." As Kevin Learning, who performs as Anne Xiety
puts it, "one of the jobs of drag performers and community
leaders is to continue being radical and to make spaces for,
and give voices to, all forms of queerness," and Man Up fully
embraces this, keeping things infectiously fun.
Man Up made its move to the Cobalt in January 2011, and
has since seen a massive audience expansion, and helping
to establish the Cobalt as a "queer hub." As their notoriety
has grown, so has the team's political awareness. They have
grown increasingly conscientious of who gets stage time,
focusing on "representation and having femme bodies in the
show, different sizes of bodies in the show, people of colour
in the show [...] That has also shifted the awareness of the
audience as well," Frewer notes. "We've also tried to be an
extra-welcoming place and platform for trans performers who
don't necessarily always identify as drag performers," they
k
share, citing neo-burlesque performer That Siren Goddess as
an example. This "more inclusive show," according to Selina
Shefrin, who performs as Owen, "brings everyone closer
together. From performers to community members."
man Up's reputation has enabled them to extend
their reach beyond Vancouver. This month, a
number of the performers will be travelling down
the Coast to perform with Blowpony, a Portland drag party
celebrating its own anniversary. Man Up's 10th anniversary
party in Vancouver will be held at The Imperial on March 30,
though more details are forthcoming, the sheer ability to hold
a "big extravaganza" is due to 10 years of audience-building
and community support.
But exposure brings its challenges. "We're almost, in a way,
kind of mainstream because we've been around for so long,"
Frewer notes, "this means we get new guests and drop-ins,
which is awesome, and super important, but [...] they're not
regulars who know what the buddy system is, or who were
around when we created the community agreements and
understand about consent. And so it's sort of a challenge to
keep that learning process underway and maintain a culture
of mutual respect and of queer focus."
As folks outside the queer community flock to their
events, this might indicate changes in Vancouver's broader
understandings of gender politics.
More shows and performers continue
to emerge, and the audiences keep
coming. But queer and alternative
spaces continue to shutter across
the city, making longevity and the
fostering of knowledge continuously
difficult. "It's this weird paradox,"
Frewer says, "cause things are so dire
for spaces, and yet there's just this
pulsating, thriving community of
gender performance."
Ot the forefront of Man
Up's concerns about space
is the looming closure of
the Cobalt. While it is apparently
only shutting temporarily for
renovations, there is no guarantee it
will open again. Noting its physical
layout, transit accessibility and a
"phenomenal" staff, Frewer laments
that the close of the Cobalt would
be "the death of something really
special [...] if it does close, it's totally
irreplaceable."
And yet, there is hope. "Not that
I wouldn't rewrite our history if I
could, but in losing spaces I think it's
given different marginalized groups
[...] a sort of extra impetus to connect
with each other," Frewer shares.
Though, as Keanen MA. Schnoor,
who performs as Karmella Bar notes,
it will "be tough to get a new venue
that really encompasses the essence
of Man Up [...] as long as we are together, we will continue to
grow as a group regardless of where we meet every month."
Looking to the future, Frewer mentions intergenerational
initiatives as a hopeful next step. Man Up team members like
Helen Proskow, performing as Femanade, are interested in
extending Man Up to include "performances of all generations," something Frewer hopes could happen in a space with
some security: "I'm interested in whether a queer cultural hub
could be possible that would have some longevity, and at least
a lease that could guarantee us some sort of a future."
But whether in a guaranteed space or outside of it, Man Up
will continue to do what it does best, with a smile on its face, a
song in its heart, and a big middle finger to adversity.
10 Years of Man Up Anniversary Bash will be held at The
Imperial on March 30. Stay up to date with Man Up by
following them on social media. You can see upcoming events and
other stuff at facebook.com/manupvancouver and on Instagram
@manupvancouver.
'TTlan Up'
 8I0S   HOHAM !   9fti5DpDfn 19blODJiQ
HUTAH
'TTlan Up'
A
 Heal Hue
fiction
FEBRUARY 2018
NICE APPLE /OLIVIA'S WORLD /CRUEL
SPORT/SIMILACROIX
FEBRUARY 3 / TOAST COLLECTIVE
nerving sleep deprived and hungover to the Toast Collective, I plopped
into one of the venue's armchairs, closed my eyes, and listened to
the chatting and laughter in the friendly space while I waited for the show
to start. I soon heard an Australian-accent in the mix say something like, "I
guess I'll go up now." Lifting my head, I saw Simi Lacroix unceremoniously
take the stage.
A pre-recorded electro-boogie tune started playing through the speakers
and the solo artist from Brisbane launched into the powerful pop vocals
of his first song. His voice, effortlessly hitting notes in his falsetto range,
sounded even better live than it does on his releases. He stuck to vocals for
almost the entire set, except for a live guitar solo during his track "Runnin'."
His instrumentals were extremely catchy, featuring intricate layerings of synth
rhythms and melodies. Simi's undeniably '80s pop sound was complimented
by his Simon Le Bon-like moves, grooving the whole set and underscoring
his lyrics with passionate gestures.
INSIDE US INSTALLATION /
PERFORMANCE
FEBRUARY 8 / WESTERN FRONT
Up next was local indie group cruel sport. Their simplistic soft rock, with
its interesting guitar work, creative drum beats, and dreamy vocal harmonies
from front person Christine and drummer Eleanor, brought the room into a
mellow atmosphere. The band had a slip-up during the intra to their song
"July" to which the crowd, in typical Toast Collective fashion, responded with
a supportive round of applause, cruel sport restarted the song and redeemed
themselves through a then-flawless performance.
The venue had become quite packed by the time new band Olivia's World
began their set. Their front person, coincidentally also from Brisbane, sang
with a sweet, powerful voice and talked nonchalantly to the crowd between
songs, joking in a thick Australian accent that she was from the Brisbane
in Ontario. The group played their upbeat indie pop rock tracks — one of
which was about the frontperson's cat — with incredible energy. Because of
a malfunction with the sound system, the lead guitar was much quieter than
the rest of their instruments. The songs were still strong despite essentially
missing their lead.
The last act of the night was local pop rock duo Nice Apple. Members
Lauren and Gal traded between drums and guitar every two songs — all the
while swapping vocal duties — displaying their multi-instrumental and vocal
talents. The pair also displayed their ability to make interesting, inventive music
out of the bare-bones sound of limited instrumentation through a combination
of unique and catchy guitar riffs, energetic drumming and quirky lyrics.
I must admit that my favourite act of the night was Simi Lacroix, whose
brilliance and eccentricity Vancouver will miss when he soon returns to
Brisbane (Australia, not Ontario). That being said, I thoroughly enjoyed cruel
sport, Olivia's World, and Nice Apple, and recommend going to see these
local indie rock and pop talents live. —Hannah Toms
ns the final round of applause filled the room, I couldn't help but feel
the blood coursing through my veins, hear the rush of air escape my
nostrils, feel the tingle of the skin on my palms as they struck one another. I
suppose that means Juliet Palmer's installation and performance piece must
have been a success.
For the week surrounding the performance, the Grand Luxe Hall of the
Western Front housed Palmer's Inside Us exhibition. Rolls of paper hung
down from the ceiling, creating a slowly undulating forest of white strips, onto
which close-up footage of moths were projected. Across the opposite wall,
projections of various fluids and microcosmic activities flowed by. Near the
back of the room, a pedestal holding a turntable sat next to a trio of stacked
- televisions, displaying droplets of blood diffusing
• and gradually settling into clear, white liquid. On
• the turntable, a record cut from the ultrasonic
recordings of Palmer's own circulatory system
spun, flooding the room with familiarly alien
0 surges of sound.
• Watching cells wriggle across the walls, as
• the sound of blood pumping through arteries
filled my ears, and catching the spastic motions
of moths out of the corner of my eye, my
attention turned inwards in
a clinical, almost medical
manner. My body became
a machine, made up of
a multitude of physical
processes surrounded
by a world of biological
systems.
The VOICE OVER
mind Choir, conducted
by DB Boyko, and joined by vocalist Laura Swankey
and Palmer, made up the performative elements of
the evening. Next to the moth covered paper, the ten
vocalists that made up the choir stood in a row, with
two microphones a step in front. At Boyko's signals,
the choir swept through a series of extended vocal
techniques, only occasionally venturing into traditional
choir-like harmonies. From rubbing their hands together
to gutturally pushing croaks out of their chests, the
choir echoed the effect of the installation in which they
performed — every sound they made pointed towards
the function of the body.
One aspect of their performance differed, however. Short texts
punctuated the performance, read aloud by the choir, sometimes alone
and sometimes multiple people at once. These spoken fragments were the
0 recollections of choir members from moments during which they noticed
• their breathing, their heartbeat, their body. The spoken fragments evoked
• intensely personal, vulnerable and human moments, like watching the death
of a loved one, the feeling of another heartbeat within you during pregnancy
_ or the grounding effects of smoking in the wake of personal tragedy —
^ "Following that death, for the next several weeks, I felt like I couldn't really
• breath. And the only way I could breath was when I was smoking. I started to
• smoke so that I would breath."
Unlike the rest of the installation, these fragments invited an inward turn
_ not in an exclusively biological sense, but in an emotive and phenomenolog-
0 ical sense; that focusing on one's bodily functions is a method of accessing
one's emotions. The body is not separate from the mind.
While it would've been an interesting, almost scientific installation without
the choir, the VOICE OVER mind Choir's documentary song cycle was
_ fundamental to the emotional poignancy of Palmer's exhibit. Stepping out of
^ the venue after the performance, as my ears filled with the small sounds of
• the night, my mind seemed more attuned to the music that was embodied
within me. —Lucas Lund
to a local favourite like Destroyer, and frontperson Erin Birgy made it harder
for herself by stopping the show to quietly plead for silence, which could
barely be heard over the rumble of chatter. This was followed by "shuhshing"
and requests for quiet by dedicated folks sitting on the sidelines. Of course,
this was ignored. The best and most cohesive parts of the set were the two
songs that Mega Bog got Joseph Shabason on stage to play saxophone for.
