Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 2017-12-01

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0364041.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0364041.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0364041-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0364041-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0364041-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0364041-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0364041-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0364041-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0364041-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0364041.ris

Full Text

  254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
UPCOMING SHOWS
I  would like an    i
annual Subscription
;That's $20 for Canada,
"or U.S.A.)
■ I would like to support
Discorder Magazine with
donation!(Hey, thanks!)
(How much would you like to donate?)'
TOTAL:	
Send this form and
cash or cheque to:
Discorder Magazine,
LL500-6133 University
Boulevard.
Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z1
JO BBgg
*^AtlC0M*rs Loftyffrirtn/iUj
CiTR 101.9  FM  & Discorder Magazine
present the
34th   Annual
O
Tuesdays in January
9, 16, and 23
nn/i
FEBRUARY 4
2
o
 TABLE Of COFITEFITS
WINTER 2017-18
COVER S PHOTOGRAPH BY BETSY FROST OF MARNIE RICHARDSON, LALIA
PATERSON, TRISTIAN THOMPSON, ELIJAH SHULTZ, SIMRAN DHALIWAL, GABBY
TWERDOHLIB, DAKOTA STALLARD, TORI JOHNSON, WOLFIE DOLL, SAPPHIRE
ELIZABETH, EILEEN MCINTOSH. SHOT ON A MANUAL PENTAX MV CAMERA.
iFeaturess
06   -  BABY,   IT'S DARK
Sarah Jickling shares her SAD.
08  -  KATHLEEN  HEPBURN
"p
SIDE
Local independent filmmaker on writing scripts, queer
representation and Canadian cinema.
09   -  BB
They're releasing music in 2018, they promise.
16 -  BETSY  FROST
Victoria photographer opens new gallery in February.
17 -  EMILY  CARR ACTION  GROUP
Is Emily Carr's new campus a waste of tuition?
Column* + £Dt|>er £>t«ff
04
04
05
10
12
13
16
18
20
21
22
23
- Hot Head
- Unceded:
Let's talk about  the
Edmonton Eskimos
- Transmission
from PLOT:
Pollyanna Library at 221A
- Real Live Action
lire shows, comedy
- Art Project
Ssmallhoax
- December Events  Calendar
- Under Review
albums, books, podcasts, films
- No  Fun Fiction:
"Worms In the Dirt" by A.L.
- On The  Air  Special:
Holiday Listening Guide
- CiTR Program Schedule
- CiTR Program Guide
- November & 2017  Charts
ADVERTISE:Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words
to Discorder, please contact the
editor ateditor.discorder@citr.ca.
To submit images, contact the art
director at artcoordinator@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE:Sendina
cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133
University Blvd. V6T1Z1,
Vancouver, BC with your
address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for one year.
DISTRIBUTED distribute
Discorder in your business,
email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE:We are part of CiTR,
a registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content
you love.To donate visit
www.citr.ca/donate.
To inform Discorder of an
upcoming album release,
art show or significant
happening, please email all
relevant details 4-6 weeks in
advance to Brit Bachmann,
Editor-in-Chief at editor.
discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct
comments, complaints and
corrections via email.
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station Manager: Hugo Noriega // Advertising
Coordinator: Audrey MacDonald // Discorder Student Executive: Tintin Yang // Editor-in-Chief: Brit
Bachmann // Under Review Editor: Maximilian Anderson-Baier // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D.
Wrinch // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Online Communications Coordinator: Sydney Ball
// Accounts Manager: Halla Bertrand // Charts: Andy Resto // Writers: Brit Bachmann, Tom Barker,
Laura Bee, Jennifer Brule, Bridget Buglioni, Esmee Colbourne, Leigh Empress, Hilary Ison, Sarah Jickling,
Jonathan Kew, A. L., Hailey Mah, Keagan Perlette, Nathan Pike, Autumn Schnell, Indigo Smart, Dylan Toigo,
Izzy Tolhurst, Hannah Toms, Douglas Vandelay, Leo Yamanaka-Leclerc // Photographers & Illustrators:
Bryce Aspinall, Sara Baar, Simone Badanic, Amy Brereton, Colin Brattey, Duncan Cairns-Brenner, Eva
Dominelli, Jules Francisco, Alistair Henning, Dana Kearley, Mescondi, Sunny Nestler, Lou Papa, Pat Valade,
Khylin Woodrow// Proofreaders: Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Brit Bachmann, Audrey MacDonald, Madeline
Taylor, Sarah Wang, Jasper D. Wrinch, Chris Yee
©Discorder 2017-2018 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by
CiTR, located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemirierh speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9
FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at starjonmanager©citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada
0 Picture 3* Wortfc #
jGD&ou$ant> Word* of
&ttbtert
EDITOR'S NOTE
'Subtext' refers to unseen messages or implications found in creative work. As
it suggests, subtext is a written phenomenon, but it shows up in different ways.
Subtext is how Walt Whitman expressed homoerotic observations in Leaves of Grass;
how most Dr. Seuss books are arguably about the negative environmental impact
of consumerism; how the plot of Stranger Things could promote colonialism and
imperialism; how Elvis' "Blue Christmas" may not refer to the colour of his mood.
Subtext can be rooted in truth or conspiracy, or both.
Because I see or perceive subtext everywhere these days — especially in media,
manifest as bias — I wonder if people see subtext in Discorder. And then I wonder if
the masthead isn't trying to send messages to our readers. Doesn't all independent
media passionately seek to tug the world in a certain direction? At the very least,
don't we strive to convince you of our worth?
Last year's Winter Issue featured Kimmortal on the cover, photographed by
Matthew Power. It was one of several photographs we considered. The cover photo
we chose wasn't the strongest of the shoot, but Kim's smile had an effect on us.
The masthead spent longer than usual deliberating on that cover. Following the
U.S. presidential election, following political decisions in Canada (alluded to in last
year's Editor's Note), the issue felt high stakes. When the masthead arrived at a
consensus, it was because of a message we wanted to convey to you, our readers:
smile in hope, smile in resistance.
This month's cover is a photograph by Victoria-based photographer, Betsy Frost.
As with Kimmortal's cover last year, it required some discussion, but not as much.
We're confident about this year's message, carried across the issue through words
and imagery:
2018, we're ready.
A+
BB
Cover of Discorder Magazine
Winter 2016-17.
Photo of Kimmortal
by Matthew Power.
r-AecEssiBitmri
COLLECTIVE
une into 'All Access Passl
Wednesdays-A^EMJ
ARTS COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'The Arts Report'
Wednesdays from 5-6PM
GENDER EMPOWERMENT
COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'Intersections'
Tuesdays 5-6PM
INDIGENOUS
une into 'Unceded Airw;
londays from 11AM-12P
MUSIC AFFAIRS
COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'Word on the Street'
Tuesdays from 5-6PM
NEWS COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'Democracy Watch
I    Thursdays from 5-6pm
SPORTS COLLECTIVE
Tune into 'Thunderbird Eye'
Thursdays from 3:30-4PM
UBC AFFAIRS
COLLECTIVE
e into'UBC Happy Hour'
Fridays from 5-6PM
J GET INVOLVED
CONTACT V0LUNTEER@CITR.CA
 Discorder magazine | WINTER 2017-lf
HOT HEAD
GALL FOR FEEDBACK RE. WOODWARDS
DEVELOPMENT.
fflTflhe Woodward's Amateur Historical Society is looking
Ji., for stories froms
-the now defunct W2 venue space in Woodward's
-the old Redgate space on the 100 block of West Hastings
-Studios and galleries surrounding Woodward's dating
from the early 90's up till 2002
We want to hear from you.
Please reach outs
www.amateurhistoricalsoc@gmail.com
FOLLOWING #MET00, FUCK YOUR
CONSUMPTION OF MY TRAUMA.
If I have to listen to one more art bro whine about how
hard it's been for him to accept the news about Louis
OK...
If I have to listen to one more journalist talk about how
afraid he is of being called out for some of the things
he's done to women...
If I have to listen to one more person talk about Lena
Dunham as though she's not the epitome of privileged
white hipster racist idiocy...
If I have to hear one more person bemoan the art that will
be lost now that Kevin Spacey has been outed...
If I have to listen to one more person talk about how
survivors should have come forward sooner to prevent
more assault...
If I have to navigate one more institution that claims
it's "hands are tied" because they don't have the right
kind of evidence to act on an accusation of assault...
As though identifying with a predator deserves to be
mourned publicly.
As though fear of being named should trump empathy for
the people you have wronged.
As though white feminism is legitimate.
As though the lost art of survivors isn't the bigger loss.
As though survivors are the ones who should do the work
to prevent assault.
As if there is nothing you can do besides press charges.
Why did it take a tally of predator's names the length of
my arm to make people realize that the "rumour mill" is
simply a spy network of true pain that women use to protect each other against predators?
If you were shocked by #metoo, you are part of the problem. Xou were not listening. We have been whispering,
writing, organizing, and screaming about this violence
forever. Xou needed to see our trauma splattered across
your phones and laptops like porn ads before you started
to "get" it.
How many parties have I been to in the last month where
men in my community came up to me and were suddenly
eager to talk about abuse because the salacious details
were fresh in their minds and they just needed to process
without considering I am a survivor too?
Please remember the list is incomplete. To quote Lindy
West, "This is a witch hunt. I'm a witch, and I am hunting
you."
In solidarity,
Anonymous
YOU DON'T NEED A PUPPY
Seriously, you don't need a puppy. Why have a dog when
you work 8 hours a day and have to keep them locked
in your house that whole time? Do you realize how fucking cruel that is?! Owning a dog when you don't have
time to let them run and play outside and socialize with
other dogs is selfish. Dogs, or any pet for that matter,
don't exist to be your accessories, or some like-booster
on your Instagram. Get a tamagotchi or download a fucking pokemon app instead.
-Poop Scooper 1
UNCEDED
LET'S TALK ABOUT THE EDMONTON ESKIMOS
words  by Autumn Schnell  //   illustrations  by  Jules  Francisco
Edmonton's football team has been in the spotlight
lately, after Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman
commented, "...there's an opportunity for a more
inclusive name."1 On one end of the football, there are
qallunaat voicing their opinion, and on the other end the
Inuit are also expressing their opinion. It's the typical case
of 'white people think this' and 'Native people think that.'
The issue, however, is that myself and the Inuit don't
care what the qallunaat think. The only people whose
opinions should matter are the Inuit, and the Inuit have
many nuanced and diverse opinions. My stance, as an
Inuit Canadian, is that the name should be changed.
Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson said that he is
willing to open up dialogue about it,2 and I
think that the rest of Edmonton should be
open to it as well. Because ultimately,
this name isn't a representation of
settler Canadiana culture; this name is a
misrepresentation of Inuit culture, now
considered a racial slur.
It's a misrepresentation at best. At
worst, it's a trope that tokenizes Inuit
culture for the generation of profit. As
Norma Dunning says, "the term 'Eskimo' is
a constant reminder of how the Inuit people were
demeaned and discriminated against during the
colonization of the north," which is still happening, but
less overt.3
It's time that Canada recognize Inuit people as
contemporary people. The Inuit aren't a people of the
past, and Canada should start recognizing our voices and
acknowledge what the Canadian state did to us.
CTV Edmonton opened up a poll which demonstrated
that 57 percent of Edmontonians find the name
acceptable, and only 12 percent of Albertans disagreed
with the name.4
There is one large problem with this poll; it doesn't
tell us the participation number of people who identify as
Inuit. Leaving that information out makes qallunaat think
t
that their opinions matter in this scenario, but they don't.
This poll should be re-done and shared in the north, as
well as open to Edmontonmiut, and other Inuit people
living in the south.
The name "Eskimo" perpetuates negative stereotypes,
and we are now just beginning to debate where the term
originates from. Initially, the term "Eskimo"5 was thought
to be derived from Algonquin and translated as a slur for
"eaters of raw meat." But more recently, it is believed that
the term comes from the Innu-aimun language, and is
believed to translate as "one who laces snowshoes."6
Regardless of the origin, it was never intended to
describe Edmonton's football team. The name came
about during a rivalry between Calgarians and
Edmontonians, where Calgary was called
the "the cow camp," and Edmontonians
were called the "Edmonton Eskimos." But
Edmonton isn't Inuit territory, and their use
of the term Eskimo creates an educational
disconnect between what Inuit culture is
and isn't.
There is also an issue with the tokenism of
Indigenous players (ie. Kiviaq). Just because an
Indigenous player played for the team once upon
a time doesn't justify the name Edmonton Eskimos.
Inuit people are diverse and have a broad spectrum of
opinions, and Kiviaq isn't the end all be all of opinions.
We should celebrate that he was successful in his career to
play for a CFL team and represent Inuit people in his own
way, but his career and cultural heritage can be totally
separate from one another. His personal doesn't have to
be political.
■   understand that not all Inuit people are offended
by the Edmonton Eskimos. However, this argument
isn't just about the multifaceted opinions of the Inuit
people, but also about the Inuit versus the qallunaat.
There is little to no mainstream representations of the
Inuit in contemporary society, but as a football team, the
Edmonton Eskimos have a lot of mainstream exposure.
The mention of "Eskimo" may appear to give Inuit
people airtime and exposure in sports coverage, and media
reporting on this topic implies that the Inuit are engaged
in dialogue around the name, but this is not true. The
Edmonton Eskimo franchise is exactly that: a franchise
business. They will always put the wants of their fans
before the needs of the Inuit from whom they appropriated
their namesake. There are bigger problems at hand, like
attrition, living conditions in Iqaluit and especially the price
of food in the North, but many of them could be solved, or
at least acknowledged by more accurate representations of
Indigenous peoples, including the Inuit.
This conversation needs to highlight more Indigenous
voices and less season's pass holders and CEO's, in order
for this problem to be radically dealt with. It's time to
decolonize and stop the tokenism of Indigenous players and
franchisement of Indigenous peoples.
