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NOV 2017
COVER S ILLUSTRATION FOR SAMANTHA NOCK'S ESSAY BY DANA KEARLEY
ifcattires
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EDITOR'S NOTE
Content Warning: Sexual assault call-outs
Over the last month, Vancouver has seen dozens of significant call-outs of
sexual predators on social media. So, now what?
I have researched some texts to help make sense of these call-outs, and
provide suggestions for how to move forward. Including url links in an Editor's
Note in print seems terribly taboo, but the following websites are important:
* *   *
"list of resources on rape and accountability" is a Google spreadsheet of zines, essays
and resources lists compiled by Anya Kark, with the intention of making "community
accountability and transformative justice work [sustainable]": https://docs.google.com/
spreadsheets/d/lkiqVdTTjtgKN61noJLmijIE2RlJ4aS5scXUYBLfKXlw/edit#gid=0
* *   *
"Resources For Dealing With Conflict and Harm" is a list of resources for survivors
of gender-based or race-based violence and their allies, with some excerpts from
zines and essays. It is written by Nora Samaran, best known for a viral post titled
"The Opposite of Rape Culture is Nurturance Culture" in February 2016: https://
norasamaran.com/2017/01/05/resources-for-dealing-with-conflict-and-harm/
* *   *
I would also like to highlight a resources list for people who have been called out,
and friends of people who have been called out. Although there are more resources
for men named as predators, there are also links and suggested readings for women
and trans who have been called out. It is compiled by Theo Slade, also known as
Tolerated Identity or Activist Journeys: https://toleratedindividuality.wordpress.com/
resources-for-people-called-out-for-sexual-assault/
* *   *
While it is my personal belief that all gender-based violence stems from
structures of oppression, mostly patriarchy, discussions of sexual assault, call-outs
and accountability should not be gendered or geographic. To reduce local #metoo
call-outs to "men are bad" or "Vancouver sucks" diminishes the experiences of
survivors across the country, and limits our ability to engage in constructive
conversations as a community that desperately needs healing.
This time is intense and necessary.
With that said, this issue also deals with some intense and necessary themes
related to identity and belonging. Samantha Nock has submitted an essay about
decolonial love and bodies; Lexi Mellish Mingo writes about Hogan's Alley as it
was, and as it aspires to become again; Blind Tiger Comedy carves a niche for
women, trans and non-binary comics with WTF; CiTR / Discorder's Indigenous Media
Collective Coordinator, Autumn Schnell, reviews the new album by Mich Cota, a
Montreal-based Two-Spirit artist; and Rachel Lau talks to Youth For Chinese Seniors
about an intergenerational Chinatown for this month's Transmission from PLOT.
As a final plea, I encourage you to be open to the articles you wouldn't normally
read, click the links that make you uncomfortable, and scroll the threads that
name your friends. Share the emotional labour of your community without ego or
righteousness. Have frank conversations about consent.
A+
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 TRANSMISSION FROM PLOT
YOUTH FOR CHINESE SENIORS AND
INTERGENERATIONAL COLLABORATION IN CHINATOWN
words  by Rachel  Lau  //  photos  by Morika DeAogelis
Chinatown is a hot topic lately. It
is the centre of many social and
political debates around housing,
gentrification and cultural preservation
in Vancouver. Unfortunately, many of
these discussions exclude the voices of the
Chinese communities. There are, however,
organizations and individuals helping to
include these voices by bridging cultural
and generational gaps.
I interviewed a representative from
Youth for Chinese Seniors, an elder from
the Chinese community, and a youth
volunteer to get a better picture of the
dynamics in Chinatown.
I met with Yulanda Lui, senior outreach worker and coordinator of Youth
for Chinese Seniors (Y4CS), at Goldstone
Bakery & Restaurant. The restaurant was
buzzing with activity, filled with Chinese
Canadians of all ages. Much like Goldstone,
Y4CS acts as a cornerstone in Chinatown
for intergenerational connection and activity between Chinese youth and seniors.
Established in 2015 by Chanel Ly as
part of the Downtown Eastside Single-
Resident-Occupancy Collaborative, Y4CS
is a youth group which strives to better
the lives of low-income Chinese seniors in
Chinatown.
"It was started because Chanel saw
that there was a need in the community,
in Chinatown and the DTES, for Chinese
senior services. Although there's lots of
social services in the neighbourhood, there
weren't and still aren't many that serve
the needs of Chinese seniors, especially
low-income Chinese seniors," says Lui.
Y4CS fills these gaps through a range of
services such as translation, interpretation, event-planning and resource referral.
Y4CS creates a community where Chinese
seniors feel cared for, without feeling like
they are a burden. Audrey,* a Chinese
senior, says that they can feel the younger
generation's desire to help them:
"Chanel and Yulanda always come and
help. One call, and they come to help. If
we have doctor's appointments, we would
need to ask our children to take time off
work to come with us. But taking time off
work is not easy. If they have good jobs,
you don't want them to lose their job. We
seniors are a lot of work [...] That's why I
rather ask the youth to help us. It's better
than asking our families [...] These youth
are happy to help us. They listen to us and
what we ask for," says Audrey with praise.
Through supporting the existing
low-income senior community,
Lui sees Y4CS as a way for youth to
revitalize Chinatown without contributing to gentrification. Gentrification in
Chinatown has been a subject of intense
discussion in Vancouver, especially in light
of the community resistance against the
proposed development at 105 Keefer St.
In a rapidly changing neighbourhood, Lui
asserts that there is an urgent need for a
new Y4CS space.
Lui explains, "I think with gentrification, we've seen the ways that spaces are
rapidly disappearing for the low-income
community. We can see this all over the
neighbourhood. So one thing we're trying
to do is create a space for low-income
Chinese seniors to be, to exist, and to
hang out. It'll be free. It's a space where
seniors can have access to services, talk to
outreach workers, get help and support,
build relationships, and have a place where
they can socialize and really belong."
For youth volunteer Mark Lee, Y4CS is
about helping Chinese seniors navigate the
many forms of discrimination they face on
a daily basis. Discrimination, rooted in the
historical exclusion of Chinese Canadians,
that is now manifesting as gentrification.
"We had meetings with seniors about
the racism that they face, and we're hearing these complaints that we, as young
people who may have university education
(some of us who are privileged enough
to have that opportunity) have all these
analyses about what's going on, but the
seniors are living it [...] Y4CS is doing
some very foundational work to get us all
together, and create an environment for us
to fight back as a community against all of
these invading forces. Being ready to fight
against gentrification is a by-product. It's
not the goal but it's happening," says Lee.
For both Lui and Lee, witnessing an
intergenerational community thrive in
Chinatown is the most rewarding part of
being involved with Y4CS.
"In my job, when I get to see the joy
in seniors' faces when they're connecting
with youth, I just know that all the hard
work is worth it," explains Lui.
Lee continues, "Getting to see [the
seniors] feel like they're part of a larger
community, feel like they're valued and
appreciated, and seeing the effect it has on
them and on the youth who are connecting
with them is a magical, beautiful thing."
If you would like to support Youth for Chinese
Seniors, which includes funding a permanent
home for the organization, you can donate to their
Seeds for Longevity fundraiser atyoucaring.com/
seedsforlongevity. To learn more about Y4CS, visit
youth4chineseseniors.c0m.
*The name of this Chinese senior has been
changed to respect their desire to remain
anonymous. Their words have been translated
to English from Cantonese.
R  R
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THE CINEHin THUT 5H.DDK THE WORLD
TRANSMISSION FROM PLOT I Y4CS
BATTLESHIP PDTEIHKIN
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the mnN uiiTh n mnviE cnmERn ■ outskirts
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A SIXTH PHRT UP THE WORLD "THE TRILUR.PRUPl TURZHUK   BED AND SUPH
PLUS! SOVIET SIDEbURr THE REyULUTItlN IN iBUllm' NOV S0-EI TICKETS $8
www.theCinematheque.ca | 1131 Howe.Street | 604.688.8202 | Straight'
 UNCEDED
REVIEW OF THE NEW ALBUM BY
MONTREAL'S MICH COTA
words by Autumn Schnell // photo courtesy of Jordan Minkoff
Unceded is a new column by the Indigenous Collective
at CiTR wi.gFM. In the same way that the collective's
radio program, Unceded Airwaves, centres the voices
of Indigenous peoples and provides alternative narratives that
empower Indigenous people, this column will seek to do the
same. This first piece was written by Indigenous Media Collective
Coordinator, Autumn Schnell.
mich Cota released her third
album, Kija / Care on October
24, and it is stunning.
Montreal-based artist Cota fuses electronic
music with her native language of
Algonquin, to idiosyncratic beats, creating
a powerful story and a listening experience
that will put you in a trance.
The front cover of Kija/Care is a dreamy
illustration by Cota herself and Aidan Thorne
superimposing complementary colours and an
assortment of faces. Without hearing the story
behind the album, the cover is aesthetically
pleasing. After hearing Cota's story, it is a
political statement. It serves to encapsulate the
complexities of being a Two-Spirited woman
in today's binary society. "Two-Spirit" being
is a pan-Indigenous term across Turtle Island
that serves to verbalize an identity that we had
pre-European contact that allowed us fluidity
within gender, sexuality and romance.
Kija I Care is released by Egg Paper
Factory, a Montreal-based independent
cassette label. Over the last few years, they
have released albums from Un Blonde,
Inland Island, Margret, Whitney K, and
others. The album is recommended for
lovers of Buffy Sainte-Marie, Bjork
and Area.
The album is primarily written and sung
in Algonquin. In a statement to Discorder,
Cota explains this because, "Algonquin
is my native language, which I sing in a
neutral yet true form. In my songs, each
syllable is elongated to make one line of
verse. Every single word carries intricate description that is unparalleled to
English." Cota continues by explaining
her songwriting process. Each line in her
songs, each syllable is elongated to make
one line in each verse, and that each line
has a sound of "curiosity" and "warmth"
in the vowels with elated consonants.
She explains that hearing Algonquin
being sung like that makes it sound more
sensual, compared to typical talking speed.
The album documents the artist's
experience as a Two-Spirit woman, and
explores her transition into her truest
self. The authenticity of this album is
perfectly demonstrated in the third song
on the album, "Kija / Care," with lyrics:
"She's got to be her own / Find a place
in this life." The entire album articulates
the experience of "coming out" totally
avant garde, making it incredibly relatable
for an Indigenous person coming out as
Two-Spirited in today's society.
Cota's first album, Rain Face, was
released in August 2012. Kija/
Care shows her development as an
artist and nonetheless, an Indigenous
artist — while still maintaining true to her
background and her self. In the winter and
spring of 2016 / 2017, Cota discovered a
passion for software synthesis, where she
found self-therapy sessions and allowed
herself to enter a state of empowerment.
This album is the result of those sessions,
and her most focused and direct work to
date. Throughout the entire album, there is
an underlying note of resilience that is so
refreshing to see in an artist. In the ninth
track, "Agwadj/Away From," Cota explores
being some people's first encounter with
Indigenous Canadians. "Today, everyone
needs to be aware," she explains, and
music is an efficient way of getting that
point across. There are many artists, just
like Cota, who are taking that route.
Kija/Care is decolonization in action.
When asked about how she actively decolonizes, Cota's response was that she "had
to start with [herself] first." There are
many stereotypically risque topics being
covered in this album that seem to fit
together so perfectly. It verbalizes that we,
as Indigenous Canadians, are still taking
the responsibility of restoring tradition.
Language revitalization is a major factor of
decolonization. Artists like Cota, Quantum
Tangle, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Nehiyawak,
and many others are making beautiful
music to demonstrate that.
Despite many of these artists finally
getting the acclaim that they deserve, Cota
acknowledges there still a lack of Indigenous
artists in a "diverse city" like Montreal.
With that, Cota reaffirms, "Native people
will continue to make the most powerful
music Canada has ever heard."
You can now listen to Kija / Care at
eggpaper.bandcamp.com/album/kija-care.
For more content by CiTR/ Discorder's
Indigenous Collective, listen to Unceded
Airwaves on CiTR 101.9FM Mondays
uam-iipm, and keep an eye on the blog
at citr.ca.
SHELF LIFE
SWAMPCONE MAGAZINE
words by Jennifer Brule
illustrations by Sunny Nestler
Coming up with a name for a
magazine can be challenging. But for
the editor of Swampcone Magazine,
it was simple: "I was on a small trip in
Washington and I saw a swamp with a
piece of driftwood that looked like a cone.
I called it Swampcone."
The idea behind Swampcone is to offe
validation to artists for their work. Often
times, art is taken for granted. People
forget the physical and creative labour it
takes to put creative work into the public.
Without encouragement and compensation
artists may choose to play it safe.
For the editor of Swampcone (who'
to remain anonymous), it is empowering to
be able to offer artists that encouragement
and compensation, to say, "Hey, we want to
pay you for your ideas. Even if it's not much,
your work is worth being paid for."
The inspiration for this project came
from their desire for a place to openly
submit comics. Currently there isn't
another project like Swampcone in
Vancouver, as far as they are aware.
Although similar projects have come
before, usually these projects haven't
lasted long due to the lack of funding.
"Swampcone isn't necessarily a new
10 wishes
idea, but it adds to the history of similar
projects," says the editor. Swampcone
has an open submission so that anyone
from anywhere can send in their work for
consideration, and issues are curated by
the editor. Inside Issue #2 is an ad for a
similar project titled Metal Phlegm. "From
being a part of the Swampcone project,
'Metal Phlegm' has decided to make his
own magazine, which is the best case
scenario - where someone is inspired to do
their own similar project," says the editor.
When artists have been published, it
is easier to pursue more publications and
disseminate their work. The editor of
Swampcone seeks to make the publishing
world more accessible to illustrators at all
skill-levels. Since the launch of the first two
issues of Swampcone, the editor has seen
a strong circulation around the Vancouver
comic scene, and arts community in general.
Swampcone is slowly building a more
international profile in zine and
art book communities. Currently
distributed around select bookshops
and comic shops in Vancouver and the
surrounding area, the editor adds, "We
run a little bit of distribution where it is
distributed in New York and random places
in the States [...] and there is a line up of
distribution for the East Coast." Issues
explains, "I have been able to pass on
these skills to other people within the
project, which has been really neat."
are $6 CAN, and can also be bought from
Swampcone online. Many artists have been
trading the issue, and the magazine is in
circulation at some venues.