His lilting sax and Birgy's pinky orange hues of voice and guitar were warm
and balanced showcasing her lovely, shy lyrics.
The last show of a tour should be beautiful, or at least a positive
conclusion to a musical adventure, but it didn't appear to be that way for
Mega Bog. Birgy seemed disappointed when talking to the audience, maybe
because so many people were uninterested in hearing anything but the main
act.
0      Destroyer on the other hand, gave the audience what they wanted —
even though both bands had quite similar styles. Local legend Dan Bejar is
always a pleasure to listen to, and it was brilliant to see the imagination in his
compositions. Loud and still delicate, Destroyer didn't need silence, powering
-jAl    km          Jk^
l      ^^SS^ ."li
It 2£Hm                          IH:
g/     ^U                Ik
i
DESTROYER/MEGA BOG
• FEBRUARY 9/ COMMODORE
;p
laying over the muffled stirring and chatter of the crowd, Mega Bog
seemed out of place. The Commodore was too big, empty and
0 uncaring for them, whose whimsical style is more suited to an intimate set
• in a dark studio than the cave-like Commodore. It is hard to be an opener
through the natter. Of course they played crowd pleasers like "Kaputt,"
allowing the audience to be satiate, after which they extended instrumentals,
gifting some extra orchestration that doesn't come across in recordings.
The band gave a performance filled with tired confidence. Bejar either
leaned on a perfectly measured microphone stand or crouched down
during extended instrumental breaks, unfazed by the people looking back
at him. Josh Wells and Colin Cowan were, as always, a dynamic pair to
watch. Cowan was grooving on the bass to the point of losing his signature
sunglasses and Wells in particular seemed to have challenge after challenge
facing him. At one point he had to use both ends of his drumsticks, swiftly
changing on seemingly impossible beats.
It is important to note the high quality musicians that play in Destroyer,
because without them Bejar might still be the solo project he was in the mid
'90s. Destroyer is representative of what Vancouver music was and what it
has continued to be: genuine interest in sound and investment in the music
community. Bejar has been able keep his locale in his music, his loafers
always touching two sides of a musical coin — the soft-spoken musical roots
of his youth and the technically brilliant performers he and his band have
come to be. —Esmee Colbourne
BLOCKTREAT/MALCOLM JACK/
APPLES
10
REAL   LIVE  ACTION
FEBRUARY 17 / CHINA CLOUD
In the wood walled China Cloud, electronic cyberscapes mingled with
warmer and more human sounds. It was the final stop on a tour that
took Blocktreat, Malcolm Jack and Apples from Haida Gwaii across Northern
B.C. and down to the Lower Mainland. With a week and a half of shows, and
thousands of kilometres out of the way, they all seemed comfortable and
confident, if not a little fatigued.
With every couch in the room filled to capacity, Apples took to the stage.
Despite being her solo project, Jessia Rampling invited Brandon Hoffman to
join her on synth as well as a backup vocalist, of whom I never caught their
name. Simply strummed electric guitar chords made up the base of each of
Apples' songs, while Rampling's voice rang out earnestly overtop. Hoffman's
synths swelled slowly and subtly underneath, setting a mood and nothing
more. While the set was far from polished, Rampling's honest songwriting
shone through, with lyrics like, "You stand so tall / I'm still left singing you
slow, sad songs /Just trying to measure up."
After a brief change over, Malcolm Jack played next. Much like Apples,
Discorder magazine ! MARCH 201?
 Malcolm Biddle's psych folk project is usually a solo endeavour,
but drummer Daniel Ruiz joined him and added some much
appreciated groove to the cosmic tunes. With his acoustic guitar
running through an amalgamation of effect pedals, Biddle's folky
sound was skewed slightly towards the alien, in a good way. And,
by using an open tuning, he managed to keep the songs sounding
full at all times, even when he reached down to tweak those effects.
Ruiz's beats propelled the songs on, oftentimes mimicking drum
machine-type sounds on his drum pad. As their set went on, the
performers and the crowd became lost in the music — songs
extended to drawn out jams, and people's head bobbing veered
closer and closer to actual dance. It was a perfect way to set the
stage for the final act.
While the first two acts of the show were predominately folk
acts that incorporated some electronic elements, Blocktreat did the
opposite. Usually the sample-based electronic project of Brandon
Hoffman is almost entirely devoid of organic instrumentation. But
the lines were thoroughly blurred, as all the performers of the night got on
stage — Ruiz on the drums, Biddle on guitar, and Rampling on bass, while
Hoffman stood at a table, full of synths, samplers and unknown electronic
gadgets. The quartet powered through an extended set of rhythm-heavy and
glitchy pop, with Hoffman's vocals gently skating across the surface of the
intricate instrumentals. Projections were provided by interdisciplinary artist
David Jacob Harder, that seemed to be a mix of antiquated film clips and
credits rolling.
Out of all the songs, "Alpha" stood out. The grainy drum loop that anchors
the song was slowly taken over by Ruiz's live drumming. The spacey synth
line that fills the first part of the songs was overtaken by Biddle's guitar work.
Hoffman's voice seemed to wade through layers of effects, coming out clean
and crisp at times, and bleeding into the soundscape at others. Bridging
the gap between Blocktreat's older instrumental material and his new lyrical
songwriting, the song perfectly captured Hoffman's careful juxtaposition of
organic and inorganic atmospheres. —Lucas Lund
JESSICA MOSS / V. VECKER
FEBRUARY 18 / COBALT
The room is mostly silent. There's a couple sitting at one of the tables
beside the stage and they talk in a whisper, possibly wary that their
voices would carry and disrupt the eerie peace of the Cobalt. I fiddle with a
camera and become increasingly aware that my shutter closing and opening
is the loudest sound in the bar. On stage two amplifiers buzz with quiet life,
patch cords meander dutifully to flickering pedals, and a saxophone seems
to bask in the dusty blue light of the stage.
With only two acts on the bill and a nearly empty bar, the show was
pushed about an hour back from its original start time. Only after the fifteen
or so people that are present start to shuffle restlessly in the dark does the
stage manager cave and ushers V Vecker onto the stage.
This iteration of V Vecker is sans ensemble — composer / experimentalist Keith Wecker takes the stage all on his own. He stomps on a few
pedals, picks up the saxophone and begins to play a mournful song in the
way only brass instruments know how. The dirge oscillates hypnotically as
V Vecker bends, folds and stretches the notes in an almost visceral manner,
mutating the blue song into an amorphous mass of dark noise that impells
the quiet out of the venue. The audience is submerged in the cacophony,
almost drowned in it, when suddenly twenty minutes pass and Vecker begins
to slowly drain the sound from the room. As we compose ourselves, he
thanks the audience and steps off the stage.
A woman in a hoodie gets on stage and starts to move instruments and
mics around. She looks composed but pensive, taking her time to decide
what goes where. She is carrying a violin, which she proceeds to tune by
ear, holding it against the side of her head. When she is satisfied with the
tuning she takes her hoodie off, signals to the stage manager and
picks up a mic on the floor. She introduces herself as Jessica Moss.
Moss begins her set by sitting on the floor and telling a story
about how she just played a festival in Alberta, and that she
performed in a small room beside another venue that was hosting
a much louder act than herself. She laughs honestly as she retells
the story, and assures us that she'd much rather be here in this
half empty bar than there. Given the number of people she decides
that she would be scrapping her set and instead play us a new
composition she has been working on, which is inspired by her
loose understanding of "particle entanglement" — a physics theory
that suggests when one particle is "entangled" in another the two
particles continue to affect each other even if they exists at opposite
ends of the earth. She giggles and notes that a romantic metaphor
is obvious, but that the song is open to interpretation.
Her set begins much in the way that Wecker's did: she picks
up her violin and beckons out a beautiful song, which fills the quiet
0 once more. But unlike V Vecker, the song never oppresses, never darkens.
• It swims elegantly in unison with Moss' own body as she dances and sways
• between pedals. Every step is in time, and even her shadow seems alive as
her body interrupts the red and blue beams of light that cast down from the
rafters.
s      Amid the swirl of the looped violin, Moss lets herself fall to the floor and
• reaches for a mic but when she places it to her lips no sound comes. She
seems confused, but doesn't let the problem deter her, and she takes a
moment to repair her signal chain. She takes care in not disrupting the song
she spent the better part of the set building, and pulls out connections in
sync with the ebb and flow of the rhythm. She finds the culprit connection
and bypasses it, then adds her shimmering voice into the composition. As
her vocals harmonize with her instruments, the crowd, though sparse, is fully
immersed in the song. In that moment, to some extent, I think maybe this
is what becoming entangled feels like. As the set comes to a close, Moss
smiles shamelessly and thanks us for taking part in her world. —R. Hester
.
Ill
■
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and onli
please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to Jasper D. Wrinch, Real
Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live
experiences. Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
 .   . •-, &P&&2
  Untie t
HeotetD
ALBUMS
ZEN DOGS
Zen Dogs
(Self-Released)
19   .   01   .   2018
If the spoken word, shaggy-dog story at the centre of Zen Dogs'
self-titled album is to be believed, Ian Brown's son Ben was born
mimicking the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Now, I don't know how I would
react if I encountered such a premonition, but it all seems to have worked
out for this Vancouver father and son duo. Under the name Zen Dogs, they
have composed an all-instrumental acoustic album that might not feature the
guitar pyrotechnics of Hendrix, but is as playfully skillful as it is maliciously
deconstructive.