Refe
lerences
1 -BrianBowman, http://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/
edmonton -eskimos-couM-have-a-more-inclusive-name-brian-bowman-1.3 669 756.
2 - Don Iverson, http://edmontonjournal.com/news/local-news/
niayor-don-iveson-joins-calh-jor-edmonton-eskimos-to-change-name.
3 - .Norma Dunning, http://www. cbc. ca/news/Canada/edmonton/
edmonton-eskimos-name-change-inuk-critic-1.4401422
news/3'8647'46/42-of-albertans-say-edmonton-eskimos-name-is-unacceptable-poll/
5 - D. W. Langford, http://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/colunmkts/
opinion-have-a-coniwsahon-about-eskimos-name-but-jight-red-racu^
HOT HEAD | UNCEDEDjLet"s Talk About the Edmonton Eskimos
 8I-VX0S H3THIWI 9nixDBDffl isbiooziQ
TRANSMISSION FROM PLOT
POLLYANNA LIBRARY
words by Jonathan Kew // photos by Pat Valade //  illustrations by Simone Badanic
The parallel views at Main and Georgia produce a spatial juncture. Outside the 221A
gallery, your vision can tunnel west at the expanse of sky-crowning West End
skyscrapers, or tunnel east into the compressed plane of Strathcona.
Chinatown is itself a critical juncture. Early in November, the Beedie Development
Group's fifth proposal for the 105 Keefer site came to a climactic voting down. Credit
lies in the mobilization of Chinatown activists, who inundated the proposal hearings.
221A and its Pollyanna Library played a part. Besides its day-to-day accessibility for the
community, 221A served as a space for organizers.
The reason I visit 221A is to chat with Vincent Tao and Yu Su about the Fall fellowship
program N.O.P.E. (Notes on Permanent Education): specifically, Yu's project, Pollyanna
Sound Archive Prototype 01. Primarily known for her dub applique music, Yu's project is an
effort towards building a speculative sound archive at the Pollyanna: one representing
a swerve away from traditional field recording, towards a methodology of collaborative
representation. What will eventually become the Pollyanna's collection was sourced from
two N.O.P.E. recording sessions: one at Stanley Park, and another at Aberdeen Mall.
This swerve, with researchers sourced from community volunteers (disclosure: I
was a volunteer for the second session), can tell us a lot about the Pollyanna. What is
permanent education? And what does 22iA's focus on "infrastructure" have to do with
the mutable space of a gallery in a neighbourhood at a critical juncture?
This is by no means a comprehensive overview of our conversation. Rather, this PLOT
transmission is a heavily condensed collection of the threads Vincent and Yu brought to
the fore.
Vincent Tao: I'm the librarian at Pollyanna.
I do some of the programming here, along
with 221A's Head of Strategy Jesse McKee.
I'm primarily a librarian, but not really. I don't
have a degree in librarianship.
Yu Su: My name is ^
the fellows at N.
I'm one of
V T: As a long preamble, 221A has been
around since 2005 as an experiment in
student self-organization that began at Emily
Carr University of Art + Design. Eventually
they moved to Chinatown, starting 221 A. At
the heart of our interests is in this partitioning
of art and design: how artists, art and education are used to recreate hierarchies and types
of labour. Maybe this is me doing a revisionist
history.
The Pollyanna Library at 221A began
two years ago. There's a lot to say about the
library as having a different kind of temporality.
It's about how art is used in the gallery: the
treadmill, the exhibition, and when the exhibition is done, the art goes in the garbage. So,
if what it takes to transform society is more
permanent structures, and longer forms of
engagement, we were thinking that the library
is the home for those longer temporalities of
production and social reproduction.
If we're able to work with people who aren't
within our small sphere of non-profit arts,
that's the slow work of trying to transform
society in some way. From really intentional
things like lending our space to Chinatown
Action Group as an organizing space, or
welcoming in patrons or guests, working with
Chinese seniors, trying to understand how we
change social dynamics in the library space.
These things are invisible; or we try to obscure
because a lot of capitalism is about "transparency" by way of funding or investment:
big spectacles. If we can create these more
opaque spaces for convening, that's far more
worthwhile in the city of glass.
ON POLLYANNA SOUND
ARCHIVE PROTOTYPE 01
Y S: With the sound archive and field
recording sessions, it's interesting to
see how people of different backgrounds
treat sound objects and practice listening. I'm restricted in some ways. When I
think about recording, I focus on musical
purpose. But for people who are not
trapped in that world, there's more possibility. Many interesting sounds are ones
that I would never think about. Especially
from the second field recording, Aberdeen,
at Daiso. There was so much interesting
one-shot material: a piece of paper, some
fabric.
The whole idea of starting this sound
archive is to think about how we can do
archival practice that's not institutional
in the traditional way. Because usually
an archive is very objective. It's about
recording a period of time and space. It's
historical. It's objective in a way that
represents the institution's perspective.
I usually feel uncomfortable when people
talk about field recording in the context
of sound art. I like it more when people
explore. The idea is to figure out how to
represent a personal experience of listening.
The personal can range from the individual
to the the recorder. Even listening to an
archival recording is interpreting it.
Sound art often focuses too much on
one sense. When you hear you're not just
hearing. I don't think it's possible in any
circumstance to only listen. There's also
more beyond your five senses. You're
feeling the air, your body, the heat, you're
interacting within your environment. Pure
listening isn't really what this project is
about. It's about personal experience on a
larger scale.
V T: You have the kind of reactionary sound
art practice where you create pure listening
spaces where it's "just the sound." I was
reading about surrealist techniques, like with
the Bureau of Surrealist Research. They were
interested in isolating everyday life as a well
of strange material. It requires the framing
of research to be able to see or hear those
things. Getting those research participants
to participate in these field sessions, talking
about how we build these libraries together,
is to be able to isolate and understand these
barely noticeable aspects of everyday life. Yu
Su is talking about is a project where we want
people to understand themselves as researchers in life. Not just art spectators but people
who are deeply embedded in our society;
and to think through the way that they record
their sounds and understand their subjective
relationship to the world. With the next phase
of the project, Yu Su will be mixing the sounds
that our volunteers and researchers collected
from Stanley Park and Aberdeen Mall, and
connecting them into a suite.
Y S: I'm interested in creating a
delusional soundscape: indoor and
outdoors combined. When you listen to
a field recording, usually the purpose is
triggering a specific response. This would
be a bizarre space that doesn't really exist.
We want people to write down how they
feel about this soundscape.
The text of the recordings is not focusing
on time and space. It's focusing on people's
reaction to it.
This interview has been edited for clarity.
Visit polly-anna.ca for more info.
TRANSMISSION FROM PLOT   |   Pollyanna  Library
A
 FEATURE   .
Discorder magazine | WINTER 2017-1E
Baby,
It's Dark
Outside
words by Sarah Jickling
illustrations by Eva Dominelli // photos by Sara Baar
T
k
I've spent a large portion of my twenties in the waiting rooms of
Vancouver's walk-in clinics and emergency rooms. I've spent hours sitting
in vinyl seats, listening to QMFM, just to tell a medical professional that
I was sad. Everything in my life was blurry and slow and heavy and dark, and
eventually I started to wish I could go to sleep and never wake up. I would
describe this crippling sadness to doctor after doctor, and I always got this
question first:
"Are you from here?"
Apparently, depression and suicidal thoughts are normal side effects
of moving to Vancouver. The doctors would tell me they see it all
the time: someone moves from a city with winter, spring, fall
and summer to Vancouver, the city with thick grey skies and
rain for ten months of the year, and suddenly they lose the
will to live. It's called Seasonal Affective Disorder (aptly
abbreviated as SAD) and when you live in a city that barely
has two seasons, it becomes a big deal. Vancouver is a city
full of SAD people for most of the year. According to the
medical community, we have a full-blown SAD epidemic.
Obviously, if I had answered yes to that first question, there
would be no need for me to visit every waiting room in the city.
Unfortunately, I'm from Surrey. I grew up with this constant drizzle.
My dad used to say that the rain would follow us if we ever went
on a vacation, so part of my little kid brain thought that my
family must also be the reason it rained so much in the Lower
Mainland. I'd tell the doctor that no, I was not some previously
happy East Coast Canadian who made a terrible mistake and
moved to the "wet" coast, and we'd
move on from that question to the
next one. As a native Vancouverite in
her early twenties, it was expected
that I was used to the constant
darkness.
After what felt like a thousand
trips to the doctor and a couple trips
to the hospital, I was eventually diagnosed with
Bipolar Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.
And, like literally everyone with Bipolar Disorder,
I also have Seasonal Affective Disorder. But on
my list of problems, SAD ended up at the bottom
of the list. I spent years trying to find the right
medication that would treat my bipolar disorder
without worsening my anxiety disorder, and finally
I could get through a month without throwing a
plate across the room or sleeping for fifteen hours
straight. It was August 2016 when my psychiatrist
and I agreed that I was doing well enough that I
could go three months between visits instead of the usual two weeks. I finally
felt okay. And then October came.
I've been stable on meds for a year and a half, and while that doesn't make
me an expert, I've learned that from October to May, life is harder. By the time
pumpkin spice latte season comes around, my symptoms of depression come
creeping back like clockwork. I've tried everything my doctor (and the collective
hive mind of the internet) has suggested to fight it. I have a little happy lamp
which I try to stare into for 30 minutes every morning. I take more vitamin D
than the bottle suggests. I try to have fun with the fall and winter holidays.
Last year I bought tickets to the Halloween train in Stanley Park, Zombie
Syndrome the outdoor interactive zombie play and the "no splash zone" at Evil
Dead The Musical. I went to the pumpkin patch, the Christmas market, the other
Christmas market, a Christmas-themed musical, saw the lights at VanDusen
Garden and if my money hadn't run out, I would have bought tickets to a
Christmas ghost tour of Gastown.
It was ridiculously hard work, and as October came rolling around this
year, I didn't have the energy (or the money) to throw myself into celebrating
"Baby, It's Dark Outside'
cozy, fuzzy feelings that only ended
up feeling forced and hollow. This
year, instead of trying my best to
have fun, I'm going to try my best to
take care of myself, even if that
means allowing myself to
feel depressed. Instead of
spending my money on
overpriced Christmas
markets, I'm going to
make sure I exercise
(I can be found at the
local pole fitness studio
almost every night), eat
food at least three times a
day, drink water, and sleep
eight hours a night. I'm going
to say no to projects I can't
handle, or postpone them
until the summer when I have <
more energy. I'm going to
expect less of myself. Bears
hibernate. Maybe people with
SAD need to hibernate too.
RESOURCES:
To speak to a psychiatrist
or join a  coping skills group,  ask your
doctor or a walk-in clinic to refer you to
the Mood Disorders Association of BC. If
you are feeling suicidal and are looking to
see a free counsellor immediately, contact
SAFER at Vancouver General Hospital. If
you are looking for an extremely affordable
counsellor and don't mind being on a waitlist,
contact Oak Counselling.  To learn skills
about mindfulness and other coping tools
for free, email the YMCA Youth Mindfulness
Program and ask to be put on their waitlist
(for people under 30 only). If you need to
talk to someone, or to find more resources
in your area, please call the Crisis Centre or
chat online with the Crisis Centre Chat (for
over 24 years old) or YouthinBC.com, If you :
are in a crisis and you don't want to go to the :
ER, there is now a mental health emergency I
centre called the Access and Assessment]
Centre. They can send a nurse to you and I
have counsellors and psychiatrists on site.:
Some helpful mental health apps include:]
Wysa, Calm, Headspace, Mindshift, and anj
app in progress called Aloe.
0 everyone who
struggles with their
mental health this
time of year, I would like to
remind you that Christmas
doesn't have to be joyful, New Year's Eve doesn't have to be exciting and
Valentine's Day doesn't have to be romantic. You don't have to pretend
that this is the "most wonderful time of the year." You have to take care of
yourselves and make sure you survive until summer, no matter what that
means to you. Maybe one day, we can all move to the south of France. But right
now, we're here, and we're having a hard time. And that's okay.
Sarah jickling is a Canadian songstress and mental health advocate. Over the past few
years, Jickling's whimsical indie-pop songs have been featured on radio stations across
the country and in independent films. The twenty-six year old uses her music to spread
mental health awareness, and has opened up about her experiences with Bipolar Disorder
and Anxiety Disorder on radio, local television, podcasts, blogs and at live speaking
events. She now performs her music in
high schools across the province with the
BC Schizophrenia Society's Reach Out
Psychosis Concert Tour. She can be
found in hospital waiting rooms and pole
dancing studios around Vancouver.
 «■   "    1
a Hi,
IN
CELEBRATING
10 YEARS
Is this innovative program the
graduate degree foryou?
►Industry-Focused Master's Degree
►Graduate from 4 Major Universities
►Competitive Scholarship Opportunities
INFO SESSION
JANUARY 31
JOIN US ON JANUARY 31, 2018 at 6 PM
CENTRE FOR DIGITAL MEDIA
685 GREAT NORTHERN WAY
VANCOUVER, BC
Register online at thecdm.ca/info-session
a collaboration between
UBC
CENTRE FOR
DIGITAL MEDIA
learn more ► thecdm.ca
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | WINTER 2017-1E
The Writer, The\
Kathleen
words by Brit Bachmann //illustrations by Lou Papa \
Can we know someone by their words? I believed so
in university, supplementing a kind of loneliness
with poetry and prose. I found intimacy with
writers through their words, and upheld these one-sided
relationships until I didn't need them as much.
I hadn't thought about this for a while until my interview with local filmmaker, Kathleen Hepburn. She wrote
and directed Never Steady, Never Still, which debuted at the
Toronto International Film Festival this summer. It has
since played other festivals in Canada and internationally.
