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  254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
UPCOMING SHOWS
NEUTERHEAD FUNDRAISER
COVER BANDS BY MEMBERS OF
3 INCHES OF BLOOD, BAPTISTS,
BISON, NO SINNER, HOOKERS,
SUMAC, GOATSBLOOD & MORE
TROKER
WITH GUESTS
Q»
ACE OF SPAYS
FRIDAY ;oor
m feb 2 k
INTERVALS
JASON RICHARDSON, NICK
JOHNSTON, NIGHT VERSES
"ECHOES"
A FIVE YEAR ANNIVERSARY
P    WHAMMYS
K    2017 AWARDS PRESENTATION
SNOWED IN COMEDY
TOUR 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY
SCOTT THOMPSON, PETE
ZEDLACHER,PAULMYREHAUG,
DAN OUINN
EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE!
THE GREAT SATAN'FILM TOUR
FEB
MATISYAHU
EMINENCE ENSEMBLE
SEBELL SARA DIAMOND,
FRANCOIS KLARK
BURGER-A-GOGO (NIGHT 1):
THE COATHANGERS
DEATH VALLEY GIRLS, THE
FLYTRAPS, FEELS
BURGER-A-GOGO (NIGHT 2):
DENGUE FEVER
WINTER, SUMMER TWINS, ROYA
attux u/icr UAII -
FEB
RON POPE
FIVE YEAR ANNIVERSARY
THE NATIONAL PARKS, THE
HEART OF
POLYRHYTHMICS
COCOJAFRO
POLYRHYTHMICS
FALL TOUR 2017     \
COCOJAFRC
TYPHOON
WILD ONES, AMENTA ABIOTO
f
THE UNCONVENTIONAL
ROMANCE VARIETY SHOW
WITH SHIRLEY GNOME &
FRIENDS SARA BYNOE, VIXEN
VON FLEX, BLOODY BETTY, HOST
KATIE-ELLEN HUMPHRIES
FEB
STARSET PALISADES,
GRABBITZ, YEAR OF THE LOCUST
SUPERCHUNK
BAT FANGS
HAUNTED SUMMER
&MORE
THE REAL MACKENZIES
RAYGUN COWBOYS
blueprint
BBEE-
UPCOMING EVENTS
aL.
^*^*»«
Feb 11
Feb 22
Feb 22
Feb 23
Feb 24
MarlO
Mar 17
Mar 17
Mar 29
Mar
Mar 30
Mar 30
Apr 03
Apr 04
Apr 12
May 04
JENN GRANT
PRINCESS NOKIA
(2 SHOWS - ALL AGES &. 19+)
THE COATHANGERS
BURGER A-GO-GO: DAY 1
DENGUE FEVER
BURGER A-GO-GO: DAY 2
NO AGE
FLESH WORLD / JO PASSED
J.I.D. & EARTHGANG
THE CAVE SINGERS
GOOD RIDDANCE
EMANCIPATOR
SEASONS FESTIVAL
FEAT. RAE SREMMURD. ZHU + MORE! (ALL AGES)
BATHS
TREEPEOPLE
FEAT. DOUG MARTSCH OF BUILT TO SPILL
CHROMEO
YOUNG GALAXY
DIGITALISM
BORN RUFFIANS
CELEBRITIES
RICKSHAW
RICKSHAW
FORTUNE
IMPERIAL
PACIFIC
COLISEUM
FORTUNE
COMMODORE
FORTUNE
FORTUNE
BLACK WIZARD mean
JEANS, WAINGRO, KILLER DEAL
*\    Z
Additional show listings, ticket info, videos & more:
May 08
PETER HOOK 8^ THE LIGHT
(NEW ORDER/JOY DIVISION)
ADVANCE TICKETS FOR ALL EVENTS AT BPLIVE.CA
 TABLE of COFITEFITS
FEBRUARY 2018
COVER I "BUKOWSKI LOVER" ACRYLIC PAINTING BY SHANNON LESTER.
ARTIST STATEMENT CAN BE FOUND ON PG.13
iFeattire*
06   -  OVERDOSE  CRISIS  UPDATE
#InjusticeIsFatal
08 -  DARK  TIMES
You could call it a Phoenix
09 -  NECKING
Put these punks in a Ford commercial, please
16 -   CD-RTICLE
Sydney Thorne goes through her old cd collection
17 -   COCONUTZ  & BANANAS
"...not a recipe for pie or cocktails"
18 -  BATHHOUSES
David Cutting takes us for a steam
Column* + iDt&er £>ttiff
04 - Unceded:
Making Room for
Indigenous Feminisms
05 - Transmission
from PLOT:
PACE Society
10 - Real Live Action
music, fashion
12 -  Art  Project
Shannon Lester
13 - February Events Calendar
16  - Under Review
music, podcasts, books
20 - On The  Air:
Astrotalk
21 -  CiTR Program Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 -  January Charts
ADVERTISE:Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words
to Discorder, please contact the
editor ateditor.discorder@citr.ca.
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director at artcoordinator@citr.ca.
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SOCAN
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Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station Manager: Hugo Noriega // Advertising
Coordinator: Audrey MacDonald // Discorder Student Executive: Tintin Yang // Editor-in-Chief: Brit
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// Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Social Media Coordinator: Sydney Ball // Accounts Manager:
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©Discorder 2018 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR.
located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiherh speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM.
online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
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&m. Consent
education* 3ticiu*ftttp«
EDITOR'S NOTE
Vou have probably guessed by Shannon Lester's cover art, Discorder is
playing with fire this month. And why not? Consumer culture has us
passing by heart-shaped balloons in grocery stores, buying the Valentine's
Day versions of our favourite snacks, and scrolling by couple getaway ads in our
Instagram feeds. It can be argued that the month of February has been hijacked by
capitalist consumer agendas, but we at Discorder refuse to comply. In part, we reject
the dominant heteronormative vision of what sexy is. We want to show you what
we think is sexy: sex, consent, education, inclusivity.
This issue features the all-Trans burlesque and go-go party, Coconutz & Bananas;
an article on bathhouses by local drag entertainer and writer, David Cutting; a
profile on PACE, a society "by, with and for sex workers since 1994"; and an
interview with soft punks, Necking.
We would also like to acknowledge that this is an important month for other
communities:
February is Black History Month. CiTR 101.9FM will be honouring this with
special weekly programming, which will include a piece on Hogan's Alley by Lexi
Mellish Mingo and Tintin Yang, based on Lexi's article from November 2017. Keep
your eyes open for other celebrations across the Lower Mainland.
February 14 will mark the 26th Annual Women's Memorial March in Vancouver's
Downtown Eastside. It is a time to march together in remembrance of missing and
murdered Indigenous women, to commemorate where they were last seen, and to
commit to finding justice.
February 20 is the National Day of Action on the Overdose Crisis. The event was
first reported on by Discorder in February 2017. In this issue, Oona Krieg gives us an
update on the overdose crisis and drug policies one year later.
■  hile I was editing this issue, I realized a secondary theme — stigma.
Ill  Many of the articles this month address the shame that is projected
^F^r    onto peoples' bodies, sexualities and interests. Through this collection
of articles and reviews, the people interviewed in this issue and contributors
themselves have done an incredible job of mapping ways to overcome the stigmas
that cripple individuals and communities, and stall policy-making.
I hope you find this issue challenging, in a good way.
A+
BB
r
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Tuesdays 2-3PM
INDIGENOUS COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'Unceded Airwaves'
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MUSIC AFFAIRS
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Tune into 'Word on the Street'
Tuesdays from 5-6PM
I   NEWS COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'Democracy Watch
Thursdays from 5-6pm
SPORTS COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'Thunderbird Eye'
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CONTACT V0LUNTEER@CITR.CA
 Discorder magazine | FEBRUARY 201?
TRANSMISSION FROM PLOT
f RE-APPROPRIATING STIGMATIZED S(PACE)
words  by Lexi Mellish Mingo  //   illustration by Amy Brereton //  photos  by Erin Flemming
EDITOR'S NOTE: This column was conceived to document organizations, movements and events
that the Discorder team encountered while working out of PLOT, our temporary off-site location at
Access Gallery in Vancouver's Chinatown. The CiTR/Discorder PLOT residency concludes February
3, marking this article as the final Transmission From PLOT. We are very excited to feature PACE
Society, who came on our radar after participating in PSA Day in December 2017.1 would like to
give a final thankyou to Catherine, Katie, Chelsea and everyone else at Access Gallery who made our
residency so special. -BB
Ottawa is over 4,000 kilometres
away from Vancouver and yet, it is
the epicentre of political decisionmaking in Canada. The global perception
of Canada is saturated with Utopian ideas,
where notions of inequality are issues
that exist only beyond colonial borders.
Generalizations stem from distance,
whether physical or symbolic. When the
Government can't see their people, they
cannot help them.
A motto persistently advocated by Laura
Dilley, Executive Director at the PACE
Society, is that PACE "meets people where
they're at." Founded by sex workers in
Vancouver's Downtown Eastside in the
'90s, PACE is a peer-driven association
organized "by, with and for sex workers"
with help from a network of community
allies. The organization advocates for safer
working conditions for sex workers and
offers individualized support not easily
accessible within the existing systems.
One of PACE'S main objectives is to
combat the stigma around sex work, a task
that is led in part by Caroline Doerksen,
their Community Educator. A common
misconception regarding sex work, is that
there is only one narrative. Portraying sex
workers as isolated, victimized and
powerless women participating in the
industry against their wills. Like any other
occupation, sex work has its baggage, but
Laura emphasizes thoroughly that "sex
work is work and without labour protections
under the law, they are at risk of increased
violence and exploitation."
Sex workers are not confined to a
single gender, nor are they from a single
demographic. They work in vast spheres
of sexual expression, within communities comprised of individuals of diverse
4
identities. The stigma around sex work
has been shaped through a history of
dominant patriarchal perspectives,
perpetuated through Canadian legislation. PACE advocates for decriminalization
of sex work and until that happens, the
stigma remains entrenched in the broader
public perception of sex work and sex
workers.
n December 2013, the Supreme
I   Court of Canada (SCC) struck down
I   provisions in the criminal code
making it illegal to sell and purchase sex
on the basis that these laws violated sex
workers' human rights under section 7 of
the charter. The SCC gave the Conservative
government one year to amend the laws
to make them constitutional. However, in
June 2014 the Conservatives introduced Bill
C-36, now the Protections of Communities
and Exploited Persons Act (PCEPA), which
recreates the harms of the old laws that
the SCC struck down for being unconstitutional in the first place.
Although the new bill was asserted as
a tool to protect sex workers, it generated
greater risks for street sex workers. Under
Bill C-36, purchasing or being involved as
a third party has been criminalized, while
the act of selling is legal. Legal stipulations
forced workers into precarious and isolated
environments, away from the eyes of the
law, and consequently the eyes of "safety."
"Bill C-36 is what we are working under,
and unfortunately it is also tied up in a
lot of the conflation of what sex work is
and what human trafficking is," Caroline
explains. The Canadian Department of
Justice claims that the objective of Bill
C-36 was to alter perceptions of sex work,
from a "nuisance" to the "exploitation of
women and girls." Within this saviour
objective lies two major problems: it
generalizes sex workers as victims,
while simultaneously excluding which
bodies under the law are worthy of
basic human rights.
I   nlike the Federal
I   Government, PACE acknowledges the intricate makeup
of their members. With a majority of
their membership being Indigenous,
racialized, trans or non-binary,
all face a multitude of structural
barriers. The support services PACE
provides are designed to be as
mindful and inclusive as possible.
Programs include Peer Health
Navigation, Transitions Project, the
Gender Self Determination Project,
and the Outreach Program, led by
Indigenous support workers. PACE is
unique in that their support workers
can relate to sex workers and the issues
they confront. PACE erases the distance
between the supporter and the supported,
and acknowledges the complexity of
individuals that society has so shamelessly
dehumanized.
Near the end of our conversation, Laura
recounted a phrase used in both the sex
work and disability movements: "nothing
for us, without us," referring to the need
to consult with populations in which
policies are designed for. As the Canadian
government continues to allow stigma to
fester in the space between upholding law
and its citizens, PACE fills the space with
love.
You can find more information about PACE
at pace-society.org, which includes a great
online store. To keep up with related current
affairs, follow PACE on Twitter @PaceSociety.
tm
it
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TRANSMISSION FROM PLOT | PACE   Society
 8ios YHAuaaa? | snixogDm ™ino38i<i
UNCEDED
MAKING ROOM FOR INDIGENOUS FEMINISMS
words by Jessica Johns // illustrations by Rachel Lau
Indigenous folks' relationships to
feminism differ for many reasons.
Some believe Indigenous feminism
is redundant. Saying you're Indigenous
insinuates that you're also feminist, as
Indigenous groups are set on dismantling
the ongoing process of colonialism, of
which patriarchy is a structure. Because of
feminism's history of erasure of
marginalized groups, some folks don't
adhere to the definition of feminism at
all. Others believe that a commitment
to feminism goes against Indigenous
sovereignty. That feminism as a movement
exists in a colonial framework, which
often ignores or perpetuates colonialism,
heteropatriarchy, and heteropaternalism.