Zen Dogs' oxymoronic band name - as I'm fairly sure most dogs are
too busy being excited by squirrels and sticks to achieve true inner peace -
gives you an initial idea of their willfully off-kilter nature. Any hopes of a silky
smooth-jazz passage to enlightenment are quickly dispelled by the opening
track "Playground." The song initially sounds like Keith Jarrett duetting with a
noisy bag of potato chips, until it is gatecrashed by a percussion that suggests
that Ben Brown's centre might be a little out of sync. There's an irregular,
jumbled nature to a lot of the playing here - akin to peering into a musical
cabinet of curiosities - especially with the percussion, which switches wildly
between drums, bells, chimes, railings and seemingly anything else they
could get their hands on. The album features a push-and-pull of order versus
chaos throughout, as the campfire jam-session of "Firelight" is interrupted by a
guitar being down-tuned, until it makes a very broken-sounding clicking noise.
"Well" presents itself as a studied exercise in acoustic composition. "Music
For Breathing" ends the album with cymbals, chimes, and what sounds like
furniture being rearranged, fading into a lovely piano solo by Ian Brown. It
speaks volumes about Zen Dogs that its most surprising moment might be this
fairly conventional - and beautifully played - piano outro.
It might sound to anyone reading that Zen Dogs is a bit all over the place,
a dog's breakfast of ideas and instrumentation - and it is. But it should never
be underestimated how much talent it takes to sound this absurd, as well as
this varied. No two subsequent tracks share the same instrumentation, as
piano'n'drums are swapped completely for Spanish guitar and upright bass,
which is then later changed for bowed double bass and guitar-as-percussion.
Maybe it's the family connection, allowing them to chop and change without
any fear of slipping up. While lovers of musical constancy, unity and stability
will probably run screaming, that will be their loss, as those that stick around
for the unpredictably wild ride of Zen Dogs will find much to appreciate.
—Tom Barker
REC CENTRE
Dealer to the Stars
(Self-Released)
8   .   12.   2017
of the Weekend" opens up with a folksy, layered vocal section a la Fleet
Foxes, slowly building into an atmospheric, spacious, distorted guitar solo
accompanied by looping synth and subtle, beautiful horns. One of the slower
songs on the record, it offers a break from Rec Centre's established sound,
and the band's experimentation pays dividends. "Blood Moon" is another
track that strays from the sound of Dealer to the Stars, introducing funky
basslines and more rhythmic, ritualistic drumming.
Overall, the songs I enjoyed most on this album were the ones that took
risks, something I wish Rec Centre would feel more comfortable doing.
Regardless, Dealer to the Stars is a great piece of indie pop and bodes well
for where the band, and the genre, is headed next. —Jonah Lee-Ash
BRIDAL PARTY
Negative Space
(Self-Released)
20   .   10.   2017
I ith the release of their third album, Negative Space, Bridal
yrW   Party reinforces their musical prowess. The latest work of this
Victoria-based indie pop five-piece is small but mighty. Negative Space flows
the listener through five refreshingly unique tracks with ease and enviable
grace.
"Fruitless" wastes no time with easing the listener in, setting up
the album with the blissfully exotic marriage of melody and bass.
Transitioning into "Makes Me Wanna" provides an immediate contrast to
the high-speed opening track, one that highlights Bridal Party's versatility.
It's an accomplished four-minute display of complementary elements, the
addition of Joseph Leroux's vocals intertwining seamlessly with Suzannah
Raudaschi's now familiar voice. Instrumental^, "Makes Me Wanna" utilizes
clever cymbal work that pairs beautifully with the lead-footed bass pedal,
flowing into the body of Negative Space with elegance. "Tips" opens with
an ear-perking instrumental duet, before the primary focus returns to the
vocals of Raudaschi. "Tips" floods the middle of the EP with the familiar
tug of introspection, lyrics often questioning and vocals always curious.
Negative Space tumbles through the mystical "Man of One of My Dreams"
and lands in "Tokyo (Outro)" for a slow-burning, lyric-free finale. What
"Tokyo (Outro)" lacks in vocals, it compensates for with the gentle reminder
that simple, well-executed instrumental harmony can be extraordinarily
effective. Negative Space's outro reiterates an album's worth of melancholy
introspection without a single spoken word, taking the time to ease the
istener out of the EP that "Fruitless" didn't need to use to ease you in.
Negative Space's proficiency is showcased through its gentle
instrumental dexterity. The power of Bridal Party's sound is found in the
contrast between its weightless, floating vocals and the bass line that tethers
it in reality. Through its varied vocals and bass-heavy instrumentals, Negative
Space is a potent medley of melancholy. —Indigo Smart
PENDER STREET
STEPPERS
Pender Street Steppers
(Mood Hut)
15   .   11   .   2017
If you have ever gotten sucked into the indie pop vortex that is YouTube
autoplay, then you should already have a good idea of what to expect
before listening to the new Rec Centre album. I'm talking about bands like
Twin Peaks, Boy Pablo, Rex Orange County, you get the idea. On Dealer to
the Stars, Rec Centre blends synths, laid-back vocals, and upbeat melodies
with a lo-fi sound that could only have originated from the Pacific Northwest,
delivering a cohesive, thoroughly enjoyable album.
The six-person band fronted by Alex Hudson, keeps their sound clean
and consistent throughout the album. This can be both a blessing and a
curse for a band, as the spacey sounds of Rec Centre blend together after a
few songs. The tracks, all featuring droning, futuristic synths, are difficult to
distinguish from one another without looking at the tracklist.
In its entirety, however, the album holds itself very well. The song "King
14
Uancouver's Pender Street Steppers' first release, the Life in the Zone
mixed cassette, was a bit of a revelation back in 2013. Comprised of
90 minutes of dusty, lo-fi originals (several later released as 12"), this tape
was heavily inspired by Chicago house, but with a distinctly Vancouver twist.
Jack J (AKA Jack Jutson — one half of PSS) released probably the most
well-known of the Mood Hut releases, with the classic sounding "Looking
Forward To You." But, aside from these releases, PSS have been relatively
quiet since.
PSS' new EP is inspired by a similar, hard to pin down mix of classic
boogie, dub and house. The first track, "Raining Again" really encapsulates
the PSS' sound. There are the constant reminders of their rainy hometown
(the title), the light ambient backing and a whispered vocal track topped
off with some distinctively whimsical synth preset choices. All these
elements, including a guitar solo, come together to create a laid-back lightly
melancholic vibe.
Though previously heard on a few PSS mixes, "Molto Bene" (Italian for
Very well') is another highlight. Along with "Raining Again," this track offers a
more refined, dynamic approach to songwriting. Unlike their earlier material,
less focus is placed on repetition. The bass line holds the song together
with a very subtle, low bpm rhythm that still manages to be danceable. The
distinctive and catchy whistled melody that flows through the track marks the
liveliest point of the release.
The remainder of Pender Street Steppers is a collection of similar
directions ("No need") and excursions into more a more dub influenced
sound ("Mirror"). Although not a huge overall departure from the hazy,
mellow jams of Life in the Zone, the five tracks here are a worthy fine-tuning
of their sound. —Jeremy Hawkins
■Hlf
■■ill
!fWII9«
SLOW
Against the Glass (Reissue)
(Storming the Base)
27   .   10   .   2017
S10
rMtv-)
It is hard to talk about Vancouver '80s wunderkinds Slow without
referencing bands that came after them. It is even harder to discuss
Slow without drawing on the legends that surround them: their impact on
punk and grunge, their legendary Expo '86 performance. But since it has
been reissued, I am going to try to talk about Against the Glass like I would
any other album, as if they were just another band whose reputation did not
precede them.
Against the Glass is easy to listen to, rock out to and enjoy - whether
or not you know diddly-squat about music history. Listeners will find sonic
familiarity in every nook and cranny, from the groovy bass on "I Broke The
Circle" to the bluesy leads in "Haven't Been The Same." Each of the six
tracks on this album incorporate familiar rock elements from a wide range of
subgenres. Yet, Slow manages to combine these influences into something
more than the sum of their parts; a distinctively garage-rock / grunge sound
complimented by the diverse vocal stylings of Thomas Anselmi. Across these
six short tracks, Anselmi manages to incorporate low, drawling vocals (a la
Iggy Pop), punk-esque screams and frantic growls, and everything in between.
"Against the Glass," the title track on this album, lays down some of
some seriously groovy thumping drumbeats and simple, straight-ahead
guitar riffs. "Black is Black" has the most fun vocal stylings from Anselmi and
incorporates a lot of diversity of instrumentation, featuring an acoustic guitar
being frantically strummed alongside awah-laden lead guitar. "Out of the
Cold" seamlessly incorporates saxophone and hand-drums into the musical
madness. Guitarists Christian Thorvald and Ziggy Sigmund play off each
other with chugging rockabilly riffs in "Bad Man" accompanied by Anselmi's
reverb-soaked roars. "Intro / In Deep" is easily the best punk song in the
album, starting out with a deceptively slow Old-Western style into that melts
into a fast-as-fuck tune that will make you want to get in the mosh pit and
throw a few elbows.
The most striking feature of this record is how easily Slow took so many
different instruments, sounds and inspirations and made them all work
together like some kind of ridiculously tasty garage-rock stew. The songs are
short, to the point, and don't waste your time. The album is pure energy from
beginning to end and showcases a group of young, talented musicians - and
it translates amazingly even today. —Dusty Chipura
PODCASTS
0PP0
(Canadaland)
Podcast Series
2018 - Present
UNDER REVIEW
On the launch day of OPPO, I was promised a Canadian politics
podcast that would be "very current, right now, insider, sometimes
gossip, some times strategy," or so said Canadaland on February 6, 2018.
The first two, half-hour episodes sound like valiant attempts at delivering on
this promise, but there is still a ways to go.