Set in Northern British Columbia, it is a realistic
portrayal of a family that copes with a degenerative
condition and sudden loss. It's centred around a mother
with Parkinson's disease, and shows the dynamic between
her and her husband, her son, and her community. The
narrative branches off to follow her son into oil fields,
parties, and lustful encounters both inside and outside
of his mind. Though it addresses serious topics around
illness, sense of belonging and sexuality, the story is
delicate, minimal and intentional.
When asked about creative influences, it wasn't
surprising that Hepburn responded, "I take a lot more
influence from writers than filmmakers when I'm
writing." She also noted admiration for filmmakers
Mike Leigh, Andrea Arnold and Kelly Reichardt, who
seem to share a love of literature.
While writing Never Steady, Never Still, Hepburn was
reading Tinkers by Paul Thomas Harding: "It is about
a man on his deathbed, going through his relationship
with his father who had epilepsy. [It is] very imagistic
and poetic. That was what I used to get things flowing."
Jamie, the son in Never Steady, Never Still, was influenced
by Toronto-based poet, Matthew Henderson, whose poetry
book, The Lease, documents his experiences working on oil
sands as a teenager.
Jamie is an interesting character. He learns responsibility through work, and having to step up after the death
of someone close. The viewer sees him mature suddenly.
Pushed into adulthood to a certain extent, Jamie questions
his sexuality, but only sharing his uncertainty with
the viewer. Jamie's sexuality is one of the film's many
thematic undercurrents, but it is strong enough that it
places Never Steady, Never Still within a growing canon of
LGBTQIA2S+ Canadian cinema. Or as Hepburn thinks, "on
the edges of it."
"It's not that it's not a queer story, but more that I think
Jamie's identity struggle is less about sexuality than it is
about being seen. But because he's a teenage boy, sex is a
major factor in that struggle. But, it's not until he experiences someone else's pleasure that he can really understand
what the pleasures of sex are," explained Hepburn.
Filmmaki
Hepburn
/photo by Colin Brattey
mid a dozen glowing reviews of Never Steady, N~
Still in print and online, there are some ba<
_  _   Writers have critiqued the character developm_
of Jamie, and his mother, Judy. The negative reviews hav.
largely demonstrated an ignorance of neore   alism and the
slow cinema that inform the film's script and aesthetic.
With regards to the character of Judy, negative reviews
have suggesf^tf vjfcpburn missed an opportunity to fee '
the viewer's hunger for more positive role models around
chronic illness and disability. This critique in particular, is
tokenizing. Speaking to the expectation for filmmakers to
depict "positivity" for the sake of it, Hepburn said, "I think
there is also the responsibility of being honest."
"To me, the mother is an extremely positive role model.
"; realistic in that she can't express what she wants
to express, but she's incredibly strong and independent.
She's trying to take care of herself and her son," explained
Hepburn. "I wanted to show what I see as strength, which
is the day to day, getting through shit."
This idea of representing the quotidian in rural settings
encroaches upon a wider national debate around the
status of fiction film writing. In January 2017, Cameron
Bailey wrote an op-ed "Dear Canadian filmmakers:
it's not about you, it's about us" for The Globe and Mail
arguing that Canadian filmmakers rely too heavily on
personal experiences of alienation. Filmmaker Kevan
Funk (Hello Destroyer) responded with an open letter that
acknowledged Bailey's perspective, and agreed "Canadian
filmmakers need to be much more bold," before
dismantling the op-ed. Funk pointed out that Canadian
filmmakers have few resources, and that funders (federal
and provincial arts programs, broadcasters, Telefilm, etc.)
are more keen to invest in depictions of Canadian identity
than other content.
"I wanted to show what I see
as strength, which is the day
to day, getting through shit."
Hepburn agreed with both sides: "It's true that we tend
to get drawn to the personal, but I think a factor is that
first-time filmmakers are often telling personal stories
because that's the only thing they know how to do."
There is also inconsistency across the country.
Hepburn explained, "I think that the problem is that
we're telling a lot of Canadian stories that aren't
authentic. I feel that there's a wave coming from the
East Coasters, that they're telling these very intense,
realist [narratives], which is what I think has been
lacking from the milk-toast Canadian rural stories that
we've seen before." Considering the issues posed by
Bailey and Funk, Hepburn concluded, "I think it's a mix
of both. I think we need to look at politics and our social
situation and be more critical, but I don't think that
necessarily means not telling personal stories."
Ond so, our conversation circled back to writing.
Hepburn holds an MFA in Creative Writing from
the University of Guelph. For Hepburn, working
on a degree gave her the time to slow down and focus on
scriptwriting Never Steady, Never Still. Time is a luxury that
many filmmakers don't get.
"There is always a push to get to the next stage, to get
films made," Hepburn stated. "I think that's something
that screenwriters don't usually get to do, is to take their
script and beat it to death, but in a good way, treating every
line as crucial."
Never Steady, Never Still is a labour of love and conviction,
a testament to taking things slow. Is a filmmaker known
through their work? I believe so.
Never Steady, Never Still will be screening again in the
new year, dates to be announced. Kathleen Hepburn is currently
working on a new feature film with Elle-Mdijd Tailfeathers
called, Stay.
8
'Kathleen Hepburn'
 8I-VX0S H3THIWI 9nixDBDffl isbiooziQ
HUTAH
"The feeling is that if we've waited this long, why not
wait a little longer until it's right? It's out forever after
that," says Megan.
"We have to do the songs justice. You want to put it
on and dance to it and feel so good when you listen to
it," Bella adds.
ut the wait drew reproach from onlookers —
mostly women — who were critical of the
styled and garish photos filling BB's social
media profiles in the absence of music. For the critics,
there was little faith in their ability as artists.
"When we first started, all we could really put out were
photos of each other. Also, it was fucking fun. We got
a lot of people talking shit but we said, 'why don't you
come and see us play. Come to our shows.' We'd only been
a band for a month or something, but we were already
getting that. We just want to be ourselves," says Bella.
Asked if they were surprised that the loudest criticism
came from other women, a group from whom one might
have expected solidarity and allegiance, Megan notes that
there isn't one women. BB are clear they don't speak for
Bella adds: "I had a girl come up to me in a bathroom
and say, 'thank you for doing what you're doing. You have
no idea but it inspires me.' We played earlier that day and
I thought it was brutal. It was a sit-down day show and
nobody was moving. I was totally redeemed."
f
MUSIC
ABOUT BEING STRONG
.YOU JUST HAVEN'T HEARD IT YET
uiorbSi!ten Colljurst //illustrations by,Bana iaearleji // photo byMesconbi //stalinganb uiarbrobe byCilbrbillz
"2D&e feeling t* ttjat if toelje toaiteo ttjte long,
torjp not foait a little longer until it'fi rifl&t?"
or the small amount of criticism levelled early on,
BB says Vancouver artists have provided immense
support for the band, and have been excited to watch
it grow. People from Little Destroyer, Dumb, Pale Red, SBDC,
and the staff at Red Gate among others have been supportive
since the beginning. "That's a big part of being an artist or
musician, is having support and community," says Bella.
It's a community that is shaped, in part, by the struggle
of life in Vancouver for many artists. The rising cost of
rent, minimum wage jobs and a steady decline in accessible music venues on the country's west coast influences
how and where art is made, and the messages it projects.
"If anything, it puts a fire under my ass to affect
change in my group," says Megan. "I work harder to
make the city more interesting and more liveable, even if
it only affects 10 people."
In the next six months, BB will
be busy. They aim to have their
debut EP out by March 2018, as
well as undertaking a D.I.Y. tour
of the West Coast into the United
States. The women will continue
to make music that is honest and
real, and they're confident about
what lies ahead. BB is the pursuit
of something vital, rewarding and
wholly necessary for both Bella and
Megan.
"I've spent my whole life
worrying what other people think.
But when I wake up and play guitar,
it feels so good. Playing with Meg
and a drummer; nothing tops that
feeling," Bella says proudly.
"It's good fun and I hope people
can see that. We're doing it for the
right reasons," concludes Megan.
^^■'^^p   are self-proclaimed Vancouver shredders
P^k B^k   Bella Bebe and Megan Magdalena, but what
mJ mJ   BB stands for is information they're not
yet willing to part with. They prefer to let people come
up with their own interpretations. "It's more fun that
way,"says Bella.
They've played music together for just over a year,
formalising an admiration that had been brewing for some
time. "I thought, 'Who would I envision this working out
with? It was always Megan," Bella states fondly.
The band's official genesis, somewhere around November
2016, signified the end of toxic relationships for both
women; parting with boyfriends they also played in bands
with. It's one of many things that Bella and Megan have in
common; part of a list that runs mesmerisingly long.
Despite these similarities, the early days were marked
with nerves; the product of mutual respect, excitement
and an eagerness for musical chemistry. "The first time
I showed Megan a song I thought I was going to cry,"
recalls Bella. "Me too, I thought I was going to barf!"
echoes Megan, laughing.
The nerves quickly dissipated, overshadowed by a
fierce work ethic and enthusiasm for BB's potential. By
December 2016, they had seven demos, recorded by Bella's
bandmate and jo passed creator Joseph Hirabayashi. The
songs are about heartbreak, openness and new-found
defiance. Their vision was being realised.
But a year on, the songs remain unreleased. There have
been challenges with additional recordings and changes
to drummers, but most importantly, a growing confidence
that's afforded Bella and Megan patience.
all women, and as such, they're respectful of how other
women feel about their approach to self-promotion.
"We understand that we all have our own pain and our
own struggles being women. As much as we are queer,
we're not POC [people of colour]; we're not trans. We will
never understand the oppression and what it's like to be
in any other body than our own. That being said, we're
fighting for female expression," says Megan.
"If other people see us and are inspired by us in any way,
or feel like our expression can help them express themselves
in any way, then that's awesome. We're not trying to speak
for an entire gender. We're speaking for ourselves, and our
friends, and our personal experiences — and that's valid too,"
she continues.
'BB'
Photography byMescondi (Connor
Cunningham) and styling / clothing by
LillzKillz (Lillea Goian), who recently
featured in Vancouver Fashion Week and
Tokyo Fashion Week.
A
 Heal Hue
fiction
NOVEMBER 2017
KING KRULE / STANDING ON THE
CORNER
NOVEMBER 5 / VOGUE THEATRE
I entered the Vogue Theatre to a saxophone solo: a fair introduction to
the complicated post-jazz group, Standing on the Corner. Informed
by improvisational music, Standing on the Corner is caught somewhere
between experimental hip hop and cultural critique.
While their set was strong overall, the musicians' individual performances were inconsistent. The distortion on the vocals made for a disorientating
landscape, and the lyrics for which they are known, incomprehensible. But
still, Standing on the Corner was a solid opener for King Krule.
From the upper balcony seats, I saw excitement physically manifest in the
audience below as Archy Ivan Marshall a.k.a. King Krule appeared on stage.
Interrupting shrieks and applause, he opened with "Has This Hit?" off 2013's
6 Feet Beneath the Moon. ["Another disappointed soul / Well I try /1 try to
keep it in control..."]
King Krule performed a balance of older broken-in hits and newer, more
introspective songs, and the audience ate it all up. During some songs — "Baby
Blue" and "Easy Easy" in particular — the audience sung over the speakers.
With that said, the bro zone around me reacted a little too enthusiastically
to lyrics like, 'You fucking bitch / You don't know when to stop / You're a bunch
of fucking fat bitches, fucking fat bitches" of "A Lizard State." For that reason,
it wasn't the biggest surprise when I overheard of two instances of sexually
aggressive behaviour on the floor. What was a surprise, however, was hearing
that Vogue security were in proximity both times and failed to intervene appropriately. Aren't professional venues, especially ones that host all-ages shows,
supposed to be trained on this kind of stuff?
Aggression aside, King Krule was brilliant. The band radiated cool. If only
the whole audience had picked up on it. —Leigh Empress
RADIATOR HOSPITAL (SOLO) / ALIMONY
/TIM THE MUTE
NOVEMBER 19 / ASTORIA
There are bands that you could take home to meet your mother. I can
imagine it now: Radiator Hospital, alimony and Tim The Mute would
be perfect, making inappropriate jokes and drinking tea. A night of off kilter
twee music was what I needed, and that's exactly what I got.
10
I arrived at the Astoria halfway through Tim The Mute's set. As always,
Tim Clapp was there just to have fun. I really appreciated the band's
approach to music like teens playing in their bedroom, surrounded by personal garbage that everyone can see but nobody likes to talk about. Playing
what they describe as mushy pea punk, I realized this meant talking shit and
being sarcastic about serious and emotional stuff, especially in songs such
as "Twenty-Two," and "Van" — "I lived in my van /1 would have thought by
now I'm pretty tough but I could never do that again / Been separated from
my wife since March / Her visa ran out so she had to depart."
The second band of the night, and honestly probably my favourite, were
alimony. They were pure cuddlecore: all of their songs under three minutes
long and deeply following in the tradition of classic Vancouver pop punk,
alimony were solid, surprisingly so, even after the bassist, Juls, exclaimed
she needed more light to "see the dots" on her oversized jazz bass. They
had a focused intensity on stage and a strength that didn't fade until leaving
the stage. They made us all bop to their beats, even through the screechy
feedback.
Philadelphia's Radiator Hospital was the headliner and the last band of the
night. Unfortunately Sam Cook-Parrott was forced to play solo as the rest of
the band had their passports stolen, making the border crossing a challenge.
The stripped down sound was reminiscent of Radiator Hospital's early songs
and acoustic sets — I wondered if Cook-Parrott's music was always this melancholy or it was just the lack of a band — "You won't get off that easy, no
don't say you love me / When you know you don't / If you're thinking that we're
through /1 won't hold it against you /You know I won't." In the sparseness of
the performance, I could hear some of his lyrics that were normally hidden by
jangly instrumentals, and boy, were they all heart breaking.