This is by no means an exhaustive
list of Indigenous folks' relationships to
feminism. In fact, I don't think there will
ever be a simple list to which we can turn
and examine. When you are an Indigenous
person whose culture, family, and history
have been systematically taken apart and
covered up, everything becomes a process
of re-learning: re-learning your history,
your family, your self, and that self's
relationship to the world. Learning is
unique, and it is constantly changing, but
the process is necessary and brilliant in
its own right. Centering Indigenous voices
is still imperative to the work of uncovering that knowledge, of reshaping, of
revitalization. And figuring out feminism
is a part of this process, too.
With this in mind, it goes without saying
that there are important considerations
for Indigenous folks when entering into
events and spaces that centre on the term
"feminist." How do Indigenous feminists,
or Indigenous peoples who don't identify
as feminists, navigate themselves in a
structure of activism that has historically
erased Indigenous women's involvement,
and, often, their leadership? How do
Indigenous folks protect themselves from
being tokenized or appropriated?
Ofter listening to Dory Nason,
an Anishinaabe professor
in UBC's First Nations and
Indigenous Studies department, explain
why she insisted on naming her class
"Indigenous Feminisms" with emphasis
on the plural, it became clear: just like
an Indigenous person cannot, and should
not, be lumped into one, pan-Indigenous
group, Indigenous feminisms cannot be
homogenized. What's important, then, is
to emphasize and represent these differing
beliefs. Despite the many differences, they
each need to be heard and celebrated.
This consideration is important as Room
Magazine, a West Coast feminist literary
magazine featuring writing from women
(cisgender and transgender), transgender
men, Two-Spirit and non-binary writers,
kicks off the Growing Room Literary
festival on March 1-4. For this year's
festival, Room has partnered with Massy
Books, an Indigenous owned and operated
bookstore, to create Indigenous Brilliance,
a reading panel occurring at the festival.
The event will be hosted by Jonina Kirton
and myself, and will feature emerging
and established Indigenous artists Joanne
Arnott, Carleigh Baker, Marie Annharte
Baker, Gwen Benaway, Selina Boan,
Molly Billows, Sharon Jinkerson-Brass,
Samantha Nock, Deanna Partridge-David,
and Bev Sellars.
During this event, these writers will be
dedicating a portion of their reading to
talking about a mentor, elder, or loved one.
In this way, there will be far more voices
on the Indigenous Brilliance stage than the
twelve bodies that will physically occupy
it. The stage will be filled with Indigenous
voices from all over the world and all across
time. This serves as a way to acknowledge
our nations, our communities, and the
people around us, it allows us to do what
we always do: hold each other up.
Simultaneously, the Indigenous
Brilliance reading will allow differing ideas
of feminism to be represented. Every one
of those voices will be bringing their own
beliefs and views. Where whitestream
feminism has often excluded groups
that don't voice the homogenized vision
of the whole, Indigenous feminisms
celebrate this. It is intentional and
imperative to represent that diversity in
our communities. It is the embodiment of
self-determination to refuse to adhere to
any one definition of feminism,
9*
to continue to question and uncover more
about the representation of feminism in
history, and to create definitions unique
to each individual. We don't all adhere
to the same structures of beliefs, and
that's something to be celebrated. That's
something to make room for.
The Indigenous Brilliance reading will occur
on Friday, March 2, 7:30pm-9:30pm at the
Native Education College (285 East 5 Avenue).
Full event details and a list of all other Growing
Room events can be found on their website:
roommagazine.com/festival
Jessica Johns is ofCree ancestry and a
member of Sucker Creek First Nation. She is
the Executive Editor of Promotions for PRISM
international and is on the editorial board
for Room Magazine, living and working on
the traditional and unceded territory of the
Musqueam, Skwxwujmesh, and Tsleil-Waututh
peoples. Find her on Twitter @stellaabrenda.
UNCEDED!Making Room for Indigenous Feminisms
5
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | FEBRUARY 201?
OVERDOSE
CRISIS
UPDATE
INJUSTICE IS FATAL
words by Oona Krieg // illustrations by Dana Kearley
no one thinks they're going to get into an accident.
You get into a car, you put your seatbelt on,
and then while you're driving you just check
your phone for a second and phew, no damage done.
Unfortunately, 27 percent of fatal car accidents are caused
by distracted driving. (1) You may not think you are
distracted, but you are. To combat the death toll associated
with car accidents, we have social policy and regulations
that try to keep up with technology. Cell phones have the
capacity to automatically go into airplane mode while a car
is moving. There are awareness campaigns, road checks,
and hefty fines for distracted driving. But what is never
considered, is shutting down roads and criminalizing
drivers. Despite the frequency of car accidents, we get into
cars and use seatbelts as harm reduction. And although we
know the risks, we still check our phones.
We are surrounded by harm reduction efforts that
mitigate circumstances in our lives. So, why is it so
difficult to get public support for new drug policy? The
2017 World Report on Drug Policy suggests that a vicious
cycle of criminalization, perception and stigmatization
is preventing lawmakers from implementing evidence-
based policy solutions that could help slow the numbers
of accidental overdose deaths. (2) It has been three years
since fentanyl and carfentanil-laced street drugs began
killing drug users at an exponential rate, and what has
changed?
from January to October 2017, there were 999
recorded overdose deaths in British Columbia. (3)
Despite having the opioid crisis acknowledged
around the world as a health emergency, and despite the
herculean and disparate efforts of community, parents,
opioid outreach, naloxone training, the medical system,
public health, and drug user groups, the overdose crisis
has become the new normal. This last year has seen
mainstream media use forceful means to get headline
attention. 2017 marked an especially turbulent year in
politics and social issues, and it seems that the public
has become desensitized. With overdose deaths at a
critical high, where is the compassion needed to prioritize
steering drug policy towards real solutions?
You may remember, in November 2016, Ottawa hosted
an Opioid Crisis Summit to address the overdose crisis.
But instead of looking at social policy, discrimination,
stigma and criminalization, attendees talked about 'new'
ways to regulate medication — they missed the point. The
Canadian Association of People who Use Drugs (CAPUD)
was part of the summit, and brought their silent protest
and pointed hashtag, #theytalkwedie. 2017 saw the
actions (and inactions) set in motion at the Opioid Crisis
Summit, and now in 2018, the overdose crisis is no closer
to a solution without any changes to drug policy. CAPUD
summarizes this and more in their dispatch, "Year in
Review: Fuck 2017" published to their Facebook page. (4)
In 2013, B.C.'s Centre for Excellence, released a report
which states that "The war on drugs [is] failing to limit
drug use in Vancouver." (5) As a follow up to a similar
report from 2009, it states that health-focused policies
have been more effective than federal law enforcement
measures at reducing illicit drug use and improving
public health and safety. Both of these reports were
published before the toxic drug supply began ravaging
British Columbian drug users. In 2013, 50 people died of
fentanyl-related accidental overdose. We still don't have
the total of lives lost for 2017.
Last February, CAPUD helped organize and promote
the National Day of Action on the Overdose Crisis,
which saw demonstrations in Vancouver, Victoria,
Edmonton, Toronto, Montreal and Halifax. CAPUD
is heading another day of action on February 20. In
Vancouver, there will be a march from Victory Square to
the downtown law courts. The focus this year is the justice
system, promoted with the hashtag #InjusticeIsFatal.
With the topic of this year's day of action addressing
drug criminalization, other discussions around the
overdose crisis will no doubt include the direct and
indirect links to deaths that have resulted from the stigma
around homelessness, poverty, colonialism, intolerance
and prohibition. Make no mistake, in Canada, the current
climate of opioid use and overdosing is deeply tied to
the same values of supremacy and capitalism that this
country was founded on. The National Day of Action on
the Overdose Crisis will seek to engage with these topics
and more, recognizing that there is no universal solution
to preventing overdoses.
The BC Centre for Substance Use nails the issue to
the wall: "There remain critical areas in public
health where the gap between best evidence and
public policies persists, and few areas suffer from this
concern more than society's response to the problems
posed by illicit drug use." At this point, it will take a
significant shift in public perception to make any changes
in policy related to drug use.
So I ask you, dear reader, to please come to the National
Day of Action on the Overdose Crisis on February 20,
wherever you are, in solidarity and with open minds. Join
the conversation, sure. But most importantly, take action.
#theytalkwedie #injusticeisfatal
#lifewontwait #drugperceptionproblem
Fo//ow the Canadian Association of People Who Use Drugs on
Facebook for more information about the National Day of Action
on the Overdose Crisis, and visit capud.ca.
Refi
erences
1. wwwiicbc.com/road-saf ty/crashes-happen/Disti'acted-driving/Pages/infographic,asp
2. ''The World Drug Perception Problem: Countering Prejudices About People Who Use
Drugs.'"' The Global Commission on Drug Policy, 2017. www.globcdcommissionondrugs.
org/reports/changing-perceptions/
3. ''Fentanyl-Detected Illicit Drug Overdose Deaths January 1, 2012 to October 21.
2017."British Columbia Coroners Service, 2017. www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/
piiblic-safey-and-eniergency-seizices/death-investigation/sta^^
dose.pdf
4. Jordan Allen Westfall. '"#Fuck2017: CAPUD's Year in Review.''
December 29, 2017. www.facebook.com/notes/jordan-allm-westjall/
fuck2017-capuds-year-in-review/206H04393675H075/
5. 'Drug Situation in Vancouver." Urban Health Research Initiative of the British
Columbia Centre for Excellence in IIIV/AIDS, June 2013. www.bccsu.ca/wp-content/
uploads/2016/08/dsiv2013.pdf
6
"Ouerdose Crisis Update'
 8ios YHAuaaa? | snixogDm ™ino38i<i
HUTAH
DARK
TimES
WHEN THE ASHES SETTLE,
THE PARTY BEGINS
words by Jasper D. Wrinch
illustrations by Nikki Lax
Mr
"We wanted to give Cariboo folk a chance to cut loose
and shake off any lingering anxieties post-evacuation.
On July 6, 2017, a wildfire sparked just west of
100-Mile House. The following day, with over
170 additional wildfires reported throughout
the province, British Columbia was put under a state of
emergency. On July 15, over 24,000 residents of Williams
Lake and the surrounding areas were evacuated due to the
encroaching flames. Thousands of hectares of the Interior
burned away, major routes were indefinitely closed and
the lives and livelihoods of countless people were put into
limbo. Needless to say, Arts on the Fly Festival, an annual
music festival in Horsefly, B.C., that was scheduled for
mid-July was cancelled.
"Dark Times started in the aftermath of all that,"
explains Brandon Hoffman, Artistic Director of both Arts
on the Fly Festival and the newly minted, Dark Times.
"[It's] something of a consolation festival. We wanted to
give Cariboo folk a chance to cut loose and shake off any
lingering anxieties post-evacuation." Taking place from
March 2 to 4 in Williams Lake, distant from the worry of
evacuation and fire, Dark Times picks up where Arts on
the Fly was forced to stop.
While there were many festivals all across the province
that were cancelled or under threat of being cancelled,
"our festival, being relatively small, rode it out pretty
well," says Hoffman. With the support of other festivals
— "Robson Valley Music Fest, Music on the Mountain
and Rogue Arts Fest all honoured AOTF tickets at their
gate," — and a fundraiser organized by Vancouver artists
that were scheduled to perform at AOTF, Hoffman and the
rest of the organizers were able to stay afloat financially
despite the cancellation. "There were a few costs we were
on the hook for, but it was manageable. Larger festivals
are a different situation altogether," says Hoffman. "Very
often options are go bankrupt or piss off your entire
fan-base by denying refunds."
While AOTF managed to pull through 2017 intact, the
threat of future environmental disasters still looms over
the festival scene in B.C.. "For the past few years, I've
been attending a conference for
festival organizers in Wells called
Northern Exposure," explains
Hoffman. "Every year, at some
point or another, we've gotten into a
brainstorming session around some
sort of trust-fund," in the event of
festival cancellation.
Oking with the festivals
themselves, which rely on
the personal investment and
dedication of organizers like Hoffman,
countless artists count on summer
music festivals to earn enough income
to make it through the rest of the
year. Especially for artists located in
smaller, more rural locations, the cancellation of summer
festivals can be economically devastating. While it is still
only a concept, Hoffman explains that "the big plan is that
festivals could put a small percentage of their ticket sales
into this fund, and if somebody has to cancel, they can
apply to the trustees for a bail-out," providing a sort of
insurance policy for the festival and the artists.
In the meantime, many of the acts that were slated to
play in Horsefly this past summer have reappeared on Dark
Times' lineup. With artists like Uschi Tala, Malcolm Jack,
Wallgrin, Plasteroid, Sonya Littlejohn and Marin Patenaude,
among many others, Dark Times showcases the variety and
diversity of the province's extensive artistic community.
"I wanted the kind of music that lets you feel comfortable
exploring your dark side a bit," explains Hoffman. "That
can mean a lot of different things to a lot of different
people, but the bottom line is artists who make space for
their audience. You can listen to the lyrics, or not. You can
dance, or not. You can sing along, or not." For Hoffman,
the festival is a chance both to reflect on the precariousness
of our modern lives, so affected by the whims of social,
cultural, and environmental catastrophe and to escape from
the worry of it all.
"I keep thinking back to the childhood feeling of
sneaking around in the halls during a school dance," says
Hoffman, "how a place that feels so routine and boring
can suddenly have a new light shed on it." Dark Times
aims to reframe the town of Williams Lake. For many, the
image of the town is still linked to the fires and
evacuations of the past year — "Fly ash was literally
raining from black skies," he says — but Dark Times
offers an opportunity to "wander around the core of
Williams Lake deep into the night," to explore its venues
and streets amidst the liveliness of its art scene.