OPPO is a brand new podcast launched as part of the Canadaland
network. Jesse Brown — founder of Canadaland and host of its flagship
podcast of the same name — positions this newest addition as an insider
perspective on Canadian politics. Co-hosts Jen Gerson and Justin Ling appear
— adept for the task at hand. Both veteran journalists, they generously dish out
9 their viewpoints on contemporary topics regarding media and politics.
Discorder magazine | MARCH 2018
 Thus far, the hosts run through a simple format. They debate one or two
issues that they presumably disagree about; then, move to "Red Stream,
Blue Stream" where each brings up a news topic that their respective social
communities are buzzing about; and finish with an interview of a guest.
With only two episodes, I wonder how closely the hosts will stick to the
polemic premise of OPPO. They introduce each episode by declaring that
they are opposed to one another, but, in reality, this gimmick frequently
collapses. For example, in the inaugural "Red Stream, Blue Stream"
segment, the co-hosts reveal that the frequently mentioned topic on their
respective social media feeds is the same: Trudeau's reaction to contests
over the Kinder Morgan pipelines. Through this segment, they strive to
subvert the homophily effect reinforced by social media algorithms, which is
commendable in itself. But, this moment makes me question if the co-hosts
will agree with each other too often in the future. Whether they need to
disagree is another story, but the most captivating dialogues so far have
been the contentious ones.
Luckily, OPPO has hooking moments outside of verbal sparring. For
instance, Gersong and Ling's analyses of media strategies are delectable. In
"Ep.2 - Patrick Brown Goes Full Shitstorm," Gerson passionately alleges that
Brown's recent media strategy in the face of sexual misconduct allegations is
to distribute a plethora of complicating stories. This is done, contends Gerson,
in hopes of tiring out the general public's attention span. Moments like this,
where the hosts can flex their insider insights, feel especially empowering for
outsiders that are not so savvy with political and media tactics.
In an increasingly hyper-partisan political environment, OPPO has
the potential to demonstrate credible ways of engaging with conflicting
perspectives. For now, they have many issues to address. Some are quick
fixes, like technical consistency with audio recordings, whilst larger questions
loom in the background: will they generate enough genuine contention to
keep their content consistently engaging? Regardless, I'm excited for OPPO
to grow past this infantile stage. —Jong Lee
SUSPECT CONVICTIONS
Podcast Series
(WVIK)
2017-Present
BOOKS
41 *
fGli DEB
I like cheese, but I'm not a rat. I like kids, but not like that." A
I seeming non sequitur in the opening intra of true crime podcast,
Suspect Convictions, this soundbite piqued my interest immediately.
Covering the still unresolved and brutal murder of 9-year old, Jessica Lewis
in 1990, Season One of Suspect Convictions is an informative and gripping
piece of investigative journalism reminiscent of Serial and In the Dark
The podcast is produced by WVIK, the Quad Cities, Iowa affiliate of
the American National Public Radio (NPR) service and is hosted by Lacy
Scarmana with field reporting and investigation by Scott Reeder.
The first episode, Evil in the Schoolyard, opens with the harrowing scene
first-responders, including a then-27-year old Scott Reeder, were met with
when they came across the body of the victim. As someone who frequently
listens to true crime podcasts and is fascinated with morbidity, the emotional
first hand description of the crime scene left me stunned. From that point
I filled all of my free time and commutes with this podcast until I had
completed all 17 episodes of the first season. Without spoiling anything, it's
safe to say this podcast is not for the faint of heart.
Scarmana reads with an impartial tone that lends itself well to the subject
of an unresolved case in which public opinion could very well determine the
fate of accused, Stanley Liggins. Liggins is to go on trial for a third time since
his initial conviction in 1990 and is the voice behind the strange soundbite
quoted at the beginning of this article.
Scarmana's impartial, controlled demeanour is at once juxtaposed and
complemented by the inquisitive and emotional reporting of Scott Reeder.
Having witnessed the scene first hand, Reeder brings a personal sincerity
to the podcast which is so often lacking in series of the same nature. In
listening to Suspect Convictions, I found myself as interested in Reeder's
quest for the truth as I was for my own.
Aside from quenching my thirst for true crime media, this podcast gave
insight into the strange and convoluted United States justice system which is so
heavily misconstrued and even played down by film and television media. Any
fans of The People Vs OJ Simpson or even of the Simpson trial itself will find
interest in the personal testimony of prosecutors and defense attorneys as they
dissect the behind the scenes aspect of the multiple trials of Stanley Wiggins.
I would recommend Suspect Convictions on its first season alone to any
fans of the true crime genre. At the time of publication I'm sure I will have
already devoured most of season two. —Douglas Vandelay
Mark Wagstaff
ATTACK OF THE
LONELY HEARTS
(Anvil Press)
07   .   09   .   2017
of the
Lonely
Hearts
Vagstaff,
margaret Rudge is one of those folks who operates at a different
frequency than most. Wild haired on the best of days and often
leaving a trail of chaos in her wake, she is a being who lives without a filter
and is entirely in the moment, sometimes to a fault. But we won't blame her
for that as she's had a rough go. Recently dumped by her husband and
now unemployed, Margaret is suddenly cast into limbo. But heartbreak and
loneliness don't seem to phase our dear Margaret all that much, or maybe
she's just good at hiding it as we of the bruised heart club are sometimes
able to do.
The winner of the 39 annual 3-day novel writing contest, author Mark
Wagstaff's Attack of the Lonely Hearts is an easy to read and odd little tale
of human frailty with the sneaky message of what a little perseverance can
accomplish.
Despite my initial distaste for Margaret, the protagonist, I quickly began to
empathize with her, as the people she comes into contact with generally treat
her like shit. Sure, she can clumsily knock over the most stable of objects and
spits lines from bad '80s movies into most conversations but she is ultimately
just a sweet girl dealing with heartache. However, like most tales of lost love
and finding oneself, Attack of the Lonely Hearts is not without its romantic side
quests. Soon after landing a job at a street coffee stand she ends up falling
for a customer named David. A dreamy modern dancer, he is at first cold and
emotionally unavailable, but after a while Margaret's quirk chaos seems to
grow on him, even though she is perpetually 10 steps behind.
Despite being written in a mere three days, Attack of the Lonely Hearts
does not feel rushed. Instead, it reads like an effective shot of life. With nice
imagery and wordplay, Wagstaff has created a character that you end up
caring for, even if it takes a while to learn that she is not all that far removed
from either you or me. — Nathan Pike
Sen Bradley
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BY THE ROAD
(UBC Press)
01   .   05   .   2017
U.   .'-'SIB
BEHXiiDUY
vwfeste**-
In 1871, the Confederation of Canada amalgamated its seventh
province. British Columbia — unceded Indigenous territory of coastal
and mountainous regions — joined Canada East to the Pacific Ocean. A
train linked the regions by 1885. It wasn't until 1904 when the automobile
began to gain traction for conventional locomotion in British Columbia. There
was a simultaneous need and political push for roadway development with
the increase in automobility.
Ben Bradley focuses the historical lens of British Columbia by the Road
on the process of roadway development in the province. We learn about
"recreational democracy" and the decisions of Fordist states. We observe
challenges surrounding the development decisions. The agriculturalist,
industrialist, economist and naturalist concerns are presented fluently. There
is a brief mention of the poor treatment of interned Japanese-Canadian men,
with an endnote that directs the reader to three supplemental resources.
Bradley separates the study with two routes. Route A presents a
discussion on "perceptions of nature." Route B presents "heritage tourism"
during the interwar years. The presentation method is effective in presenting
the non-linear political decisions in understandable context.
The book is a historical view of British Columbia's landscape as
it changed with the motorways that now line the coasts, crests and
valleys. Bradley acknowledges the complexity of automobility and how it
"embodies many contradictions and has wide-ranging and often unintended
consequences." British Columbia by the Road has value as a guide to the
politics of public construction. Inspiration may be drawn from understanding
the cyclical decisions and consequences resulting from political direction.
—MarkBudd
1660 EAST BROADWAY
MARCH
HIGHLIGHTS
WWW.RIOTHEATRETICKETS.CA
MAR
4
LOVING VINCENT
THE OSCARS
LIVE & FREE ON OUR BIG SCREEN
MAR
5
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
See www.riothealre.ca (or more dales
DUNKIRK
MAR
6
JFL FILM FESTIVAL PRESENTS
THE DEATH OF STALIN
GET OUT
MAR
7
THE FLORIDA PROJECT
THE GENTLEMEN HECKLERS
& JFL FILM FESTIVAL PRESENT
TWILIGHT (2008)
MAR
9
JFL NORTHWEST PRESENTS
CAMERON ESPOSITO &
RHEA BUTCHER: BACK TO BACK
AUNTY DONNA
Friday Late Night Movie
PERFECT BLUE
MAR
10
THE SQUARE
JFL NORTHWEST PRESENTS
THE LUCAS BROTHERS &
ALWAYS AMAZING
MAR
13
Nicholas Cage & Selma Blair
MOM AND DAD
MAR
16
WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH!
Dolly Parton, Lily Tomlin, and Jane Fonda in
9 to 5
Friday Late Night Movie
PERFECT BLUE
MAR
17
VANMUSIC
BURLESQUE
MAR
19
SPICE WORLD
WITH THE SPICE GURLS
DRAG SUPERSTARS!
MAR
20
REIGN CITY
CABARET
MAR
21
THE FICTIONALS COMEDY CO.
Present
LADIES AGAINST HUMANITY
#IAHATRIO
MAR
22
STORY STORY LIE
Fool For Love
CONCERT DOC!
METRIC: DREAMS SO REAL
MAR
23
THE GEEKENDERS PRESENT
STAR WARS: A NUDE HOPE
Friday Late Night Movie
FIGHT CLUB
VISIT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA FOR A COMPLETE CALENDAR OF EVENTS.