However, it was lovely to see him play with his band confined to his
imagination, cueing himself with drum beats we couldn't hear. It looked and
sounded like he had rain clouds on his shoulders. Luckily a solid group of
fans clustered around the front of the stage and danced all the way through,
requesting songs and just enjoying his presence. Usually known for their
upbeat, D.I.Y pop, and strangely desolate lyrics, Cook-Parrott's set was
markedly glum. Thanks for deciding to play anyway — we were all glad you
did. —Esmee Colbourne
FOXHOLE COMEDY: AMBER HARPER
YOUNG / GINA HARMS / ARASH NARCHI
/ CHARLIE COOK / ZOE BROWNSTONE
/ SHOSHANNAIZSAK / ABDUL AZIZ /
KATHLEEN MCGEE
NOVEMBER 22 / PROJECTION ROOM (FOX CABARET)
first and foremost, congratulations to hosts of Foxhole Comedy, Jackie
Hoffart and Robyn Pekar, on their recent nuptials. That aside, Foxhole
Comedy is an intimate night of stand-up featuring some of Vancouver's best
local comics. Located in the Projection Room above Fox Cabaret on Main
Street, Foxhole Comedy is proud to host women, POC and LGBTQIA2S+ as
the majority of performers.
Working to develop a community within the weekly comedy night, host
Jackie Hoffart offered collectible buttons to all audience members which
garner free entry to the following show. After some honest and ad-libbed
banter from Hoffart, the audience was warmed up and ready for the first
performer.
Amber Harper Young delivered an expressive and personal routine, her
material acting as somewhat of a comedic catharsis based on recent hardship.
The routine brought the audience through a bell curve of self-deprecation, which
went from relatable to cringeworthy before
finishing with an undeniable charm.
Next was Gina Harms with a safe, but
tried-and-true routine, which offset the
nervous energy of the previous act with a
quiet confidence. Harms'joke about her
time working at a Dairy Queen became a
surprising cornerstone for a recurring theme
of the night.
Arash Narchi followed with a series of
well-written anecdotes that could benefit
from a self-confidence that will come with
time. Narchi pulled his set out of a nosedive
with determination, winning the audience
over in the end. While he missed some
opportunities to link jokes into comedic
segues, he offered a great setup for Jackie
Hoffart to riff off during interludes.
Again contrasting from the previous performer, Charlie Cook carried their material
with confidence and a natural comedic timing usually awarded to performers
with much more experience.
Hailing from Toronto, Zoe Brownstone was next to grace the stage.
Displaying the energy and crowd-work of a veteran comic, Brownstone had
the audience wrapped around her finger with topical and engaging material. She somehow managed to talk about pockets for half of her set without
becoming tedious.
Shoshanna Izsak followed, delivering one of the best performances of
the night. A self described "baby comic," Izsak is one to watch out for. Her bit
about utilikilts had the audience in stitches, offering the sentiment that finally
"gay men are bad at fashion."
Opening with an anecdote about his high school experiences of working
at a Dairy Queen, Abdul Aziz tied the theme of the night together. I feared
that his routine was in danger of relying on tropes when he ventured into
religious material, but his fresh takes and amicable delivery won me over
immediately.
Headlining the night was Kathleen McGee, who used the last minute
booking as an opportunity to test drive some newly drafted jokes. One of the
best parts of attending these intimate types of shows is witnessing the birth
of new material, and Mcgee delivered. Displaying tones of Sarah Silverman,
Mcgee was a crowd favourite.
All in all, the night's show was a great taste of Vancouver talent, showcasing a diverse mix of comics. Foxhole Comedy is a fun, intimate night of
stand-up that I would urge all comedy fans to attend. —Doug Vandelay
DEVOURS /ADRIAN TEACHER AND THE
SUBS /FUTURE STAR/ MR. MERLOT
NOVEMBER 23 / ASTORIA
Showing up to the Astoria early and alone, here was no one there to
hide behind. The crowd that would later arrive hadn't yet, but I was
there to see all the acts: Mr. Merlot, Future Star, Adrian Teacher and the
Subs, and of course Devours, who was celebrating the release of two cassettes, Late Bloomer and Avalon.
As I sat on the edge of the dance floor the internal arches of the room
felt much bigger than normal. There was an air of nervous solemnity, maybe
because most of the audience was made up of the bands waiting to play
later. This was a variety show, unusual in Vancouver, where genres only
occasionally mix to this extent. Tonight however, it was the crowd that was
linking the bands together, supporters meandering through the venue attracted to the bar, and the shiny blinking lights of the pinball machines.
The first act, Mr. Merlot, cautiously stepped onto the stage and began his
smooth, experimental lounge music. Sweeping onto the checkered dance
floor, and leaving his tech behind, Mr. Merlot performed hard to his six
person audience. Committed, he pushed past the curse of being the first act
at a midweek early show. I wanted to dance with him but instead, let a swing
dancing couple set the tone of the night. The songs had highs and lows —
every time he started a new song he had to warm up again and lose himself.
Eventually he seemed to burst with confidence and showcased his laid back
beats and crooning voice.
The soundcheck between sets thickened the air in which I loitered, and I
found myself eavesdropping in on unimpressive conversations about conservative music education, dubstep and Christmas carols come too early. Future
Star moved from her spot hiding behind a pillar and tinkered on her keyboard, which was centred on the dance floor.
I was hoping to hear Future Star's song "Karaoke," and my wish was
granted by her beautiful, melodic voice. Future Star radiated. Her songs of
swGGt nothinos wgtg DGrfGctlv ss.d s.nd hfir scrGsmino fs.ns s.nd loud frifinds
■tfc&SligLS!
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PRE
ON-LIVED   NOSTALGIA
ROGRAHMED BY CASSANDRA BOURCH I E R
FRIDAY DEC 8 / £
THE CINEHATHEC
1131 HOWE S
REAL LIVE ACTION
WORKS FROM THE VIDEO OUT COLLECTION BY VINCENT
TRASOV, FRASER FINLAYSON, LORNA BOSCHMAN, ED
MOWBRAY, & A WORLD-PREM I ERE OF ROBERT HAMILTON
"PASSER-BY" !
Discorder magazine | WINTER  2017-1E
 surrounded her with their support. Future Star was, without a doubt, successful without her drummer, tapping her hip and clicking her fingers to keep
the beat. The set felt too short — quick songs in quick succession.
Next on were Adrian Teacher and the Subs who were, as expected,
brilliant. Playing a range of material from their extensive discography, their
newest songs were surprisingly funky. Adrian's face scanned the crowd,
while he stood on the corner of the stage, non-verbally threatening to crowd
surf. The Subs made me understand why some people claim that bands are
like marriages — they were so in sync, it was like they didn't have to think
about what was next. It was impossible not to dance, and I couldn't stop
smiling.
After a break just long enough to get a beer in my hand, Devours
appeared on stage like a mystical beast. He was a bright mirror ball
engulfed in a galaxy of glitter eyebrows, a patchwork lame shirt and a silver
quilted suit jacket that looked like it would melt from being set on fire by the
stage lights. I had never seriously danced at the Astoria before, but in a
small group of people we moved our bodies to what can only be described
as experimental spring break anthems. In the end we asked for more, which
Devours was unprepared for; but with a little switch up to the programming,
he was able to give us two more songs. Devours' candy flavoured beats
were a wild and empowering ride. —Esmee Colbourne
BLUE MOON MARQUEE/GILLIAN
MORANZ / MILK CRATE BANDITS
NOVEMBER 24 / WISE LOUNGE
Upon walking into the underground bar, I was met by the pleasant
vocal stylings of Gillian Moranz. In addition to her own guitar playing, Moranz was joined onstage by Petunia & the Vipers' guitarist — and
righteous musician in his own right — Stephen Nikleva. Moranz, with her
stinging lyrics and smooth, velvety voice, sang through several folk and
country songs supplemented by Nikleva's slide guitar. This, along with the
overpowering bar smells of days gone past, provided an eerie mood in the
bar and made it feel as though it were an old-timey tavern amongst bandits
and thieves.
Fittingly, next up was Milk Crate Bandits. By this time the crowd had
swelled and there was no longer room to sit, let alone stand. Fronted by
Australian singer and banjoist Jack Ray, the amazing band was rounded out
by performers on the trombone, clarinet and stand up bass. With a modern
take on New Orleans jazz, the solos from the clarinet and trombone players
set off some swing dancing in the crowd. Despite riling up the room, the
background chatter began to drown out the music. But the Bandits soldiered
on with their swingin' sound and won the crowd back with more epic trombone and clarinet solos and Ray's jazzy vocals.
After much anticipation, Blue Moon Marquee hit the stage. Recently
returned from an exhausting European tour, Jasmine Colette and A.W.
Cardinal hit the stage all smiles and ready to roll! Right away, I could overhear the crowd marvel at the fancy foot and hand work of Colette, who
played the bass and snare drums with her left foot, the hi-hat with her right,
all while holding the stand up bass with her right hand and intermittently hitting a cymbal with her left. Got all that?
Despite the complicated yet crafty setup, you could tell both Colette and
Cardinal loved every second of it as they played with their eyes closed,
laughing and smiling throughout the whole show. Cardinal's clean jazz and
blues guitar playing, honed in clubs and bars throughout Montreal and New
York, coupled with his gritty and grizzled vocals rounded out the soulful
sound to this jazz, swing and blues band.
Blue Moon Marquee had the full attention of the crowd, blowing us all
away with their carefully crafted, foot-stompin' performance. With tunes such
as "Double Barrel Blues," "Trickster Coyote" and "Pour Me One," I got the
sense of their tough, Alberta roots, and their experience playing everywhere
from dives to festivals showed. The performance was cut short due to strict
noise bylaws, but I have the feeling they would have gladly played us into the
night. —Laura Bee
TIDAL-SIGNAL II
NOVEMBER 24 / VAL VILLA
I I hen I walked into Tidal ~ Signal II at the VAL Villa, Vancouver Art
^^r   and Leisure's fantastic Railtown venue, it felt dark and spacious.
Having been at an enormous Halloween party there weeks before, the space
was decidedly calmer, almost hushed.
People were milling about, checking out art installations on both levels of
the space: a tiny peek into prOphecy sun's lucid-dream field; an interactive
spinning wheel and instrument setup
by Sarah Gold; Brady Marks' tower
of synths blinking "ANALOG;" and
two phones connecting the listener
with faraway sounds from smalltime
magic. We were being invited to
explore, to be transported, and to
think — something my Friday night
brain was barely capable of after a
long week.
The musical offerings of the
evening were as diverse as the
installations. First up was Sasha
Mannequin, whose spacey, dark
"club music" merged grime, synth-
pop, samples and more. Her latest
project delves into Jewish identity
and the issue of recently reinvigo-
rated anti-Semitism in a surprisingly successful mashup of klezmer
sounds and electronic music.
Next was Real Adult from New
York City. His innovative setup
revolved around an amplified snare
drum and various sonic objects. His set invited the the audience into the
tactile, playful nature of sound. With the crowd sitting and standing around
his kit, it felt like an intimate gallery show within the cavernous club setting
of Villa.
After a break of wandering to the various installations and running into
various friends, Sabrina Schroeder took to the stage with a heavy electronic
set using self-built mechanics. Without much visual action, we were left to
feel the powerful vibrations in our bodies, which sounded like boomy, doomy
roars from underground.
gran am played next, crafting a deep, loopy, textured ambient sound that
included both vocals and samples. A beautiful black and white video featuring
collages of stereotypically feminine imagery — butterflies, bikini-clad dancers,
and flowers — accompanied her set.
Wallgrin finished the night with a set of violin, voice, loops and drum
machine. Her project spanned performance art, Kate Bush-esque vocals,
skillful violin and lyrics that suggested strong feminist themes. Her ferocity
passion and musicality were impressive, and the crowd clearly expressed
that in their response. The woman in front of me yelled "Oh my god! No!
Amazing!" after every song.
Tidal ~ Signal aims to disrupt gender disparity in musical programming
of all genres. It was an early show, because the venue was being flipped for
a techno show at 11 p.m.. Near the end of Wallgrin's set, a couple of confused techno dudes entered the space. They started to leave, but stayed to
watch, perhaps as transfixed as the rest of us. That, to me, looked like Tidal
~ Signal's mission in action. —Hilary Ison
III
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and online,
please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live
Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA is al<
A is also expanding to include comedy and theatre, among other live experiences. Feel free to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
1660 EAST BROADWAY
DEC
DEC
8
10
THE GEEKENDERS PRESENTS
HOW 1 MET MY MOTHER
A BACK TO THE FUTURE
PARODY MUSICAL
DEC
11
THE 19TH ANNUAL
ANIMATION SHOW OF SHOWS
*ALS0 PLAYS DEC 18
THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER
DEC
THE SQUARE
13
THE GENTLEMEN HECKLERS PRESENT
STAR TREK: GENERATION
DEC
14
NO DRESS REHEARSAL:
A MUSICAL TRIBUTE TO
GORD DOWNIE
DEC
15
KITTY NIGHTS WEST PRESENTS
PEE WEE'S BURLESQUE
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
ALS0 0NTHE16TH!
DEC
17
JANEGOODALLBIOPIC JANE
THE GEEKENDERS PRESENTS
A HARRY POTTER
CHRISTMAS BURLESQUE
DEC
20
THE FICTIONALS COMEDY CO. PRESENTS
IMPROV AGAINST HUMANITY
CARDS AGAINST VANCOUVER LAUNCH
#IAHATRI0
DEC
ANOTHER WOLFCOP
21
LOVE ACTUALLY
DEC
22
YIPPEE Kl YAY, MOTHERFUDGER!
DIE HARD
FRIDAY LATE MOVIE
DEC
WHITE CHRISTMAS (1954)
23
BLACK CHRISTMAS (1974)
DEC
24
FRANK CAPRA'S
ITS A WONDERFUL LIFE
WILL FERRELL IN ELF
DEC
27
THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW!