44
1
grew up here," explains Hoffman, "and
left for my twenties to live as a starving
artist and student in Vancouver. I felt the
pull of small-town living again, and there happened to
be a lot of good opportunities in the Cariboo." Living
in Williams Lake full-time now, Hoffman is a shining
example of how someone can be active in an artistic
community without living in an urban centre. In addition
to organizing Dark Times and AOTF, Hoffman hosts the
Safety Meeting concert series in Williams Lake, records
and performs under the name Blocktreat, and does sound
for countless shows and festivals across the province.
"It's pretty hilarious how many people from the Lower
Mainland never dare venture past Hope," he says. While
the geographic distances may be greater, the concentration of artists among the residents of the rest of B.C. is
extraordinary. "We'd love to see more city folk come up
for stuff like this!" he says. "It's a totally different vibe,
but you might like it."
Whether you're looking to release the stress of the
past year, flames and all, escape the city for something
completely different, or just wander around Williams
Lake at night, Dark Times is the festival to do it. "It is a
chance for us to come together," says Hoffman, "in all our
glorious broken forms, tug each others' heart strings, and
relish in the possibility that the end is nigh."
Dark Times is taking place in downtown Williams Lake, B.C.,
March 2-4. To purchase tickets, view the full lineup and find out
more information, visit artsonthefly.com/darktimes.
"Dark Times
 J
7
W H 0
PARTY IN
THE VALLE
TOUR
SDAY FEBRUAR
IMPERIAL
TICKETS: TIMBRECONCERTS.COM
RED CAT MAIN ST, RED CAT HASTINGS ST AND ZULU
 8ios YHAuaaai | snixogDm ™ino38i<i
HUTAH
words by Hannah Toms.
illustrations by Sunny Nestler.
photos by Javiera Bassi de la Barrera.
44
i
t's just wild," says Necking drummer,
Melissa Kuipers. Her, guitarist Nada Hayek,
bassist Sonya Rez and vocalist Hannah Kay,
collectively known as Necking, have met substantial
success in Vancouver's independent music scene since
the release of their debut EP, Meditation Tape, in mid
November. The punk group has been invited onto a
plethora of show bills, received considerable airplay on
campus radio stations across the Lower Mainland, and
even reached number two on Ride The Tempo's Weekly
Top 10 chart last November. This exposure has earned
the band a following that they were not expecting when
they formed in February 2017, an exposure they are still
struggling to accept as real.
"We're waiting for the set to fall, and we'll be standing
in the middle of a field with all of Vancouver pointing
and laughing at us," says Melissa, having re-started her
sentence after it was cut off by a beer spill in their Mount
Pleasant rehearsal space. "Like a film set!" Nada adds, as
she rescues the fallen can.
With songs that are not only catchy but also convey
messages about social issues, it is easy to assume some of
their sudden popularity is a result of the politics presented
on Meditation Tape. "We're political people," Sonya says
on behalf of the band. "We write songs about [what] we're
passionate about," continues Hannah. "These things [...]
are really real and really important to us."
The song "Detective Olivia Benson" is a perfect example
of Necking using their lyrics to make a social stance. It
focuses on a central character in the T.V. show Law &
Order: Special Victims Unit. The show takes place inside
"a dream universe [...] where people are actually served
justice for committing [sexual] assaults," says Melissa,
who wrote the song's lyrics. She goes on to say, "It's
something that doesn't actually really happen as much as
it should."
In the show, the fictitious police officer, Olivia Benson,
calls for more sympathy toward sexual assault survivors
and demands stricter consequences for abusers. These
actions resonate with Necking's members. "Her whole
character is like, "Believe [sexual assault] survivors! [...]
Do whatever you can to make them feel heard! And change
policy!'" explains Melissa, "It's obviously something that
is so important."
But the popularity of one song is just an indicator
of a larger society shift that Necking finds
themselves a part of. Hannah recalls one
particularly passionate performance during a gig last fall,
when #MeToo was circulating social media: "I was singing
^^^^^^^^**H i^^^^^^^^""
*r-~T- "—r
mM       BJ v/J|/^B
"3 toa*
supposed to
be linging, but
3toa*|u*t
screaming/'
[Detective Olivia Benson] and I kept making eye contact
with women. [...] I was supposed to be singing, but I was
just screaming." With a laugh she adds, "We were just
tearing it up at that show."
Comedy is one device Necking uses to convey strong
messages, with the lyrics on Meditation Tape reflecting the
bandmates' senses of humour. Seemingly lighthearted
songs, like "Ford Commercial" for example, use humour
to make a critique on consumerism and capitalism. On
the surface, lines like "Put us in a Ford commercial" and
"We want money!" could poke fun at Necking's own
materialism, or could denounce the act of musicians
"selling out." Hannah explains, "You listen to the lyrics
and they're kind of funny, and then you're like 'Oh, this is
a thing that happens, and it's a bummer.'"
j  hatever messages they may be conveying in a
I  song, Hannah says that Necking strive to be
varied with their lyrics, endeavouring not to
write solely from their own perspectives as "cisgender
women." The value they place on inclusivity is the
reason Necking object to their frequent association
with Riot Grrrl, an early '90s feminist movement in the
underground punk scene. "The definition of the word
'inclusive' has changed since then," says Melissa. The
Riot Grrrl brand of inclusivity, the band explains, was
highly exclusive towards trans women, sex workers, and
women of colour. "Inclusivity-centred seminars that Riot
Grrrls held [...] would be all white," says Sonya, "and
communities of colour would cater to them."
In spite of their disagreements with some of the
movement's principles, Necking acknowledges the
contributions that Riot Grrrls made to opening up
the punk scene for female musicians. Nada says, "We
wouldn't be here without Riot Grrrl."
It is likely that the following of fans hearing Necking's
stances on social issues by way of their mixture of serious
and silly lyrics will continue to grow, as the group intends
to continue gigging, to release an LP, and to tour to some
towns in the U.S. and Canada. The band members' senses
of humour show through once more in their inability to
resist providing some joke answers to my question about
their plans for the future. Nada claims that their own
reality T.V. show modelled after The Bachelor, in which the
four members compete against each other "and Hannah
wins every fucking time!" is in the works, and Sonya
tells me that they anticipate an offer "to be in a Ford
commercial."
Listen to Necking at neckingband.bandcamp.com, and flip to this
month's Under Review section for a review 0/Meditation Tape.
"flecking'
A
 Heal tint
fiction
JANUARY 2018
ELISA THORN /SHAPES /MEGHAN
GILHESPYTRIO
JANUARY 5 / GOLD SAUCER
n
I ice. It's finally here
You board the bus and take a seat. Twenty minutes later
you exit the bus and continue walking through a public square. You wait at
the entrance of a building until a friendly face opens the door and escorts the
crowd to a warm room. Four rows of chairs gently curve around the stage;
some couches line the front row and a few elevated perches line the back row. •
You take a seat as Elisa Thorn begins to tune her harp. She jokingly
howls into the microphone before filling the room with her music: looped harp
paired with harmonized hushed breaths. The harp loops sway with subtle
rhythmic accents, only to be embraced by the texture Thorn adds with vocal   ,
and string manipulations. Her performance lifts you onto a dreamy cloud,
with lyrics occasionally peaking through to paint your mind with colours.
There are six compositions (five, if we don't count the one that only temporarily existed) and Elisa Thorn remains casually in command of her music
and the attentive audience.
Applause marks the first break. People hydrate and you skip off to the
loo. Fifteen minutes later, Shapes — a sextet led by Eli Davidovici on upright  •
bass — takes the stage. Davidovici makes some acknowledgements to the
performers, audience and Self-Help (the night's host). He states, "This is my
music," before the group breaks into a hypnotic set of improvisation.
The two drummers' creative percussion creates a wave through the
group. The bass immediately finds a pocket. Two guitarists respond with tex-  •
tural swells. A piano melody briefly sails above the group before anchoring to
the bass line. The sextet shows signs of free form improvisation that hints at
post-bop and modal awareness.
Applause marks the final intermission. You stand, stretch and converse.
The Meghan Gilhespy Trio arranges on stage. Gilhespy is seated opposite   •
the upright bass and guitar accompaniment. She calmly introduces her music
— vocal lines that remain delicately playful alongside the steady melodic line
of upright bass and guitar. The trio guides the audience through a handful of
original songs that exhibit composure and cohesiveness.
Applause punctuates the end of the performance. You put on your coat
and thank the hosts as you exit the room. Descending to the building's front
door, the melodies that filled the room now reverberate in your head. You
open the door and look over your shoulder. The reflection of the bus lights
flicker from a few blocks down.
"Nice. It's here." It looks like you'll make it. —MarkBudd
WHAT THE FUCK ARE THEY DOING?
JANUARY 10 / FOX CABARET
This was my first fashion show. For some reason it hadn't crossed my
mind that people would be, well, fashionable. In a city with a reputation for bland fashion, I was mesmerized by the people around me, wearing
clothing that looked like it should be on display at a modern art museum. I
was instantly intrigued, despite feeling horribly underdressed.
As I made my way into the Fox, I was impressed by the size of the crowd,
and the setup of the event. What The Fuck Are They Doing? is a collective of
artists who have taken it upon themselves to create more spaces for artists
to showcase their work, stemming from a lack of such events in the city. The
event encompassed a broad range of mediums, including fashion, visual art,
print work and music.
The fashion show started an hour late. According to the host (who was
donning a long kilt-like skirt and what seemed like a million jackets, even
though it was warm and crowded inside), the late start was because there
were so many people waiting outside to get in. When the fashion show
began I had a prime spot in the upper balcony. There were five designers
and I appreciated the range of experience among them — this was one
designer's first runway, while the headliner had shown at Tokyo Fashion
Week. The first two, Jared Kotyk and Not Dead Yet, had a dark, androgynous looks to their design. While Kotyk's pieces were slightly more minimalist, Not Yet Dead's collection was memorable for its experimentation — one
of the models wore what appeared to be a tarp, but still managed to look
right out of The Matrix.
In contrast, King of Hearts, Ripley Freedom and Lillz Killz, were colourful and punchy. The collection of U.K.-born King of Hearts had groovy, '60s
undertones, while Ripley's took on a multimedia approach, as the
designer painted directly onto the clothing.Lillz Killz was the standout of the
night, showcasing their "Profanity" collection. Their looks were defined by
chunky pieces of fabrics, a variety of angular shapes and bold, primary colours.
After the fashion, there was live music. Electric Sex Panther was the first
band on, and their aesthetic fit the name perfectly. The lead singer was
sporting a sheer red button-up shirt that was completely buttoned-down and
swanky high-heeled leather boots. Their eclectic sounds were a perfect for
getting the crowd moving after the fashion show. With a fusion of R&B, funk
and hip hop, Electric Sex Panther enticed the room with their dance moves
and saxophone instrumentals. They even played a cover of TLC's "Waterfalls."
Unfortunately, Chillrose Place, a five-member hip hop group, was a weak
follow up to Electric Sex Panther. Their smooth flows and stage presence
were weighed down by relatively unimaginative beats. Despite a strong
energy and look — one of them had an amazing leather jacket with cow print
on the shoulders — their outfits couldn't save the show, and the crowd slowly
trickled out during their performance.
The remaining crowd returned for the final two acts of the night, house DJ
Nomad Black and EDM artist Avstin James. Nomad Black was my personal
favourite of the night, as their style was very much what you find in a Berlin
warehouse — it was exactly what I wanted to hear after a fashion show.
The range of acts was refreshing.
It's rare to find such an eclectic mix of art in one space, and it's equally
rare to find such a strong turnout on a Wednesday night in this city. If you're
someone who routinely complains that Vancouver is so boring, supporting
artists who are striving to change that narrative is critical, and What The
Fuck Are They Doing? is very much worth supporting. —Alex Lenz
THIS SAXOPHONE KILLS FASCISTS / X
(WATERMILL PROJECT) / RIDLEY BISHOP
& CLARINETS
• JANUARY 12 / CHINA CLOUD
The clock struck midnight and all through the China Cloud, minds were
on their way to systemic loss.
For some, the symptom was laughter— snickering, then cackling, enough
to draw the attention of one's more staid neighbours (or at least anyone still convinced that "serious" music demands a serious reception) before drowning out
in the multiphonic onslaught of Arrington De Dionyso (aka This Saxophone Kills
Fascists). If the ridiculous-o-meter hadn't cracked yet, would it when drummer
Ben Bennett decided that percussing his kit a thousand times a minute wasn't
enough, whipped out a mutilated hose and began circular-breathing into his
snare? How about when the sweaty smells of the stage began competing with
its sights and sounds for attention? Or when De Dionyso ditched his saxophone
for a PVC contraption that looked equal parts like it belonged in the keep at
Helm's Deep and rallying the orcish horde below the walls?
10
REAL   LIVE  ACTION
Moments of lucidity punctuated the slaughter. De Dionyso found the resonant
frequency of the room with a tenor sax, then went searching for it again with a
bass clarinet. Commitment and indulgence competed for dominance in an
aesthetic landscape staggering between maximalist blasting and minimalist,
well, blasting. With his one brief, cosmically-themed audience address, De
Dionyso proclaimed the merits of capital-C Canada, which, he said, had, unlike
his homeland, always treated its Indigenous people with respect. Oh yes, the
irony of the fascist-killing saxophone was straight-faced indeed.