The first issue is called "Crushing," and
the second is "Goin' Down." [The second
issue] has a lot of emotional, emo comics
about people feeling sad. I wasn't expe<
that," explains the editor. An underly
ing theme in all the comic submissio:
are feelings of indulgence referenda
generic feeling of being sad. Surprisingly,
while everyone feels sad sometimes, few
people talk about it. Expressing emotion a
vulnerability is what this project is all about
In producing the magazine, the edito:
feels it wasn't dimaiu getting it off the
ground. They laugh, "No, I am a very
organized person and I do these kind of
things. I used to run all-ages spaces/and
I ran an all ages comedy show. I find that
this type of organizing is very similar
to this proje«y>To the editor, the most
difficult aspect was the amount of time
spent online advertising and promoting
the initial issue. However, with a strong
mission statement, it didn't take
to generate a community interest. A fev
logistical struggles included learning how
to create a book with layouts and designs,
but was easily accomplished through
online workshops and research. The editor
I
«"
he official launch party for the
first two issues aLSwampcone was
October 20 atVoast Collective.
The place was decqjjatekwith Swampcone
branded traffic cones and draped with
decorations.VT small pop-i&?shop table
was on display for contributors and
supporters! to buy zines. Roxie Zagar,
a local animator and comic artist, had
contributed a aorrraf "Goin' Down" that
had a musical component, and her and her
partner played a^tj^esgjNSiJe launch was
ss.
issions haven't been opened up for
the third issue, as the Swampcone team is
trying to fundraise. However, any artist
osen for publication will be Affffijcted
nd paid $i5^rthfiir work, which isr
uch but it is
Subr
irther inquiries please contc
ipconemag@gmail.com or check out
heir faceboo\pfyg$l{isit their webpage and
miag.net/shoppe.
UNCEDED I Review of Mich Cota's Kija/ Care // SHELF LIFE \ Swampcone Magazine
 HOGAN'S ALLEY
DISPLACED and ERASED, REPLACED and REFACED
words by Lexi Mellish Mingo I illustrations by Alejandra Sanmaniego I photos by Evan Buggle
The vulnerable streets of high-valued concrete
and low valued residents are what has come to
characterize Vancouver. With external pressures
of development and gentrification in Chinatown and the
DTES, marginalized communities are at constant risk of
losing their sense of belonging that is deeply embedded
in their place. This is precisely why Stephanie Allen
and her fellow volunteers from Hogan's Alley Working
Group (HAWG) works relentlessly, on top of a full-time
jobs and family commitments, for what she refers to as
a "labour of love."
HAWG is an organization that is currently working
with the City of Vancouver on plans for the area under
the Georgia and Dunsmuir Viaducts, which was once a
cultural core of Vancouver's first and last centralized Black
community. The first Black settlers arrived in Vancouver
as early as the late 1800s, many avoiding oppression in
the United States. Today Vancouver's Black population
includes people of African, Caribbean, and American, and
Canadian descent.
Within HAWG, there has emerged two main goals:
one being the development of a cultural centre, and the
other being a land trust to steward and prevent future
displacement. The land trust would allow a not-for-profit
organization (Hogan's Alley Land Trust) to receive ownership of the vacant space, which would then be utilized as
commercial, cultural, residential and public land.
In 2015, Vancouver City Council voted to remove the
Georgia and Dunsmuir Viaducts, which hover above the
Northeast False Creek area, including the former Hogan's
Alley. The plan to take down the viaduct has inspired the
opportunity for a project that would enable reconciliation
between the City of Vancouver and the Black community.
"This is a chance for us is to create and hold space for
ourselves, to offer something to the greater community,"
says Allen.
Today we use the name Hogan's Alley to pinpoint
the space that was once an active hub. "[Hogan's
Alley] was actually a derogatory term that was used
to refer to these racialized inner city areas of settlement,
so there are 'Hogan's Alleys' all over the place," explains
Allen. The name has been reclaimed by the local Black
community that exists, in hopes to spread awareness about
its history and significance. The former neighbourhood is
marked by unbounded perimeters, located between Prior
Street and Union Street (North to West) and Main Street
and Jackson Avenue (West to South).
In addition to the the predominant Black community,
Hogan's Alley was home to Italian, Chinese and Japanese
families. The City's attitude towards the area at the time,
and the prominence of cultural diversity that existed
there, suggest that segregation resulted from racist and
classist coercion.
Hogan's Alley was also infamous for its nightlife of
gambling, drinking, entertainment and chicken houses, all
that stirred into the wee hours of the morning. "You had an
informal economy which always springs up around people
that have to rely on each other," says Allen. She describes
that in the '30s and '40s, Hogan's Alley was a flourishing
district for food and entertainment, due in large part to the
welcoming of people from any class or heritage.
With the rise of automobile culture, freeways and transportation symbolized prosperity. 'Urban Renewal' was
a trend across North America that justified the disunion
of marginalized communities on central pieces of land,
making space for urban development. "When the City of
Vancouver displaced the community of Hogan's Alley back
in the '50s and '60s and dispersed the community away
from the original area, there was a lasting impact on our
generation and future generations," explains Allen.
'Urban Renewal' was not independent in provoking
the disintegration of the Hogan's Alley community.
Tensions between the Black community and the City
existed well before the proposed demolition of the
Hogan's Alley. Dominant society viewed the community
in a lens of poverty, characterized by the presence of
violence, drinking and illegal gambling. The area was
harshly stigmatized, through racist and classist ideologies
projected from the European majority population in
Vancouver at the time.
Although the Eastside neighbourhood thrived off of
its contrasting cultures, nightlife was not its only social
reputation. Another institution that offered a sense
of belonging was the Fountain Chapel on 823 Jackson
Avenue, founded by Jimi Hendrix's grandmother, Nora
Hendrix. The community had come together to raise
money to purchase the chapel, and from there, birthed
a "thriving Black community congregation," says Allen.
The Chapel is one of the few buildings still standing that
nurtured a once prominent Black community. It was sold
in 1985, not too long after the construction of the Georgia
and Dunsmuir Viaducts.
[   n the years arising the destruction of Hogan's Alley,
I  the community had already started to disperse into
'  neighbourhoods that were more affluent at the
time. The area was marked with stigma, so it wasn't much
HOGAN'S ALLEY
 of a surprise with the cultural changes of the '60s, that
members of the Hogan's Alley community left to exercise
equality in greater society. Speaking to the effect of this
migration, Allen states, "Vancouver has the lowest Black
population of all of Canada's top ten major cities, and that
can be traced directly back to the action, I would argue, of
the former city council to break up this neighbourhood."
There is a need for reconciliation between the City of
Vancouver and the local Black population.
For HAWG, the vision of the future is a place of historical awareness and inclusivity. With a steady increase in
the Black immigrant population, it is important to HAWG
that people of all diverse backgrounds feel represented.
"People have a better success rate, especially those who
are racialized, when they have a sense of community and
social networks to tap into," explains Allen. It is this
realization that has provoked her and many others to take
action. "As we see other communities have their places
and their heritage, and they were able to grow into the
greater fabric of the city, that's what we hope to accomplish for our people."
HAWG hopes to create space for community growth by
incorporating a reflection of the past into their proposal
for the future. Recreating a geographical centre provides
a physical place for members of the Black community
and the greater Vancouver to network, and learn more
about the rich history of Black heritage in Vancouver. The
project hopes to achieve a place for the community that
mirrors the multi-cultural, co-dependent community that
existed over sixty years ago.
The viaducts could be dismantled as soon as 2018, so
HAWG is working closely with the City of Vancouver to
assure that the place will accurately reflect their vision.
There are a web of interrelated non-for profit organizations at work. Connected to HAWG, there is the Hogan's
Alley Talk back! group, that functions to start public
discourse and receive feedback from the greater community, The Hogan's Alley Trust, which focuses on the plans
for land stewardship, and lastly there is the Hogan's
Alley Society, which will be active in the development of a
cultural center. Although today's Black communities are
dispersed across the Greater Vancouver area, concepts of
time and distance are challenged by the obligation to give
a systematically displaced community agency.
HAWG is hosting a talk with the Institute for Diaspora Research
and Engagement November 17 at SFU Harbour Centre. Their
guest is Zena Howard, the architect from North Carolina leading
the engagement with HAWG. For more information, including
details about the project and other events, visit hogansalleytrust.
References:
-Compton, Wayde. 2005. Hogan's Ally and retro-speculative verse.
West Coast Line: A Journal of Contemporary Writing & Criticism 39 (2): 109
-Cramp Beverly 2008. Neighbourhood Lost. Beaver 88 (2): 28.
-Jo, M., & lann. 2014, Spring From ILogan's Alley. Broken Pencil: 42-45.
-Scott, Curtis. 2013. The End of LLogan's Alley -Parti.
Spewing Vancouver (accessed online October 31, 2017)
HOGAN'S ALLEY
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The group is comprised of former
members of an even larger troupe
with ties to the University of British
Columbia, where Jacob originally developed
an interest in gamelan through a music
elective. A 2013 trip to Indonesia helped to
inform the style of music the band plays
today. "We definitely learned a lot there
that we didn't know," Jacob says. "Where
the music sits in relation to the social and
physical, and what its purpose is in the
communities — which is something that,
not having grown up in Bali, we were sort
of learning the music in an abstracted way.
We were learning the music outside its ritual
and spiritual concepts." Rahi notes that the
band still struggles to find its place between
contemporary and traditional styles, playing
authentic Balinese gamelan with a unique
twist.
Gamelan originates from the archipelago of
Indonesia, where it has played a key cultural
role for centuries. The most exported styles
of gamelan are from Java and Bali. While it's
impossible to distill the rich history of the
form into two different traditions, Jacob notes
that Gamelan Bike Bike's Balinese sound tends
to be "more active and big and bombastic"
than the Javanese style, which tends to be
more meditative. It's easy to see this in the
band's live performances, which crackle with
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or a band with ten members, Gamelan Bike Bike's
r rehearsal space is positively cosy. Set at the edge of
'   Kitsilano Beach overlooking a picturesque view of
English Bay, the three-room fieldhouse is just wide enough
to fit the band's collection of handmade instruments, which
are primarily made of repurposed bike parts amassed from
bike shops across the city. When I arrive in the evening
to interview Robyn Jacob and George Rahi — the band's
unofficial leaders —the rest of the group are milling
about, packing up gongs and drinking tea. There's a casual
rapport between them, almost like that of a theatre troupe
or sports team. "It's like a family," Jacob says. "We all
know each other pretty well at this point."
I immediately gravitate towards the gamelan instruments, which are composed of colourful poles pulled from
used bike frames. The idea to make instruments from
bike parts came from an art project Jacob and Rahi began
in 2012. "George and myself had started scheming about
building public sound installations for parks and we were
experimenting with materials," Jacob recalls. "I remember
one day George had picked up this bike frame that he'd
cut up and he said, 'listen to this, it sounds great.'" From
there, the duo started to collect pieces of frames from
local bike stores in the city, discovering that certain bikes
sounded better than others. "We did start getting a little
bit picky once we figured out that bikes from the '60s and
'70s were just heavier. They were clunkier bikes, but they
sound better because the metals that were used were high
tensile strength steel," Rahi says. "They sound like small
bells." From that sound, Gamelan Bike Bike was born.
jittery energy and inventiveness. For a group
of ten members, the band is perfectly in sync,
never missing a beat. All of this comes from
weekly rehearsals, the difficulty of which Jacob admits has
led to a change in membership over the past few years —
only 60 percent of the band's original members remain.
But thanks to those who have stuck around, Gamelan
Bike Bike has gradually built an impressive repertoire
of original music, most of which remains unwritten in
honour of gamelan's oral tradition. All of the band's music
can be found on their debut album Hi-Ten, which releases
November 11 on the Indonesian label, Insitu Recordings.
For member Shawn Sekiya, this back catalogue has been
the result of many arduous hours of practice, and trial and
error. "It's taken us three or four years to be usually fairly
competent at that roughly half an hour of music," he says.
It's emblematic of the music's complexity that Gamelan Bike
Bike has only managed to master about a concert's worth
of material — and even then, most members would admit
there's room for improvement. "Most of what we spend
time on is about executing the music really well," Jacob says.
"Everyone has to be very integrated with each other."
says that the band will likely play more shows once the
weather improves next year.
In the meantime, they're hoping to write new music
and take advantage of their time with guest
teacher, I Putu Gede Sukaryana, who will
be mentoring the band for the next eight
months. As Gamelan Bike Bike continues to
grow, they're focused on self-improvement,
noting that they have a lot of work to do to
live up to the example set by the masters of
gamelan in Indonesia and across the world.
"The most consistently difficult thing is
to actually engage musically with so many
other people at the same time," says Sekiya.
"I think when gamelan is executed really
well, it's because people are very present and
attentive. I think we still struggle to maintain
that."
"All music has some amount of listening
to other players, but it's really almost all about that in
gamelan," says Rahi. "The parts themselves aren't that
hard, but it's just about how you fit in with everything
else. It's a really intense listening experience."
Gamelan Bike Bike is hosting an album release party on
November 11 at 240 Northern Street. The musicians on this
album are Robyn Jacob, George Rahi, Shawn Sekiya, Kris Victory,
Trish Klein, Martin Fietkiewicz, Justin Devries, Wendy Chen,
Tony Kastelic, Pietro Sammarco, James Whale and Jack Adams.
To find out more about the group, search them on social media
and visit publiksecrets.com.
PIVOTS,
...AND
T
he band is best known for its performances in
artists spaces and the outdoors, and they express
little interest in playing commercial venues. "The
instruments like being outside, I think," Jacob says. "They
sound nice outside, and the music is traditionally played
outside, or in open areas." For Rahi, the band's public
performances give them "the opportunity to interact with
different people who wouldn't normally buy a ticket to
a music show like this, and see it and hear it." They're
not planning any tours in support of the album, but Jacob
SPINS
ANNUAL AUCTION FUNDRAISER
ART I DRINKS | MUSIC
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NOVEMBER 18
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GAMELAN BIKE BIKE
 Sometimes it takes a pair of fresh eyes to notice a
problem. For Ryan Rosell, leaving Vancouver to
move to Berlin three years ago presented a host of
challenges: integrating himself into a new city and society,
adapting to the capital's listless pace of life, and finding
more to do than just washing dishes. But this transcontinental shift also put Rosell in an interesting position:
as a dedicated member of CiTR 101.9FM both during and
after his tenure at the University of British Columbia, he
sought the kind of cohesive music community he'd known
in Vancouver, and was surprised when he didn't find it.