8I0S   H0HAM !   9fli5DpDlTI 19blODJiQ
UNDER REVIEW
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | MARCH 201?
POETRY IS
BADFORYOU
Making Bad Cool Again
words by Ivanna Besenovsky //
illustrations by Janee Auger // photo by Sara Baar
On a late Friday morning, I meet with Samantha
Nock and Firinn McHattie for coffee. Our
greeting is coloured by the caffeinated interactions all around us. Past the window glare are glimpses
of condos in their final stages of development, greying
what is otherwise a bright Vancouver day.
attendees get to hear incredible contemporary poetry.
"I've seen a lot of people who don't know each other at these
events chat, people from all corners talking, which I think is
cool. But there's also space if you need to take space. I think
we're pretty friendly people. It's a welcoming place," says Sam.
"I don't know what their exposure to poetry or readings
has been in the past, but it's always very positive, and readers
know that they're not gonna get laughed at or whatever,"
Eirinn continues. "If someone's laughing during your poems,
it's cause you tickled them."
6
3f someone'*
pour poems, it's cause pou
est of all, the event takes place at The Toast Collective,
already a much-loved DIY venue that offers room for
community-based artists, musicians, and collectives
to put on events, shows and workshops, and which has, thus
far, stayed resilient despite rampant renoviction and general
displacement of cultural spaces around the city.
"It's been really cool. Like, I've been surprised at how good
the turnout has been for all the events — knock on wood for
tonight," jokes Sam. "I'm always scared that it's gonna be like
a bad sixteenth birthday party, where you plan it and no one
shows up. But I've been really surprised by how many people
have come out, and the variety of people."
T
hat evening, Nock and McHattie would be hosting
their sixth installment of Poetry Is Bad For You
(PIBFY) —a refreshing anomaly in contrast with
standard event formulas of the literary world, where academically-dominated exclusivity can tend to centralize the
interests of established institutions and published writers,
university creative writing departments, local publishing
companies, and the financial aims associated therein.
While, as of late, a more diverse spectrum of literary events
has been coming into form, PIBFY has mobilized an impressive counter-response to elitism in the lit sphere, making space
for emerging writers and experimental engagement.
Poetry Is Bad For You has introduced an unprecedentedly
cool and colloquial approachability to the interchange between
poetic output and reception, encouraging a perspective shift
of what poetry readings can be. In its inception, Sam and
Eirinn hoped Poetry Is Bad For You could straddle the literary
and DIY scenes, offering an accessible space to anyone and
everyone — regardless of their familiarity with poetry.
Of course, it's easy to see why PIBFY has been such a
uniquely popular addition to the arts community: Sam and
Eirinn have embraced and integrated key organizational
cues that have vitalized other successful local events, while
subverting the rigidity and formality inherent to many
literary readings. Listeners are encouraged to hang out
between performances — drink a beer, get air or have a
smoke, catch up with old friends and make new ones.
"I think it's just really nice to have this event where we're
not associated so much with the lit world, which can be really
intense and kind of has this like, publish or perish idea, where
you have to already be semi-established to get a toe in," says
Sam, explaining that PIBFY offers a space for emerging writers
and "people who've never read before and wanna take a
chance in a nice and comfortable atmosphere to just do it, and
just try, low bar, no pressure."
The encouraging environment cultivated at PIBFY has
acted as an important step towards increasing openness
and malleability in the local poetry sphere, paving the way
for further expansion and experimentation in Vancouver's
rapidly-evolving lit scene.
"People can be exposed to some language that's fresh, and
some feelings, and you're sort of free to take that how you
want," says Eirinn of the events. "I think some poems are more
direct than others, and there's such a wide range. I just really
like this idea of exposing people to the opportunity to hear
tichieti tfjem*
tt
When asked what's in the future for PIBFY, Sam and Eirinn
open up about their hopes toward growing the community:
"Anything that makes it kind of more collaborative and more
community-based is really exciting. And then the other thing
— I'd love to do a zine," says Eirinn.
"I was just gonna say that! And maybe merch. I just need a new
tote bag. This is completely self-serving," says Sam, laughing.
Regardless of what's to come, Poetry Is Bad For You
doesn't seem to be losing any steam. The event has been
consistently packed since their first reading last spring.
When asked how emerging writers can get involved, Sam
and Eirinn's advice is: "Get in contact with us, talk to us in
person, send as an email — whatever."
Emailed submissions can be sent to peotryisbad4u@gmail.com
(intentional typo) The next PIBFY will take place Friday, April 27
"at the Toast, naturally," Eirinn adds.
You can search for upcoming Poetry Is Bad For You events on
Facebook.
something that's gonna change the way you think [...] in a
didactic way [...] or it can be in a more abstract way, that just
forces you to make different connections than you otherwise
would."
D
*
uring PIBFY events, readers and hosts alike have
spoken candidly and critically about the minutiae of
sociopolitical oppression, topics breaching: sexuality,
mental health divergence, gender and racial tensions, radical
love, drug use, and more.
The readings have served not just as a politically and
creatively generative space, but a dynamic alternative to the
usual weekend run of Vancouver events. At PIBFY events, entry
is by-donation, listeners can buy cheap beer and cider, scoop
hummus and chips from the snack table, browse through zines
and other materials by local writers and artists. Best of all,
'Poetry Is Bad For You'
 8I0S   HOHAM !   9fli5DpDlTI 19blODJiQ
icihay
by Samantha Nock
ustrations by Paige Lecoeur
my hands are small
with short fingers
a short attention span
and a long temper
my hands have driven trucks
down back country roads
with windows down
and laughter echoing
over canola yellow fields
this one is for my body
my hands have held the fingers
of lovers and entwined their hair
these hands have waved goodbye
and cleaned them from under her nails
this one is for northern prairie dirt
*4ss«
my hands have held stories
and songs
and screams
,N» "»
this one is for when tears don't feel like ceremony
my hands have held keys between knuckles
have held fear in fists
have held the anger in that fear
have held the sadness in that anger
this one is for rivers that never stop flowing
„• H     my hands always have one finger pointing to the exit
ySf"^-   even when they are at home
Sty*
^rQk .   my hands have shuffled
9PaP
y. v _   the same deck of cards that
vsyp
»—   grandpa did
• that kokum did
that mom did
that aunty did
this one is for when mourning is a river
this one is for when love and loving aren't the same thing
my hands are ready to
burn it down;
rip a hole in the dirt
so that the next generation
of these hands
can dip them in the waters
where the rivers meet.
Samantha Nock is a Cree-Meiltis poet and writer from Dawson
Creek, B.C.. Her family originates from Sakitawak or Ile-d-la-Crosse,
Saskatchewan. She has been published in GUTS Magazine, Red Rising
Magazine, Shameless Magazine, and Mamawi-acimowak: Lit, Crit,
and Art Literary Journal. She cares about radical decolonization, coffee,
corgis, and her two cats, Betty and Jughead. You can find her tweeting at
@sammymarie.
KELURISSA^Ba
OCEAN ELECTRO LP/CD/DIGITAL
ALBUM RELEASE PARTY ON MARCH 22
(a) RED GAT REVUE STAGE
WITH DEVOURS & HELLO, BLUE ROSES
HAPPY RECORD STORE DAY!
PEACH KELLI POP - WHICH WITCH 7"!
mint recerds
www.mintrecs.com ©mintrecords
Canada FACTOR
This project is funded in part by FACTOR, the Government of Canada and
Canada's private radio broadcasters. Ce prajet est finance en parte par FACTOR,
le gouvemement du Canada et les radiadifTuseurs prtves d u Canada.
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | MARCH 201?
MRG that filthy SJW, pro choice and pro ho / And fuck
your feelings if you lack in basic decency /I really don't
give a fuck about an asshole who believes that he / Deserves
the right to choose what other people get to say or be.
I   am a shade too incredulous watching Diana Hellson AKA
Mamarudegyal take the stage during CiTR's Shindig 34
Finale in February. I feel like if there's a Vancouver MC
that can rap this well and perform this confidently, I should
have already known about them.
Though Hellson doesn't label herself as a self-promoter,
when I interview her, the sentences spill out unedited as if
she is the most self-assured person around. She's articulate
and funny, and the kind of person whose candor is clearly
motivated by prioritizing truth and openness. So, we cover
a lot of ground in one conversation: How dope it is to have
orgasms, how we feel about mental health memes, how
impossible it is to do it all.
Hellson's appetite to "do it all" seems insatiable. She has
been involved in theatre, animation, graffiti and was a part of
the Empirical Freedom krump dance troupe in Calgary, where
she grew up. In part this desire to try out so many different
art forms comes from her pride in her mixed heritage. For
her being mixed is a cause for celebration, though it has also
come with the drawbacks of not fitting in perfectly: "People
were either black or white or brown, not all of them like me.
For me, race is always the first thing they ask me: Who are
you? What are you?'" she continues, "I'm native and black and
proud of it."
In addition to being mixed race, being a female performer
has come with another set of obstacles: "When I was growing
up, it was very male dominated, the most highly-celebrated
hip hop dancers were men, and girls who were often limited to
slutty hip hop routines."
■ 4 hen speaking of the difficulties of being a woman
I in hip hop, Hellson manages to walk the fine line of
^r*Jr   being honest about what her anxieties are without
dissing other women's choices. "That's one of the things
about being a female performer and artist, that stresses me
out so much. I'll watch the new Tommy Genesis video and
start freaking out that like, 'I gotta get in a bathtub, I gotta
get naked and get in a bathtub in my next music video!'" This
isn't shade on her part — "love you girl," she says of Tommy
— but an acknowledgement that it's difficult to be a woman
in hip hop and be seen as a complex person. "I'm absolutely
pro ho. I used to do cam work, I enjoyed it, it was fun. When it
comes to being on stage though, I'm not comfortable with my
body in a way that makes me feel like I can be overtly sexual.