Throughout the night's events, the line between consciousness and
accident received the kind of fastidious walking normally exercised only by
drunken politicians at New Years Drive Safe checkpoints. When, towering
over clarinetists Natasha Zrno and Johanna Hauser, local troubadour Ridley
Bishop announced that "there's a party in your mouth and you're invited," the
line met its fair share of askance reception. Less confused was the effect of
the clarinetists themselves, whose extended-tonal ostinati churned through
Bishop's serenade with an insistence that both balanced and justified the
metaphorical involutions lacing his lyrics. Bishop bantered that the trio was
"meant to be together," and I agree with him.
The great surprise of the night, though, arrived with the middle act: Sara
Kim and Mili Hong's Watermill Project, a theatrically-inflected drums-and-voice
duo devoted to Korean folk. It's not very often that one watches a drum kit
take the place of an entire backing band, and still less often that one watches
the endeavour succeed; but Hong's solos were as fluid as her beats were
head-nodding, with the space between the two traversed in at once virtuosic
and imminently comprehensible style. The combined clarity and adventure
in Hong's drumming, as woven into Watermill Project as a whole, constituted
what I consider the standout event of a diversely ear-bending evening.
And of course, while unlikely to have killed them in the first place (although
not for lack of a good old college try), This Saxophone's exultant degeneracy
would have any self-respecting fascist rolling in their grave. —Matthew Horrigan
BE AFRAID / SIGHTLINES / DAD THIGHS
/ LITTLE SPROUT
JANUARY 13 / TOAST COLLECTIVE
I arrived at Toast Collective as Little Sprout were just wrapping up their
soundcheck, forty-five minutes after the show's designated start time.
The cheery and nonchalant venue, with its couches and coloured lights, was
fairly full and more people trickled in as Little Sprout's actual set began. The
indie garage rock group's prominent bass, jangly guitar and dreamy vocals
made them my personal favourite band of the night. Frontperson Amie's
between-song banter — recalling to the crowd her former roommate's obsession with yellow Gatorade, for example — set the casual and light-hearted
atmosphere of the show.
Be Afraid surprisingly took to the stage for the second of four sets,
despite it being their own tape release show. The power-poppers transferred
the liveliness of their new LP, One More Year, perfectly to the live setting,
prompting head-nodding and grooving in the crowd. Their second to last
song was markedly slower and mellower than the others in the set, a style
they pulled off just as successfully.
The vocalist in Dad Thighs, Victoria, told us jokes in a soft and sweet
speaking voice while the group got ready for their set. Seemingly the entire
club, myself included, was therefore taken aback when they launched into
aggressive hardcore emo, with their vocalist suddenly screaming their lungs
out. The band seemed to be revelling in the shock they had induced, grinning while they thrashed away on the drums, waving their guitars around and
belting into their mics with even more energy and passion than is present on
their releases. The quality of their music, which displayed diligent songwriting
and serious musical complexity, gave them another reason to be happy with
themselves. The crowd's general reaction to Dad Thighs was captured by
the statement the person next to me made to their friend when the set had
ended: "That was the most emo thing I've ever seen in my life."
A convenience store run meant that I missed the very beginning of the
last set of the night. When I walked back into Toast, Sightlines already had
the venue bopping. They played their poppy brand of power punk, featuring
high-octane drumming and catchy leads, with incredible vigour. You could tell
how much fun they were having, and they definitely projected that positive
energy into their audience.
With Sightlines' set over, I felt thoroughly satisfied with having gotten to witness some of Vancouver's incredible rock talent in an environment where I felt
accepted and at ease. The beginning of "Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody
Dance Now)" was promptly blasted through the venue's speakers and I hurried
out the door, terrified of being caught in the dance party that quickly ensued.
Around ten minutes later, as I walked past the back of the club on Kingsway,
the sound of voices singing along to "Whoomp! (There It Is)" told me that the
party was still going strong. —Hannah Toms
Discorder magazine | FEBRUARY  201?
 LIEF HALL (VIDEO RELEASE)/
KELLARISSA / THE NAUSEA
JANUARY 19/WESTERN FRONT
Stopping at the merch table on my way into the Grand Luxe Hall of the
Western Front, I inspected Lief Hall's latest cassette. An image of a
woman in white robes rising off the misty floor, with candles burning in front
of her covered it — an image I would later realize that was taken from the
accompanying music video.
I sat down inside the dark, wood-panelled hall. The lights dimmed. With
drinks in hand, people sat with susurrous anticipation for the show to begin.    (
The Nausea, Anju Singh's experimental noise project, performed first.
Singh created a metallic, dark atmosphere by looping long, drawn out notes   <
on her violin. The drone was overbearing. The soundscape bled ears.
Her creation was a symphonic composition of screeching blackness.
The following performance was the antithesis of Singh's. Kellarissa, the
indie pop project of Larissa Loyva, was a blend of classically trained vocals
and soft synthesizer — it was calming, especially after the aural onslaught
on The Nausea. Behind her, a screen displayed an ever-changing two-dimensional cacti animation throughout the set.
After a brief intermission, the music video for Lief Hall's single, "Roses for a
Ruin" began, with only slight technical difficulties. This past summer, Hall and •
her collaborator, Julia Hutchings, traveled to the interior of British Columbia
to film. Mountains with wintry grey clouds and evergreen trees welcome
Hall in a cream dress and dark brown hair, standing atop a Jersey barrier
of a campestral highway. The video features a recurring motif of reversed
film — Hall emerging from a bath with dry hair, a motorcyclist driving forward  f
descending a hill and the familiar image of a the woman rising from the misty •
floor. The scenes change rapidly and feel disjointed and scattered. In spite of
this, the film's somber atmosphere perfectly suits the mellifluous ambience of
Hall's electronic pop single.
After the video and warm applause, Hall took to the stage, accompanied by drummer, Kevin Romain, and harpist, Elisa Thorn. With her talented   '
backup, Hall's set, rife with lyrical harmonies and phantasmagoric atmosphere, was highly enjoyable. She performed several songs — all of a similar style, evoking a feeling of floating in space. The drums and harp added
vigour to the dreamlike quality of her songs and though her music was unvar- •
ied — persistently within this ethereal air — the audience was absorbed,
happily floating within the dark space flow and empyreal beat of her music.
Then, the music stopped and the listener returned to earth. Her performance was short. It would have been nice to float a while longer.
—Julian Yeo
•
CONVERGE /SUMAC /CULT LEADER      •
JANUARY 19 / RICKSHAW THEATRE
If you grew up listening to any form of metal or hardcore, you've probably •
heard of Converge. Hell, even if you don't listen to those genres, you've
0
probably seen their name floating in the literary ether of music publications,
or seen some denim vested punk sporting their now iconic Jane Doe symbol, q
either as a well-worn patch or permanently inked on their arm. For all of the    i
accolade, I was shocked to see that the Vancouver date didn't sell out until
the very last minute, especially since the East Coast band doesn't get out
West much — and when they do, it has been as the supporting act to bigger,
cheesier metal bands at venues like Rogers Arena. Seeing them headline
the Rickshaw might be a treat that we will not be privy to for a long time.
Opening up the night was Salt Lake City's Cult Leader. The band gained
a lot of ground in the metal scene in 2015 with their full-length, Lightless
Walk and I had heard rumors that their live show was even more destructive — I was excited to witness the carnage. Unfortunately, their set was a
disappointment. They were loud and exceptionally tight, but the energy I was
expecting simply wasn't there. Their presence floated somewhere between
forced metallic antagonism and road-worn apathy, though the later seems
unlikely given that Vancouver was the first date of the tour. A few people in
the crowd were incredibly into it and a circle pit or two opened up during their
set. Technically they were right on the money, but I was expecting a slam
dunk and Cult Leader missed the hoop by a hair.
Up next was Sumac, sporting local talent drummer Nick Yacyshyn,
making the act the most "local" of the night. Their set was a formidable
collection of cuts from Sumac's largely experimental catalog, pushing the
rigid boundaries of metal to the very limit. It was an impressive performance
that at times seemed like it would wash the crowd away in a flood of
maddening feedback, only to have the trio reign the composition back to
shore in a crash of guitars and cymbals. The supergroup — completed by
Aaron Turner of the now defunct band Isis, and Brian Cook of post-metal
behemoth Russian Circles, in addition to Yacyshyn — was mesmerizing to
8ios YflAuaaai | 9nhD|>Dm ™b-ro38i(l
watch, and even though Cook suffered through myriad technical difficulties,
the set was tight, unpredictable, and incredibly moving, albeit a bit on the
long side. When Sumac finished up, Turner stepped up the mic and dedicated the set to love before he departed from the stage.
Soon after Converge took the stage, the Rickshaw was buzzing with life,
the theatre filled to its absolute capacity. Guitarist Kurt Ballou heralded in
the night with the intra riff to "Reptilian," off of their new album The Dusk In
Us, which would comprise the majority of the set for the night. Converge are
a force to be reckoned with, and their performance made it clear why they
have more than deserved their status in the metal world. Every member met
the crowd with an energy unmatched by any of the previous acts, and they
bounced between their newer material and some unexpected tunes from
their previous releases with ease.
There's also something to be said for the positive banter that vocalist
Jacob Bannon inserted between songs. Though Converge is not known for
cheer and positivity, Bannon had no intention of keeping up the dark front-
person persona when he addressed the crowd which was incredibly
refreshing to see. Instead he spoke candidly and with the same informality
you would use to speak to a friend you haven't seen in a long time.
The hardcore veterans kept the energy up through the entire set and, in
response, the crowd turned into a mass of screaming voices and flying limbs,
all feverishly reaching for the mic. Looking into the crowd you could see the
impact the band has had on so many generations of punk and metal fans —
barely-20-somethings and people well over 40 all yelling along with Bannon's
cauterwal scream in unison.
Converge closed off the main segment of their set with fan favourite "Last
Light" before returning to the stage to encore with a trio of songs from their
magnum opus, Jane Doe. They thanked the now exhausted and sweating
crowd for their time and waved goodbye — friends departing and promising
that they'll be back again before you know it. Let's hope that's true.
— Luciano Sabados
III
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and online,
please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live
Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA is also expanding to include comedy and theatre, among other live
experiences. Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail above
Cinematheque
HE VISIONARY CINEMA
OF NICOLAS ROEG
DON'T LOOK NOW
THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH
WALKABOUT • PERFORMANCE
EUREKA • BAD TIMING
• amz-mt . -rue WITCHES
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HeotetD
ALBUMS
DEALS
Johnny
(Self-Released)
39   .   01   .   2018
On January 9, 2018, Vancouver-based indie band DEALS released
their second EP, Johnny. A blend of '90s rock and modern indie
pop, DEALS' lo-fi sound has enough grit to constitute the label "garage
rock," but the band's cohesiveness elevates them above other artists in the
same genre. DEALS' sound is a mix of pulsing drums, buzzing guitars and
laid-back vocals, held together by excellent tonal quality and mixing. Think
Parquet Courts and King Gizzard as examples of artists who embody a
similar sound to that which DEALS executes so well. The trio features Brent
Glasgow-Brown on drums, Dave Warne on guitar, and Jaroslav Welz on
bass, with all three members sharing vocals. Despite all the noise that the
band makes, no member seems to overpower the others. The guitar licks are
distinct, but don't steal the show. The drums build a solid foundation for the
rest of the band without drowning them out. The basslines go on their own
little journeys, but always manage to find their way back home. It's a rarity to
find such balance and consistency in a band these days.
The EP begins with "Johnny," opening with a dreary guitar accompanied
by the lyrics, "When I first called you I was scared / It had been too long / But
when I heard your voice I knew you." A fitting opening for an EP that comes
two years after the band's last release, these first few lines seem to mirror
the listener's feelings of familiarity at hearing DEALS again after such a long
hiatus. It only takes seconds for the song to go from soft indie to banging rock,
and it holds that energy right through to the end. On "Ravens," DEALS begins
to experiment a bit more with their rhythm, an almost conversational tone to
the back-and-forth between vocalists as they harmonize, and the catchy hook,
"I miss the Ravens / Where did they go?" is addictive. The last song, "Atlas," is
co-written with prOphecy sun. It begins as more of a ballad before cranking up
the energy and closes out the record on a high note.
DEALS takes a sound that has been the mainstay of garage rockers for
decades, and cleans it up with enough personality to stand out from the
crowd. For a five song EP, this project is packed with catchy melodies, masterful instrumentation, and a sound that has you craving more. If Johnny is
any indicator, DEALS has a bright future ahead of them. —Jonah Lee-Ash
audacious punk sneer. Their twin vocalists, relatively clean guitar work,
and thematic wrestling (albeit simplistically) with gender and wealth, evoke
an embryonic - and much more sarcastic - version of Sleater-Kinney's All
Hands On The Bad One. Just as the vocal interplay between Corin Tucker
and Carrie Brownstein defined many of Sleater-Kinney's greatest moments,
Necking best coalesce in "All Melissas Are Keepers," which highlights both
singers through contrast - exasperated anger pushed up against a mocking
sing-song delivery. Their screamed lines on how "this body isn't mine anymore ... how can I take back what's mine" shows a lyrical depth at odds with
the playful taunting and chanting that surrounds it. The combined harmonies
at the end of "Ford Commercial" are another vocal highpoint, especially as
both singers are often only heard in isolation.