"When I first arrived, it took me a few months to even
figure out that there was live music happening within
a community of people," he says. "The music scene in
Berlin is really strong, but it's dispersed into a bunch
of different neighbourhoods and microcosms that don't
interconnect at all [...] I went to a few shows where I saw
a poster on the street or whatever and I checked it out, but
there was no central place, or even a venue that I knew
of, where you could just go and meet people who were
participating in the music scene."
flfter half a year of going to shows without feeling a
sense of camaraderie or making connections, Rosell's
luck changed over the course of a night.
"I was at a bar and these two French guys were DJing.
They played the Apollo Ghosts and I kind of shit my pants a
little bit," he laughs. But hearing his favourite Vancouver act
in a distant land was enough for Rosell to know he'd found
his entrypoint into Berlin's cryptic music community.
rvyan Rosell
Has a Baby
in Berlin
words by Elijah Teed
illustrations by Olga Abeleva
photo by Evan Buggle
Thanks to that "freak accident" (and Adrian
Teacher's winsome songwriting), Rosell crafted
a project with the likeminded individuals he ha'd
begun to meet: a community outlet dedicated to
expanding, promoting, and better connecting
Berlin's diverse music milieu. Within a few
months, The Chop was born, and over the past two years
Rosell and "The Chop Squad" have grown their initial
idea into a monthly magazine that combines a concert
calendar, band spotlights, featured shows, horoscopes,
and his personal favourite, the sardonic recommendations
column "Top of The Chop."
daue some marc
baiers."
notably, The Chop is dedicated to featuring
projects by women and female-identified people
in at least half of its content, and strives to
achieve language plurality between German and English
when possible, although Rosell admits achieving that kind
of equilibrium has been tricky.
"We axed the quota for the reason that, right now, our
focus is quality and improving the quality to make The
Chop as good as we can," he says. "The reality is that
most of the people who ask to write for it, ask to write in
English. But if you want to write in German for The Chop
you're more likely to get a spot, because I really want to
have that included."
In any case, the response to the magazine has been
overwhelmingly positive, and The Chop has quickly become
a fixture of the city's arts community, with a growing
cohort of volunteer contributors and fans alike.
"People read it now, which is cool," Rosell laughs. "It
took a year and a half, but I think people actually take
them home, and read them, and keep them.
Ironically, the response Rosell keeps hoping he'll
receive but hasn't yet is the last thing you figure he'd
want: hate mail.
"I would love to have some more haters," he grins.
"The Chop is like my child; it's like my family now. It's
like, if you talk shit about this, you're talking shit about
some good people — people who are making this community magazine for free — so you're going down if you do
that. But no one's done that, so it's just a little fantasy I
have in my head."
maybe it has to do with being a transplant to
Berlin, but you can tell that Rosell referring
to The Chop as his family isn't just a
throwaway line. Despite being the magazine's editor and
founder, Rosell showers praise over the efforts of The Chop
Squad with such earnestness and awe that it's easy to
forget his role in its production.
"The most important job that I've done at The Chop,
and the reason The Chop exists, is because of the people
I've found to work on it," he remarks, and it's advice
he recommends to anyone trying to undertake a project:
"Find people not only that do the job well, but that you
care enough about it that if you fuck it up, you're letting
them down, and then you just do it because you don't
want to disappoint people that you care about." He laughs,
but you can tell he's not kidding.
Going forward, Rosell notes that The Chop is undergoing
a series of changes he hopes will make the magazine more
enjoyable for himself and for readers, aspiring to make it
more accessible to those outside of the music community
that might be looking for an avenue to get involved. A full
graphic redesign is in the works that will help navigate the
inclusion of more visual artwork, illustrations, and photos;
Rosell also hopes to incorporate more creative articles and
publish new voices.
As Berlin's music scene continues to expand and its
community becomes increasingly interlinked, there's little
doubt that The Chop will be anywhere but the forefront,
championing the cause.
Going to Berlin soon? Check out The Chop online at
thechop.de, and connect with them on social media.
THE CHOP
 Heal Hue
Action
OCTOBER 2017
LEISURE CLUB / BB / SUNGLACIERS
OCTOBER 6 / WALDORF HOTEL
I hen I had arrived at the Waldorf Hotel, I was unfashionably early.
™ Too many months away from the East Van indie-rock scene
made me forget that no good show starts before 10 p.m. Yet here I was, at
the Waldorf Hotel Tiki Lounge, at 8 p.m. on a Friday night. Nevertheless,
I grabbed a beer with some of the musicians and looked around at the tiki
torch and grass skirt decorations, the dance floor filled with couches, bamboo-covered walls and hidden bathrooms. I may have beaten the crowd to
the venue, but once they started trickling in, I knew I had done one thing
right: I wore denim-on-denim.
Ten o'clock rolled around and the night started off with a trio from Calgary
called Sunglaciers, touring their new EP, Moving Into Darkness. Although
a small group, the band produced a big and complete sound. Heavy on
the bass guitar and experimental on the vocals, I got a real Interpol-meets-
Radiohead vibe from their sound. Each song danced back and forth on a
stylistic spectrum with New York garage-rock and melodic electronic sounds
at either end, and it was clear the band's tight sound was well thought
through, making them really fun to watch.
Up next was Vancouver's own BB, another three piece band, who had
many fans in the audience. Their sound mixed together harmonized vocals
and a '90s punk rock style. Whether it was the vocalists' matching silver vintage dresses, their back-to-back guitar and bass shredding or the drummer
emulating the energy of the Animal from The Muppets, BB kept the balance
of soft and hard, polished and punk, and their high energy show kept the
audience really captivated.
Once Leisure Club came on, the dance floor became the place to be.
The local five piece band, was there to celebrate the release of their debut
self-titled LP. Although this was their first full-length, they instantly felt like
a much more aged band. The band's sound was not only cohesive, well
rehearsed and collaborative, their energy on stage and attitude towards
each other made their show highly enjoyable for a new listener like myself.
The vocalist had great pipes, well developed and soulful, and their melodies
ranged from groovy ballads to indie-rock guitar riffs and heavy drumming.
During their set, Leisure Club contributed such ditties as "Mike Tyson" —
my personal favourite of theirs. At one point they asked the audience, "How
many vodkas is too many?" before jumping into a song aptly named "22."
I had a great evening listening and dancing to all three bands, and would
absolutely recommend checking them out, especially if you're looking for
new, unique and talented local artists. Word to the wise, however: next time
you want to see a show at the Waldorf Hotel, grab some pizza before you go
and make sure you don't arrive before the fashionably late hour of 9:30 p.m.
—Daniela Hajdukovic
THE CRIBS /PAWS
OCTOBER 10/COBALT
The Cobalt was dark and smelled strongly of beer. The graffiti on the
walls and on the tables sat proudly, unharmed, like a badge of honour.
But something was off — craft beers replaced dirt-cheap pilsners, posters
were forgone by electronic signs proudly displaying upcoming shows and
tobacco advertisements, and the vending machines were stocked with vape
supplies and venue-branded t-shirts. It all seemed very inauthentic.
Nevertheless, the atmosphere was alive even for the opening act, a bold
three-piece indie outfit from Glasgow, Scotland. PAWS opened the show
with "Catherine 1956," their tribute to frontman Philip Taylor's late mother. It
wasn't the best performance of the song I've seen — it was a bit sterile and
lacked emotion — but it was a solid introduction to the lo-fi indie-garage-rock
sound of PAWS for the mostly unfamiliar crowd. It was followed by an
explosive and passionate performance of "Tongues" that immediately won
the affection of those here for the headline act, and brought an energy to
both the crowd and the band that carried throughout the set.
PAWS tend to play almost all of their songs differently live than in the
studio. While it usually works to their advantage and creates a highly
energetic atmosphere, the accelerated tempo at which they played their
biggest hit, "Sore Tummy" ruined the integrity of the song. However, the
ending crescendo with Taylor standing on top of Josh Swinney's bass drum
was as electric as ever, a highlight of any PAWS show. "Bloodline," on the
other hand, an angry, loud punk-influenced tune became much more
powerful when sped up. By the end of their 45-minute set, most The Cribs
fans in the crowd had become PAWS fans as well.
Before leaving the stage, Taylor announced that The Cribs were "one of
the best live bands on earth," so I was expecting a lot from the three brothers
from Yorkshire. Promoting their new album, the sarcastically titled 24-7 Rock
Star S"t, The Cribs did something I've never seen before — they played
songs exactly as they sound on the records while still keeping the energy
at a fervorous high. Some bands play studio perfect live but aren't exciting,
while others, like PAWS, bring excitement and
emotion to their shows but no two performances
are alike.
The punk edge that The Cribs brought to the
U.K. indie scene in the early '00s was as present
as ever, both in their older hits and their newer
material. The majority of the crowd seemed to
be in their mid-to-late thirties, and, as a result,
the most popular songs were those off of 2007
album Men's Needs, Women's Needs. Songs
like "Our Bovine Public," "Men's Needs," and
"I'm a Realist" were met with raucous cheers
and applause, jumping and dancing, and singing along, while the cuts from their 2017 album
caused much less excitement.
As the evening went on, I began to feel
as though every song was the same brand of
punk-tinged indie-rock, but "Pink Snow" was a
much-needed sharp turn towards some sort of Soundgarden or Bush sound.
From 2015's For All My Sisters, the seven-minute journey through tempo
changes, haunting guitar chimes and a slow climb to insanity at the coda
(with a generic indie song plunked directly in the middle), was a perfect
way to end the evening on a high note. For very different reasons from their
opener, The Cribs were a rock-solid and very impressive live act.
—Eric Thompson
: 333! TOUR KICKOFF W/ KIMMORTAL /
• JB THE FIRST LADY / MISSY D
JB, a musician of the Nuxalk and Onondaga nations, was moving and
astute. She used the space to experiment with songs, even abandoning
some mid-way through; lyrics forgotten or incomplete. It mattered little, as
the crowd cheered, laughed and respected the artist's right to determine and
style her art as she desired. Lines such as "I see the gaps /1 have the maps,"
and "The message is clear / They wanted us to disappear / But we're still
here!" spoke to Indigenous injustice, the perceived negligence of community leaders and ultimately to survival. It was hard not to be moved. A spoken
word song silenced the room, and was the most affecting track of the night.
The final song, "Wanting More," was about having "dope sex — tonight,
tomorrow or for the holiday." Dancers and audience members joined her on
stage for an important and entrancing celebration of women's sexuality.
The 333 Tour! was evidence of women who use criticism as fuel rather
than a deterrent to their practice — they're spurred on by the firm belief that
art is a true agent for change. It was a powerful, inspiring and incredibly
important thing to witness. —Izzy Tolhurst
OCTOBER 11 /CAFE DEUX SOLEILS
:1
t's not often you get a show hyped for its all-female line-up, so when
the opportunity comes to witness both exceptional hip-hop and fierce
• feminism in a single night, you should seize it. Carpe diem, right? The
• inaugural stop of the 333! Tour touched down at Cafe Deux Soleils on
Friday, October 6, and was, as headliner JB the First Lady said, women
combining "energy, light, love and sisterhood." If this first show is a taste of
0 what the tour offers, then expect brilliance from the remaining five stops,
running around Vancouver until October 11.
Missy D kicked things off, saying, "as a woman of colour in music, I'm
honoured to be a part of this." There were songs about feelings, love and a
lot of new stuff, delivered as "mellow hype; rappin' soul." Songs were about
0 being an "MC, artist, woman, black woman," and seeking value and respect
• in all identities. The final song was a track with Kimmortal called "XX" about
"being the only rapper girl." To say they killed it is an understatement.
It was an easy transition into Kimmortal's set, and the Filipina-Canadian
artist was mesmerising. Encouraging crowd participation, the audience got
to choose whether Kimmortal played a "sexy song" or a "fuck-the-patriarchy
song." Punters sang along enthusiastically, buoyed by Kimmortal's energy.
Later, Lesley Gore's famed song, "It's My Party" underwent an impressive
transformation, with Kimmortal insisting loudly that, "It's myarf and I can cry
if I want to!" At the same time, a dancer was brought up for the final songs.
0 "Music and art are really fucking powerful — we don't need to doubt that,"
• she said to a sea of nodding and beaming faces as she readied the stage for
• JB the First Lady.
VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL
IMPROV FESTIVAL
OCTOBER 11-14/GRANVILLE ISLAND
l or most of us, going on stage in front of people is a nightmare. We've all
I  been told just to picture your audience naked to manage the anxiety —
which is the worst advice I have ever heard. Nonetheless, for the improv folk
that populated the Vancouver International Improv Festival, they thrive on that
stress, performing and using the audience suggestions for inspiration. I was
privileged to attend the festival, and after a long week, I was excited for a good
laugh. Despite being in it's nineteenth year, I had never been to VIIF before,
so I was excited to see what was in store. Both Friday and Saturday evening
shows were located on Granville Island, an area filled with tourism and
entertainment — the perfect location to host an Improv Festival.
I watched eight different improv groups perform over the two nights. All
groups had their own unique characteristics and strategies for audience
suggestions and all were hilarious — it's hard to pick which was my favourite
because most of the time I was laughing so hard I almost peed. I didn't,
don't worry.
The intermissions during the performances were a bit short — only 10
minutes, which is not enough time to get a beverage and enjoy it, unless you
were first in line. There was, however, more time for drinking, mixing and mingling between the 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. shows. After the performances, the
improvisors often came out to the lobby to chat with their fans.
On Friday evening I was introduced to Dave Morris and Meags Fitzgerald
from the group We're So Strong. These two have known each other for a
very long time, 16 years to be exact, which is half of Meags' life and a third
of Dave's and somehow they manage to still be friends — or how Dave puts
it "Meg still puts up with me." Their set was inspired by an object — a walnut
— and a quote — "argue for your limitations and sure enough they're yours."
What developed was impressive, scenes of drama and comedy that held the
crowd in suspense, waiting for what was going to happen next.
Overall, the festival's location was well-suited, the atmosphere was
excited and the acts were incredibly hilarious. With all different flavours of
improv — some groups created complex, long-form story arcs, while others
stuck to short snippet scenes — it was a great way to spend my weekend
evenings. If you happened to miss VIIF this year, there are lots of opportunities to watch improv around Vancouver: Sunday Service at the Fox Cabaret
is one of my favourites, along with Blind Tiger Comedy, Little Mountain
Gallery, or Vancouver Theatre Sports. I can vouch that you will laugh so hard
you might cry — or pee. —Jennifer Brule
STILL LIFE WITH ECHO
OCTOBER 17 / ORPHEUM THEATRE (LOBBY)
■ felt like I was wandering through an orchestra. The evening was
W presented by Redshift Music Society, a charitable organization focused
on bringing contemporary composers to the general public, and Ecstatic
Waves, a concert series that features local composers writing pieces for
open instrumentation. Still Life With Echo took over the chandelier atrium of
the grand and stately Orpheum Theatre.