#DNDLIVE, IMPROVISED EPIC FANTASY
DEC
29
AMERICAN PSYCHO
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
DEC
30
STANLEY KUBRICK'S THE SHINING
JOHN CARPENTER'S THE THING
DEC
31
PATRICK MALIHA'S
NAUGHTY LITTLE NEW YEAR'S EVE
JAN
1
NEW YEAR'S DAY HANGOVER MARATHON!
HAUSU + THE BIG LEBOWSKI
MAD MAX: FURY ROAD
JAN
3
DOUBLE BILL!
RIDLEY SCOFS
BLADE RUNNER (1982) &
BLADE RUNNER 2049
COMPLETE LISTINGS ATWWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA
8I-VX0S  H3THIWI 9nixDBDffl i9bi032ia
REAL   LIVE   ACTION
  \                                      \\                                                                                               «                                    a                                                        »                                                                                               »                                                                                               «                                                                                               »
1                               %                 3         ti    ^                                         «                             ^                                 ■«           s               °                       ro                                  &                                                                      WWwl                                                                              %
1                          1           „:S       1    £                  s              i                        2    §    *           II         1            go^S               IH      ~            k                                   Ik                                        IH
****•
!**************
««««»»
!*****»
>"<
«
;1       I    |               j|          i|
U   fl   T)    0)                                     CO
bfi              cfl                                         ;
r    T^
.^B
^ 1
x:           ra        -      n                 aw             i
V.          .v w .h      m               a oj      m    3
pa          Soeo              ^ ^      $    3
In           'a    ' m  a      J                     S      ™    :
3  '*  -(->         ®                cfl
CO   CM   >J    Cfl                            ti    ^                             j
0        Pi       g                        ;
>> co   <d             0        3 -t->                   :
j«; '   x: xj      x:       0  co                 :
O   +J   EM     CO            CO            t~,     Cfl
3  ca      ca       j«;       M) hj
g           a                              i
•H                    4J                                                         •
13                     CQ                                                         !
cfl              -H                                         ;
CD                     Ph
Ph               x:                                         i
4k:                                  i
o                                               §
3                                               i
-i                                               ||^l
WlP^
w    i
f*   1
||       1   •       ||    |1    |    »  |
BJ'S         o   w   w  £        3                       SS        M     ;
w .h       tj  a  a             -                oj           s    :
hJ CM ®             t-.        ^
® ®  a           ec      xj  co                 i
a  co                 a  >>
*           4k:
0               0                                         :
^                                              j
H
1
1   *-»  s
K   B    I-    i    ^"i    »               ■                              °    3             3;
M e   h   e        g              pq                    i
rH                        Cfl                                                                 i
cfl       g                                     i
a j«;   M) -»->        "-1         w        rH               s
rH                       rH                                                                 !
rH             -H                                                                          S
1* *%
w    i
.i§        Is     ^ o 2 ^ «    _g£     m o »   3
'HhoaxJcfl     id a h         -
xJcfl-t->"-i3&H        'H   «)   a)               ;
cflS3ECO               P  .H  K                •
CO             <C,             H    fl             "-i    r-i
h h        >>oa        h -a; fij             :
^-    Cfl       -    CO             Cfl           -0           CO                     j
cfl                PQ                                             i
Sh                                                           :
cq           -                                         :
b0  0         cq                                         1
g -h       cfl                                :
•H           cfl                                                          j§
>■             (D                                                                 S
P-J                       •—                                                                                                                                 i
1
a
2 $ E     a     § «b ^ ow ^1     >, S 'S   1
■H   ,H     J)    a     O    3            H     0>             0)    O    0)   3E     0>   .H        ;
>JjJ>Jo>.j(i)>t->.[J3a      a £   ;
+j   t-i   0   cfl               co    - n               •
j«; co coce a jj+jh as
OS-t->           'H    G   CO     HI    0)
O          P    »   £   H          OC0®                   ;
Si      CO     3    -4->    O              tn               t-i                                   :
tnpqco         ^HC0®OC0                •
cfl   3          co  ®   cfl  xi               r-i                :
x: +> <« >      oaacoo          s
PH                     Cfl   "-i     0)   "-f    Pi   ^
•h a       a                              :
4J   0        4J                                         :
rH    U            CQ                                                         1
cd              -H                                         :
3E     CQ             fn     O                                                !
cfl >>     0 en                          :
>■             CD                                                                 S
^                                                                I
cfl                             !■
rH              Fh                                                                           ^H
rH             O                                                                          S
L.
r*
o<fl
rn   4k!                                                           :
CQ                                                         §
^fc.   a   ^^^^tm
k.^
I I M
"'11   1 e g s 1111,- 3 - s 11 !
all   ISIlljsll i^Sf 1" !
Oao>0>>-1                      OS0>OT3>,(l)'Cia;
he     x:'ojgwoojJ^Ha"awat-    |
«D
a3xjaf»apL<coo"-i          <
cflocfl'-icaca       cax:o           s
a-ocoarH+j+jxico
cfl3ti(Li''caococo"-ixJ               :
COCOpqpPPqcflSPqa)                  S
   ft]   1    1  ce           •
i
T3    0           (D    (D                                           i
g 3      4J x                        i
Cfl    p-h             "H    4J
0 @      a @                          j
i O
4kI         p-q    o                                             S
a         -h                          s
cfl       g  a                                |
Of        o   o                                         «
CO         p   u
^
SI          s           i
1       . 1
CO                                            n             CO             i
(tj                        i
~     :
co       t-i                            s-<!       x:        ;
a)                               co                                :
M                                                          i
i-~—S
0         co                    a                   H         :
x:                            n                             :
CD             O                     O                                        Isl^l
g~^1
"H      x:               "-1       >.               3
FM                     <U                   EC                                              !
rH                pq                           -H                                                      S
+J                          ttd                             s
Ph^^m
WWVA
I  t,   i  *  .s     ^  1          ■
W!          id  id                       pq          e                                   :
H            °   -S                                            ID           W                         ;
co        0                  t-i        t-i        a) 0   :
r-i              (-,             r-i               Cfl               Cfl             H    W      1
xJ                                                       I
cfl          ®                                                          ^|
CD                                      CD                                        §
X               >>                     Xh                                              i
>v
1
^     I
1    "    I     *    1        1    5     »f      1
0}                ffi                 id  t3         ^         S  +>               j
O          pq           cfl          S          Q-,          xi   CO    •
co                  f»             co             a        :
>,         >H           cfl    MS   CO           Cfl   ®    •
t~,     js +> +>      aaca      0      i
a           0           b                         ;
ph             a             O
0           a          x:                         :
s^
s
w    S
B                0               co                                    :
^                                                                                                                                   S
■
1.1'   Is5 II     1   ^!a£    s
r-         @  «          H  £   HO         a         HhOE;
rH                           nt S-i   N         nt         nt
c>j        -f*   o               id -m         at        o£co;
co        Pi co   co        "-i   3 S              "-1   ;
+J            fntiCO           rHOI             ti    N     !
a           3c3Pn           0)   (-q   f^J           hcfli
"-\      a ja           co                ^h  M) ;
EC          -   cfl   a              W   co         co   0   1
rH                       O                                                                                  !
O                                             CO                                              !
co            +j            Ph              ;
>>        cfl              @                             i
4J         Ph                                                    «
•H                                  O                                   ^^1
O             O                    Xh                                        S
Vsa
i/
iS"™    ,-; Sh 3 ' 5        *     * » o' ■=      j
HO                      (h      3    (*H               ID                      f.,    _j           .
fHCOOh             •  to    P,          ECO-
tn             co                             :
go             o                        ^^H
alal^MOT3Cn                @               ;
corH>;        co        a^i)            pq;
sz  ti   0  x ±>       oecx:        -       3
■i-» cc >h 0 a     -t->     -t-*      a-:
+J   h    (fl             B   ®    O   H    (fl    Pi    !
a                     ID                   rH                     CO                     1
0            +f             0            x:              :
•h             a            co            +»              :
CO                3                                                       1
Cfl             CQ                     >>                                       S
>■            -H                     CQ                                        S
P                Ph                                I
P-idJCO           hJ           *H            ti   r-H     0)    0)     i
0               EC                co               ®                 :
id                S-i   0    <D   O    <D          iD-uSal
OM)         ®                 H    Pi   (q    (fl    P,   H    !
Ph                                                     Ph                                                      :
ck          g                    1
HS°fc'l»*Mo«£S*iS.«£       s
t«H       t3            h >; b       (t,       to   s  0      1
^HCflxJ             1)           H     0)           KP             J
w          m a       a)          xj           i
a  0      x:           tn            :
Cfl               O    4J               Cfl                                              S
§ » a S " ^ d .« ™ 3 " 5 ™ n ° ™ i «   i
+JCOC0C0             O   'H    P,                       -3
rH             +>     (D               O                                              i^|
O^H+J^CO           EC   CM    CO   [£[   >;    CO     j
-   +J             3     O           4->     CO            cfl                      !
^ in a s a w          acocflrH!
co   (D'H  (, *< a  a x)  a>^   d h   j
a    rH             Ph     Ph               O     M)            EC                         1
r>                   1        Cfl                 rH                                                      ^H
1 1 —
B608608666666666&66&66tttlttlttlttlttlttlttltttttttf000&^
W      "of^a^V^oVo1?*?     :
n
3ECoax:CMOpH3ECpHO;
S           C4C3CJ           HOCO           ptiPn!
is.
CO   J3             G>   rH                     3             CO                     !
^H     O           X:    cfl             O    O           "-\                      |
pq  O        H pq        Ei >J        P               !
CD             g   X             CD                                        S
x       o cfl       a                     1
*T
.. ^
^^
W\Wa
p_
EC                   K         a   a)         3
CO                   W    41                                     Cfl    tn             J
-cj      g
a      cd                                §
3                     r*                                                                                                        8
1
^m^mm
■^
O                           M      (h                              OJ                  O      £fl                   j
X                                           1
o         cfl                                               S
^ (
w    i
a                  1
o £5                      :
•          -u   Etl              Si
wj      ^ In            0       S      ^                    '
•H                    EC   4->           H   £           H   a             3
+j                    cfl         cfl fm        co   cfl         :
co             co   a>        0                  0        :
,h            f» x:      ^h ®       pn            3
0             "-1 h         co               co   1-;         ;
Cfl       -    CD                                                                 ;
rH      bfl    3
cfl   bfl >>         cd                                   :
CQ      Cfl      CD                 r>                                                                 I
CO             CD                                                                 ^H
CD                                                                                 S
a     <h
•           3   p
O   p£J
pq         rH  t3                 id         £           id                            j
at    (h                    Jd           +»            Oh                                j
CO                 4->                  3    <U           Oi   0           '■
OB          SB   "H           CO   pt,           ;
tn        a) ca        a     ffl        i
a>             r-i SZ         ••   B        "-a ®         :
-t->                   rH    CO           rH     O
a               0 j«;        cfl P          '   >>        i
rH     C«                  O
-    PQ                           r-H      O                                                      !
4J         cd              -h                             :
-C     CQ   4J               -  W                                        i
b0 cfl   cfl         Qi                                  •
3             O                                                                 |
+J                     CD                                                        »
rH                           CQ          3                                                                                                                  S
Ph               Cfl     CD                                                                 ^^|
s   (
_          cfl  Q
V  ♦♦          CO
cn         (h  s         nf CO         a,       +»                         !
id              Ja               (h         M                         :
rH            Oh O            O    <5            ID           -f*                                 !
"-t            0   0        co            rH +j        ;
EC   rH                    "-I            Pi   X)             Cfl    tn             3
rH        t-. K         cfl   t-.         f-   cfl         :
•H    rH    O               O     (D                                              :
K    O                 ox:                                :
O    T3             CH    4J                                              •
P    X                                                                 §
_^^_,
s*   1
Hill
I»         CO  CO                E-«                       £                            ;
M         -w                S-i    M   (h    at           id   (h                      i
CO    Cfl           "-i                     CO    O            ti    CM             !
x: ec       0 ®      x: 0       0            3
-»->             x:               a>             p   co         ;
CO           O    Ph           Cd     O                   rH             1
4J    -H     (D             rH                                                        !
CQ   25  fU           o  @                                :
CD                            S
n       cq a                              i
HJ            HJ     CD                                                        S
A
T
— ***   Q, Sh
• 44     Cfl    PH
Pi    M)               <v               +j          co  +j          •
bO    - @               >>                            i
cd         bO -pi                                         s
m
■
1  *  i
£    3                •*    id          S3  S-i    2                     j
^COJaS-ialO^^x:                      ;
oa            a           SK           rl     DUH                         J
rH£KMS-i^atcJaiDO                     j
0 ca      a co      co          co a      ■■
<h-4->         cfl"-i         coco        am         :
*-\         >   cfl          co  +j         >H  0          ;
0   Ph              Ph         Ph   3        *C               1
>r-\      0)             p    Tj             P    -O                           -               '•
g    -H                        Ph    rH                                              ;
O  £   H           (D   H
r-H   o -H        x3   cfl                             :
Cfl     O             4J     3                                              ;
PQ          -H   U
Cfl                     CD                                                        §^H
•O          >> Xh                                             1
M^___^.
_ _^
T
V
^^»   ffi   O
HO    ffl     HO              Df<rlj:»(lHrlv<                              1
:»*          pqKat"alKf3        0S-i                         ;
;     f«                !^!PqT3!fi]@!@!@                              J
2
co ec        co   a            "-1       'a)  Pi       3
3             cfl   3        0  Ph       x: >h        :
a®      ttipt,      e;h      oh       3
F5
CD    \>     CQ             O   4J
-C   cfl   o         g   o                             :
Sh   p   p-h         <q   <q                                j
CO
rH                        +>       +>                                                                                                                  ^^|
3E           U  @
(tj                              |
>>                                  i
X                                   1
co               :
4J                                   :
CQ                     CQ                                         3
°                       1
• •                         -H                                           ■
-H              -cJ   cd                       :
-H                            S
EC                      !
g                     :
*C  ®                 |
^!                   -  0                                      ;
«H
4k:              rn  X:                     ;
cq            ft;                   s
CD                     O
=
g          cfl 4J                3
3                         !■
^           p g
=1
•H               u                             3
CD                     CD                               S
&o   I
'■                  ci                                                ..   CO                 !