As should be expected from a band only several months old, Necking
still have yet to fully hit their stride, as the minute-and-a-half long tracks that
bookend this EP can feel slightly one-note, and a reliance on single-line
chants gives "Ford Commercial" a limited shelf-life. Regardless, Meditation
Tape remains a catchy and promising beginning which, like the making out
referenced by the band's name, provides cheap thrills without much thought
— and is certainly preferable to anyone droning on about their ex.
—Tom Barker
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PATRICK COWLEY
Afternooners
(Dark Entries)
19   .   10   .   2017
NECKING
Meditation Tape
(Self-Released)
15   .   11   .   2017
Stop! Singing songs about your ex! Stop! Singing songs about
the ocean!" — It is in the final moments of Meditation Tape that
Vancouver band Necking really establish what they stand for. With Nada
Hayek on guitar, Melissa Kuippers on drums, Sonya Rez on bass and backing vocals, and Hannah Karren providing vocals, they collectively roll their
eyes at melodramatic 'serious' songs about make-up sex or saving the
whales. So, if Necking see these topics as akin to "jerk[ingj yourself off,"
what do they feel is worth singing about? A quick scan of the song titles provides some clues, as tracks like "Daddy Issues" and "Ford Commercial" suggest that gender roles and commercialism are coming under the hammer.
Yet, Necking refuse to play anything straight, coating several repeated lines
in a thick layer of irony: "I'm gonna be your daddy now," "We are four
commercial girls / Put us in a Ford commercial," "We want money!" as well
as the aforementioned rebuke of any and all allusions to the ocean. But
then again, if you expect a tape whose cover features a cartoon girl riding a
purple horse to have its tongue anywhere else than in its cheek, your
expectations might be a bit off.
Necking match this rejection of self-seriousness through their music,
as their fast-and-loose interpretation of '90s alt-rock is delivered with an
I e are all bodies in motion. We throb to connect with one anoth-
V er. Our hearts pulse as we near. We touch and ache with raw
pleasure. We can feel so close to one another, nothing separates us. We
reveal ourselves fully, as if naked. Skin becomes our only barrier. Can we
go deeper? Can we pierce the flesh that keeps us apart? Can we place ourselves inside of another, entrusting to them not only our joys and pleasures,
but our anxieties, our fears, our anguish? Not always, maybe never. But
when we do - if we do - we may find sanctuary in such unity with another. Together, we think, we can conquer all obstacles, without and within.
Together, we feel absolute pleasure. We gush, overflow with joy.
Patrick Cowley's Afternooners is a collection of songs that originated as
soundtracks to gay pornography in the 1970s. What unifies these songs
is a sense of rhythm, a soft beat that makes it difficult not to imagine the
debauchery of moustachioed men. With songs titled things like "One Hot
Afternoon" and "Bore & Stroke," such an image does not take much imagination to conjure. There is little complexity to be found in Cowley's songs. In
many respects, these songs are as simple as that: a consistent basis upon
which to explore the most basic of human impulses. Each of these songs
offers a variation on the theme. A slow build - funky synthesizer grooves, a
catchy hook - and a climax. Then, filthy and panting, it comes to a close.
One might critique Afternooners for being repetitive - and it is. This is,
of course, to be expected given its origin as a collection of single songs
not exactly intended to be listened to. But beyond that, the repetition is an
integral component of the pleasure that these songs are intended to create
and supplement. Though these encounters of flesh may be fleeting and
superficial, they are nonetheless experiences of human connection. It is
only through repetition, an unwillingness to resign ourselves to solitude,
that we may forge something meaningful. This passion, this pure love, that
undergirds lust, is what Cowley's songs are about. As the collection comes
to a close with "Love come set me free," you might find yourself liberated to
pursue your purest, basest instincts. —Joey Doyle
PAINTED FRUIT
PF//
(Self-Released)
31.10.2017
As the fourth track on the record, "No Substance" pulls listeners out of
the brain fog that they will likely find themselves falling into. This song pumps
out a more aggressive edge than can be found on any of the numbers that
come before it. Its shouty refrain is reminiscent of Jay Reatard's hard-and-
fast underground hit, Blood Visions, which is nicely contrasted against my
personal second-favourite of the record, "Make Up Your Mind." This simple,
hooky love song is followed by a few forgettable fillers that could have been
written by any other indie rock band and a danceable pseudo-disco hit called
"Product." With that, PFII wraps up neatly in under 40 minutes.
The general sound of the record is luxurious, dripping in reverb and
wrapped in warm but chirpy guitar tones that compliment and carry the front-
person's throaty crooning. There are influences on PFII that make
themselves abundantly clear from the album's start to its finish; Joe
Strummer, King Krule and Morrissey are obviously present in the vocals, and
inspirations like Preoccupations, Foxygen and Beach House are easy to pick
out from the record's instrumentation.
What makes Painted Fruit fun and fresh to listen to, despite being able
to easily draw these comparisons, is that it sweeps listeners up and into an
unforeseeable direction. It's difficult to predict where the music will take you
next, or what to expect during the two seconds of silence between one song
and another, but it's an exciting wave to blindly ride.
The band lives comfortably within their genre, but manages to deny
limitations with PFII. In 2017, Painted Fruit finally settled on a style that's
not too dissonant and not too sugary, both of which Fruit Salad unfortunately fell victim to. Similarly unfortunate, though, is that it's curtain time for
Painted Fruit, who will be leaving only two records and one split seven-inch
to remember them by. —Alyssa Laube
fy\jg CouFiM
CIRCUIT
ROWAN C0UPLAND
Circuit
(Self-Released)
27   .   10   .   2017
H
14
following a tour with Vancouver glam legend Johnny de Courcy,
Painted Fruit has released their second and final album, PFII. Two
of the members have now moved across the country, making this LP the
group's last word in the West Coast music scene.
Compared to 2015's Fruit Salad LP, PF II is not a bad hill to die on. The
beauty of the album lies in its flashes of unpredictability. Where Fruit Salad
was flat and formulaic, PFII is driven by pleasantly surprising breakdowns
sprinkled throughout what could easily have been little more than an homage
to typically beachy songwriting.
n album is so often reduced down to its individual components, singled out for whatever is deemed its strong suit while everything else
is given less importance. But this is impossible to do with Circuit, the latest
release by Berlin-based British folk artist, Rowan Coupland. Everything is on
equal footing here. This balance is not as easy to achieve as it may seem,
but Rowan has accomplished it.
The first track, "Opening," sets things up perfectly. It captures a sense
of the album's intimate, quiet power, with a delicately-played plucked harp
acting as a beautiful background for Rowan's spacey, haunting vocals. This
is pure, unbridled folk, lonely and lo-fi, with a simple palette of instruments
and captivating singing. Most amazingly, the album never loses itself — it's a
refreshingly consistent work.
Production-wise, Circuit feels like it was made in a local basement. I
say this as a compliment. In the background behind the playful guitar at the
beginning of "Bubblegum" there is a slight buzzing, almost like a muffled
sound of rain — look no further to find the strength in Rowan's DIY sound.
With its quick, light vocal performance and bubbly production, "Bubblegum"
is as instrumentally sweet as its title suggests. But its lyrics, forlorn and wistful, tell a more conflicted story: "And someone has come, and the summer
has gone / And the hour's getting on."
I'm reminded of the music of Conor Oberst, especially his later solo work,
where he so often tackled melancholic topics overtop a decidedly more upbeat
tone. As Circuit continues, the music often veers into a softer, balladic territory
(the piano-driven "CAnAdiAn wholeearth AlmAnAck" comes to mind), but the
comparison to Oberst still stands. Rowan's lyricism often captures beautiful
portraits of the minutiae of life, from internet cafes in "Bubblegum" to seances
in "Cycling to Your House." But he is equally good at crafting effective imagery
and strange metaphors to speak about his most haunting experiences. The
album's best lyrics can be found on the track "Circuit," where Rowan sings
that "The tap is still on downstairs / But still nothing flows from it / We came to
forget / What it was meant to do." These are powerful, delicate words, and they
are sung with passion.
Circuit is a beautiful set of tracks, balanced and well-performed. Its
steady, confident tone, a thing which many albums across all genres fail to
capture, is simple yet effective. Rowan is not reinventing folk here, but he's
sure doing it well. —Leo Yamanaka-Leclerc
III
To submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please email
Under Review Editor Maximilian Anderson-Baier at
underreview.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review at
CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1.
UNDER REVIEW
Discorder magazine i FEBRUARY 2Q1£
 PROJECT PABLO
Hope You're Well
(Technicolour)
20.10.2017
II roject Pablo is a deep house musician from Vancouver, based in
Montreal. Their most recent outing, Hope You're Well released via
Technicolour, slides into their discography with ease. It is a historical Project
Pablo project, combining elements of their near and far past work with a
playfulness that is not always successful but is nonetheless exciting. Through
manipulating song structures, this release is a continuation of an established
sound and a harkening back to their early work.
/ Want to Believe, their 2015 debut release, plays with the juxtaposition
of melody and nontraditional instruments to hold the audience's attention.
Sometimes, this is done at the risk of feeling incohesive. Over the course of
their discography, Project Pablo has relied less on shocking variation, but
Hope You're Well plays again with stark contrasts of sounds.
Similarly, we see Hope You're Well returning to a structure present on the
2016 album, Priorities. In "Warm Priority," Project Pablo establishes a strong
rhythmic strain that grounds the track with a constant variation of sound. This
structure is also used in their more recent releases like Risk the Rip. This
album, however, has less variation around the rhythm, making for smooth
tracks that give the feeling of tough gum.
Yet, this refinement does not define Hope You're Well. Project Pablo
moves away from more constant, gum like tracks. Instead, they call back to
the high variance of / Want to Believe with stark tone shifts in each song.
I the distinctive rhythmic variation of Priorities and Risk the Rip is not fully
abandoned.
"Fer Sure," the album's final track, exemplifies this melding of constancy and variation. It begins speedy and plunging but transitions to a feeling
of pulled taffy about halfway through, with a sound reminiscent of Risk the
Rip. Changing from a feeling of fluidity to tautness recalls the playfulness of
/ Want to Believe, while still acknowledging the relative constancy present in
their more recent releases.
In "Is it Dry," the album's initial track, the two tonal elements, energized
pulsing and languid fluidity, are able to coexist alongside each other; when
they are present each complements the other. This complementary juxtaposition is not always perfectly executed. "No Sweat" begins with the playful feeling of a popping joint before transitioning into a billowing melody.
Sometimes the popping rhythm is lost amongst this airy melody, which
ungrounds the track.
To best appreciate Hope You're Well, one must first understand Project
Pablo's artistic development. The whole of their sonic journey is represented
in some way, making it a time capsule of an album. —Clara Dubber
LT. FRANK DICKENS
Sour Bubblegum
(Jaz Records)
27.09.2017
debut was made unique by its ambiguous answers to heavy questions,
Sour Bubblegum is brought down from this level of uniqueness by following
romantic cliches.
However, the album redeems itself by delivering lyrics about love in a way
that speaks to the soul rather than to the brain. This can be seen in the track
Don't Want to Fall Asleep with the phrase "Waltz to the end of time / Colder as
the sky drips dry / Warmer as it flakes with snow /1 feel a smile break cross
your eyes." While the lyrics don't make logical sense, the listener somehow
w understands what Dickens means. In doing this, Dickens demonstrates his
unique writing style by juxtaposing unexpected images together, as well as
ideas of positivity and hope alongside hopelessness and despair. Despite
Sour Bubblegum's setbacks, the writing style of Lt. Frank Dickens reifies the
album's ingenuity. —Elizabeth Schwab
PODCASTS
GENERATION WHY
Podcast Series
(Self-Released)
2012-Present
Lt. Frank Dickens, a grungy experimental folk artist and self-proclaimed
poet, released his second album, Sour Bubblegum, on Jaz Records
in September 2017. Sour Bubblegum is the kind of thing you would listen to
while contemplating the meaning of love and / or the pointlessness of our
existence with no company but a box of cigarettes. Its title is a perfect
representation of the duality of the album's message: that our existence is
pointless but there is hope in finding meaning through love.
Much like his first album, Sunburned (October 2016), Sour Bubblegum
is characterized by nihilistic tones and raw, growling vocals comparable to
those of popular indie-rock group, The National. Sour Bubblegum's
instrumental and rhythmic simplicity, as well as its lack of vocal virtuosity,
effectively brings greater attention to the lyrics rather than to its other musical
elements. The ingenuity of Dickens' work lies in the poeticism of his lyrics
and the questions addressed in them.
Sour Bubblegum is cloaked in a veil of existential angst. But where
Sunburned fails to introduce any notion of hope, Dickens centers his second
album around a single individual, someone presented as a lone figure of
solace. As a result, Sour Bubblegum places greater emphasis on the idea
of a lover rather than on questions regarding the fallacy of human connectedness, the point (or pointlessness) of our existence, and other nihilistic
and existential themes that contributed most of the emotion on his previous
album. This is the main setback of the Sour Bubblegum. Where Dickens'
8ios YflAuaaai | 9nhD|>Dm ™b-ro38i(l
I hether it is following the bloody footsteps of a serial killer or chas-
" ing the seductive leads of an unsolved crime, Generation Why is a
guided journey through true crime that is as eerie as it is thrilling. But while
following the narrative paths constructed by the two hosts, I began to question my faith in them as responsible guides.