Twenty-four musicians, playing a variety of mostly instruments scattered
themselves throughout the three ornate levels of the historical theatre's
lobby. All coordinated by stopwatches, the ensemble performed six open-
score pieces by six Vancouver composers — Michael Park, Mike WT Allen,
Jordan Nobles, Christopher Blaber, KaterinaGimon and Nancy Tarn. For
close to an hour, the group filled the space with an array of music, emanating
from seemingly everywhere.
Michael Park's opening composition, "The Orpheum Lobby," started
the show with a soundscape. The performers played short and disparate
REAL LIVE ACTION
 they brought to the stage. In the tradition of many great underground rock
bands, they excelled because they kept their songs simple, loud and filled
with powerful, anthemic vocals.
Vocalist Stefani Blondal had a great stage presence as well. Decked
out in a Billy Ray Cyrus t-shirt, she howled, wailed and screamed her way
through the set and jolted the sleepy audience awake. For all of her energy,
it was surprising when Burns later mentioned that Blondal was actually sick
with a cold.
Louise Burns came on after and performed a strong set of indie-pop
tunes that mostly came from her latest album, Young Mopes. What stands
out in her music is that she places a great emphasis on melody — songs
such as "Storms" and "Who's the Madman" are filled with catchy hooks and
choruses that glimmer with emotion and stay in your head long after they've
finished. Burns's an excellent vocalist too, and was especially dynamic when
harmonizing with her guitarist.
Though she claimed that she's usually not an "on-stage comedian,"
Burns was quite chatty with the audience. She joked about Vancouver's rainy
weather, dropped multiple f-bombs, complimented her guitarist's pants and
talked about how it's "fucking tough being a lady sometimes." It was a smal
and modest show, but her banter kept the set lively, varied and fun.
I was sad that she didn't play "Downtown Lights" — her excellent cover
of the Blue Nile's sophisti-pop masterpiece — but her penultimate song,
"Emeralds Shatter," offered similar thrills and stood out as the show's best
moment. A synth-heavy tune with pulsing drums and lyrics about heads in the
clouds, it perfectly captured the wide-eyed melancholy of the best Blue Nile
songs while also reflecting Burns' own confident songwriting. If you need a
good songs for staring out a bus window, add this one to your Spotify playlist.
—Joshua Azizi
musical phrases between reading aloud sections of text about the features,
history and amenities of the Orpheum. At one point, an automated message
announcing the show was about to begin played through the theatre's PA
system — a thoroughly disjointed and wonderful way to begin.
Just as the musicians were distributed throughout the many alcoves
and hallways of the lobby, the audience were not fixed to any specific area.
Moving freely around the space, listeners constantly shifted focus from the
sound of individual instruments to the ensemble as a whole. While some
found a spot the seemed to suit them and stayed still, most of the crowd
were in constant flux, pacing in and around the performers,
comparing the reverberant qualities of different areas and listening
to the ever changing ways in which the music interacted with the
space around them. It was a choose-your-own-adventure concert,
where no two audience experiences were alike.
Mike WT Allen's "Woke Floke Gaze" and Katerina Gimon's
"Rain on a Tin Roof" were both standout pieces because of their
drastically different approaches to writing music for the room. Allen
opted for a lush and flowing feel, melding all the sounds together
into one smooth and beautiful piece of music. As I walked around,
the different instruments washed back and forth, building in intensity
and drifting back down. Regardless of where I was in the lobby, it
sounded full.
Like the title of her piece suggests, Gimon's "Rain on a Tin
Roof" sounded more sparse and strewn around the space. Instead
of bringing the different sounds together, she kept them far apart,
emphasizing the spatial dynamics of the event. I found myself
almost on edge, catching bits of clarinet here and cello there, never
able to settle my attention on any one thing.
As I moved up and down the stairs, through the hallways and
across the floors of the Orpheum lobby, I began to think about the
inherent subjectivity of the concert experience, how the perspective
of every individual is equally valid, and that there is no ideal way
to experience any event — unless of course I could've somehow
hung from the central chandelier. That would've been ideal.
Ill
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine
and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA is also expanding to include comedy and theatre, among other
ive experiences. Feel free to submit those event details to the
e-mail above.
—Lucas Lund
LOUISE BURNS /MISE EN SCENE
OCTOBER 19 / FOX CABARET
fter driving from UBC to Main Street as fast as I safely could
I and running top-speed towards the Fox Cabaret, I was
scared that unfortunate time overlaps would have cost me to miss
the opening act of Louise Burns' show. Not only did I make it just
in the nick of time, but the band also turned out to be a helluva lot
of fun.
Winnipeg rock group Mise En Scene opened the night with an
electrifying set, full of loud guitars, howled melodies and long hair
flying everywhere. Metro News calls them "indie pop-rockers," but
their songs were so lively and muscular that it's tempting to reach
for '80s rock comparisons to describe the sound and energy that
iT'J TIME AGAIN FOR...
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MUSIC
HOLY HUM
All Of My Bodies
(Heavy Lark)
06   /   10   /   2017
k alfway through All Of My Bodies' centerpiece "White Buzz," the muted
I drum patterns and ambient synths - that the listener has long since
become accustomed to - fade out, giving way to harsh guitar feedback and
cymbal crashes, further followed by a transcendent four-minute outro of
emotive, wordless singing. The accompanying music video seems to steer
away from anything matching this cathartic intensity, simply tracking the KTX
fast train heading towards Seoul station. This, however, is the scenery that
Andrew Lee (Holy Hum) took in while travelling to his family burial site alongside the ashes of his father. A pained, emotional fracturing that only a death
in the family can cause pervades this album, with Lee commenting that
the music "is not for you. It's for me. It's for my late father." (Grayowl Point,
October 2017)
Though sharing a concern with the 'real death' of a loved one, this album
does not have the insular, non-musical ruminations of Mount Eerie's critically acclaimed A Crow Looked At Me. Rather, All Of My Bodies is lush-
an album that is unafraid of breaking the musical confines of Holy Hum's
previously synth-only instrumentals. "Flower In The Snow" is complemented superbly by snatches of flute and piano, as well as stand-out backing
vocals from Kathryn Calder (The New Pornographers, Immaculate Machine).
"Heavy Lark" features a lot of ideas heard nowhere else on the album, with
an industrial drumbeat, vocoder, an unexpected Spanish guitar solo, and a
slow, brooding surf guitar line that feels right at home on the rain-sodden
beaches of Vancouver. This newfound complexity, however, means that the
hazy instrumentals "Joseph Pt. 2" and "Sun Breaking," that reference Holy
Hum's earlier work, compare poorly. Especially when the same building,
swaying synths are complemented by the sputtering drumbeats and melancholy vocals of the title track's dramatic conclusion.
Fittingly, for an album as personal as this one, it is ultimately the vocal
work of Lee that binds this album together. Lee's compelling voice, now
separated from the rock stylings of his previous band In Medias Res, is free
to become the absolute centre of attention. This, in turn, provides a greater
focus towards his often-enigmatic lyrics, that wrestle with the impossibility of communicating such a private sense of grief and regret through his
art - at one point Lee addresses his audience: "You can all clap as hard as
you would like to / But he's not coming back." It is fortunate then that the
feedback swells and formless wailing of "White Buzz," as well as the layered,
accomplished beauty featured throughout All Of My Bodies, conveys far
more emotion than simple poetic lines ever could. —Tom Barker
ALWAYS
Antisocialites
(Royal Mountain Records)
08   /   09   /   2017
to cement the backbone of the album and grant Always official pop status.
Antisocialites reclaims momentum in its penultimate track "Saved by a Waif,"
which sets itself up beautifully for a memorable finale in "Forget About Life."
With Antisocialites, Always has tapped into a rare vein of musical appeal.
With hazy, atmospheric charm that should by all logic be saved for dinner
parties and quiet nights in, their melodies instead force themselves into the
foreground. Always has crafted an album which offers both first time easy
istening appeal and the ability to be absorbed more deeply with each repeat,
making itself definitively worthy of your attention. —Indigo Smart
ORNAMENT & CRIME
Unbuilt
(Josephine House Records)
07   /   09  /   2017
I Iways released their second album, Antisocialites, to thunderous
I acclaim. The Toronto-based indie pop group who first created a name
for themselves in 2014 with their debut, self-titled album and its stand out hit
"Archie, Marry Me," has retained the dreamy pop haze of their breakout work
and re-molded it into a fresh collection of unique yet cohesive tracks.
Vocalist Molly Rankin delivers Always' sirenic lyrics with gossamer
strength. Rankin's distracted yet engaged lyricism is a constant in a rare
album of individually noteworthy songs. Antisocialites is a true example of
musical cooperation, with vocals used less as a front and more as a tool for
the communication of style and atmosphere of introspection.
The album eases itself into a melodic opening and gains force and pace
through its first half before tumbling gracefully back towards homeostasis.
At the core of the album is the upbeat "Your Type" which works at double speed
The two members of Vancouver's Ornament & Crime took their name
from the title of an essay published in 1910 by Austrian architect
Adolf Loos. This essay criticized the use of "ornament in art," claiming
that embellishing practical objects with decoration is pointless and foolish.
After listening to Unbuilt, the impact of Loos on the music of Ornament &
Crime becomes clear, as the most defining characteristic of this album is its
minimalism.
The first half of Unbuilt is slow-paced garage rock. Tracks like "Academy
of the Birds" and "Catch Your Death" consist of simple, dirty, bluesy guitar,
bare-bones drum beats, basic vocal melodies, and a complete absence of
bass. At times, these songs almost sound like an early Black Keys album,
just slower and much, much more simple.
On the seventh track "Tin," however, the album takes a sharp turn
towards dark and unsettling art rock. Initially, songs like "Stickabrick City"
and "Perspectiva" retain elements of conventionality. But as the album
progresses, so does its experimental and disturbing atmosphere. This culminates in the final track on the album, "Blind Mice," when Suzy King and
Thomas Hudson sing a variation of "Three Blind Mice" with an ominous and
violent tone, which manages to be both avant-garde and disconcerting.
Impressively, Unbuilt does not lose its minimal edge. Ornament & Crime
manages to dive head-first into experimental while maintaining simplicity. For
example, "Sawhorse" features Hudson dragging a pick across the strings
of his guitar, but this moment of musical exploration occurs only within the
repetitive strum of a single chord.
But while this album remains sonically minimal, its lyrics do not.
Throughout the entirety of Unbuilt, King and Hudson explore complex
themes including materialism and substance abuse. On "I Owe," for instance,
the lyrics criticize the hypocrisy of materialism within religion, declaring that
"their God's money." The lyrical content of "Dizzy Uppers" describes using
drugs as a means to lessen the mundanity of life, stating, "Thought I'd take
the yolks out of my eggs / Well that didn't help me at all /1 took two pills in
the p.m."
Unbuilt illustrates Ornament & Crime's loyalty to the principles of Loos.
The instrumentation and vocals (disregarding their content) lack any element
of unnecessary complexity. Yet, they masterfully form interesting, enjoyable,
and moving songs that bridge two very different genres. —Hannah Toms
know it's not a masquerade?" - which it doesn't disappoint in fulfilling. These
songs are well-rehearsed, well-constructed and display all the best features
of their influences. "Death Metal" aches with nostalgia for a lost youth, and
pining for lost friends and a simpler time, before the "city-dwelling rats" infested everything, a demo's second song, "Blur," blasts into a scathing critique
of "material ways," featuring firey instrumentation that enhances evident fury
and confusion. "The Seagull," the final track of this release, cools off into a
sombre and regretful tune, treading over and over into those all-too-familiar
moments in which we "fuck it up. . . . fuck it up again." Throughout a demo,
this trio shows adeptness, seamlessly moving through styles and tempos
to evoke an emotional variety that would be impressive by a group with 10
years' experience. As this is Laverne's first musical enterprise, it can only be
considered remarkable.
As each song trails away, one hopes it is only a brief interlude, that the
music will return, renewed and revitalized. It is not to be. We are left guessing. Three songs is hardly anything, a demo may have been an accident, or
it may be the start of something brilliant, a musical project that will happily
keep us listening and searching, hoping to understand the profane power it
possesses. —TonyF
'This is a review of a project which the Under Review Editor (Maximilian
Anderson-Baier) is involved in. It was edited by Real Live Action Editor
Jasper D. Wrinch.
JB THE FIRST LADY
Meant To Be
(Self-Released)
19   /   08   /   2017
LAVERNE
a demo
(Self-Released)
06   /   09   /   2017
fveryone is in process, moving from place to place. Where is the end?
How do we know when we have reached something worth lingering at?
The world places infinite demands on our attention, and we have to make a
choice as to what is valuable. With music, this question is even more
pronounced. An album can blow your mind on first listen, only to bore you a
week later. Conversely, it may take dozens of listens to finally come to enjoy
an album, after which it will become part of your musical itinerary forever. We
isten as detectives, to solve the mystery of value. Music, in these times, is
about a process of discovery, investigation and revelation. Trawling through
cornucopias of sound is one of the great joys in the world.
Among the bric-a-brac, Laverne released a demo. Though only three
songs long, it demands attention. It opens with "Death Metal Used to Be
My Friend," a pleading promise of honesty - "Hey now darling / Don't you
I hether she is rapping, singing or performing spoken word, JB the
™ First Lady's smooth vocals and agile flow make her a captivating
storyteller. On her fourth album, Meant To Be, JB the First Lady — the pseudonym of Jerilynn Webster — furthers her mission to create music that is both
positive, personal and political.
Meant To Be opens with the title track, which functions as the album's
manifesto. She says, "I'm telling a story so open your ears / They wanted us
to disappear." Through the telling of her story, JB resists Canadian History's
attempt to erase the voices of Indigenous peoples, more specifically the voices
of Indigenous women. Both her vocal stylings and the autobiographical nature
of her music positions JB in a tradition of female MCs like Lauryn Hill. Akin
to her musical predecessors, JB the First Lady mixes the personal with the
political. When she says, "Justice must come eventually," it seems like she is
hopeful for the future and critical of the distance Canada has to go before we
achieve reconciliation.
Yet, JB still finds room to explore minutely intimate subjects. "My Baby"
is a mellow R&B track about how her love for her partner builds her up and
helps her to "keep shining." Themes of heritage and culture still remain
present, and JB and her partner assert the power of their connection is due
to their ancestry. With a refrain of "My baby's my baby," it is one of the more
repetitious tracks on the album. Still, JB deserves credit for unabashedly representing her love.