That's why it panics me so much sometimes is when I think
that that's the answer to getting my career elevated like that,"
she explains.
k
In MRG's video for her song "Freedom," a more laid back
song recalling '90s neo soul, she strips herself of make-up
and sings in her sweats, looking straight into the camera.
The video was shot in forty-five minutes, but was difficult
for Hellson to make, "I wanted to push myself. I was so
nervous about filming it like that with my shorts on and
putting it out there," she continues, "It was about lifting off
the restrictions and lifting off the beauty standards, finding
the comfort in being fair with myself. But I felt like it was
important to make that statement. I've got a little sister —
Tanisha — she's a grown up now, but I'm 26 and I'm still
struggling with that kind of thing." (MRG also has an older
sister, who Discorder readers know as Mourning Coup.)
Hellson's boyfriend, an MC by the name of HOPE,
joined her on stage at the Shindig finale, and has
supported her through her work. She describes
him forcing her to watch videos of her own performances
as, "confronting me with myself. Because I think I've been
avoiding looking in the mirror even for years and I don't
think that's what I wanna be anymore. I don't wanna live in
my self loathing anymore."
Like the other local MCs, Hellson name checks as
friends and inspirations during our talk (JB The First Lady,
Kimmortal), she is holding herself to the task of being both
a performer and an activist. The lyrics quoted at the top of
this article are from a Smoked Out Cypher at LED Nightclub,
where she finishes off the set by tearing a hole into sexual
abusers. About the verse, she says, "I wrote that right after
the Harvey Weinstein thing and I kind of come in like 'this
is your day of reckoning,' like if I had the chance to bring
natfue and black
ano
proub of it."
it down on your head I absolutely would." She states that
making music like this is a direct challenge to people who
refuse to "challenge and assess" themselves, saying, "That's
why I try to make really confronting music. I come offstage
a lot of the time and I have guy friends who say, 'That was so
dope! Made me feel really bad about myself though' and I'm
like, 'Yeah good, it worked then!'"
With all the critical issues she confronts with her music,
I want to hear more from MRG in 2018. But Hellson will
be taking her time on utilizing the recording space she won
through Shindig, making sure she has the right beats. On
competing, she admits, "I signed up for [Shindig] thinking it
was a music festival, found out it was battle of the bands, and
thought 'I do hip hop, so I guess I'm out,' and then a few weeks
later I hear, 'see you next Tuesday!'" and she won the whole
thing, turning a mistake into a happy accident.
Learn more about Mamarudegyal at
rudegang.wixsite.com/mamaempress.
'iHamarudegyar
 8I0S   HOHAM !   9fli5DpDlTI 19blODJiQ
HUTAH
the  Pull  ol
AN    INTERVIEW    WITH    KELLARISSA
words by Leigh Empress // photos by Jen Van Houten // illustrations by Tintin Yang
It has been a cold minute
since Kellarissa graced the
cover of our April 2011
issue with the release of Moon of
Neptune. And while Larissa Loyva,
AKA Kellarissa, has been busy
in the industry since then, the
release of Ocean Electro on Mint
Records this month will be her
first solo album in seven years.
It is everything we had hoped
for, and we're done holding our
breath.
The press release for Ocean Electro claims that this album
seeks "to propose a new genre which entangles femme psych
electronica with driving synth pop." This statement was
written by Sydney Vermont (visual artist, Hello Blue Roses):
did she come up with this concept?
Well, there's a fish place or something in Hastings Sunrise,
north of Commercial Drive, that's called Ocean Electro. I used
to live near there, so I used to walk past it. A lot of my songs
were about the ocean, I love the sea and going to the beach.
Over time, 'Ocean Electro' just kind of stuck as an album
title, and I wanted to write a song [named] that, but it ended
up being "Ocean Electric," which made more sense. [Ocean
Electro] encompasses the sound of the record, but it is also like
a sound that I just made up. I suggested something along those
lines to Sydney.
It seems that most of your albums have themes around
expanses and abysses. Moon of Neptune (2011) was spacey,
Fake Tears' Nightshifting was all about nighttime and
darkness, and now Ocean Electro references deep water. Do
you write songs with an idea of your future album's theme?
I think it emerges over time. Some of the songs [on Ocean
Electro] are 5+ years old, because my last album came out
seven years ago, so I had written songs since but hadn't gotten
around to recording any of them. Over time, I noticed a lot of
these songs are about the ocean.
I like to have an encompassing theme and would like to
explore that further in the future. [I would like to be] in a
position to be like, 'I'm going to write a record and this is
what it's going to be about,' but I've never really had time to
approach [writing] in that way.
That seems to be common in artistic communities, that
we're so busy working that we don't ending up giving our
own work as much time as we want.
Honestly, I wish I had taken more time
with [Ocean Electro], but now it's done
and out in the world. It has sort of
cleared my slate. I was touring with
the band, How To Dress Well for
almost three years until 2015 or so,
and that took up a lot of my time. And
then my last [solo] record came out
while I was touring with Destroyer. I have
always been hustling for someone else. Now
Fake Tears is on a bit of a hiatus. We've got a show
coming up, but we're not actively writing stuff. It
feels good to put all that aside and say, 'Okay,
my turn.'
Ocean Electro appears to have some
political themes, and I would like to ask you
specifically about the song, "Black Sea" - what's
it about?
It's about barren landscapes and polluted seas. It's sort of a
protest song — no pipelines, oil spills are bad. I also jokingly
referred to it on Facebook the other day as a song about not
wanting to have kids, and that is a pretty conscious decision
on my part, too — I don't want to introduce kids to this fucked
up world. [...] I feel like we're a bit doomed. It's a bit bleak.
In your 2011 interview with Discorder, you mentioned
that some of the songs from Moon of Neptune couldn't be
performed live. With pop music there is always a tension
between the studio recording and the live performance. Over
the last seven years, have you picked up any tricks?
Well, touring with How To Dress Well made me realize
that it's okay to have backing tracks. [...] I used to do
everything from scratch with loops, and I have since acquired
a different loop pedal that allows me to record longer tracks
that I can sort of play along with. So it sounds fuller, but it
is still just me. I feel like because [Kellarissa] is a solo thing,
I don't want to deal with having a band. I know how much
effort it takes on the part of other musicians to drop what
they're doing to help create my vision, and I don't really
want to ask other people to do that. Especially if I can't
pay them. Because, you know, something that I have also
learned is that it's really nice to be a paid musician if I'm
playing in other peoples' bands.
You were quite optimistic about Vancouver in 2011. Are you
still in love with the city?
Yes. Every time I came home after visiting all
sorts of exotic places, I was always happy to return.
[...] People like me need to stick around to
continue to make this a nice place to live.
Kellarissa's LP release show with Devours and
Hello Blue Roses is March 22 at Red Gate Revue.
Kellarissa will also be performing at the Copper Owl
in Victoria on March 23, and The Vault Cafe in Nanaimo on
March 24, supported by Devours and Hush Pup. There will
be East Coast Canada tour dates in May, and possibly even
a European tour in April (fingers crossed). Pre-order Ocean
Electro at kellarissa.bandcamp.com.
"Kellarissa'
9
 ON THE AIR
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL
Interview by Christina Dasom Song // photos by Jamie Loh
Ben Lai is the well-seasoned host of Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hell, a weekly program on CiTR 101.9FM that hosts
bands to perform live at the station. In fact, he has been
doing the show for so long that he cannot remember the exact year he
started. His guess is "2000, maybe 2002."
The show itself has been around since the '80s and was pretty
well-established even before Lai took over. From the beginning, it has
featured mainly Vancouver-based groups, many of whom competed
at Shindig, CiTR's very own annual battle of the bands that highlights
local talent. Since Lai took over Live from Thunderbird Radio Hell,
the format of the show has slightly changed. When he first started,
he interviewed the bands between sets. Now, each show begins with
the performance, followed by a little chat and, for the sake of whimsy,
games such as "Would you rather...," Buzzfeed personality quizzes, and
recitations of random movie quotes that Lai prepares beforehand.
When Lai is asked questions, he often answers wry and self-deprecating.
But what else did we expect?
Do you prefer hosting newer, fresher bands or more
established bands?
[With the newer bands] if they do well, you know, I can say they
were on my show three years ago [...] Japandroid was on my show
before, before they hit big. Or whatever, right? With a band that's
already established, the interview is a bit easier. Then I can actually ask
like a list of interview questions [based on their history], and check it
off and hit it off.
Is there a surprising thing about the show listeners might
not know?
Well, I guess it's pretty obvious, but you can drink on the show. You
can't be intoxicated. But there have been bands who, halfway through
the set, have to go to the bathroom to puke. I guess, sometimes people
get nervous. [...] It's an awkward situation for the bands sometimes.
They're used to playing for an audience, on a stage for a crowd, but
they come to the station and they realize, 'Oh, I'm playing to, like,
no one. Just facing a wall with a bunch of mics.' There's no feedback,
and when they finish, no one is clapping [...] Just being on the radio
— being broadcast live — is a nerve-wracking situation for them [...]
There's also been stuff broken on air at the station 'cause it's a rock
show. There's chairs that get broken, that's the most popular thing.
Is there a shortcut to finding new bands you like?
Just go around town. I guess the key is to head out early hand try to
see the openers. Also, in Vancouver, the people in 'new bands' are just
people who were in other bands. So a lot of the times the bands that
came on the show five, ten years ago, or a couple of months ago, are in
a new band because their [old] band broke up.
w        /I
#      *
\    J
'4
It
% i
I*-  !
VK
Hi
•
•'Pi
i
Discorder magazine | MARCH 201?
tfllEN0£
OF
Would you say then that the music scene in Vancouver is
pretty insular?