Since they began recording their conversations in June 2012, co-hosts
Aaron Habel and Justin Evans have come far to polish the quality of their
audio content. In response to negative reception from early fans regarding
their often inconsistent and unpredictable structure, the hosts refined each
episode to be coherent and serviceable. The two friends focus on a single
topic per episode — be it a deep-dive into a serial killer, an infamous criminal
or an unsolved crime. They present the facts of the case, narrate often gory
and repulsive details and spur on discussions with their personal theories.
For example, in Episode 261, "Jeffrey Dahmer," Aaron and Justin loosely
follow a chronological narrative of Dahmer's brutal murders, sexual assaults
and acts of perversion; interspersed amongst these criminal exploits are
information regarding Dahmer's upbringing, personal theories for his psychological motives and discussions regarding contentious facts.
The monotone and dispassionate delivery of Habel and Evans irks many
ears, but I find unexpected solace in the contrast between the unflinching,
coarse images of violence and the soft, droning voices that paint them.
However, what is dangerous about their ostensibly impartial delivery is its
potential to mask this podcast as a piece of journalism and obscure what
it really is — a conversation between friends. Whether this air of expertise
is intentional or not is unclear, but there is definite room for improvement
in making clear transitions from hard facts to speculation. For example, in
Episode 243, "2012 Aurora Shooting" the co-hosts are mindful enough to
preface a particular strain of conversation discussing the mental health of
the mass murderer, James Eagan Holmes, by acknowledging the sensitivity
of the topic of mental health and their own lack of expertise. While gracious
for this caveat, it reminded me that such a gesture was not made in the
aforementioned Dahmer episode when discussing Dahmer's mental health.
Ultimately, it made me question how much conjecture I passively accepted
as truths.
Generation Why pulls listeners into uncomfortable yet enthralling experiences, unsparingly covering graphic criminal details to an extent most conventional media outlets avoid in fear of alienating their audience. Whether
you want to soak in the bloody spectacle of crime scenes, examine the outliers of human monstrosity or simply want to add some morbid excitement to
a mundane morning commute, there's something here for you. However, the
abhorrence packed into an hour-plus episode can be draining. It is a podcast
best consumed in smaller doses and with a grain of salt. —Jong Lee
LOVE TO SEW
Podcast Series
(Self-Released)
2017-Present
The Love to Sew podcast is hosted by two Vancouver-based sewing
enthusiasts and friends, Helen Wilkinson and Caroline Somos. Both are
engrained within the sewing community. Helen is a pattern designer and the
blogger behind Helen's Closet, while Caroline is the founder of the online
store, Blackbird Fabrics. This weekly podcast provides advice to creators,
showcases independent business owners, and features the work of others
in the sewist community. New episodes air Tuesdays and are, on average,
one-hour long, adding to the now twenty-five episode catalogue. Along with
the option to download the podcast, each episode offers meticulous links for
patterns and resources to supplement the discussions on the show.
With my own crafting resolutions fresh in mind, I was drawn to Episode
22: "New Year's Re-SEW-lutions." After a brief catch-up segment, featuring
messages from listeners, the hosts laid out the theme of the week: setting
and meeting sewing goals. They discuss methods of setting goals using
Gretchen Rubin's Four Tendencies, monthly sewing projects, and using a
Trello board to help with effective follow-through. Although I am only a novice
sewer myself, I am an obsessive crocheter. And I found the advice they
shared highly transferable to all crafting. Even, to other aspects of my life.
But while these in depth discussions are tantalizing, the best part of the
show remains the anecdotal advice given by Helen and Caroline. Through
personal stories, experiences and perspectives, they discuss and detail their
own plans for the new year. These intimate moments are ultimately the most
relatable, as Helen and Caroline acknowledge how difficult it is to set goals
and stick to them, whether you are a hobby crafter or an entrepreneur. The
tips I found especially useful were: planning a weekly crafting day with your
friends, working around a deadline, and specifying all the materials you need
for a project before heading to the store.
I look forward to listening to more episodes, including those featuring
local guests. I highly recommend this series to not only the sewing obsessed
and modern home sewists, but to anyone who is interested in learning more
about growing creator communities or those interested in developing a smal
businesses. Love to Sew is also ideal for anyone who might want to give
sewing a try but has been afraid to do so. —Daniela Hajdukovic
BOOKS
ooking for a seamless podcast, strung together with darn good sewing
advice and spools of resources? Make it sew!
NEXT TO THE
BUTCHER SHOP
Rodney DeCroo
(Nightwood Editions)
01  /  05  /  2017
ftodney DeCroo, a Vancouver singer-songwriter of grim blues / rock,
released a book of poetry in 2017 titled Next Door to the Butcher
Shop. His writing does not depart stylistically far from his music; his moody
verses are sometimes narrative, sometimes expository, often brimming with
nostalgic anger. In fact, reading this book while listening to his music is not
altogether disorienting, granted you have the volume down low enough to
obscure the lyrics.
If you are familiar with DeCroo's work, you will likely know his childhood of abuse and the resultant PTSD and drug use that plagued him in
adulthood. In both music and writing, he tends toward the autobiographical.
Being aware of his history lends poignancy to his poems. "Black Columns"
is an elegy of sorts addressing his "Indigent father," a ghost who "haunts
the bus stations of Appalachian The poem alludes to the experiences of
his father, uncle, and grandfather in Vietnam and the Second World War.
DeCroo acknowledges that much of his work is built on suffering ("They pay
me because my head is broken"), inferring that his career is a culmination of
"three generations" of violence, a career they collectively "earned [...] like a
wage." As a result, his father appears a victim of familial and historical violence. This is an extraordinarily forgiving view of someone whose abusive
habits are well documented in Rodney's songs.
Sometimes DeCroo slips into gory imagery but the real horror remains
his actual experience. In "The Chair," he writes "A liver, a kidney / a lung, a
deformed and oversized heart / to lug around like a pot roast / among his
rags and bottles." It reads like a laundry list of maudlin metaphors that is,
at times, self-indulgent: "I wanted to fuck my way back to the nothingness I
came from /1 wanted to burn God's face off with a flamethrower." However,
he is usually more incisive and sparing, and grants grace in the aftermath of
brutality. It is only when he abandons the vitriol can one see the ghosts lingering behind it. —Christina Dasom Song
UNDER REVIEW
15
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | FEBRUARY 201?
II /
1k*
I've reached the age where my parents
don't want to move my old boxes of
shit around anymore. As soon as
they announced they were moving
house, I dreaded the inevitable
"come sort through your stuff in
garage" phone call, but I knew
what I had to do. I drove to White
Rock one morning to sit on the cold
garage floor, ready to complain my
way through the process. Much to my
surprise, the dreaded exercise turned
into an afternoon of discovering my past
self unearthed in scratched Napster -
brand CD-Rs and broken jewel cases.
I gathered the pile of discs and drove
back to East Vancouver accompanied by
the songs of my adolescence. Noticing
the curious song selections I made and
the flow of the mixes, I couldn't help
but wonder — how has my process of music listening
changed? Is that change correlated with the development
of new listening platforms? In that moment I decided to
embark on a personal listening archive — listening back
to the CDs, making the track listings into Spotify playlists,
and attempting to unlock the secrets of my personal
progression.
Os a financially dependent 8-year old, my
motivation for pirating music arose through my
parents' distaste for most of the music I liked and
their unwillingness to purchase it for me legally. I learned
how to copy Shania Twain tapes from my friend's parents'
collections, and spent my evenings listening to Top 40
radio stations, praying I'd hear my favourite songs so I
could hit 'record' on my tape deck. Everything changed
the day my family got a computer with a CD burner. The
music listening that was once a healthy pastime quickly
became my obsession. I spent countless hours learning
the ins and outs of peer-to-peer softwares like Kazaa and
Limewire, and how to predict which files might actually
be pornography, a recording of Bill Clinton addressing
the Lewinsky scandal, or simply virus-laden. (Looking
back, none of us knew what we were downloading.)
I'd patiently wait anywhere from 20 minutes to many
hours for mp3s to finish downloading, throw them into
my iTunes library and burn a CD so I could go walk
around outside with my discman and take it all in. In the
beginning, the process was strictly utilitarian: fill the CD
with any random tracks I was enjoying at the time in no
particular order, and getting the CD
as close to the 70-minute, 650
MB capacity as possible. I
indulged in the diversity of
►' my taste with little regard
for mood or genre, grooving to
"Don't Phunk With My Heart"
and screaming "I'M NOT
OH-FUCKING-KAY" in nearly the
same breath. These private discs were
a safe and unrestrained way to absorb the
songs that resonated with me most — one
J» disc was titled "Stevie Nicks x3" to denote
that "Edge of Seventeen" made up the first
three tracks so that I didn't have to skip
backward to listen to it again.
$
*
elf-imposed rules came later — no
artist repeats on one playlist, no
song repeats from CD to CD. As the
mixes matured and evolved, so did the listening medium.
My parents gave me an iPod Mini one Christmas and
just like that, playlisting became an artform. No longer
restrained by the duration or storage capacity of a physical
disc, I was free to create mixes for every feeling and
occasion, as long or as short as they needed to be. At this
time, I relied less on Much Music or commercial radio for
introductions, and instead looked to blogs liketsururadio.
com and the CBC Radio 3 podcast
for new music. My understanding of the internet
directly influenced
my development
as a listener and
supporter of
independent music.
My processes of
discovering music
and playlisting it has
continued into the present
day. Recently, I've started
archiving what I'm listening to
as Spotify playlists organized
by month and year. There is no
art to the order of tracks other
than my general interests, and
the mixes are often jarring and
uncomfortable. (Selena Gomez
is cozied up next to Ambrose
Akinmusirein "February I2016,
"CO-Rticle'
for example.) I realize now that this form of playlisting
almost directly mirrors my process as a preteen — no
self imposed rules, no consideration of energy or flow or
genre, just a place to collect my general musical interests.
many of us question how the evolution of
listening platforms changes our direct
relationship to what we're listening to. As a
fan and as an artist, I wonder, does the convenience of
digital platforms add to or take away from the emotional
and intellectual experience of listening? I've concluded
that my own experience of listening and discovery
hasn't changed much at all since my days recording pop
singles from the radio onto cassette tapes. My curiosity
is continually piqued by popular media, word of mouth,
and a lot of time spent on the internet. If I love someone's
work, regardless of how I discovered it, I will go out of my
way to listen to a full album and support that artist in a
live setting or by buying a record.
After listening back to some Spotify playlists that
I created from the found CD-Rs, the experience felt
contrived and I knew that transferring the mixes to a
new context was an exercise in futility. The old playlists
were made for the old medium, and to listen to
them playing off Spotify felt like an awkward
school reunion. I realized that it wasn't the
playlists themselves I sought to archive,
but the growth the music allowed me,
as that music represented a stage in
my emotional development I didn't
know how to express at the time.
I'll continue to digitally archive my
current listening, and the CD-Rs will
remain in my car as sources of nostalgia
and embarrassment for years to come.
Sydney Thorne is a Vancouver-based interdisciplinary
artist. She is releasing an album of songs to get-all-
dressed-up-and-stay-home-to in late spring 2018.
 8ios YHAuaaai | snixogDm ™ino38i<i
HUTAH
COCONUTZ & BANANAS
WORDS BY MADELINE TAYLOR // ILLUSTRATIONS BY JEMMA TITHERIDGE
PHOTO BY ALISTAIR HENNING
The first image I saw by Coconutz & Bananas was the
photograph of a naked woman holding coconuts
across her chest, and a banana in front of her
crotch. Shockingly, it was not a recipe for pie or cocktails.
Coconutz & Bananas is a monthly club night held at The
Odyssey featuring an all-Trans cast of burlesque and
gogo dancers. It is organized by Anasteja-Syren Layne
and Kota Gallipeau, though it soon becomes clear during
our interview that Coconutz & Bananas is Anasteja's baby.
I am sitting in a cafe on Powell Street in       ^^^^^^^
East Vancouver with Kota Gallipeau; DJ,
promoter and co-producer of Coconutz &
Bananas. We are waiting for Anasteja-
Syren Layne, aka That Siren Goddess.
She is the one pictured on the poster.
Gallipeau explains that the name was
conceived by Layne: "I remember we
were lying in bed at my house, and she
was like, 'One day I'm going to have an
event called Coconutz & Bananas,' and I
was like, that's so random. Like, what
are coconuts and bananas? [...] [When]
we started the event, [Anasteja] was like,
'We're calling it Coconutz & Bananas.'"
Layne is a model, actress, performer
and now entrepreneur. As That Siren
Goddess on stage, she heads the Pearl
Squad, a feminist modern burlesque
troupe. She dominates the stage, flanked
by performers who worship her as their
dance mother. The titillating verve That
Siren Goddess pours out on stage was
visible even in the first photoshoot for
Coconutz & Bananas, Gallipeau explains:
"We were in my house and she had
bought two coconuts and a banana, and
she was like, 'We're gonna make the
poster right now.' [Anasteja] oiled her body up, took off
all her clothes, put the coconuts in front of her chest, put
the banana in front of her downstairs, and she was like,
'This is gonna be the poster!' I was like, get it girl. I'll
take the photo." The image is striking, sexy and playful
— just like the event it promotes.