In contrast, "O.O.T.G.," which stands for 'out of the gates,' is a rallying cry.
With declarations like "No one can take my light," "O.O.T.G." is life affirming.
JB denounces the injustices Canada has inflicted against her people: "There
is no excuse for hate and abuse." JB's son Sequoia is her hype man, calling
out, "Tell 'em, Mommy!" Horns coupled with a booming bass line make for
polished and gripping production.
Building upon this tone, "Still Here" is a forceful closing track and assertion
of identity. JB references the Canadian Federal Government's commitment to
Truth and Reconciliation, acknowledging and solving cases of murdered and
missing Indigenous women, the staggering number of Indigenous reservations without potable water, and increased suicide rates in rural communities.
In spite of the systemic racism and colonialism, the Indigenous peoples of
this land endure. JB calls on everyone to dismantle systems of oppression
because "Together we are better." JB asserts both her own resilience and the
resilience of her culture. With honest lyrics and compelling storytelling,
Meant To Be proposes a better future for Canada. —Courtney Heffernan
UNDER REVIEW
 MOUSE SUCKS
Andtheniwhippeditout
(Booty World Records)
38   /   09   /   2017
■ f the "sophomore album slump" is real, then 23-year-old rapper and
W producer Mouse Sucks must not know about it. From the first bass
note in "CheyannedidmeDirty," to the last dying chord in "401 East End,"
he delivers an eccentric and unique project that stands out in today's
fairly predictable hip-hop landscape. Hailing from Toronto, the young artist
crafts subtle instrumentals laced with carefree lyrics and dark flows in
Andtheniwhippeditout, his second album in as many years.
Looking at his social media presence, you can almost get a sense of
Mouse Sucks' style and persona. The comical life observations and sen-
tenceswithoutspaces littering his Twitter feed are matched sonically on his
album, in a surreal but tasteful way. Even more impressive is the fact that all
of the beats featured on this project were produced by the Ontario resident
himself. For an LP running only 28 minutes long, it features an admirable
aural assortment of instrumentals, with beats that sound like smooth elevator
music put through a blender, trap-flavoured MIDI recitals, and even a song
that samples the twangy banjo of a country tune.
None of these attributes would matter, however, without the entree — the
actual rapping — and fortunately Mouse delivers. Though his lyrics are no
match for literary greats like Dostoevsky and Lil Wayne, he delivers some fun
bars that are enough to keep the listener engaged and moving. On tracks
like "Debbies," he even uses some clever wordplay, "Swimming in my Polo /
That's chicken / Not Marco." That being said, while this track is arguably the
project's strongest due to its great features and brooding flows, it also exposes one of its few weaknesses: inconsistent mixing between the featured artists. The charming and relatable lo-fi, bedroom-recording sound of the album
is jarringly amplified at times when certain features come on, creating an
experience that can possibly disconnect the listener from the music.
Aside from this oversight, the project has a distinct audible DNA that is
an impressive evolution and continuation of his humble roots. Seemingly at
a crossroads between the trendy Soundcloud rap that has been dominating the genre's Zeitgeist, and more established mainstream hip-hop, Mouse
Sucks constructs a puzzle whose pieces should not interlock under conventional wisdom. Yet with the exception of some minor gripes, he delivers a
strong project that will undoubtedly be influential in defining his sound and
that will help him carve his name in the shifting sands of Canadian hip-hop.
—Borna Atrchian
vidual thinking, to be challenged and not digested with passive comfort.
But by sampling those like Madlib and boasting production inspired by MF
Doom and Kenny Segal, Milo disguises his heavy-dose rhetoric with an easy
istening air. Make no mistake, Milo is still disgusted and angry. On "Ornette's
Swan Song," Ferreira slaps back at the dangerous ego of white America:
"Your captivity will never make the news / Suddenly conscious of the speed
of my windshield wipers / Before angry let's be truthful /1 pause, 'yo, this
pain could be useful' / Simply put and we're faking rap together now." It is
clear that being black in a white space informs a large part of Milo's artistic
vision. But who told you to think??!!?!?!?! ultimately spews unique importance as a rap poetic project. It evolves from the suspicions of United States
history and higher schooling, bringing Milo that much closer to his rightfully
deserved spotlight. —KelleyLin
BBQT
^&tZQTjM All Dressed
(Self-Released)
14   /   06   /   2017
MILO
who told you to think??!!?!?!?!
(Ruby Yacht)
11 /  08 / 2017
montreal power pop quartet BBQT pack the sounds of summer
into a catchy five minutes on their second EP, All Dressed. The
June release is a delightful example of the fuzzy, lo-fi surf punk that is slowly
washing across the DIY scenes of North America, putting a Canadian twist
on the California-born genre. Guitarist and lead vocalist Amery Sandford's
voice is cotton candy layered over the garage noise supplied by bandmates
Jack Bielli (guitar and backup vocals), Mikey Melikey (bass and backup
vocals) and Allison Graves (drums), skillfully mixing sugary pop with
grungy punk.
All Dressed leads with a cute pun on short shorts and tall cans with "High
Wasted," an ode to summer romance that showcases their knack for writing
solid pop songs with minimal but punchy lyrics. The band stumbles a little
with "Too Late," which amps itself up only to end too soon. But BBQT gets
back up again with a slowed-down third track, "Hawaii." This island-themed
tune gives listeners a brief pause in the middle of the short, fast EP with its
dreamy escapism and a sound that recalls the Beach Boys as much as it
does contemporary surf punkers like Best Coast or The Frights.
The real joy of the album, however, is "Your Band," a playful track that
strikes a great balance between the fast noise and sleepy beach vibes heard
on other parts of All Dressed. This song delivers a well-melded and perfectly
paced close to the EP. The lyrics tell of a first date turned music critic,"You
met me outside in your sports jersey / Said he didn't like BBQT". Through
these tongue-in-cheek lines sung with a heavy dose of irony, the band pulls
off the tricky task of being self-referential without sounding self-important.
All Dressed's bite-sized playtime leaves you wanting more, but the four
songs are substantial enough to hold up to repeat listens. Even in the rainy
grey of autumn, the bright tunes feel like the lazy warmth of the summer sun.
—Lexine Mackenzie
: PODCASTS
Jn an age of college rappers and educated poets, Milo builds upon
today's wordsmith culture by drawing on the works of famous authors,
intellectuals and social critics. It is of use to note that this 25-year-old
rapper, born to the name of Rory Ferreira, belongs to no single place. Born
in Chicago, Ferreira moved frequently between the white-majority states of
Maine and Wisconsin. He soon found himself settled in Green Bay to study
at St. Norbert College, before eventually dropping out. His newest LP titled
who told you to think??!!?!?!?! (which itself may be a play on The Roots' Do
You Want More?!!!??!) is not only his best thus far, but also the most lyrically
conscious addition to an already complex rap discography. It's on this album
where we see Milo carving himself a place of his own.
The album begins with a chopped-up monologue from James Baldwin in
"poet (Black bean)" and boasts references throughout to the artistic likes of
Vladimir Nabokov, Charles Bukowski, Friedrich Nietzsche, Zadie Smith, John
Maynard Keynes, and more. Still, this album is much more than pedantic
name dropping. Above all, Milo is sharpest with his criticism. On "call + form
(picture)" for instance, he insists that his talents as a poet are needed in this
time of rampant consumerism and political lethargy, asking, "Why's your
favourite rapper always bragging about her business acumen? / Like we asked
em? Like we asked em? / Why's your favourite rapper always babbling about
his brand again? / Like we asked him? Like we asked him?" Under this thick
veil of cynicism, who told you to think??!!?!?!?! is not exactly made for sale. In
fact, it is made to be read like a dense book, to encourage research and indi-
ST0PP0DCASTING
YOURSELF
(Maximum Fun)
03   /   03   /   2008  to Present
•T
en minutes into their inaugural episode of Stop Podcasting Yourself,
Graham Clark asks his co-host, Dave Shumka, "is this what podcasts
0 sound like?" They had just brushed their beards against the microphones to
give the audience an impression of their respective facial hair. Perhaps, he
could feel the episode losing direction and grasped at some standard form
to follow. Luckily, it seems the Vancouver comedy duo never bothered to
establish a guideline. Spurred on by their care-free attitude, they went on to
build a body of work spanning nine years, five hundred episodes and many
• notable guests.
Every week Clark and Shumka fill upwards of an hour of material with
charming banter, anecdotes and countless improvised bits. The two are
_ regularly joined by a single guest - often veteran comics, themselves. The
^ trio will launch into a free-flowing conversation with only two discernible
• goals: crack each other up, and get through the two regular segments. One
• of these bits, "Get to Know Us," is an informal interview of the guest, but it
often unhinges and springs into varying off-topic subjects. For example, in
0 "Episode 498" featuring Steph Tolev, the guest chats about her defunct car, a
■ horrible one-night stand experience, and an anxious call made to her parents
• after dreaming her dog's eye fell out. Clark and Shumka were ready to volley
• with jokes about ideal ages for a dog's eye to dislodge and an anecdote or
two of their own. "Overheard" is a segment that follows in which the hosts,
a guest, and listeners who call in share a humorous audio byte that they listened in on.
The hosts feast on teasing laughs out of each other and the guest from
organic points in the conversation. However, this spontaneity has a cost. At
times the show can feel like an extended moment of "Overheard," where I
am eavesdropping on a group of close friends entertaining one another. I can
laugh along most of the time, but every so often, the frequent derailing and
constantly shifting topics has me feeling disengaged.
In "Episode 500," the hosts perform a song commemorating the most
ridiculous moments of SPY. Often slipping off-beat / note they sing lines like,
"Machete, Ma-che-te, 'Sure hope those dogs aren't gay,' baseball pranks,
shirtless weigh-ins, Treat me nice, daddy,'" over a tightly-produced tune. The
song nails the spirit of the podcast. The appeal of an episode of SPY is not
necessarily the wild range of topics discussed, but rather the polished balancing act happening underneath each show. Clark and Shumka put on an
ostensibly amateurish front to create an intimate tone welcoming to listeners,
while still flashing moments of comedic virtuosity. The best part about the
act? No one really knows what next week's show will sound like. Especially
the hosts. —Jong Lee
THE VANISHED
(Podcast Series)
10  /   05   /   2016  to Present
THl
VANISHl
I hen people go missing, some who vanish are more visible than
™ others. While some cases cause media sensations and police
frenzies, others fade into obscurity. The Vanished podcast attempts to shed
light on those who are less visible. Each episode focuses on a single missing person case. It breaks down the circumstances of their disappearance,
such as the evidence, timeline, police reports and phone records, while
also exploring the life of the missing, and the relationships they had with the
people around them. Accounts of events leading up to the disappearance
and subsequent search are told through both interviews and the narration of
the show's host and creator, Marissa Jones. Of particular focus is the relationship between the vanished and their family, friends, and their possible
aggressors — who are not always separate entities.
Jones handles each case with unmistakable empathy and it is unsurprising
to learn she has had her own experience with a missing family member. Her
great-grandfather disappeared without a trace, leaving an indelible mark on
her grandfather and her great-uncle. Jones, who describes herself as a paralegal by day and a single mother of two, began the series in response to the lack
of coverage on missing persons, especially for those who did not fit the more
media-captivating victimhood of young, white, upper-middle class women. Of
less interest to the news cycle and the police are the socially isolated, people
of colour, and those with a history of mental illness or substance abuse. Such
was the case of Mahfuza Rahman, covered by The Vanished in October.
Rahman was a recent immigrant from Bangladesh who had few connections
in the United States where she was living at the time of her disappearance. It
was also the case of Kevin Mahoney, a 25-year-old who disappeared in Fargo,
North Dakota. The apathy of the local police department in dealing with his case
is apparent and abhorrent. His sister woefully wonders whether Kevin's case
would have held more precedence "had he been from an influential family."
The contrast between the desperation of loved ones to find the vanished
and the indifference of everyone else feels bizarre and heartbreaking. All of
the cases featured on this podcast are unsolved, and many have gone cold.
The listener is left suspended with the unfinished arc of a fading life. Jones
asks listeners if they have any information. With some families it seems like
any news, even bad news, would be a relief. —Christina Dasom Song
UNDER REVIEW
 BOOKS
Geoff Dembicki
ARE WE SCREWED?
(Bloomsbury Press)
22   /   08   /   2017
Using his chapters to join eight journalistic vignettes, Geoff Dembicki
connects climate change action with the need for systematic
change. He breaks down discrete instances, such as the youth led protest
at the COP21 conference, where "rejection of mainstream society" does
not necessarily lead to flawless victories. Instead, he convincingly presents
the position that the effort in rejecting the status quo contributes heavily in
establishing footings for which social and climatic change can stand.
This is where Are We Screwed? excels. Dembicki chooses examples
that are diverse, real and accessible. He speaks in conversation that neither gets bogged down in jargon nor unattainable actions. His concise and
consistent statistics are presented alongside honest sentiments from a full
range of human experiences. The overly repetitious statistics could benefit
from visual aids that may better ascertain the scale of the whole climate
change debate. But, he leaves the statistical analysis to the non-believers of
mathematica and the insecure that are ready to duel with his well-annotated
and sourced text — fools.
The subjects in his vignettes are young and Dembicki makes a conscious effort in establishing that this age group will bear the consequences
of societal decisions made by a much older ruling class. It is with this idea
that Dembicki makes his most powerful statement that echoes across the
vignettes "..there [is] more to life than making the most money possible and
not thinking about the consequences." His ability to thread this statement
through each subject's story resonates the need for not just action on climate
change but also systematic change, regardless of one's generational label.
The status quo is as destructive as much as it is unstable. Are We
Screwed? invokes the need for immediate action and necessary hope. In
his Afterword section, Dembicki provides a path for hope through suggestions to educate and limit our impact. By doing so, we can gain awareness
toward the necessity of sustainable lifestyles. Whether or not we are in fact
screwed, Geoff Dembicki has nailed and bound together a text that should
become a necessary read for all entering into the independence of adulthood. —MarkBudd
!!!
To submit music for review consideration in Discorder Magazineand online,
please send a physical copy to the station addressed to:
Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Under Review Editor at
CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver BC, V6T1Z1.
Though our contributors prioritize physical copies, you may email download codes
to underreview.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums sent prior to their official
release dates. Under Review is also expanding to include independent films, books
and podcasts. Feel free to submit those, too.