Oh, yeah... it's hard to break in if you're a new band and you're just
making it and you don't know anyone. It's hard. There's also not a lot
of venues in town. I'm at the Astoria and Pat's Pub, and then there's
illegal venues. There's only five or six [venues], and when you go to
shows there's only five or 10 people who show up.
Do you have close ties with these bands you present on air?
It's something that just happens. I mean, you can't be around for
twenty years of music and not know [these bands]; the town is way too
small. There's a different side of music that I don't necessarily know...
like a hip hop scene that I'm not totally into. But in the small world of
indie rock, there's only so many bands and you see a lot of the same
people.
Which band or artist would you consider for your wedding
and/or funeral?
Well my favourite band is always Eric's Trip but they're a band on
hiatus —they're not officially broken up. I mean, I guess [if it's for my
funeral], I won't be able to hear, so I guess it could be anything. Maybe
something stupid like Len, "Steal My Sunshine." It'd just be hilarious.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell airs weekly on CiTR 10L9FM and citrca.
Archived shows can be found at citr.ca/radio/live-from-thunderbird-radio-hell.
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
You get discounts at these
FRIENDS OF CiTR + DISCORDER locations.
m n i n
ANTISOCIAL
SKATEBOARD SHOP
■10% off
THE BILTMORE CABARET
■10% off at the bar
DANDELION RECORDS
S EMPORIUM
■10% off used records
EAST VAN GRAPHICS
■10$ off
EAST VANITY PARLOUR
'10% off any service
FAS IN FRANK
■15% off
LUCKY'S BOOKS S
COMICS
■10% off
NEPTOON RECORDS
■10% off
RAG MACHINE
■10% off
RED CAT RECORDS
■10% off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
'A free DIY button with
any purchase over $5.
The Regional
TRUE VALUE VINTAGES
I FOUND GALLERY
■10% off
WOO VINTAGE CLOTHING
■10% off
THE WALLFLOWER
MODERN DINER
a
eommeRciMi
AUDIOPILE RECORDS
■10% off
BOMBER BREWING
■10% off
BONERATTLE MUSIC
'10% off of accessories
THE CANNIBAL CAFE
■10% off
non-alcoholic items
HIGHLIFE RECORDS
■10% off
JO CLOTHING LTD.
■10% off
MINTAGE
■10% off
PEOPLE'S CO-OP
BOOKSTORE
■10% off
THE RIO THEATRE
•$2 off regular Rio
Theatre movies
/ select events
STORM CROW TAVERN
O % f) e R
BOOKWAREHOUSE
■10% off
BAND MERCH CANADA
■15% off
PANDORA'S BOX
REHEARSALSTUDIOS
■10% off Hourly
Studio Rentals
BEAT STREET RECORDS
■10% off used records
THE CINEMATHEQUE
■ One small bag of
popcorn per person
per evening.
DEVIL MAY WEAR
■10% off
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
S ART EMPORIUM
■10% off
THE PINT PUBLIC HOUSE
■ 20% discount to
guests on food bill
SIKORA'S CLASSIC
RECORDS LTD.
■10% off of Merchandise
VINYL RECORDS
■ 10% of New and Used
UB£
AUSTRALIAN
BOOT COMPANY
■15% off Blundstone and
& R.M. Williams Boots
THE BIKE KITCHEN
■10% off new parts &
accessories
BANYEN BOOKS S SOUND
■10% off
FRESH IS BEST
ON BROADWAY
GRANVILLE
ISLAND BREWING
■10% off food / 10% on
merchandise (not beer)
KOERNER'SPUB
■10% off food
ON THE FRINGE
HAIR DESIGN
■10% off
RUFUS GUITAR SHOP
■ 10% new instruments
and accessories.
STORM CROW ALEHOUSE
■10% off
TAPESTRY MUSIC
■10% off in-stock
music books
UBC BOOKSTORE
■10% off general
me rchandise(clothing,
giftware, stat ione ry,
general books)^^,^ a?niy.
ON THE AIRlLive   From   Thunderbird  Radio   Hell
(VISIT:
CiTR
. C a /friends
for more  info. \
 S1T1S SLuMUS
mmw
U     VXJ
SPonDap
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
T'RANCENDANCE
GHOST MIX
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
YOUR NEW SHOW
SYNCHRONICITY
PARTS UNKNOWN
THE  BURROW
ASTROTALK
Cue*tmp
PACIFIC PICON"
QUEER FM
YOUR NEW SHOW
MORNING AFTER SHOW
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
INTERSECTIONS
INTO THE WOODS
DOUBLE
SPACE
YOUR NEW
SHOW
322Ketme*ftap
CITR GHOST MIX
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
POP DRONES
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
KEW IT UP
ALL ACCESS PASS
Cfmratmp
CITR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
YOUR NEW SHOW
CULT!
FROM THE
UBYSSEY
CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
YOUR NEW
SHOW
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
U DO U RADIO
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
K-PQP CAFE
YOUR NEW SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
THUNDERBIRD EYE
SHOES  ON  A WIRE
JFrifcap
AURAL TENTACLES
CANADALAND
CITED
MIXTAPES WITH
MC & MAC
THE REEL WHIRLED
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
&>aturt>ap
CITR GHOST MIX
THE SATURDAY EDGE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
POWER  CHORD
CODE  BLUE
$>unftap
CITR GHOST MIX
YOUR NEW SHOW
SHOOKSHOOKTA
THE ROCKERS SHOW
LA FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
5 PM
THE  LEO  RAMIREZ
SHOW
WORD ON   THE  STREET
ARTS REPORT
DEMOCRACY WATCH
THE UBC HAPPY HOUR
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6 PM
FINDING THE FUNNY
YOUR NEW SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
FLEX YOUR HEAD
7 PM
YOUR NEW
SHOW
EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
YOUR NEW
SHOW
SAMS
QUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
NO DEAD
AIR
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
YOUR NEW SHOW
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
CI RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
8 PM
MIX CASSETTE
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
CRIMES & TREASONS
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
THE NEW ERA
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
T'RANCENDANCE
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
NINTH WAVE
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
COPY / PASTE
11PM
THE MEDICINE SHOW
RANDOPHONIC
THE AFTN SOCCER
SHOW
12AM
12AM
YOUR NEW SHOW
1AM
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
1AM
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
OF INSOMNIA
CITR GHOST MIX
2AM
CITR  GHOST  MIX
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAM MANAGER AT PROGRAMMINGQCITR.CA TO LEARN HOW
"DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERY DAY."
 TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththebrowns
@h otmail.com
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE BURROW
3PM-4PM, rock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
department manager Andy
Resto, the Burrow is Noise
Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock
with a nice blend of old
classics' and new releases.
Interviews & Live performances.
Contact: music@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
4PM-5PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm-6:30pm, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TUESDAV
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
3AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the LGBTQ +
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmaii.com
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM,  ROCK / POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY/
DISABILITY
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communityiivingradio@gmaii.com
INTERSECTIONS
2-3PM, talk/feminism/gender
EMPOWERMENT
The Gender Empowerment
Collective's goal is to center
the voices, issues, concerns:
and experiences of women:
transgender, intersex, Two-
Spirit, genderqueer, gender
non-conforming, non-binary:
and gender fluid folks and allies.
Tune in weekly for interviews:
commentary, stories and news
from YOUR communities.
Contact:
genderempowermen t@citr. ca
INTO THE WOODS
TUES 3PM-4PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope:
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DOUBLESPACE
ALTERNATING TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/
DESIGN / FEMINISM
Investigating interactions with our
surroundings and society. Every
week we discuss our experiences
with these interactions, how
they emerge and the impacts
of these invisible forces.
Twitter | @doubiespaceshow
WORD ON THE STREET
5pm-6pm, rock/indie/pop.
Hosted by the Music Affairs Collective, every episode is packed with
up-to-date content from the Lower
Mainland music communities including news, new music releases:
event reviews and upcoming events:
interviews with local musicians and
industry professionals and discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES &TREASONS
3PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ WEDNESDAV
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room.
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/ POP
Jayden targets the audience
in the Korean community in
Vancouver to introduce the
News on Korea, Korean Culture
while comparing other Asian
Cultures, plays all kinds of
Korean Music(K-POP, Hip Hop:
Indie, R&B,etc),talk about the
popular trend in the industry of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows:
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, what's
going on in Korean Society here
in Vancouver, Talk with Guests.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
2PM-3PM, talk/cultural
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
third season! This team of
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
folks produce a weekly show
on Indigenous issues, current
affairs, entertainment, culture
and news - all centering
Native voices. Come make
Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Foiiow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves
KEWIT UP
3PM-4PM, experimental/talk
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica:
Post-Punk, Industrial.
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
4PM-5PM, talk/ accessibility
POLITICS
CiTR Accessibility Collective's
new radio show. We talk
about equity, inclusion, and
accessibility for people with
diverse abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every week
for interviews, music, news:
events, and awesome dialogue.
Contact:
accessibiiitycoiiective@citr.ca
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC:
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves
on CiTR Radiol01.9FM:
Wednesdays from 5-6pm.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE NEW ERA
9PM-10PM, HIP HOP/ R&b/ SOUL
A showcase of up n' coming artists
who are considered "underdogs'
in the music industry. We provide
a platform for new artists who are
looking for radio play. Bringing
you different styles of Hip Hop
music from all across the Earth
and interviews with music industry
professionals. It's the NEW ERA...
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM, HIP HOP/ R&b/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk, and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSDAV
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture:
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CONVICTIONS & CONTRADICTIONS
ALTERNATING THURS, 9AM"9:30AM:
talk/comedy/social OBESERVATIONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society; shown through social
observational comedy. To boot
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
CULT! FROM THE UBYSSEY
CULT! is a bi-weekly radio show/
podcast about culture at the University of British Columbia (UBC). From
The Ubyssey— UBC's independent
newspaper and a definitive source
of campus/community news — the
show will feature the rag's brightest
minds discussing the happenings
and issues in the arts and culture
scene as well as interviews with the
creators and creatives involved in
the various projects around town.