Gallipeau and Layne were friends before they were
co-organizers. Their affection for one other shows as
Gallipeau explains their working relationship, "I couldn't
do it without her, I wouldn't want to do it without her."
Coconutz & Bananas debuted at The Odyssey, a
former gay club, August 2017. Layne and Gallipeau
wanted to create a Trans-centric space for Trans
artists, performers and allies to come together and
celebrate Trans bodies and identities through visibility.
Maiden China, who opened in January 2018 for Chi Chi
Devayne and Shea Coulee of Rupaul's Drag Race, is a regular
on the Coconutz & Bananas stage, but most others are
rookies Layne and Gallipeau want to make space for.
Both Gallipeau and Layne describe the event's beginnings
as coming from a sense of displacement when attending
other queer parties in Vancouver. Referring specifically to
her start as a performer at East Vancouver's longest-running drag night, Man Up!, Layne says,
"[Man Up!] was more so for female-bodied queer people
to occupy a safe space, which is great, but [...] when you
are Trans [...] maybe you are female bodied, but male
presenting. A lot of that gets taken away from you because
you stepped into what other people would see as privilege.
[...] As a Trans woman, I often am looked at as not
female-bodied, so therefore my occupying that space can
become a bit hostile at times."
She clarifies, "It's not to say that that's the influence
of the proprietors of Man Up!, that's more so just the
community that's been created around Man Up!. Because
again, it's a heavily feminist environment, but it's also
very empowering of female-bodied, identifying folk. So
the missing [piece] is when we go out to these clubs,
we're just trying to have a great time and be social just
like anybody else, but we have to become extra vigilant
about the space that we're occupying around us."
This sense of almost belonging within existing queer
spaces in Vancouver was the push that Layne and Gallipeau
needed to start Coconutz & Bananas. They brought their own
ideas about safety, celebration, belonging and community
with them to start a utopic queer and Trans party.
Layne says, "If you're in a queer space, no matter who
you are, you [have] the right to feel safe and to express
your story. So I just decided to create what I would hope
to be a Utopia where [...] you can come and celebrate your
body, because your body is uniquely you. It's part of your
experience, it's part of what makes you the beautiful you
that you are."
When we see queer and Trans people in the media, stories
are almost always exclusively centred around their identities,
around explaining their identities. Although these stories
are obvious departures from cisgender-heterosexual norms,
they often miss a far more pertinent and interesting angle
— the story about a community rewriting what it means
'Coconutz & Bananas'
to build belonging and family, through gender expression,
sexual discovery, artistic performance and embracing nuance
in every aspect of their being.
Layne acknowledges that there is misinformation
about the experience of Trans life, and wants
to change that. She says, "It's more likely that
people will be educated if we have a playful carefree
environment."
She continues, "I feel like as a Trans person, it is our
responsibility to be able to answer those questions. It's
frustrating as all hell, and no one should have to feel like
they're a science project, but the fact of the matter is [...]
we are not a very visible community, [and] we have to
educate people. That's just the way it is. But why not do
it from a standpoint that's going to be easy and fun and
relaxed, versus a hardcore clinical education." This open
environment is something she works to foster through
Coconutz & Bananas.
Gallipeau is equally passionate about
the event as an opportunity to break from
the intensity of queer identity politics and
"call out" culture, which often pits people
against one another inside the queer
community: "These issues are very serious
and it's exhausting. The work needs to be
done, it's being done, but I think we can't
take it too seriously. [...] These spaces are
super needed, but like, have a laugh, play
on things, you know? If you mess up, call
each other in, and go from there." This
is a hopeful invitation to a community
that so often attacks and condemns its
members when they are perceived to have
misstepped.
In the end, Layne left me with this:
"Honestly, I just challenge the Trans
community, and even the queer community,
to really step outside themselves and think
about the future of our community, and to
really think about why visibility is important,
and why it matters. And to actually come to a
Coconutz & Bananas."
You can catch Anasteja-Syren Layne and Kota Gallipeau
hosting Coconutz & Bananas monthly at The Odyssey. Follow
them on social media for announcements about tours, charitable
foundations, and more community activism in the coming
months.
Instagram I @coconutzandbananas
Facebook I facebook.com/coconutzandbananas
V
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | FEBRUARY 201?
"THE STERILE SMELL OF CLEAN HITS MY NOSE as I am handed
a towel, I feel a mix of nervous and horny, an odd blend of bodily sensation rushes over me as I
wander through Steamworks Bathhouse for the first time. I feel tingles on my body as the sexy
energy of my surroundings start to engulf me. I remove my clothing and place them in my locker,
I take my towel and wrap it around my waist and I safely tuck the condom and lubricant I was
handed by the front desk person away in my locker. What happened next is my little secret, I'm far
from a prude, but you can take some really adventurous guesses about the experiences I had."
BATHHOUSE to the FUTURE
words by David Cutting // illustrations by Maxwell Babiuk
I   will never forget my first bathhouse
experience and if you speak with any
gay man, it is much the same — a rite of
passage. Some won't go, but many would argue
that they will be missing out on experiencing a
pivotal piece of gay culture. Bathhouses, after
all, are great places of sexual exploration for
those who have deeper desires than the classic
missionary-with-the-lights-out situation.
I have often heard it said, and believe it myself,
that "coming out" is such a liberating act that
it often frees the individual from self judgment.
It liberates one's sexual desires and turns
judgement away from said acts.
I got to talk to Del
Stamp, General Manager at
Steamworks Baths Vancouver,
Ubout bathhouses and other
things. Steamworks is
one of the most successful
bathhouse chains in the
world, with businesses in
five cities. In addition to
manager, Del is also a local
DJ and social influencer. He
is outspoken and respected
in the gay community, and
is partially responsible for
the Vancouver bathhouse
resurgence, whether he would
admit so or not. He is also a
generous and kind friend.
We spoke about some
of the early cruising days:
"In Vancouver, our tubs
hersterrrrry takes us back to the beginning at
English Bay. Who knew, over 100 years ago and
pretty much any park in that area could be a
makeshift bath house," said Del. It's true, to this
day cruising culture is alive and well in some areas
down by English Bay, and there are even a few
online portals to help locate these places. Before
money and amenities, any sort of warm night in
the woods could play home to Vancouver's earliest
bathhouse experiences. I have even heard some
epic stories from decades ago of spontaneous
orgies behind the Vancouver Aquatic Centre on
Beach Avenue. The HIV / AIDS memorial is placed
just adjacent to Sunset Beach; this is certainly not
V
random, as it was one of the most active cruising
sites in the city in its day and the stomping
grounds for many gay sex workers, a legacy that
must not be forgotten. Because much of our
history is oral, and / or died with the victims of
HIV / AIDS, it is important we not turn a blind eye
to what was once our reality.
During the HIV / AIDS epidemic, individuals
exhibiting signs of HIV were often asked to
leave bathhouses. The misunderstanding of the
disease and serious fatality rate created a division
within our own community. While on the subject
of division, Canada has a history of bathhouse
raids. Although there are no recorded accounts of
bathhouse raids and arrests in Vancouver, there are
numerous accounts in both Toronto and Calgary, (l)
*
Oel is adamant that bathhouses are just
misunderstood. He explained, "People
often think that we are an unsafe space.
[...] We have condoms everywhere, an in-house
nurse who will test, provide treatment and offer
counselling, and there are several staff on at any
given point. [...] When you think about it, you
and your belongings are much safer if you just
bring your Grindr and Scruff tricks here - don't
bring a stranger into your home, bring him into
mine. Can't host? We can!"
Bathhouses are starting to become popular
again. In 2009, a small app called Grindr was
"Bathhouse to the Future'
founded, and this tiny
hand-held innovation made
navigating desires of a
carnal nature much easier.
But as the need for human
connection, community,
community spaces and
intimacy has grown, our
minds have wandered
back to the time-honoured
bathhouses. Taboos around
gay sex and gay sex culture
are changing again.
Del attributes a lot of Steamworks' success
on being a community space, crediting the
businesses community-minded approach to
how much visibility and growth they have had.
Through sponsoring and supporting local events,
Steamworks has managed to garner a lot of
confidence in its safe space values. Steamworks
and the Pumpjack team up each week to offer
an epic club night on Fridays called Wet & Wild,
where you can literally see the biggest dicks ever
having a shower above you as you dance, with
DJ Del Stamp on decks of course. Steamworks
has also inspired an amateur strip night at the
Junction charmingly titled DickSafari, where any
person can come strip for prize money, sexuality-
and gender-inclusive.
 8ios YHAuaaai | snixogDm ™ino38i<i
Through these events and others, Steamworks Vancouver
has played their part in what has been a longstanding
connection between DJing and bathhouses, between
artistic expression and sex. One example of an artist known to
perform in bathhouses is Bette Midler. She famously made a
huge impression on the gay scene and, in turn, her epic career
by performing at Continental Baths in New York City in the
'70s. Look that shit up, it's real. (2)
At Burning Man in 2012, I visited a camp called "Comfort
and Joy" that had a makeshift bathhouse tent, complete with
mattresses, condoms and lube. One night, while I was sitting
outside with my newfound German lover, we were invited in
and a bunch of desert-dwelling drag queens had commandeered
the orgy space and transformed it into an epic drag den, with
lights and music. Watching the show, I was in awe of how
versatile a space like this could be. Sex and creativity are so
closely knit.
There are a few cruising tips and tricks inside the bathhouse.
There is the basic "hello," although there isn't a lot of talking
unless someone is getting railed, and then there is the verbal
coaxing of the partner's pace and / or completion. There is the
gentle hand touching as you walk past someone in the hallway,
and there is the intense gaze and up-and-down stare; you get
combo points if you touch the hand, and intensely gaze at them
at the same time. In the modern era, you can talk to others in
the bathhouse on Grindr or Scruff and invite them to your room,
come through innovation. Also, the biggest plus to a bathhouse
experience is the high probability of having more than one
partner at a time. Why have one dick when you can have a dozen?
To sum up this cacophony of random bathhouse musings,
I would like to leave you with the very important topic of
consent. It is mandatory. Always. If someone touches you and
you don't want to be touched, tell them. If it persists, seek help.
If after reading this you feel curious or interested, the best piece
of information I can give you is that Steamworks' busiest night is
Sunday. It's called Sunday Service, and Del assures me that it has
more life than a PJ Kegger! See all you horny piggies there!
David Cutting is a local drag entertainer, writer and mischief
maker. They are the host 0/Commercial Drag, a weekly drag show on
Commercial Drive every Sunday at The Penny. You can follow them at
@unicornriverchild on Instagram and @mommadust on Twitter.
References
1. C'A history of raids: Bathhouses & the cops. "Xtra, December 2002. https://ziivw.dai/yxtra.
com/a-histmy-ofraicls-44700
2. https://www.youtube.com/wakh7v—UOrzpQfJyKL
mint records
www.mintrecs.com @mintrecords
Canada FACTOR
This project is funded in part by FACTOR, the
Please
support
VANCOUVER
girlsrockcampvancouver.ca
 ON THE AIR
ASTROTALK
interview  by  Fatemeh Ghayedi  //
illustrations  by  T'ifanie  Lamiel   //  photo  by  Colin Brattey
marco Bussanich has been running AstroTalk, a talk show
about all things astronomy and space, for around four years.
AstroTalk is one of only a couple science programs on CiTR
wi.gFM, and Discorder wanted to learn a bit more about it.
Could you give us some background on AstroTalk? What's it about?
Unofficially, I started 16 years ago. I came into CiTR and trained
in the summer of 2002, but then I got a job offer in Tokyo. I lived
in Asia for 7 years, and then I started AstroTalk when I came back.
I've been an astronomer for about 30 years now. It's a hobby, it's
a passion, it's something I do for fun. I'm a scientist, too — I have
a physics degree, and I've taught engineering and physics. So,
I love science, it's a natural thing for me. The universe — it's a
big place, right? There's lots of topics, lots of things to talk about
every week.
What do you think is important about what you're doing with the
show and the topics you cover?
Well that's a very intense, probing question. A
lot of people say, "Well, why do we even spend
money on astronomy? Why do the governments go to the moon? What's the use of it?"
Sometimes people ask, is it useful? But then,
there are so many space-related spinoffs. Like
the Space Shuttle: it had to have a protective
coating for when it comes back from space so it
doesn't burn up. Now a lot of cookware is made
from that material, Teflon.
[Through AstroTalk] I am just questioning, is
astronomy practical? In another way, we have
to go out and populate the solar system cause
the sun will eventually expand and our Earth
will die. I do some shows about NASA using
their satellites to look at the chemistry of our
atmosphere and how they're measuring the
chlorine content in there, because chlorine reacts
with hydrogen to make hydrochloric acid and
that's what depletes the ozone. They monitor
forest fires, storms. NASA does so much practical
stuff with their satellites. So, I think astronomy,
Discorder magazine | FEBRUARY 201?
tfllEN0£
OF
in terms of the Earth, is very practical and it's fun for me.
I think if anybody has a passion, they should do it. I think if we
follow our passions, that'll bring out the best in us.
So far, what has been your most memorable radio experience?
One of my best experiences was interviewing a NASA astronomer, her name is Trina Ray from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
She was working on the Saturn program that just finished. I've
interviewed her, and seen how [astronomers] are so dedicated.
That spacecraft was there 14 years. I used to type 10 hours a day for
my book; that's what these people do for years, and it's amazing
how much expertise they have on these things. How can they
discover all these amazing things?