:                    (D                                                    rH    a)                   !
H                      cd                                   3
>> t3                                       ;
1
Ph   >>               <§>                          :
cfl         ••                             3
a*A
1     w    S
:                      H                                                              CO   "H                      i
fn                  W   -O
13       K                          >>    XH                                                                 3
"^                   .H                                                                                           S
X
XJ             a)                                     f»   rH                      !
Cfl                   O   -H
rH                                         4J          O                                                                 3
CT1           O                    @                                S
■
*=>    i
f»    3           >H                     (1)           4->    f»                      ;
>H     O           P                    h             CO     O                     !
fe co                          oi         a) i-q               :
+»     0)           <-i                     Cfl                    XJ                      !
4J                   0   X                                           3
CO                p
0                (§)
•• -H                                                 ;
cq w       cfl g                          i
si
cfl   bO       -H   g                       :
x g       g 3                 3
o -pi         cfl   cfl                       3
rH        g                     a      r-H                                                    :
O   cd         3                             3
rH                                                                                    S
4k:           *                 1
CD              o              o                     ^UH
rH     bfl             Cfl                       X                                    §
Cfl     Q(            rH     CD             CO                                    3^^l
i	
J
V
Y
0 g      rH a      0       0 0           i
(1)    3             Cfl     O                            >r\     0                     1
"-3 -4->           CO     O            Xi             CO   O                      !
Oh                  tn           0           3                          :
tn     O              -  fH           Pn           SB     <D                     1
Ph                     CQ     Cfl
CD     CD             CQ     a                                                3
rH   £          -H    Ph                                           3
4k!    SH              Eh      CD
IsiE
+■>        X   fn          o           3
• •X                   <D          13
X!    bO        4J    r>         -H            3
cq  -H         cq   3        p-q           3
CO                  PQ    3                                           |
CD                   o"                                          ^H
>>   CD               -    CD           'H                                «
cfl   cq        g x:       K                   i
^
1     **    i
CM  h         fl  H                            x:                 ;
0                 cfl   4k!                                      ■
•H   ^   cd   g   o                       :
P   ■—            CD   4J                                                S
g   cfl        ®        j«; -t->               !
CD    @             rH     O                                                       3
—JJC
4kI P^   bO -H   o         <D           3
t»     Cfl             ^                                    i
rH   ®             Cfl   PQ                            rH                              1
X                       rH     3
g _  g  cfl  g      s:         ■
bO  cd         cfl   a         cfl                       §
1    {s    i
cfl             fl             cfl        0 x:              :
B    >j          "H     <L>            CO           P*.   4->                      :
<L>    t-i            XJ    h             Cfl                    *"H                      '
g       cd ch
g 0      &^                            i
#^-a
•H  i=J   3   bO cfl        4J           3
g    rH               CD     CD               O                                    S
•H   -H         x    g         -H                         &
a   ca        t,   0       ce        tn   B              !
(D   -H                  t3                                           3
-3
^       rH                                                         @                                1
M    Qi                -H          4J                            H
a)   co         a) xi                    a)                    !
a  +•           -  r^
s
4J    PQ               \>    4J                                     3
O    O          ch   U          -H                            S
ce ^      pc,  0      ca       f» mi           ;
a)                a         tn          3   H                 !
CD    Cfl            4J     O
^
(D         w    o   CQ            *            3
PQ      "H                     O                                 rH                                                   S
rH     Ph               (D    rH                                                       3
kz)
g  cd co u  g       cd        :
TZJ                   (D           U                            S
M
a t»      n a      3      0 >h           ;
Cfl   -H             go           J3             O    g    rH            1
J3d             cflO            a             giDfH            1
:   ._.        f-i    M         f-i                cfl          cfl   t»    cfl
4J     CD             Q( 4J                                                3
cfl .c ph   Q( -h        g         3
4kI   3         CQ  x:                                   I
^
*    V      1
w
g  g       Oi -h                           :
CD     CD             0   SZ                                                ;
O   O           CM    CQ                                           ;
0
rH   Sh   iS    a    Cfl    O   -H              3
Ph              ph   bfl -H  ch           i
i    qS   ®    i    <q  Oh     1              3
II
O   <£,           >> 4J            CD                            §
3               cfl              -C                       »
fe      -§)                   p      <§)                   gH                                                   1
<a
C
J
1
■-,, O   u                                      C\j         to                   ]
0                       3
«              i
w                         i
CO                                           |
PH                                           s
■■r                                    fl      ^B
O   S3    O                    O                                          CO                         j
4k!                                    @                         3
4J                         •
bO *                                |
0
CD             CQ   pj                        j
liH
Cfl     CD                                      Q(                              3
3          3   W                   i
•H   <§)                   (D                    S
rH    0                             -H                         :
r>          PQ   P                     i
—           M                         X                     §
^> 1
S3       i:  a       0       £                   a,                i
pq -h                     x:                  J
rH                                           CQ
CQ                              (D                                                1
Cfl     CD             CQ   fti            4J   CQ                        :
cri        o  g            4J              ^H
rH             PQ     CD
w    S
▲.    %.
S .-< _i a               (h       3      £              I
..  0                     g                  3
cd Ph                         0                     :
rH    b0         3                £   t-H                   :
o   g         o   cd         bO                      :
CD       '             CQ     3                                                S
1     **    S
^}
O    CO             rH             •,*            —-              3             £                              j
Ss^S   "   s   "   t       !
3                       4J         -H
b0   ^                    rH             Q(                              3
Fh    CD    CQ           cfl           a                            •
X    3          g   4J         -H   W                   i
O    O           O    cfl          S5   3E
•H   p^J          4J   O                  <aj                     :
rH     bfl           fn     O                     CQ                       S
Cfl     Q<            CD     o                     Cfl                       S^H
CO                     Q( CO                     M                       §
^^^^^
^
s-i .f* _i     rH     -^      a
O    t»     (D           XI             Cfl
K                       4J                         ••    K                           I
CD           -H                              CD                       S
h co xs           rH       i:      -^       m
E-i  K    id          id  CO          a                       +>                      j
3E  3  >>       0      x:                  3
W          3t)         ^o                         :
>>   CD          >   Xh                  Sh                     S
s   i
-"
O   -H           U          u                            .
CD    0   £                                                          3
+    CQ            rH     CD           (\j   |>-i                        :
ph        o w           •  s                 :
Cfl     CQ                     Cfl                                                §
P   ■—              CD     rH                           -                          S
k
W
«■>&.
O-l                      HH     O   Tj               ID             .f*              CH                              !
^H0-^Ka^t5                 HO              j
K  E-i  .f*    _    t3    a          °         +>  CO  +>  •■"<               ]
^ g  0      <§>       bo
•pj   cfl   Ph                      g                       :
>■   <aj           >>         -H                            3
g                          (D          rH                            3
CD   S                                      O
CQ                     >> <§)            K       -                       !
Cfl    ®              rH                                 4J                           1
PQ                     (D    CQ            C-     O    Cfl               :
Xh     Cfl                     CQ     CD               S
bO   CD           4J   CO                    -H     3               ^^H
g     rH                                                             rH      O"                   i
■H   *H          og                          Cfl    (D             ^^H
^r^     r
^
^^
WW\y\
•-"^J            HOT)            o°            (hUID                 ]
•H    ®     +              S:             rH
s:      > cfl      4k: rH -h        3
M    Q<                X                  Ph   £             i
^V                  ^H
Cfl            (D    CD                    ;
(DO                            a                  O      rH      rH                     3
O    O           cfl    CQ                         4J             S
W\w/A
ocoa--i3t*H&3-'jaaaM            i
CQ    Cfl    a          ,-J          4J    f->                     3
o  -H          >i+j          o    cd    o            :
PQ   -H          -H    Cfl    (D             -   Cfl             S
PE-i1hKj=iCJO<0           OiQhK                 i
« a   3                     >> +»                 3
B,     >■             rn     CQ             Ph    £   -P               3
-cJ         g  PQ   bO        aa           |
3
•H   rH    (D           M           ^    «i                     ;
Cfl     O             (D   -H                              CQ               3
4k:  3       ^       g       rH   cd        ^H
13   X^    CQ            (D           O    CD                    3
r>      bfl              >      rH                4J         •     <^                    ;
:   kO
o<q      hj>>3      -ng        |
;     IT<                !p!!S3!Pqi@!fi]!(t|                     •
M
O     Cfl     3             rH             4J    £                           3
en
-O      rH                           X3                 rH      rH
3                   (D    Cfl    O          4kI   -H             §
3E   p   3E         <         CO   Sh                   j
<q  &d!        <   u         cfl  3E  @           :
j ^4
pn   (§)         Pnp,^         phu            &
j
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////^^^^
T3                                                                 j
CQ                                                                                  3
d                                      i
cfl                                         ;
CD                                                        j
Cfl                                                                                              !
a                                           3
4J               cd                                         :
f /
\
4J                         O                                    !
ch               3                                         :
CQ               3                                         3
V     a
■
d                 ^                          !
0                     O"
-H                 cj<                                            3
■     a
■
S               (D               u                       ;
cd                                         3
U                      CD
»    m
M
CD                     CQ                                                         1
*              £                                         3
X                X-                                             i
li                                     I
^^J
,W
^ 1
:                     CD                     CD                     a
3                     Ph                     Ph
cy           cm            0                  1
4J                     ;
O                       4J
£              cfl                                      i
co            a                                3
CD
«S                                         3
•p           a                              i
Cfl                     CD                                                         !
-^
^■^
d&
w    S
@                        -                   CO                                !
W                        CQ    r-t             (§)                                     !
rH                        Cfl     CD                                                       I
rH    CD          CM    S           CQ                            i
g           g                              1
0                -H                                             3
•H                  U                                                  ;
Cfl                     CD
g                              3
CQ                -H                                             :
CQ                  u                                                  3
cd                                                           3
rH                         <D                                                                 3
1
o    i
*
tk»
D    ^                   CQ           fn                             ;
*   4J             ..   t3             CD
£.   cfl        g   g        cd                   j
O    CD           O    3           3                            i
.c      -h  0      cy                 i
SZ                 cfl   O         t3                         :
en s:      -h            g                  :
a  rt      ^                              3
-pi    O          4J                                                  ;
g '^                                             :
rH     CD              Eh                                                                 1
cfl  £         cd                                         :
3 N       a                              i
cd          s:                              3
a          -p                              3
o                                                           3
x 4k:      @                              3
rH
cd   cfl                                                     3
X   CM           CD                                                  3
•p               a                                         :
©
^5?^
4J             rH    (§)               Cfl                                     !
-   cd         -H                                             ;
g @         0
g       x                                   i
bO  o         o                                         3
■Hi
|l Haaal
CQ   X>             O     CD             CQ     g                        i
<              W                                         s
g    CD          Oh                                                   3
^L^L^OT
i_*r fl
CD    Cfl             g    U            4J    ^
CQ                                                                         •
-H   bO                                                    :
kjkgM
•H     N             0    3             CQ     CD                       1
£ *       0                              1
T3   -H          o                                             3
EdH
M   'H            O   4J            (D    ^                     !
4J     O           -H
cd  Ph        -H                                         3
m
.        'H   H          (D   3          3    cfl                   i
CTi  £           ^                                                   3
CO
CD                     Ph
!■#
:   ^         CM   Cx)           «    fe            C?   SH                        j
*Zm
rH    CO              fxj
Ph  @         W                                         :
^
n                    rH         a              £                              j
x:                                                   j
+•                                                                                               !
cfl             ••   _                        -t->            :
CO                    >j   S                      CO              CO                   !
•PJ
CD
CQ           fn
s
1
CD             (D
P                       +J      (1)                         Ph                 (1)                      !
**                                                    1
<^         cfl
cfl
«fl**kw          ^vat.
"^        (£        a         0               at               (h             !
CQ          X3          T3
In    3                         -t->                Ph
>j                   Cfl                              Cfl             +J                   !
a          cm »           »      co         3
X
X
Cfl             4J             rH              fxj                                    3
rH                           Cfl          CD
CQ
^kW\r   ^^^.        i^^
0        £        °        -d              @               3             i
0                     cfl        co         cfl           3
CD                                                                                 §
CD   rH    U    a
4k:
%
S             CH     CQ     fn              »H             rH                 J
3                     CO   H                     FM             rH                   i
rH                        <H                                                                                                                                  S
CD    rH               3
o
!«««««
HO      0       ■a             0       -m             a           i
•^                     at        t5 a        -^         (h   at             !
O          O   4k!    CD         S         rH            ;
ft.                        Cfl                                                      rH                      3
+*             rH                                                                          |
3     Cfl     CD    4J
-H
^ 1
w    1
^           0 a               -Hj
a      -                   B            CO                !
Cfl              H                                                                          |
C9      K         fH          rH
«
1
a      3     en     0 a             "to "          !
—<      ID     D1                                          O               ID             (t,    £                     !