Hosted and produced by Ubyssey
staff writer Olamide Olaniyan
Contact: Twitter | @UbyssseyCuiture
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr(3>gmaii. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Roc ke t From Russia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean:
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B.
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
3:30pm-4pm, talk/sports
Your weekly roundup of UBC
Thunderbird sports action from
both on and off campus with
your hosts Eric Thompson
Jake McGrail, and Jacob Aere
Contact: sports@citr.ca
SHOES ON A WIRE
4PM-5PM, rock/pop/indie
Reworked as a music show
with the occasional sprinkle of
commentary, Shoes On A Wire
is back. As always, stories:
interviews, and hot takes will
make an appearance, but
mostly you'll hear sweet tunes.
Contact:
Twitter | @shoesonawirepod
Instgram | @Staunchjitters
DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this
is CiTR's brand new Current
Affairs show! Tune in weekly
for commentary, interviews,
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
NO DEAD AIR
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
JAZZ FUSION / POST ROCK
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion:
experimental electronic, and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook | NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30pm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautonomy, com
■ FR1DAV
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraitentacies@hotmaii. co m
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse<3>canadaiandshow. com
CITED
3AM-9AM, TALK/ACADEMIA
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact:
facebook.com/citedp odcast
Twitter | @citedpodcast
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary:
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion:
mastery, and a 'IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@g maii.com
MUZAK FOR THE OBESERVANT
1PM-2PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
CiTR Music department
program, highlighting the
newest/freshest cuts from the
stations bowels. Features live
interviews and performances
from local artists.
Contact: music@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30pm-5pm, music/interviews
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp ://nardwuar. com/rad/con tact/
THE UBC HAPPY HOUR
5pm-6pm, talk/news/current
AFFAIRS
The UBC Happy Hour is
produced by the UBC Affairs
Collective, and made by
students, for students! The
show is all about what's
happening on UBC's campus.
Tune in for updates on
campus news, clubs outreach
and just about everything
else you can find at U BC!
Contact: ubcaffairs@citr.ca
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6pm - 7PM, talk/comedy
6pm-7pm,  Every week Jack
Tristan and a special guest
randomly select a conversation
topic for the entire show;
ranging from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure.Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30pm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
imational
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop:
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skaids_Haii
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock remains committed to the
best in post-rock, drone, ambient
experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can
put the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, eclectic/live
INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco uvermedicineshow(3>gmaii. com
■ SATURDAV
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citriatenightshow@gmaii.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codebiue@pauinorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary:
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmaii.com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavoina@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy:
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hone
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmaii.com
SOCASTORM
3PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoN #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
Sbit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ SUNDAV
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM,  INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmaii.com,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
3PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmaii.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
3PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, DeepTrance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Antherrr
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmiieymike @trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS:
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ ISLAND OF
LOST TOVS
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citr.ca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9FM FEBRUARY CHARTS
Li
Li
Ll
|s
s
Ll
Li
Li
Lii
Li
Le
Li
Jjs
Li
is
l*
Li
Li
Lii
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
la
Li
Li
Ll
Li
jjjj
Li
Li
Li
Ll
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
LiL
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
{m_
artist
Album
label
Champion Lawnmower*#+
Storc*+
Buffy Sainte-Marie*#
Esmerine*#
The Lynnes
Rec Centre*+
Miesha & The Spanks*#
Shrouded Amps*#+
Laila Biali#
Necking*+#
Parkland*
Tough Age*#
Ivy. The Pulse
Petunia-Liebling
MacPumpkin
Rowen Porter#*+
Shopping
StegoSarahs
tUnE-yArDs#
Andre Ethier
Anne Janelle
Be Afraid*
Black Wizard*+
Collette Savard and the
Savant s#*
Destroyer*+
Emily Burgess#
Gord Downie*
John Maus
Johnny Jewel
Makthaverskan#
No Museums
Ora Cogan#*
Palm#
Shame
The Burning Hell
Whence Came Pestilence'
Blue Hawaii#*
Jane Blanchard#*
Jonathan Kawchuk
Rio By Night#*+
Tim Russian and Pavel
Bures
Viewmaster+*
Circuit des Yeux*#
Future Star#*+
Heavy Bell
Hi-Ranger
In Mirrors*
Little Miss Higgins
Off World*
Peach Pyramid**
Wooing
Babies
store
Medicine Songs
Mechanics of Dominion
Heartbreak Song for the
Radio
Dealer to the Stars
Girls Girls Girls
World Well Lost
Laila Biali
Meditation Tape
Affiliates 2
Shame
Chameleon
I Left My Heart In Uncanny
 Valley	
Everything at Once
The Official Body
Simple Subtraction
I Can Feel You Creep Into My
Private Life
Under Grape Leaves
I Didn't Want To Break It
One More Year
Livin' Oblivion
Collette Savard And The
Savants
ken
Are We In Love?
Introduce Yerself
Screen Memories
Digital Rain
It All Begins to Feel
Crickets
Rock Island
Songs Of Praise
Revival Beach
Rained a Ton
Tenderness
Enemy
North
Yet The World
SuperHit & The Other Song
Alternative Classics
Reaching For Indigo
Who Cursed Me Then Cured
Me
By Grand Central Station
Hi-Ranger
Escape From Berlin
My Home, My Heart
Repeating Myself
Daydream Time Machine
Self-Released
Self-Released
True North
Constellation
Self-Released
Self-Released
Saved By Vinyl
Self-Released
Chronograph
Self-Released
Offseason
1 °^a
Mint
Self-Released
Electric Phantom
Self-Released
FatCat Records
Self-Released
4AD
I  S
Telephone Explosion
Self-Released
Self-Released
Self-Released
Self-Released
Merge
Self-Released
Arts & Crafts
Ribbon Music
Italians Do It Better
Run For Cover
Self-Released
Hand Drawn Dracula
Carpark
2 >c
■si  p
U   CD
4-.   _Q
si
.a 3
>■   QJ
5    QJ
V    %
Jl    <.
1>   (S
CX ex
B 3
a.a
B E
v.   £^
T3   %
||
p ra
E
a)   V
2 c
tu
ci
.2
Dead Oceans
BB Island
Baffled Octopi
Arbutus
Self-Released
Paper Bag
£
Self-Released
Self-Released
Alarum
Drag City
Self-Released
Self-Released
Self-Released
Italians Do It Better
Self-Released
Constellation
Oscar Street
n<8
ra v.
u v
o ex
SH    C
ra u
M
c/1 CJ
>, QJ
OS >
b"5
2
a c
S'vC
"H.C
_ c
1) J
£ <*
S c
jZ^   4-1
CJ   u
Pi C
U '5-
BaDaBing!
ADVERTISE
ORDE
AZINE
1
PRINT
RADIO
WEB SPOTS
AVAILABLE?
LET S SWEETEN THE DEAL
AND MAKE IT A COMBO.
TALE TO
AD
IH
CITR CA
Id like ai
annual Subscription
'20 for Canada,
I would like  to support
Discorder Magazine with a
donation!(Hey,   thanks!
How much would you like to donate?)
^
this form
cash or  cheque  to:
Discorder Magazine,
LL500-6133 University
Boulevard,
ancouver BC,
V6T 1
Zl       J
jo mim
 C«4fi
°?*e
JUNGLE
S
<m A
L-4;J
>
EST.,
'1981
WAIN G\H\-
CONCERTS
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
March 4
THUNDERPUSSY
The Cobalt
March 8        March 10
MR. CARMACK1   CUT CHEMIST
Imperial       The Cobalt
March 11
ANDERSON EAST
Imperial
March 14
SON LUX
Fox Cabaret
March 14
THE NAKED AND FAMOUS
Rio  Theatre
March  18
ANTIBALAS
Biltmore Cabaret
March 19
DUMBFOUNDEAD
Fortune
March  24
OUGHT
The  Cobalt
March  25
AJR
Vogue Theatre
March  27
LUCY DACUS
Biltmore Cabaret
March 28
THIRDSTORY
Biltmore Cabaret
March 29
MINISTRY
Vogue Theatre
March 31      March 31
SHRED KELLY  THE 60! TEAM
The  Cobalt Fox Cabaret
April   4
KATE NASH
Imperial
April   6
SURE SURE
Fox Cabaret
April   6
GRIEVES
Fortune
April   1
NILS FRAHM
Vogue  Theatre
April   3
JUNGLE
Vogue Theatre
April   8
THE SOFT MOON
The Biltmore
April 11
THE BREEDERS
Commodore Ballroom
April 14
DR JOHN COOPER CLARKE
Biltmore Cabaret
April 15      April 16 April 17
L0 MOON    ANDREA GIBSON   CARPENTER BRUT
The Cobalt | St. James Hall       Imperial
April 24
PHOEBE BRIDGERS
The Cobalt
April 26        April 27
WILD CHILD   CHARLOTTE CARDIN
Fox Cabaret
Biltmore Cabaret
April 27
KHRUANGBIN
Rickshaw Theatre
May 9
PREOCCUPATIONS
The  Cobalt
April  28
JORJA SMITH
The  Biltmore
May  1
April   27
FLATBUSH ZOMBIES
Vogue Theatre
May  8
May  12
JOEY BADA$$
Vogue  Theatre
INJURY RESERVE EZRA FURMAN
Fortune
Fox Cabaret
May 14 May 17
THE GLITCH MOB     MOUNT KIMBIE
Commodore Ballroom I   Imperial
Tickets  & more  shows at
timbreconcerts.com

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0364396/manifest

Comment

Related Items