That's what gets me, I guess. There's this vastness and how
these astronomers come up with these incredibly complex theories,
and later they're proven correct. The vastness of it all is in terms of
the scale, the size, the amount of energy, the amount of power, the
distance. Our nearest stellar neighbour is 4.3 light years away, and
just for us to get there would take 4.3 years travelling at the speed
of light — and we can't get anywhere near the speed of light.
AstroTalk airs on CiTR wi.gFMMondays 4~5pm. Marco is also an
author, and his books are available on his website marcoastrotalk.com.
For more show information or archived episodes and podcasts, visit
citr.ca/radio/astrotalk.
This interview has been edited for clarity.
20
ON THE AIR j AstroTalk
Opening Reception and Performance
Friday, February 9, 7:00PM
*The artist begins her durational performance at 7:00PM
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you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththe-
browns@hotmail.com
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE BURROW
3PM-4PM, rock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
department manager Andy
Resto, the Burrow is Noise
Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock
with a nice blend of old
classics' and new releases.
Interviews & Live performances.
Contact: music@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
4PM-5PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm-6:30pm, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TUESDAV
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
3AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the LGBTQ +
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmaii.com
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM,  ROCK / POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM,  ROCK/ POP/ INDIE
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communityiivingradio@gmaii.com
INTERSECTIONS
2-3PM, talk/feminism/gender
EMPOWERMENT
The Gender Empowerment
Collective's goal is to center
the voices, issues, concerns:
and experiences of women:
transgender, intersex, Two-
Spirit, genderqueer, gender
non-conforming, non-binary:
and gender fluid folks and allies.
Tune in weekly for interviews:
commentary, stories and news
from YOUR communities.
Contact:
genderempowermen t@citr. ca
INTO THE WOODS
TUES 3PM-4PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope:
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DOUBLESPACE
ALTERNATING TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/
DESIGN / FEMINISM
Investigating interactions with our
surroundings and society. Every
week we discuss our experiences
with these interactions, how
they emerge and the impacts
of these invisible forces.
Twitter | @doubiespaceshow
WORD ON THE STREET
5pm-6pm, rock/indie/pop.
Hosted by the Music Affairs Collective, every episode is packed with
up-to-date content from the Lower
Mainland music communities including news, new music releases:
event reviews and upcoming events:
interviews with local musicians and
industry professionals and discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES &TREASONS
3PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room.
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/ POP
Jayden targets the audience
in the Korean community in
Vancouver to introduce the
News on Korea, Korean Culture
while comparing other Asian
Cultures, plays all kinds of
Korean Music(K-POP, Hip Hop:
Indie, R&B,etc),talk about the
popular trend in the industry of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows:
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, what's
going on in Korean Society here
in Vancouver, Talk with Guests.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
2PM-3PM, talk/cultural
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
second season! The team
of Indigenous and non-
Indigenous peeps produce the
show weekly. We talk about
Indigenous issues, current
events, and entertainment
centering Native voices through
interviews and the arts. Come
make Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Foiiow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves/
KEWIT UP
3PM-4PM, experimental/talk
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica:
Post-Punk, Industrial.
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
4PM-5PM, talk/ accessibility
POLITICS
CiTR Accessibility Collective's
new radio show. We talk
about equity, inclusion, and
accessibility for people with
diverse abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every week
for interviews, music, news:
events, and awesome dialogue.
Contact:
accessibiiitycoiiective@citr.ca
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC:
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves
on CiTR Radiol01.9FM:
Wednesdays from 5-6pm.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE NEW ERA
9PM-10PM, HIP hop/ r&b/ soul
A showcase of up n' coming artists
who are considered "underdogs'
in the music industry. We provide
a platform for new artists who are
looking for radio play. Bringing
you different styles of Hip Hop
music from all across the Earth
and interviews with music industry
professionals. It's the NEW ERA...
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk, and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSDAV
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture:
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CONVICTIONS & CONTRADICTIONS
ALTERNATING THURS, 9AM"9:30AM:
talk/comedy/social OBESERVATIONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society; shown through social
observational comedy. To boot
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
CULT! FROM THE UBYSSEY
CULT! is a bi-weekly radio show/
podcast about culture at the University of British Columbia (UBC). From
The Ubyssey— UBC's independent
newspaper and a definitive source
of campus/community news — the
show will feature the rag's brightest
minds discussing the happenings
and issues in the arts and culture
scene as well as interviews with the
creators and creatives involved in
the various projects around town.
Hosted and produced by Ubyssey
staff writer Olamide Olaniyan
Contact: Twitter | @UbyssseyCuiture
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr(3>gmaii. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Rocke t From Russia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean:
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B.
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
3:30pm-4pm, talk/sports
Your weekly roundup of UBC
Thunderbird sports action from
both on and off campus with
your hosts Eric Thompson
Jake McGrail, and Jacob Aere
Contact: sports@citr.ca
SHOES ON AWIRE
4PM-5PM, rock/pop/indie
Reworked as a music show
with the occasional sprinkle of
commentary, Shoes On A Wire
is back. As always, stories:
interviews, and hot takes will
make an appearance, but
mostly you'll hear sweet tunes.
Contact:
Twitter | @shoesonawirepod
Instgram | @Staunchjitters
DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this
is CiTR's brand new Current
Affairs show! Tune in weekly
for commentary, interviews,
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
NO DEAD AIR
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
JAZZ FUSION / POST ROCK
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion:
experimental electronic, and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook | NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30pm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautonomy, com
■ FR1DAV
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact: auraitentacies@hotmaii.
com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse(S>canadaiandshow. com
CITED
3AM-9AM, TALK/ACADEMIA
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact: facebook.com/citedpod-
cast, Twitter | @citedpodcast
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary:
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion:
mastery, and a 'IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@g maii.com
MUZAK FOR THE OBESERVANT
1PM-2PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
CiTR Music department
program, highlighting the
newest/freshest cuts from the
stations bowels. Features live
interviews and performances
from local artists.
Contact: music@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30pm-5pm, music/interviews
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp://nardwuar. com/rad/con tact/
THE UBC HAPPY HOUR
5pm-6pm, talk/news/current
AFFAIRS
The UBC Happy Hour is
produced by the UBC Affairs
Collective, and made by
students, for students! The
show is all about what's
happening on UBC's campus.
Tune in for updates on
campus news, clubs outreach
and just about everything
else you can find at U BC!
Contact: ubcaffairs@citr.ca
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6pm - 7PM, talk/comedy
6pm-7pm,  Every week Jack
Tristan and a special guest
randomly select a conversation
topic for the entire show;
ranging from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure.Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30pm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
imational
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop:
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skaids_Haii
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock remains committed to the
best in post-rock, drone, ambient
experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can
put the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, eclectic/live
INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco uvermedicineshow(5>gmaii. com
■ SATURDAV
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citriatenightshow@gmaii.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codebiue@pauinorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary:
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmaii.com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavoina@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy:
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hone
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmaii.com
SOCASTORM
3PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoN #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
Sbit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ SUNDAV
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM,  INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
ALTERNATING SUN. 3PM"5PM:
COUNTRY
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmaii.com,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
3PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmaii.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
3PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, DeepTrance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Antherrr
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmiieymike @trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS:
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ ISLAND OF
LOST TOVS
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citrca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9FM JANUARY CHARTS
#rtfet          SUfoim          llabei
«
Nicholas Krgovich*+
In An Open Field
Tin Angel
i ^
Buffy Sainte-Marie*#
Medicine Songs
True North
1 *
Destroyer**
ken
Merge
1 *
Esmerine*#
Mechanics of Dominion
Constellation
1 »
Woolworm*+#
Deserve To Die
Mint
1 *
Storc*+
store
Self-Released
1 »
Champion Lawnmower*+#
Babies
Self-Released
1 •
Shrouded Amps*+#
World Well Lost
Self-Released
1 »
Brutal Poodle*+#
Long Time No See
Self-Released
«
Ora Cogan*+#
Crickets
Hand Drawn Dracula    j
|i
Blue Hawaii's
Tenderness
Arbutus
le
The Body & Full of Hell
Ascending a Mountain of
Heavy Light
Thrill Jockey
l«
Rec Centre*+
Dealer to the Stars
Self-Released
|M
Rapsody#
Laila's Wisdom
Roc Nation
IB
Project Pablo*
Hope You're Well
Technicolour
I"
Off World*
2
Constellation
1   »
Painted Fruit*
PFII
Self-Released
|M
Little Miss Higgins*#
My Home. My Heart
Self-Released
l«
Alvvays*#
Antisocialites
Polyvinyl
t*>
Partner**
In Search Of Lost Time
You've Changed
it.
Needles//Pins*+#
Goodnight, Tomorrow
Mint
y
Weaves*#
Wide Open
Buzz Records
h
Gord Downie*
Introduce Yerself
Arts & Crafts
y
Petunia & The Vipers*+
Lonesome Heavy &
Lonesome
Self-Released
i»
METZ*
Strange Peace
Royal Mountain
y
Dead Quiet*+
Grand Rites
Self-Released
i»
Rawlins Cross*
Rock Steady
Ground Swell
y
Tough Age*#
Shame
Mint
M
St. Vincents
MASSEDUCTION
Loma Vista
i»
Odonis Odonis*
No Pop
Telephone Explosion
!«
Big Brave*#
Ardor
Southern Lord
y
The Burning Hell*#
Revival Beach
BB Island
i»
Andre Ethier*
Under Grape Leaves
Telephone Explosion
y
Bird City*#
Winnowing
Label Fantastic/Coax    1
i»
Co-op*+
2nd View
Self-Released
i»
Sharon Jones And The
Dap-Kings#
Soul of a Woman
Daptone
|»
Valiska*
On Pause
Trouble In Utopia
y
Profligate
Somewhere Else
Wharf Cat
l»
Sarah Hiltz*#
Beauty in the Blue
Self-Released
l«
John Maus
Screen Memories
Ribbon Music
1 *
Petunia-Liebling
MacPumpkin#
1 Left My Heart In Uncanny
Valley
Electric Phantom
1®
Ivy. The Pulse*+#
Chameleon
Self-Released
1*
True Norths
Open Road, Broken Heart
Self-Released
1«
The Pack A.D.*+#
Dollhouse
Cadence Music Group   \
1 *
Amor De Cosmos*+
Myth Of Origins
Self-Released
l«
Kaitlyn Aurelia Smiths
The Kid
Western Vinyl
I*
CCFX#
CCFX
I
1*
Stars*#
There Is No Love In
Fluorescent Light
Last Gang
1*
Mauno*#
Tuning
Idee Fixe
I  SD
Peach Pyramid**
Repeating Myself
Oscar Street
2 m
T3 J*
b ^
'Si
.°7.
B   3
a.H
B E
3 o
a m
<* I
E    ■
IS
L^H
re >
Cfl U"
Q =
>. <D
Is
«g
Ej   r
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"d  on
re ^c
Cfl   ^
NATIONAL DAY OF ACTION
ON THE OVERDOSE CRISIS
MARCH BEGINS AT VICTORY SQUARE
(200 West Hastings) AT 12:30 PM
INJUSTICE
FATAL !
ii iAWMY TALK, W\M DIE 8
VANCOUVER, BC
VANCOUVER    -    VICTORIA    -    CALGARY
EDMONTON     -     TORONTO     -     OTTAWA
MONTREAL - AND MORE...
CAPUD.CA
ADVEKIKE
DISCORDER
MAGAZINE
AJ) VKKTISING@C1TK CA
 UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
February 2 February 2        February 5
DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS' JESSICA LEA MAYFIELD '     YACHT
Imperial The Cobalt      I Fox Cabaret
February 6
MAKO
Fortune
t
February 9      February 11
KIMBRA  M0 & CASHMERE CAT
Imperial      Vogue Theatre
February 14
MASON JENNINGS
Biltmore Cabaret
February 15 February 16
PARQUET COURTS & THURSTON MOORE  JAY SOM & JAPANESE BREAKFAST
Imperial
February 16
BLACK WIZARD
Rickshaw Theatre
Biltmore Cabaret
February 16    February 17
NOBLE OAK BRUNO MAJOR
Fox Cabaret
February 21
MARY TIMONY PLAYS HELIUM
The  Cobalt
Fox  Cabaret
February  17
AUTOGRAF
Imperial
February 23
DOROTHY
Biltmore  Cabaret
February 24
GRAILS
The  Cobalt
February 25
CALEBORATE
Biltmore Cabaret
February 27
ALEX CAMERON
Imperial
February 26
BULLY
Biltmore Cabaret
February 2 3
ELDERBROOK
Fortune
February 26
KIKAGAKU MOYO
Fox  Cabaret
February  2 7
TUNE-YARDS
Commodore Ballroom
February 28
TY DOLLA SIGN
Vogue Theatre
March  14
SON LUX
Fox Cabaret
February 28
BETTY WHO
Imperial
February  2 8
SHAMIR
Biltmore Cabaret
March 4        March 8        March 11
THUNDERPUSSY MR. CARMACK ANDERSON EAST
The Cobalt      Imperial        Imperial
March 14
THE NAKED AND FAMOUS
Rio  Theatre
March  18
ANTIBALAS
Biltmore Cabaret
March  24
OUGHT
The  Cobalt
Tickets  & more  shows at
timbreconcerts.com

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