SUPER COOL TUESDAYS
T FOR EVERYONE
VORDS BY ROHIT JOSEPH | PHOTO COURTESY OF
SFU'S VANCITY OFFICE OF COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
[  arrive at the location, a small gallery
I  on the corner of Hastings and Carrall
'  known as the Interurban. An iPad fills
the room with Charleston-inspired tunes from
the 1930s. Everyone has a pumpkin in their
hands, diligently chipping away at carving and
decorating.
Right then, I knew I was exactly where
I was supposed to be. This is Super Cool
Tuesdays, also known as Contemporary
Arts 101. Twice a year, in weekly six session
blocks, a drop-in speaker series takes place
at the Interurban Gallery on Tuesday nights
with Downtown Eastside residents. Each
week, a different Canadian or international
artist is invited to present at the series. The
artist shows their work, describes the process
behind it, and occasionally gives an artistic
assignment to the audience. The audience of
Super Cool Tuesday are open and keen participants, happy to engage with any form of art,
whether it be visual or performance based.
Adriana Lademann is the coordinator of
Super Cool Tuesday and a visual artist. She
gives a lot of weight to the value of art and
has seen the difference it can make. "Super
Cool Tuesdays gives [people] a space to be
themselves."
Lademann doesn't do this work alone. Dean
Wilson is a long-time Downtown Eastside
activist, supporter of Super Cool Tuesday and
a volunteer of the Drug User Resource Centre
(DURC). He helps Lademann by promoting
Super Cool Tuesday within and around the
community.
"The people have really taken to it," Wilson
says. "We've had an incredible array of artists,
performing artists, painters, recording artists,
all different kinds, and I haven't heard a bad
word from anybody about any of the courses."
The project was started in 2011 by Am
Johal with SFU's Vancity Office of Community
Engagement in partnership with PHS' Drug Users
Resource Centre (DURC)  — over the years, it has included
guest artists such as Ken Lum, Amy Kazymerchyk and SFU
art professor Sabine Bitter. The project was then curated
by student and SFU Community Engagement employee
Andrea Creamer for four year, during which time Jeneen
Frei Njootli was invited to present and Tin Can Studios
had a popular residency. When Creamer left to attend grad
school in Toronto in 2016, Lademann took the reins. The
intellectual stuff for their brain, it's the best
result we can have," he adds.
Both Lademann and Wilson note that
accessing contemporary art can be particularly
difficult for folks living in the DTES. "To access
art can be difficult for somebody with financial
or health barriers," says Lademann.
Larger art galleries can be discriminatory
places for DTES residents, who may not be
able to afford paying an admission fee, or may
simply feel uncomfortable being in institutionalized spaces. Wilson explains, "People in
the Downtown Eastside don't feel good about
going uptown to [see art], they feel they are
shunned. And many times, they are."
You definitely don't get the sense that Super
Cool Tuesday participants are uncomfortable
in this space, however. One participant smiles
as he applies the finishing touches to his
pumpkin. "I never carved pumpkins as a kid
but now I wish I did, it's fun!" he exclaims.
B
program has been consistent for over five years now.
At the time of the initial partnership between SFU
Community Engagement and DURC, DURC was a
low-barrier drop-in centre for folks in the Downtown
Eastside serving up to 1,500 clients a day with its facilities
and programs. Last year, DURC lost its funding from
Vancouver Coastal Health, which resulted in the closure of
its physical location.
"Many [Super Cool Tuesday participants] come from
very broken places, myself included," Wilson says. "When
we give them an hour of some peace and quiet, and some
ut Super Cool Tuesday is not just
about the participants. It's also about
exposing artists to a new audience
for their work.
Jeff Hallbauer, is a painter and sculptor.
He got involved with Super Cool Tuesday
through Lademann, and leads the pumpkin
carving session I attend. Though initially
daunted at the prospect of creatively engaging
participants for a full hour, he now considers
it refreshing from his usual environment.
"I find the commercial art world can be
dehumanizing and very capitalistic," he says.
When asked why he chose pumpkin carving
for this session of Super Cool: "It's good to
just connect with people," he says. "I prefer
doing art as a social practice because it's a
more collaborative process."
The session wraps up. When I ask a couple
participants if they will return to Super Cool Tuesdays,
they say they will. "It's good for your spirit," says one.
The lights go off, transforming the carved pumpkins
into beautiful, spooky Jack O'Lanterns.
On my way out, I ask Dean Wilson what he really
wants people to know about Super Cool Tuesday. " Look,
people in the Downtown Eastside can enjoy the arts and
I think that more people should try and bring it into the
community."
UNDER REVIEW//SUPER COOL TUESDAYS
 WORDS BY DOUG VANDELAY
ILLUSTRATION BY EMMA CLARK
PHOTOS BY DUNCAN CAIRNS-BRENNER
"WE WANT TO SEE
MORE WOMEN
IN COMEDY, IT'S
ABOUT MAKING A
SPACE FOR THEM."
I  hen Paul Sills, David Shepherd and Del
I  Close developed the historic Second City
improvisational theatre troupe in the mid
1950s, the goal was to create theatre that was accessible
to everyone. Though improv has always been accessible to
audience members of all shapes, sizes, colours and creeds,
the same can not be said for the performers. Even with the
Upright Citizens Brigade, with Amy Poehler as a founding
member, it is not uncommon to see the stage dominated
by an overwhelming male presence in any improv
performance. The comedy scene in Vancouver — and the
rest of the world for that matter — has much more to
offer than four to eight white John Doe's in their 20s and
30s.
Blind Tiger Comedy in Vancouver is striving to break
this trend with their first WTF (Women Trans Femme)
improv night at Little Mountain Gallery on Friday,
November 3. The night begins with a free drop-in class
hosted by Blind Tiger Comedy instructor, Amy Shostak
and culminates in a one hour jam show performance.
"We want to see more women in comedy, it's about
making a space for them. We're encouraging women to
come and try this. We're curating a space just for them.
It's harder to do [improv] if you don't see anyone like
yourself —it's hard to picture yourself in that position,"
added Caitlin Howden, co-director of Blind Tiger Comedy.
When asked where the idea came from, co-director Tom
Hill had this to say:
"[WTF] came from a feeling that this was long overdue.
We wanted to make more space in the comedy community
of Vancouver for all types of people. It's been a dramatically
male-heavy world for far too long."
To this, Shostak added, "There might be a perception
that improv is a realm that is dominated by men and there
might be a barrier there. Hopefully some people will get
interested in improv then take a step toward taking a
class. In Vancouver, there's a real lack of programming
that's identity based."
Blind Tiger Comedy was established in 2014, but
Shostak, Howden and Hill have been teaching and
performing improv for almost two decades. Howden
explained that "these free improv classes are part of Blind
Tiger 'school plan' — initiatives by the school to keep
growing and expanding and be a place that people could
look to for a safe, fun and inclusive space."
Beyond WTF, Blind Tiger Comedy also offer a class called
"Women Centre Stage", which is a four week class run by
Shostak for women-identifying performers.
"We get to be funny in a way that is just purely
feminine. We could have an all-women show and wouldn't
have to say it's an all-women show," said Howden.
Both the WTF and "Women Centre Stage" aim to give
performers the confidence and skills to hold their own in a
male-dominated environment.
Shostak explained: "I've been trying to build a section
around tactics: how do you deal with an audience member
or fellow cast member says something misogynist, or
something that offends you, something that might
isolate you as part of an ensemble? How do you hold on
to your agency, your space? How do you fight back in the
moment? Sometimes you see people being excluded or
their story is not being told just because they aren't the
most aggressive or they aren't the loudest or their stories
aren't as interesting to the other performers."
Blind Tiger Comedy isn't just about showing
diversity of gender on the stage. As of next
semester (commencing January 13, 2018)
they will be offering a diversity scholarship for new
performers, as well as hosting a people of colour jam in
February 2018.
But as with all projects that seek to subvert the status
quo, the group admits that there may be a learning curve
ahead. To this, Shostak said, "The other part about this
programming is we want this to be inclusive but we're
not the most diverse group yet, so we're open to feedback,
because we're trying to be really as inclusive as possible."
WTF is Friday, Novembers at 5:30p.m. at Little Mountain
Gallery with no registration required. There will be an optional
performance afterwards at 7:15p.m. that is open to all members
of the public. The jam show is also open to women, trans and
femme performers, along with trans-masculine or non-binary
folks who present as masculine, who don't need the drop-in
class. More information can be found on blindtigercomedy.ca
and at Blind Tiger Comedy's Facebook page.
BLIND TIGER COMEDY
 Learning I Had
A Body
WORDS BY SAMANTHA NOCK // ILLUSTRATIONS BY BANA KEARLEY
Learning I had a body
[  was a cute kid. I had these big chubby cheeks that squished my eyes into two
I  upside crescent moons when I laughed. I had a belly and rolls on my thighs
'  and arms. Basically, I was a little halfbreed bonhomme, and I was adorable.
Unfortunately, baby fat does not translate well into adolescence and I remember the first
time I was made aware that I had a body. I mean, I always knew I had a body, it was
the vessel that let me shove dino shaped chicken nuggets into it and transported me
around the playground. But, my body was never something that I was aware of, let alone,
something that others were aware of.
So, picture this, I'm in grade three, and we are playing dodgeball. The most coveted
game of gym class. Grade three was probably the last time I felt tall. I towered over the
boys in my class, and because I was a chubby kid, I also outsized them. We are playing
dodgeball, it was heated, red foam balls are flying across the gym. Kids are being hit in
the face. Kids are crying. Kids are planning attacks like army generals. It's a war, but
only it smells like sweat, plastic, and the fear of two dozen eight year olds. I'm on the
front lines because grade three is also the last time I liked being the centre of attention.
I'm dodging foam projectiles left and right, thinking I am smooth and graceful. Then,
from the backlines, one of the boys yells out, "Hey fatty! move to the back, the bigger the
target the easier to hit!" Up until that point, I had never really thought of myself as "fat"
or a "fatty" or a "target big enough to get hit." Sad and defeated, I move to the back of
the line and watched the boys laugh together. They thought it was funny I was fat and
were drunk with little seeds of toxic masculinity that was growing in their stomachs.
From that point on, I began to think of myself as a "fat kid," and I realized, the world
did too.
I moved roughly eight or nine times before I was in grade seven, and each new school
I fell into my roll as "new girl" and "new fat girl." It became a routine. It was always
the boys in the class who were first to point out my pre-adolescent rolls, and then the
girls followed suit. I would get called names on the playground by the boys in the class,
I would go to the teachers and tell them what the boys had said about me. Often, they
would brush it off as a "boys will be boys" thing or, if I was really lucky, they'd tell
me: "Oh, that means he likes you." Around the time teachers started informing me that
bullying by boys just meant they had a crush on you, was when I started developing
crushes. This phenomenon of adults telling little girls that when a boy is mean, that
means they actually like them, is nothing new. Ask any woman, and they will tell you
at some point in their childhood a teacher, an aunty, cousin, mother, or some sort of
authority figure, once was like, "Don't worry that Tommy called you an ugly she-hippo
and pushed you off the slide, dear, that just means he has a little crush on you." It's
fucked. Yet as I grew from chubby child, to chubby teenager, to chubby adult, the echoing
of men being shitty but that just means they like you followed and played a key role in
my formative teen years... ok and my early twenties... ok and my mid-twenties.
Outside of my teenage hormone filled super crushes, I have had three big loves in my
life. And all three of them were terrible. These are outside of people I have dated and
slept with (sometimes they intersected, mostly they never did), these are the Big Three
that I held a long burning flame for that was eventually snuffed out. The thing these men
had in common, is that they were all very nice. I was so used to men treating me coldly
or ignoring me all together, because, let's be honest, most dudes do not give you the time
of day unless they want to bone you. But the Big Three, I thought they were different.
They weren't the childhood boys from the playground calling me fat, they were nice! they
talked to me! about books! and music! they became my friends. They became my close
friends. They became loves of my life.
This isn't about the "friend zone"
this is about emotional labour
fvery single one of the great unreciprocated loves I've had in my life were my best
friends. Some of them knew I had feelings and some did not. They were self-described feminists, here to do their part to take on the patriarchy and help liberate
the women. Or something like that. They read feminist theory, engaged in anti-oppressive politics, frequented radical spaces. These were the dudes, I thought, that could love a
fat girl. They were nice guys. Just like I don't exist outside of internalizing the male gaze
these guys do not exist out of internalized toxic masculinity, but because they were nice
and I loved them, I didn't realize I took up a very typical socially prescribed role in their
lives.
Now, before we get any further, I want to make it clear: people of all differing genders
can all be friends with each other. I'm not saying that every person I've had feelings
for is obligated to reciprocate romantic feelings back. I'm not saying that every person I
pass on the street has to find me attractive, because attraction is complicated and highly
subjective. What I am saying though, is that relationships don't exist in a vacuum and
desirability politics will always come back to bite you in the ass. Who we choose to love
and who chooses to love us in return will always be inherently political. Now pile that
on top of being a fat Metis woman, loving is never outside of colonial set boundaries and
trying to love beyond all of this is a horrifically difficult act of revolution.
Loving these men was easy and terrible all at the same time, but I realized the hard
way, that you can't love someone into loving you the way you want them too. You can't
love someone so much and so hard that they realize they've been loving you the wrong
way this whole time. It was complicated and messy, and often ended up with me five
beers in sad texting my roommate telling her about all my feelings while we sat across
the table from each other at the bar. There is an unbearable weight to loving someone,
feeling inherently unlovable, but hyping yourself up because you think this nice guy
is different than all the other guys. It's not the other person's fault you are putting all
your eggs in their basket. And these people I'm writing about, they're not "bad men."
They're humans and I've seen them do a lot of work on themselves but unfortunately,
undoing your internalized misogyny often doesn't extend to really examining why you're
attracted to the people you're attracted to. And really, I get it. I empathize with not
wanting to do that work, because it means unraveling every bit of societal fabric you use
to cover yourself up.
>^S
LEARNING I HAD A BODY by Samantha Nock
 Long story short, I watched the Big Three loves of my life date skinny white women.
I'm not joking, I'm not being hyperbolic, I'm very serious. All three of them. Once this
happened after we had slept together and I told him that I had feelings. Like literally,
they started dating two days later. When you've lived in a body like mine and you've
grown up using humour as a coping mechanism, this is deeply funny. Trust me, you can
laugh at it. I am. Now, I'm not delusional. I would not have harboured long-standing
love for people if I didn't think it was reciprocated. I was treated gently and tenderly
by them. Sometimes we made out, hooked-up, and awkwardly cuddled in the morning
after. There were moments made so confusing by the ever-blurring line of platonic and
romantic that I would seek council from outside friends that were like, "Yeah my dude,
it's a go." When all arrows are pointing to go, and you feel like maybe you can be loved
enough to live outside your body for a minute, you throw yourself all in. Because, as a fat
girl, you're taught that moments where you are loved wholly and fully do not exist for
you, so you need to learn how to love outside yourself. I found these nice boys to help me,
love me, despite my body. I tasked these nice boys with an impossible mission that was
destined for failure.