CO             CQ     O   W           <§)            >■               S
CD    Ph    PQ
cd   b0  cd        (§)         <d        p^J           3
+j   co              ca         b            3
co            co  mj           x:        o           3
n          >-i a           co      cm         :
X        .                                  i
Sh          cd                                                    «
CD                     O     O
•P     ••    W    a   Ph
Cfl    rH    CO   4J
CQ
CD   <§>
-H
rH^f-i       ho^m-^-mph          :
g a           a      E-- a              tn 0         i
O    cfl   -H    CQ                  4k!          <a;             3
ec           x:  co             o       rH           I
CH                                                                          S
O     3    PH    rH    <§>
•p  pq
JM i
g^fl   3£          cfl         >            i
o  co             >h        o            :
>>          H                                                          S
O   S   -H
•H   !>h
Cfl    CO    rH     O     O             rH
a                    co              ce         r-             ;
4J         p-q                                                    §
-O  K         PQ   pq
rH        K
Amm^r^^^^.
+>   rH    M           *            at      -          Hi                   Tj                 •
P         0   cfl   g        PQ        ®          3
(DM   +•    3                                           ■
rH                        CO    rH    -t->                                    rH
Cfl                 -     pq   rH           ®                                ;
CM                                    rH                       Cfl                                                      ®                                 3
M)  co   O           3          +j               3
-H                                                                         S
O             rH                                                                          S
(D         (§)         !>h
X
CD    U
Wj           >W
"D-wtJ-waia^-w-w             :
g 3      ph ph       g      —        s
U     r>     ••     Cfl   PQ            -H             Ph               •
Cfl             CH                                                                          S
X3     CD
<§>   bO -cJ  pq   cd
rH    "H
(D    O
I      -B
-MrHa              P.IDS3I0             +»               013                     J
•-"Ott,              CUtO"!                 u                        3                     ]
<D    (D   <a;    Of                  N            (D             •
4J    W    CO    CO    rH               Cfl             £                 J
CQ            p3             3   X    U            4J               :
CO                     Cfl   CM   O              f»              CO                   !
CO                   tJ                               CO             Ph                   3
rH                      -   OJ        PS          cfl             :
cfl             >. co x:                   j=>            :
n         a^H      a      ca         3
a          ca x:           co      o         i
o   cfl         Pi M) ®          f»                         :
o >rH.      a "^           ca       a         ;
Ph           o   +»    CO           cd             o                i
>                          rH                                                                                                                                   |
CD                                                                 S
•H     cfl    |>H    4J
pq   g  rH  ja  -H
>M     -CJ     CO                Xh
@     CQ
\
»     BU     fl^             rHK               ID             *JS                     i
£MaOt0T3rH                       £               3!                       :
E-IIDOPh-MIDID-            +>             -UrH                     1
..    .^    ft,               O              QhM-—               tOlD                    i
M£a|@t0333         SrH               j
Cfl    (D          (§)    0    3    Cfl            CD             3
W -p ti        co rH co        bo         3
Cfl    Cfl    Ph           0                   0             :
CD   O     (D    Cfl     >>          4J            SH               i
rH             £    %     91     P.     P.      (D                          i
a                                  I
(DO                                                                 «
a      *                                  i
■H                                                                         SlilH
rH                           Cfl                                                                                                                                  S
K    'H             rH    S
S   hi   H
cd        p   cfl  ^5
J>     CD           pQ
Cfl x:    -       4k:
-H
CD    rH
rH     O
O     Of   CD
(\j          O         rH
•*
to     -mm      p.     c a Ju bh
Tj   tJ    g          T3<DCDb0cD             :
TScD-HcDgQixga        3
>> o        o   Pi rH                      o             :
S   H   —    S    o
13                 rH     +*
^V ^^ii^^^^^^L.
Pi -t->             E3   cfl          co         a             3
CO    CO           XJ             3             -4->                                     !
a) ■<         o   a> 4->         *H          B             :
rH           o x: ^h       x:       co          i
bO       w                                           1
g      4k: o cfl
g  pq -p   cfl
•H(«4k:o3q(o30           3
S
a      -    o                                |
a g g g rH
3   Jh     d    O
o"fflSS^SSi3'~lu£^r^            i
X=1
3E        cocflcoawocj          i
n*
Cfl             4J    -H                                                                 S   ^
CO   ph    3   CO   PQ
oaS  -C
■  l"0        I   pm   I   @   I   s-i   I    I   @   I   s-i   I   @          :
1    <§>     1    fS     I    CQ     1    p-h"     1               J
co ®        o FM cd         EC         e;             :
^
N             PH    f«                                                                 |    >*>
1       1     Ph      1       1
co   i    i  e=i
ImmmmmmmAsSHS^
SKKKK*KKK«
&KKKKK
i««««««««««««««»»»»»»»^
i«««««««««««««»»»»»»»»«
^s^
********
*****************************
******!
^***********************************^
****•
^^^^
*************
 Untie t
ttetmro
ALBUMS
BRUTAL POODLE
Long Time No See
(Demonstration Recordings)
33   /   11  /  2017
november brought us the first EP release from Vancouver-based,
grunge-punk band Brutal Poodle, Long Time No See. Their live
debut was made only earlier this year and Brutal Poodle has worked quickly
to carve out a name for themselves in the local music scene. The three-piece
is made up of individually talented and experienced musicians, guitarist John
Johnston, drummer Dustin Bromley, and bassist Karmin Poirier.
In his first attempt at self recording, Johnston efficiently cultivates the core
of grunge and mixes it with the static screech of indie rock. The EP's opener,
"Amateurs of the Universe," sets a fast pace and strong instrumental backing that makes up the majority of the album. From the carefully constructed drum line on '"Space is Displaced," to the conversational back and forth
of "Charlene." Brutal Poodle keeps it in high gear before slowing down for
"Anna's Gone." The EP's finale, "Broadcast," is high impact and demanding,
its long-sustained final note an open invitation for repeat listens.
Brutal Poodle has found its true draw in its duality. Duet vocals, sung in
both a high and low registries, are heavily prevalent throughout Long Time
No See and offer striking polyphony. This contrast provides the EP with an
endearing sense of teamwork, the vocals frequently overlapping over themselves, and each other, to form an intertwined, if somewhat disorganized, call
and response.
Brutal Poodle balances its lack of experienced cohesion with its raw,
heartfelt enthusiasm. Long Time No See's lo-fi production is sure to appeal
to grunge lovers, making them worth a listen and most certainly one to
watch. —Indigo Smart
FUZZYP
Amateur Alchemy
(Self-Released)
16  /   10  /  2017
I ■ ith a band name like Fuzzy P, and a 2015 debut release entitled the
^r^r   Fuzz EP, it is only fitting to talk about Amateur Alchemy in terms
of its fuzz. Is the fuzz used to elevate some already seriously rocking tunes,
or is it meant to paper over the cracks in flimsy songwriting? Fuzzy P do not
let slip which side of they're on. Instead, they keep it fuzzy. But by putting
"amateur" right there in the title, and having a completely forgettable album
cover, they seem to offer some initially troubling hints - though maybe it's all
just amateurish.
But being fuzzy and amateurish never stopped Sebadoh, or Silver Jews,
or any of the other '90s rock bands who have shaped Fuzzy P's sound.
These are ideas that have been aped and imitated by countless bands - fortunately, Fuzzy P are not content to coast by on hero worship and lackadaisical ethos alone. Looking behind the fuzz reveals an album that throws everything at the wall - for better or for worse. While the jangle-pop of "Esme" and
the punk posturing of "Somewhere Else," both seem to put their aesthetic
over any actual hooks, the majority of Amateur Alchemy comes off as a joyful
ride across the indie canon. This is especially true for the opening power-pop
of "Fluorescent Light," an exuberant song whose peppy style is not replicated
anywhere else. Daniel Tessy's keyboards improve on this variety by adding
some much-needed textural diversity - most notably on "Wastewater," where
he seemingly has his Rhodes on the lesser-spotted 'marimba' setting. I
wasn't expecting this self-described 'jam band' to stretch themselves to such
an extent. I also doubt any of Fuzzy P's '90s idols were quite brazen enough
to try the squiggly synth solo that ends "Hoverboard Road."
Despite all this, it is a comforting thought that "Season 3," the fuzziest
track on Amateur Alchemy, might also be the record's best. This song is the
only one where guitarist Lauren Nelson sings lead, and serves as a welcome
W
break from Joey LeBrun's occasionally grating deadpan delivery. Nelson's
understated vocals, near-buried by the surrounding murk, act as a point of
beauty amongst all the ugliness. There is, however, life for Fuzzy P beyond
the fuzz, as evidenced by the closing track "One Trick Pony," which lopes
by on folky charm and an extended harmonica solo. This is just one further
example on an album that finds moments of quality with and without Fuzzy
P's namesake distortion. How they will choose to develop their sound next,
however, is anyone's guess. —Tom Barker
MANILA GREY
No Saints Under Palm Shade
(Self-released)
13  /   10  /   2017
manila Grey is one of the latest to enter the much-overcrowded
field of artists who have come into popularity on Soundcloud.
Many of these artists can hardly be distinguished from one another, and this
Vancouver-based duo is hardly the exception. Their latest project, No Saints
Under Palm Shade, is a serviceable piece of work, providing a baseline level
of enjoyment between its party oriented lyrics and solid production.
The opener, "Timezones," sets the tone for what is to come. It's one of
the better cuts on the EP, with Neeko's distant odes to extravagance perfectly complementing Soliven's laidback flow. The hook, with the lyrics, "It
don't matter what I spend / Money dies in the end," is at once haunting and
extremely catchy. Unfortunately, the following track "Darkside" hamstrings
this momentum, with its all too familiar and repetitive trap beat and
party-themed lyrics.
With the next song, Manila Grey ventures into uncharted territory.
"Eastbound," a PB&B-influenced track, is a breath of fresh air. The lyrics
discuss self-turmoil, with the hook of "I've been up, oh I've been down, I've
been lost /1 was blind but I found my way back home" standing out as some
of Manila Grey's better lyricism. It doesn't hurt that this song has fantastic
production; the haunting vocals and minimalist beat go together wonderfully.
However, "Eastbound" is the extent to which Manila Grey experiment with
their talents. "Owe U" follows the first two songs in its repetitive exploration
of the duo's riches, with Neeko boasting "All I know is flexin' flexin' / I'm neck
deep in my money I swear I could drown." The next track, "Disco Eyes," is
the album's low point. The beat is hardly there, and the lyrical content is
entirely cringe-inducing: "I got both your legs up / I'ma do some long division
ike yeah."
Luckily, the album ends on a better note with the upbeat "Youth Water."
The lyrics are the best ones about partying on the entire album, as when
Soliven muses on the second verse, "Sippin' on that youth water, we'd never
age / We'll never fade out." It serves as a clever play on the myth of the
Fountain of Youth and an exploration of the vigor with which many young
people approach alcohol.
It's tracks like "Youth Water" and "Eastbound" that I would like to see
more of on future releases from Manila Grey. The duo has strong chemistry,
good flow, and quality production. It's unfortunate that they often waste these
qualities on subpar, monotonous trap songs. —Leo Yamanaka-Leclerc
PEACH PYRAMID
Repeating Myself
(Oscar St. Records)
22   I   OS   I   2017
Somewhere between dream pop and beach rock drifts Repeating
Myself, the shimmering ten-track collection of spacey kaleidoscope
riffs and vintage pop aesthetics from Jen Severston's latest musical project,
Peach Pyramid. This inaugural release from Victoria label Oscar St. Records
entered the world on September 22. It proves a fine and emotionally powerful
first-entry for the label. This album meanders between the ethereal sound-
scapes of "My Collapse," "Lo and Behold" and "We Glide / She Sighs," and
the catchier melody of songs like "Polarized," Severston's serene, buoyant
vocals fasten the record together as it navigates through themes of abuse
and healing.
Lyrically and aurally, Repeating Myself proves dynamic. From the Dolores
ORiordan-esque (The Cranberries) vocals that open the record on "Getting
Cold" to the sweeter, more charming delivery of title-track "Repeating
Myself," to the droning hum in the chorus of "Escape," Severston steers
listeners through a bewildering range of emotions.
This diversity is not due to a lack of unifying theme. Rather, Repeating
Myself moves forward with control and purpose, displaying the variety
necessary to articulate the internal layers of her experience. "Polarized," for
instance, uses an early '60s pop beat and syrupy vocals almost like makeup
to cover the emotional bruises revealed in lines like, "It doesn't feel the same
/ Did I lose a part of me / When I walked through the flames /1 guess I didn't
feel a thing / But now I'm feeling strange / A distant cold reality." On the other
hand, there are moments like the closing minutes of "My Collapse," when
Severston's manic wail and the cacophony of distortion and drums seem so
clearly to express this same desperation. As a result, the listener is provided a
view of the damage done in an abusive relationships and the journey needed
to heal these wounds.
Part of what makes Repeating Myself so effective at conveying such a
painful subject is the nature of its making. The album was recorded and mixed
by curator of Pacific Northwest indie, Colin Stewart (Dan Mangan, Destroyer),
who also gets production credit along with Severston, lead guitarist Layten
Kramer and label head Katherine Calder (New Pornographers, Immaculate
Machine). Besides Severston's own guiding vision, Calder's influence on the
record is most noticeable. The swirling, effervescent pop that dips in and out
of dissonance on the back of ringing guitar lines and building synths, draping
melancholy in glittery robes of sound, seems like a hallmark of both this record
and Calder's own work.
This remark is by no means a knock on the record. Rather, it is a testament to the close-knit, collaborative music scene that exists in Victoria. As
Peach Pyramid's Bandcamp bio notes, the project is supported "by a rotating
collective of musicians / close friends." It is this support that has allowed
Severston to piece together an ornate sonic vessel capable in both calm
water and the rapids that arise along the way. —Dylan Toigo
O • O • 0*0*0
ERIK HUTCHINSON
Something In The Water
(Self-Released)
04   /   08   /   2017
0*0*0*0*0
On his Facebook page, Erik Hutchinson describes his favourite pastime
as "being drunk at petting zoos" and his musical style as "Tabasco
Muppet Rock." Therefore, this singer-songwriter's social media presence
encapsulates perfectly the lighthearted and easygoing vibe of his first solo
release, a surf /jangle pop mini LP entitled Something In The Water.