This doesn't conclude in a nice neat package
[   've cried, a lot, about loves that were casualties in this war I've had against my
I  body. I've cried about not being desirable enough for people to want to date me.
'  I've cried about the differences in the ways my skinnier, more conventionally
attractive friends, were treated nicer than I have been. I've cried because my skinnier
friends were getting asked out and making out while I was still here, alone, with myself.
I've shed so many tears about this, that I've developed a comfortable distance so far
outside of myself that I sometimes feel like a voyeur looking through an uncovered
window into someone else's life.
The weeks leading up to my most recent heartbreak I was having nightmares about
this person. He and I were fighting about mundane things, sometimes we were fighting
about huge, very personal things. Often, we were just fighting because I think intrinsically, I knew something was off. I have always been told that our ancestors communicate
with us through our dreams, and I laughed because I couldn't imagine my great great
great kokum warning me about a white boy. But I guess that's probably not too far off
the mark of a possibility. I had put a lot of hope into this situation and had declared this
one the Last Time I Fall in Love. I'm really dramatic, sometimes (all the time). When the
time came for the heartbreak to happen, I let it happen and didn't really cry. Instead,
I felt relieved. I felt like I could breathe again. I realized, that I had been holding my
breath for so long, waiting, wishing, for an impossible situation to come to fruition. I had
held out every hope for this one person to help me enter my own body again. This was a
long lesson in learning that you can't expect someone to just have the tools to save you
because they're nice and nice to you. You have all the tools you need already.
Hot take: decolonial love isn't about how
others love you
[   n 2012 interview for the Boston Review, author Junot Diaz, described a "certain
I  kind of love" that could "liberate [...] from that horrible legacy of colonial
' violence." That "certain kind of love" he was talking about, was this concept of
"decolonial love." Decolonial love is a concept that has been taken up by many other
authors who have felt the brunt of colonization. Anishinaabe writer Leanne Simpson
came out with her pivotal collection of short stories entitled, Islands of Decolonial Love, in
2013. Most recently, in 2017, Anishinaabe-Metis writer and all around badass, Gwendolyn
Benaway came out with her article, "Decolonial Love: A How-To Guide." In her how-to
guide, Benaway simply states:
"Love is constructed by whiteness and colonial narratives to be many things,
but decolonial love is not a Katie Perry song. Love does not fix you, heal your past,
resolve your insecurities, or lead you to violate your boundaries."
Um, wow Gwen, why don't you just @ me next time. Could it be that this whole time
I was looking for love in the faces of these nice boys, looking for someone to love me
despite my fatness, despite my colonial trauma, despite the laundry list of shitty things
that have made me the anxious freak I am today, I was just playing into colonial narratives? Short answer: yes. Long answer: also, yes.
I have been spending time, since I was a teenager, trying to get others to love me
into being a person. When I grew up, and started thinking through concepts of radical,
decolonial love, I always hoped that someone would feel those things for me. I never
stopped to think, that maybe, just maybe, you can't find yourself in the body of someone
else. You need to love yourself radically and wholly, outside of the boundaries colonization has built for you. Great epiphany I know, easier said than done. Loving yourself is
simpler when you have someone else telling you why you should be loved, but when you
live in a fat body, you are constantly living in a world that tells you exactly why you are
not deserving of love or desire. If you're a woman, you live in a world where your love
and desire are tightly monitored and you're told your emotions are not your own. Outside
of calling it quits and becoming an old witchy lady that lives in a shack in the woods and
scares the neighbourhood kids, I'm not sure what the answers are. How do you mitigate
a society that continually calls you disgusting with the deep need to love yourself so you
don't turn into a shrivelled up, untouched raisin?
-^s.
<>*\
You just do it, at least, that's what I'm starting to realize. You just have to take that
big leap and say, "Sorry really nice white boy, but not today!" and put yourself first and
learn how to love yourself deeply, and radically. The more I think through this the more I
realize that radically loving yourself isn't a destination. I can't earn enough frequent flier
miles on all my past mistakes in hopes that eventually I'll accumulate enough to land me
in the land of Self Actualization. The decoloniality of loving yourself enough is the actual
journey you embark upon. Maybe this epiphany isn't new and countless other chubbers
halfbreeds are sitting there mending their broken hearts with cans of Old Mill and cups
of coffee, writing about how they think they've cracked the code. Or maybe it is. Either
way, it's new to me.
I've been reading a lot about genetic memories and intergenerational trauma. I've been
thinking a lot about the dreams I have before bad things happen, and how my intuition
is pretty much never wrong. I've been thinking about how maybe all of this is genetic
memory. It's my ancestors passed down traumas and insights that have lead me to live
the complicated and messy life I have lived. It's them, and their intrinsic teachings that
already exist in my body, that have been teaching me all these lessons. Maybe, a part of
decolonial love is finding a love outside of yourself that loves you through all the colonial
trauma. But I think it's more than that. Decolonial love is learning to love yourself so
much so, that, when your future generations are sitting there, worried, anxious, and
heartbroken, they can have the strength to pull themselves back up again and learn to
love themselves: fully, wholly, and outside of another person's existence. Maybe, just
maybe, generations of the decolonial love passed down from our ancestors is that voice in
the back of our head and the feeling in the pit of our stomachs telling us: "It's going to
be ok, you are enough."
Samantha Nock is a Cree-Metis poet and writer from Dawson Creek, B.C.. Her family originates
from Sakitawak or Ile-a-la-Crosse, Saskatchewan. She has been published in GUTS Magazine,
Red Rising Magazine, Shameless Magazine, and Mamawi-acimowak: Lit, Crit, and Art Literary
Journal. She cares about radical decolonization, coffee, corgis, and her two cats, Betty and Jughead.
You can find her tweeting at @sammymarie. More writing at halfbreedsreasoning.com.
Kokum: Creefor Grcmdnia
Junot Diaz, c''~The Search for Decolonial Love: An Interview with Junot Diaz," interview by Paula M. L. Meya, the Boston Review
June 2Gh, 2012, online.
http://bostonreview.net/boo fo-ideas/paulM-ml-mq)>a-d£colonial-lme-interviewjunot-d%('3%ADaz
Gwendolywn Benawcy, 'Decolonial Dive: A I low-To Guide," Working It Out Together.
http://workirigitouttogether.com/contmt/decolonial-loi-e-a-how-to-guide/
LEARNING I HAD A BODY by Samantha Nock
 ON THE AIR
U DO U RADIO
interview  by Hilary   Ison //   illustration by David Wakeham
photo  by Peter Hawkins
falen Allan is a DJ with a focus on electronic music. He has a new show on CiTR wi.gFM
called u do you radio, airing on Thursdays at ua.m.. During our conversation, we chatted
about his approach to planning the show, the fluid nature of electronic music, and his
experiences in the Vancouver DJ scene.
Hilary Ison: Do you listen to radio, yourself?
Galen Allan: Yeah, I listen to a lot of
shows after the fact — a lot of radio
stations in London and Berlin that aren't
on at the right time here, but that's what
so great about Soundcloud or Mixcloud.
For me, that's where I explore music. I
find so much music listening to other DJs.
And it's kinda cool that it's still coming from a
radio format.
Yeah, and I'm playing the music here,
and people are asking me what song that
was. So I find it, I like it, I share it, and
people dig it. There's continuous sharing.
The whole DJ world involves getting music from
other people, sharing.
Yeah, it's a funny flow of ideas in the
form of songs, especially because you can
break songs down into samples, so people
take samples and then use those samples
in their songs, and they heard that sample
from a song on the radio. Especially with
electronic music, because it's so easily
disseminated and reformed and put in a
new parameter, like you can take a funk
sample, chop and screw it and mush it
down and you're listening to techno.
So is there a particular idea behind udou radio,
or themes in specific episodes?
Each episode is very indicative of what
my listening habit has been over the last
week or two. So a lot of the times, it's new
music. I'll hear a song I like so I'll track
that song down because I want to play it.
The idea of the show is just to share the
music that I like and I'm listening to.
So do you do a lot ofDJing out in Vancouver,
too?
Yep. I moved home to Vancouver to go to
school in September 2016. I was living in
London for two years, just DJing, and I was
in Toronto for three years before that. So
I've been away for a while. Before I moved
away I was DJing a bunch, in my previous
DJ career, I like to say.
A different identity?
Completely. There are still some songs
that I'd bring out in a set, but I was just
DJing down on the Granville Strip and
stuff. It was all electronic, but more
disco, bloghouse. I always think about
my musical progression from when I
started DJing to now, and it continues
to evolve. When I program for the show,
it's completely experimental. I play a lot
of ambient to start the shows off with, I
think it's a good way to get into a show
and set the vibe, and I wouldn't have been
interested in that before. Ambient to me is
some of the most interesting stuff to listen
to because it's more emotive. I still can't
really DJ that stuff anywhere. You can't
be out on the dancefloor playing ambient
tunes.
So what's your experience of playing in
Vancouver?
We have a night at the Boxcar called
Cuddy Sessions which is tons of fun. It's
the first Thursday of every month. We
just play whatever. Disco, Kenyan surf
tracks, '80s [...] super weird and random.
We've had a lot of friends come in with
their music, and I'll teach them how to DJ
on the fly. I would love to play some acid
techno somewhere, but I don't have those
connections right now. And Vancouver's
not huge, so there aren't too many opportunities to do it.
I guess it's obvious when you know you're
doing a good job as a DJ.
Yeah, it's really obvious, especially if
you're playing a dancefloor. At the Boxcar
there's no dancefloor, but we've had a
lot of dancing going on there, and that's
when you know you're doing a really good
job — when there's not even a place to
dance and people are dancing. But yeah,
it's pretty easy to tell. Recently I was
DJing a movie premiere at the Imperial.
It was a Wednesday night and people
usually just go home after the movie, but
the management wanted us to stay and DJ
so they could sell beer. There was nobody
dancing, and I played one song and all of a
sudden ten people were on the dancefloor.
I didn't even know ten people were still
there, like, where'd they come from? So
sometimes it works, and sometimes it
doesn't.
Why did you want to start a radio show?
I had a radio show called Friends of The
North on Toronto Radio Project [TRP],
internet radio. It lasted about two years.
Having an outlet to share the music I
listen to, it's always been something I've
wanted to do. I think that's why I started
DJing — to be able to select the music and
curate what everybody's listening to. It's
kind of a weird control issue probably, but
hopefully people think I should be doing
it.
That's why we have experts in things.
So people can do it for us.
udou radio is self-described as "Acid, Afro-beat,
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of classic house."
Ifthat'syour thing, tune into CiTR 101.9FM
Thursdays at ua.m., or listen at citr.ca. Archived
episodes at citr.ca/radio/u-do-u-radio.
OF
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
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FRIENDS OF CiTR + DISCORDER locations.
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and accessories.
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music books
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ON THE AIR I udou radio
(VISIT:
CiTR
. C a/friends
for more   info. )
 •zr^r
^
u.$M
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0
sponfcap
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
T'RANCENDANCE
GHOST MIX
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
SYNCHRONICITY
PARTS UNKNOWN
THE BURROW
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
CueaDap
PACIFIC PICON"
QUEER FM VANCOUVER:
RELOADED
TEXTBOOK
MORNING AFTER SHOW
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
PARTICLES & WAVES
INTO THE
WOODS
DOUBLE
SPACE
STUDENT FILL-IN
©UUtmc6tiap
CITR GHOST MI)
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
POP DRONES
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
Cfmratmp
CITR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
THE YOUTH ELEMENT
PODCAST
STUDENT
FILL IN
CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
STUDENT
FILL-IN
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
U DO U RADIO
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
ROOM TONE
KEW IT UP
ALL ACCESS PASS
K-POP   CAFE
VIBES  &  STUFF
JFritmp
AURAL TENTACLES
CANADALAND
CITED!
MIXTAPES WITH
MC & MAC
THE REEL WHIRLED
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
ASTROTALK
TERRA INFORMA
INTERSECTIONS
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
&>aturt>ap
GTOST MIX
THE SATURDAY EDGE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
POWER   CHORD
CODE  BLUE
$>unftap
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
CLASSICAL CHAOS
SHOOKSHOOKTA
THE ROCKERS SHOW
LA  FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
5 PM
THE  LEO  RAMIREZ
SHOW
WORD  ON   THE  STREET
ARTS REPORT
DEMOCRACY WATCH
THE UBC HAPPY HOUR
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6 PM
FINDING THE FUNNY
ANECDOTAL EVIDENCE
STUDENT FILL-IN
FLEX YOUR HEAD
7 PM
INNER
SPACE
EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
ARE YOU
AWARE
SAMS
QUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
NO DEAD
AIR
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
m\miAL
PROJECT
STUDENT
FILL-IN
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
8 PM
STUDENT FILL-IN
MIX CASETTE
CI RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
THE NEW ERA
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
CRIMES & TREASONS
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
T'RANCENDANCE
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
NINTH WAVE
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER
ROOM
COPY / PASTE
11PM
THE MEDICINE SHOW
12 AM
RANDOPHONIC
THE AFTN SOCCER
SHOW
THE SCREEN GIRLS
1AM
CITR GHOST MIX
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
CITR GHOST MIX
SPICY BOYS
CITR GHOST MIX
12 AM
AURAL TENTACLES
1AM
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
OF INSOMNIA
CITR GHOST MIX
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
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DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERYDAY"
 ■ iWONUAV
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththe-
browns@hotmail.com
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
11AM-12PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
second season! The team
of Indigenous and non-
Indigenous peeps produce the
show weekly. We talk about
Indigenous issues, current
events, and entertainment
centering Native voices through
interviews and the arts. Come
make Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Follow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves/
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE BURROW
3PM-4PM, rock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
department manager Andy
Resto, the Burrow is Noise
Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock:
with a nice blend of old
classics' and new releases.
Interviews & Live performances.
Contact: music@citr.ca
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
4PM-5PM,JA22
Host Jade spins old recordings
of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies and motown.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm-6:30pm, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
IESDAV
THE SCREEN GIRLS
12AM-1AM, HIP HOP/r&b/ SOUL
The Screen Girls merge music
and art with discussions of
trends and pop culture, and
interviews with artists in
contemporary art, fashion and
music. We play a variety of
music, focusing on promoting
Canadian hip hop and R&B.
Contact: info@thescreengirls.com
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM8am-io:30am, talk/
politics
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmail.com
TEXTBOOK
TUES,  10:30-11:30, TALK
Textbook (FKA The Student
Special Hour) is a student
show covering textbook
(and not so textbook)
approaches to student life.
Contact: outreach@citr.ca
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ROCK / POP / INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM,  ROCK / POP / INDIE
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communitylivingradio@gmail. com
PARTICLES & WAVES
2PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Like the quantum theory it
is named for, Particles and
Waves defies definition. Join
Mia for local indie, sci-fi prog
rock, classic soul, obscure
soundtracks, Toto'sdeep
cuts, and much more.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DOUBLE SPACE
ALTERNATING TUES 3PM-4PM, TALK/
DESIGN / FEMENISM
Investigating interactions with our
surroundings and society. Every
week we discuss our experiences
with these interactions, how
they emerge and the impacts
of these invisible forces.
Twitter | @doublespaceshow
INTO THE WOODS
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope:
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
WORD ON THE STREET
5pm-6pm, rock/indie/pop.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
9PM-11PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room:
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/ POP
Jayden targets the audience
in the Korean community in
Vancouver to introduce the
News on Korea, Korean Culture
while comparing other Asian
Cultures, plays all kinds of
Korean Music(K-POP, Hip Hop:
Indie, R&B,etc),talk about the
popular trend in the industry of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows:
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, what's
going on in Korean Society here
in Vancouver, Talk with Guests.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROOM TONE
2PM-3PM, talk/interview/film
Room Tone is a talk show
focused on Filmmaking that
invites guests weekly to
discuss their slices of reality
on set, tips, past/future
projects and love for the craft!
From Directors/Producers:
to Cinematographers:
Production Designers, Actors:
Composers, Writers, Editors...
anyone !(Theatre/Video
Games/Animation/Fashion
or any other sort of creative
entertainment is welcome).
Contact:
listentoroomtone@gmail.com
KEWIT UP
3PM-4PM,  EXPERIMENTAL/TALK
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica:
Post-Punk, Industrial.
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
4PM-5PM, talk/ accessibility
POLITICS
CiTR Accessibility Collective's
new radio show. We talk
about equity, inclusion, and
accessibility for people with
diverse abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every week
for interviews, music, news:
events, and awesome dialogue.
Contact:
accessibilityc ollective@citr. ca
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM,TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC:
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves
on CiTR Radio 101.9FM:
Wednesdays from 5-6pm.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
ANECDOTAL EVIDENCE
6pm-6:30pm, talk / story telling
Anecdotal Evidence is a live
storytelling series in Vancouver
where people share true stories
of how they experience science
in their lives; stories of failure,
fieldwork, love, death, cosmic
loneliness and more. Tune
in for humour, humanity, and
sometimes even science.
Contact: Twitter | ae_stories
INNER SPACE
6:30pm-8pm, electronic/dance
Dedicated to underground
electronic music, both
experimental and dance-
oriented. Live DJ sets and
guests throughout.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE NEW ERA
9PM-10PM, HIP HOP/ R&b/ SOUL
A showcase of up n' coming artists
who are considered "underdogs'
in the music industry. We provide
a platform for new artists who are
looking for radio play. Bringing
you different styles of Hip Hop
music from all across the Earth
and interviews with music industry
professionals. It's the NEW ERA...
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM, HIP HOP/ R&b/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk, and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK/ SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSDAV
SPICY BOYS
12AM-1AM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
Playing music and stuff.
You can listen.
Or don't.
It's up to you.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture:
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE YOUTH ELEMENT PODCAST
8AM-9AM,TALK /YOUTH
Welcome to the Asia Pacific
Foundation of Canada's new
podcast series about youth
cultures in East Asia. Over
the next several weeks, join
co-hosts Justin Kwan and Linda
Qian as they travel across five
cities in East Asia: ShanghaL
Taipei, Hong Kong, Tokyo and
Seoul, to listen to the voices
of millennials and learn more
about contemporary East Asia
through their views and the
stories of their own lives.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CONVICTIONS & CONTRADICTIONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society; shown through social
observational comedy. To boot
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr(3>gmail. com,
(3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/RocketFromR ussia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored bydonuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
K-POPCAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean:
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B.
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
VIBES & STUFF
2PM-3PM, HIP-HOP / R&B / SOUL
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and
Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to
contemporary hip-hop artists
all in one segment. DJ Bmatt
& Dak Genius will have you
reminiscing about the good
ol' times with Vibes and
Stuff every week! skrt skrt
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
3-3:30pm, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TERRA INFORMA
3:30-4pm, talk/enviromental
Environmental News:
syndicated from CJSR
88.5FM in Edmonton.
Contact: sports@citr.ca
INTERSECTIONS
4PM-5PM, talk/feminism/gender
EMPOWERMENT
The Gender Empowerment
Collective's goal is to center
the voices, issues, concerns:
and experiences of women:
transgender, intersex, Two-
Spirit, genderqueer, gender
non-conforming, non-binary:
and gender fluid folks and allies.
Tune in weekly for interviews:
commentary, stories and news
from YOUR communities.
Contact:
genderempowerment@citr.ca
DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK /NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this
is CiTR's brnad new Current
Affairs show! Tune in weekly
for commentary, interviews,
and headlines from around
the Lower mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
ECLECTIC
Celebrating the message
behind the music. Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NO DEAD AIR
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
JAZZ FUSION / POST ROCK
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion:
experimental electronic, and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook | NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30PM-gpM, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ FR1DAV
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact: auraltentacles@hotmail.
com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
87AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact:
jesse@canadalandshow.com
CITED!
8AM-9AM, talk/academia
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact: facebook.com/citedpod-
cast, Twitter | @citedpodcast
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM, rock/pop/indie
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary:
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion:
mastery, and a 'IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@gmail.com
MUZAK FOR THE OBESERVANT
1PM-2PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
CiTR Music department
program, highlighting the
newest/freshest cuts from the
stations bowels. Features live
interviews and performances
from local artists.
Contact: music@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp://nardwuar. com/rad/contact/
THE UBCHAPPYHOUR
5pm-6pm, talk/news/current
AFFAIRS
The UBC Happy Hour is
produced by the UBC Affairs
Collective, and made by
students, for students! The
show is all about what's
happening on UBC's campus.
Tune in for updates on
campus news, clubs outreach
and just about everything
else you can find at UBC!
Contact: ubcaffairs@citr.ca
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6pm - 7PM, talk/comedy
6pm-7pm, Every week Jack.
Tristan and a special guest
randomly select a conversation
topic for the entire show;
ranging from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure.Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-gpM, r&b/soul/inter-
IMATIONAL
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop:
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE DIGITAL TATTOO PODCAST
PROJECT
The Digital Tattoo Podcast
Project raises questions:
provides examples, speaks
with experts, and encourages
you to think about your
presence online. Our goal
is to help you navigate the
issues involved in forming and
re-forming your digital identity
and learn about your rights
and responsibilities as a digital
citizen. It's really just about
making informed decisions
and your own decisions.
Contact: Twitter | @DTatUBC
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock remains committed to the
best in post-rock, drone, ambient
experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can
put the word "post' in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, eclectic/live
INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco uvermedicineshow(3>gmail. com
■ SATURDAV
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citrlatenightshow@gmail.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll
like it. Sonic assault provided
by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary:
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmail.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy:
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmail.com
SOCASTORM
8PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
Papayo!!#SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
8bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era -1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
7AM-9AM, experimental/difficult
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPAN© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter \ @BEPICRE-
SPAN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
9AM-10AM, CLASSICAL
From the Ancient World to
the 21 st century, join host
Marguerite in exploring and
celebrating classical music
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmail.com,
Twitter | @nwtpoclcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM, ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
gPM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem.
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmileymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS:
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ ISLAND OP
LOST TOVS
STUDENT FILL IN
ECLECTIC
A place for experimentation
& learning!
MOONGROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9FM OCTOBER CHARTS
#rtfet          8Xbum          llabei
«
Godspeed You! Black
Emperor*#
Luciferian Towers
Constellation
^
Alvvays*#
Antisocialites
8
Polyvinyl
»
Faith Healer*#
Try;-)
8
Mint
*
Holy Hum*+
All Of My Bodies
8
Heavy Lark
»
METZ*
Strange Peace
8
Royal Mountain
s
Kronos Quartets
Folk Songs
8
Nonesuch
»
Maya Jane Coles#
Take Flight
l/AM/ME
•
Petunia & The Vipers*+
Lonesome Heavy &
Lonesome
8
Self-Released
1»
Chad VanGaalen*
Light Information
8
Flemish Eye
M
respectfulchild*#
Searching
8
Coax
»
KMVP*+#
KMVD - Revenge Demo
8
Self-Released
O
Birds of Paradise*#
Love Hotel EP
REC
«
Chelsea Wolfe#
Hiss Spun
8
Sargent House
1m
Trailer Trash Tracys#
Althaea
8
Domino
IB
Wares*#
Wares
8
Double Lunch
«
The Weather Station**
The Weather Station
8
Outside Music
*
Forager*
Scribe Stepping In and Out
of Season
8
Self-Released
M
Golden Retriever
Rotations
8
Thrill Jockey
«
Julia Holter#
Live at RAK: In The Same
Room
8
Domino
a
Partner**
In Search Of Lost Time
8
You've Changed
a
Woolworm*+
Deserve To Die
8
Mint
£
Kaitlyn Aurelia Smiths
The Kid
8
Western Vinyl
3
Liars
TFCF
Mute
M
Lt. Frank Dickens*+
Sour Bubblegum
1
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Mount Kimbie
Love What Survives
Warp
a
Naomi Punk
Yellow
8
Captured Tracks
»
Pale Lips*#
Should"ve Known Better!
8
Surfin Kl Records
2,
Phono Pony*+#
Death By Blowfish
8
Self-Released
h»
Sam Coffey and the Iron
Lunqs*
Sam Coffey & The Iron
Lungs
8
Burger
»
Shimmers
Shimmer
8
Drop Medium
»
The Deep Dark Woods*
Yarrow
8
Six Shooter
J2
Alex Cameron
Forced Witness
8
Secretly Canadian
»
Cat Clyde*#
Ivory Castanets
8
Cinematic
»
Colin Cowan & the Elastic
Stars*+
Cosmos In Summer
8
Self-Released
»
David Nance
Negative Boogie
8
BaDaBing!
3s
Quantum Tangle*#
Shelter As We Go...
8
Coax
»
Hermitess*#
Hermitess
8
Self-Released
Ja
Jom Comyn*
1 Need Love
8
Sweety Pie
»
This is
An Evil
8
Number
«
Uptights*+
Time + Space
8
Other Wonders
*
Wolfgang
Amadeus
8
Mozart
N
Sannhet
So Numb
8
Profound Lore
*
King Krule
The OOZ
8
True Panther
«
Le Plaisir*#
Le Plaisir
8
Self-Released
*
Mappe Of*
A Northern Star, A Perfect
Stone
8
Paper Bag
■'«
Oh Sees
Ore
8
Castle Face
»
Sam Tudor*+
Quotidian Dream
8
Self-Released
«
Jon Cohen Experiment*
Go Getters
8
Sugar Gator Records   it
1*
Zellots, The*+#
S/T
Supreme Echo
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Laura Sauvage*#
The Beautiful
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CiTR 101.9FM & Discorder Magazine
present
The official line-up
for the
34th   Annual
o\
SHIN
x-x-x-
27 bands, 27 winners for $6
every Tuesday
-x-x-x-
Hastings Mill Brewing Company,
FKA Pat's Pub & Brewhouse
Oct 10
Mi'ens
Modern Day Poets
The Sylvia Platters
Oct 17
Basic Instinct
Sissy Heathens
Ap r il Fools
Childrenhood
Oct 24
Kmvp
Parlour
Panther
The Dead Zones
Oct 31
Bored Decor
The Maneuver
Lave r ne
Nov 7
Sorry Edith
Reign Cloud
No Mothers
Nov 14
Sexy Merlin
Last Forest
Pleasure Blimps
Nov 21
The Civil Dead
Tangiers
M a m a r u d e g y a 1
Nov 28
King Buzzard
Mooshy Face
These Guy
Dec 5
The Afrolution
Dammit
Samantha
Duck
T=M
Cannery Brewing
six
Ocent    (rxr
press   v£
HACKLING
 NOAH
GUNDERSEN
SHABAZZ
pALACES
THE WEATHER
STATION
J£
; 1     V   I I
1981
ONCERTS
November 3    November 5 November 7
BLANCK MASS    KING KRULE ' TED LEO & THE PHARMACISTS
Fox Cabaret iVogue Theatre The Cobalt
'MoTT-ciTn'hci-r 1 fl
November 8        November 9  November 10   November 11
THE WEATHER STATION GAVIN TUREK      MICHL       JAWS OF LOVE
Fox Cabaret       Fox Cabaret  Fox Cabaret St. James Hall
November 11 November 11     November 12
THE ELWINS + FAST ROMANTICS  TREVOR HALL NOAH GUNDERSEN
The Cobalt Imperial        Imperial
November 14
HAMILTON LEITHAUSER
The Biltmore
November 16      November 18
FOREIGN BEGGARS  JULIA JACKLIN
November 18
SHIGETO
The Cobalt      The Biltmore    Imperial
November 20
FLYING LOTUS IN 3D
Vogue Theatre
November  23
GARY NUMAN
Rickshaw Theatre
November 24
SYD
Fox Cabaret I Vogue Theatre
November 24
baio     I
Fox Cabaret
November 25
MOGWAI
Commodore Ballroom
December 2
TENNIS
The Cobalt
December 1 December 1
COM TRUISE DJ SET   SHABAZZ PALACES
Open Studios
The Cobalt
December 6    December 8     December 8
LEIF VOLLEBEKK   METZ   PATTERSON HOOD
Imperial    I The Cobalt I   Fox Cabaret
December 9
HUNDRED WATERS
Fox Cabaret
December 9
JULIEN BAKER
Rickshaw Theatre
December 12   December 21
ALEXLAHEY   XAVIER OMAR
The Cobalt   Fox Cabaret
January 12
STEVE GUNN & JULIE BYRNE
St. James Hall
January 18
HIPPO CAMPUS
The Imperial
January  19
CONVERGE
Rickshaw Theatre
Tickets  & more  shows at
timbreconcerts.com
&

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