Reminiscent of '60s psychedelia and pop rock, Something In The Water
features beachy drum beats, reverb driven rhythm guitar, jangly, melodic
leads, and soothing retro vocals. The album opens with its title track, whose
wacky synth melodies and cheerfully nuanced lyrics set the upbeat and nonchalant tone of this release. At one point during "Something In The Water,"
Hutchinson crones about the untroubled days of summer, "Smoking my
cares away," a phrase that makes you question exactly what Hutchinson is
smoking and what exactly he wishes to smoke away.
Building on this laid-back atmosphere, the album's second track, "One
Night," recounts a summer fling over an abundant synth line that gives the
song a psychedelic edge. Similarly, the off-kilter "Scooby" describes the
pains of a hangover, complete with the sound of a can opening and double
layered vocals that are slightly out of unison. It is also on this track that
Hutchinson introduces variety in the form of distorted, almost grungy lead
guitar. On both "Scooby" and the final track, "Turn Me On," the level of distortion is sufficient for an interesting juxtaposition of styles without reducing
the song's listenability. However, during "On The Run," the distortion exceeds
that level, clashing with the song's cheerful, beachy sound.
Amongst these tales of hangovers and summer flings are the occasional
lyrical misstep. One significant example of this is found in the lyrics of "Turn
Me On," where Hutchinson refers to a "Little big whore / Just looking for her
big score." To some, this line could be justified by its consistency with the
carefree colloquialism of Something In The Water, but a staunch feminist like
myself questions why Hutchinson chose such demeaning and antiquated
language.
Throughout this review I have resisted comparing Hutchinson to the
stylistically similar Best Coast or Always. After listening to Hutchinson's
release, one wonders why they receive all the acclaim. Despite its imperfections, Something In The Water proves an enjoyable, interesting, and
engaging first release. —Hannah Toms
UNDER REVIEW
Discorder magazine ! WINTER  2017-1E
 D. TIFFANY
Blue Dream
(Pacific Rhythm)
lb  I  01  I  2017
Breakbeat and house meets fantasy on D. Tiffany's Blue Dream, a
four track EP worth tuning in to. Sophie Sweetland, who performs
under the moniker D. Tiffany, released Blue Dream on Pacific Rhythm in
June 2017.
The EP opens with glitchy, pulsing beats that eventually mellow out into
a meditative loop that ebbs and flows through various samples for the entire
six minutes. The second track, appropriately titled "Blue Dream," builds upon
this soothing energy, but is slightly faster and celestial sounding. While each
of these songs suck the listener into a relaxing world of steady beats, "How
RU Plush feat. Regular Fantasy" is by far the most impressive track on Blue
Dream. It features hilariously deadpan phrases throughout such as "How are
you?" and "Excuse me, I'm tryna dance." The only lyrics on the EP, these
vocals are unexpected and borderline annoying, yet fit perfectly with the simple
beat of the song. Just as you think you've reached the last of these deadpan
samples, a final Sweetland "see ya," or "I'm good" is thrown in.
Any fans of California's DJ TOKiMONSTA are sure to love D. Tiffany's
Blue Dream. Eccentric samples, sweet rhythms, and varying flows provide
the listener with a release suitable for many different circumstances, whether
studying or dancing. Sold out on Pacific Rhythm's website, this EP has been
well received by those in the electronic community. And, with compelling and
hypnotic beats, it is no wonder why D. Tiffany is one of Vancouver's most
exciting producers. —Bridget Buglioni
PODCASTS
THE LAPSE
(Self-Released)
2014  -  Present
The Lapse is a local production that is independent to the core, entirely
facilitated by host Kyle Gest. In his three years of making The Lapse,
he has managed to amass a passionate following of fans who fund and
support the show. Each episode focuses on one guest, who is often an avid
listener of the podcast, thus creating a unique two-way relationship between
creator and audience. As each episode progresses, the featured guest
slowly unravels their tale with an unprecedented level of intimacy.
Episodes are slim, however, with runtimes rarely exceeding 30 minutes.
As somebody who often listens to podcasts two or three times that length, I
was pleasantly surprised at how much could be explored in such a short time.
The unique personality and voice of each guest is given room to shine as they
propel the listener through their story. Occasionally, Gest will chime in to transition between vignettes, hammer a point home, or help re-enact scenes of
dialogue. Some added foley sound effects help create a sensory atmosphere
around each scene, providing listeners with a feeling of total immersion.
The remarkable thing about the stories shared on The Lapse is that they
exist amid the everyday. Slices of reflection are revealed as the story is told
in a way that feels natural and conversational. For example, in "Skinny White
Oprah" (Episode 51), Gest shares his own experience of participating in a
reality TV show. His humourous experience evolves into revelations on how
promises of fame or power bring us to act in ways we would never expect,
and how the advice we give is often a projection of our own insecurities.
The Lapse exemplifies how collaborative storytelling can be used to
create a highly intimate listening experience. You will start an episode looking forward to hearing an interesting story, but you will stay for the startlingly
profound and personal experience of stepping into somebody else's shoes.
—Hailey Mah
BOOK
TN  DUNNION
Krystin Dunnion
TARRY THIS NIGHT
(Arsenal Pulp Press)
15   /   09   /   2017
Tarry This Night, a novel by Canadian
author Kristyn Dunnion, is one hell of
a tale that is rich with imagery and is lush in
its telling. Now, with the use of descriptives
such as rich and lush, I speak more in terms of the impact the words on the
pages have, as this is no story of happiness pie and pretty things. In fact, the
scenes and players are all rather grey. It is a squalid tale with a few threads
of hope holding it in place, much like a mucky shabbily sewn quilt that still
provides some warmth against the encroaching, harsh cold.
The plot takes place in the not too distant future. America has gone to
hell in a handbasket with civil war on the verge of breaking out far and wide.
An elitist group of religious terrorists have carried out attacks in major cities,
decimating swathes of the population and sending many others into hiding.
One particular group of survivors, presided over by the once charismatic ego-tripping Father Ernst, serves as the focus of this story. Ernst and his
"family," consisting of several wives and children born out of incest, scrape
together a life in an underground bunker. Cut off from communication with
the outside world and inundated with the goofy old world religious sermons
of Father Ernst, discontent is brewing amongst the elder members, especially since food is running thin and their leader's actions begin to grow more
desperate and violent.
This tension makes Tarry This Night cinematic in nature and had me
wishing for a movie adaptation, which for me is the hallmark of effective
writing. I wanted to go deeper with characters such as Ruth who is coming
of age and is next in line for Ernst to wed. Understandably, she is scared to
death. As well, I wanted to walk in the steps of Paul, a designated scavenger
in the outside world, who is clearly divided by his loyalties to Ernst and those
in the "family" who are being used, abused, and starved. Similar to Paul, the
reader is torn. While I was rooting for this "family" of good but manipulated
people to succeed, I also found myself loathing Father Ernst with every fibre
of my being. Part of what makes this novel so compelling and Father Ernst
so detestable, is that such exploitative and twisted people genuinely exist.
The spectres of David Berg and Jim Jones loom over this novel. And this
relevance breaks my heart in half.
Tarry This Night is a disturbing, yet accurate portrayal of religious cult
mentalities. It also imaginatively portrays the fear and paranoia that the
collapse of civilization and the American government would wrought. Tarry
This Night had me hooked from the start and hungry for more, long after the
last two words stopped echoing throughout my being. —Nathan Pike
FILM
MASS FOR SHUT-INS (2017)
Directed by Winston DeGiobbi
THERE LIVED THE COLLIERS
(2017)
Directed by Nelson MacDonald
Screened at VIFF September 28 - October 13,2017.
The stereotype of Canadian film is that it situates itself in the periphery:
all the more with the Maritimes. Goin' Down the Road may be the
regional summary: a story about two Nova Scotians migrating to Ontario for
work, enshrined as a sociological snapshot of the era.
In an era of Reddit, Overmatch, and Netflix binges, however, the tenor
of suburban hopelessness is different. Set in a dilapidated Cape Breton,
Mass For Shut-Ins is focused on the day-to-day of jobless Kay Jay, a 25 year
old who lives on his grandfather Lopper's couch. Mass For Shut-Ins is as
much about a comatose state of masculine-geekdom as it is about industrial
deracination and the economic collapse of post-coal Cape Breton; as much
about the aesthetics of Weird Twitter and Vice photoshoots as it is the succor
of low-rent hedonism: sleeping-in, drinking a litre of soda a day, watching
movies until you pass out.
The tremendous achievement of Mass For Shut-Ins is that it supersedes
comparison to American precedents. Depicting Canada's white underclass,
critical comparisons to the work of Harmony Korine could be made. But the
surreal emotional landscapes of Gus Van Sant might be more appropriate.
At a Q&A after Mass For Shut-ins' debut, director Winston DeGiobbi said he
admires films which immerse themselves in the debauchery depicted, rather
than assume an objective distance. Mass For Shut-Ins' leering is informed by
a empathy for the pitiful circumstances it depicts.
Shot predominantly in close-up, on grainy film, lingering on bodies, faces,
appliances, and other Cape Breton ephemera, Mass For Shut-Ins is a film
filled with empty highways and unadorned apartments. Flesh is sun-worn
or peach-pale. Kay Jay's hustling brother listens to horrorcore beats, cruising with his brother from the bottle depot. Kay Jay is the sole attendant at
a kitschy church funeral, while a web-like portal on-screen depicts young
women fawning over a pup. This is a movie about aching sustains. It makes
an erect penis sliding out of boxers as a man sleeps in on a weekday pathetic and bathetic: a moment of quotidian oddity and beauty, comic waste and
bodily sadness.
Mass For Shut-in's debut at the Vancouver International Film Festival was
preceded by the short-film There Lived the Colliers, by fellow Nova Scotian
director Nelson MacDonald. A montage of project duplexes built in Cape
Breton for the colliers (or coal miners) who worked in the area set to hypnagogic tape loops, There Lived the Colliers is similarly simmering and dulled,
bludgeoned with its comatose environs, in a critique of a dead-end capitalism which builds-up communities and then abandons them. Houses, occupied or otherwise, sit in various states of disrepair and decrepitude. Often
half of the duplexes are complete: a silly slanted slash next to an overgrown
field of weeds.
The wear of the material world is always adjacent to the Canadian consciousness, as responsible for wealth as it is for shame. Documentation
from DeGiobbi and MacDonald, tuned into forward thinking aesthetics,
signal a new East Coast milieu that is worth paying attention to. Ambient
loops are the sound of contemporary hauntology: paeans for past moments
when other futures seemed possible. But the well is dry. DeGiobbi and
MacDonald's hypnagogia signal the need to rouse, still deferred.
—Jonathan Kew
!!!
To submit music for review consideration in Discorder Magazineand online,
please send a physical copy to the station addressed to:
Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Under Review Editor at
CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver BC, V6T1Z1.
Though our contributors prioritize physical copies, you may email download codes
to underreview.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums sent prior to their official
Jease dates. Under Review is also expanding to include independent films, books
and podcasts. Feel free to submit those, too.
8I-YI0S   H3TMIW!   9fliXD()Dm 190*10321(1
UNDER REVIEW
15
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | WINTER2017-1?
BETSY FROST
Victoria's Local Bad Girl
words by Doug Vandelay // illustration by Amy Brereton //photo courtesy of Betsy Frost
Photo of Mamie Richardson, Gabby Twerdohlib and Tristian Thompson, courtesy of Betsy Frost.
44
3'm more of a tangible person* Rabins tfje physical, ceUuioiD
strips of mp images is something important for me/'
ndm^d^/, Betsy Frost first appeared on our radar through
the Instagram account @supportyourlocalbadgirls.
She has photographed artists featured in Discorder,
including BB, Jody Glenham, Louise Burns, and others we look
forward to featuring in the future.
Beginning in February 2018, Frost will be adding 'gallerist' to her
curriculum vitae, as she works towards opening a shop in Victoria
that will exhibit emerging work.
Discorder caught up with Frost in Victoria to talk about this, and
other things.
Who is Betsy Frost?
A photographer. I'm a photographer, born and raised on
Vancouver Island. Betsy Frost is sort of a created name, it
isn't my real name, but it's the name I prefer to go by to
represent my art. So she's her own entity, if you will.
Sort of like Ziggy Stardust?
Sort of, I wouldn't go anywhere to compare myself to
somebody that cool.
Most people would know you from your photography work as
Support Your Local Bad Girls. How did that get started?
I've been taking photos for almost as long as I can
remember. When I was about 12, my mom gave me her
old camera and at the time, one of my older brothers was
a photographer. He was part of a photography collective
that was down the street that had studio space and a dark
room, things like that. I would beg to go to the studio with
him all the time. I would help him in the darkroom, so I
kind of got a bug for it.
I used photography almost like a therapy session for
myself and I found that getting a bit older, later on in the
teen years, that my memory wasn't so great. So as a trick
h
for myself, I would just rapidly document everything. It
started as an obsession, rapidly documenting where I was,
the things I'd see, and I would just collect so many images
of literally a wall or something. Being a visual person, I'd see
that and think, 'Oh, I can piece this all together from that.'
It wasn't until about this time last year that I started
putting my work online, putting it out there. I compiled
hundreds of images over my teen years, but I still, to this
day, haven't shown anyone those photographs.
What other art media do you practice?
I do styling work that comes along with photography,
but pretty much photography is all I know. I don't do
digital. I never crossed into that realm. For me, it was just
a completely natural thing to stay in the analog world. I've
never really liked or felt comfortable with the internet and
technology, and working with digital files. I'm more of a
tangible person. Having the physical, celluloid strips of my
images is something important for me. I still watch VHS and
have records and tapes; it's more of a world that I understand. So I stick in the film realm because I don't understand
the other realm, and I'm pretty comfortable with that. I love
film. I can't see myself venturing out into other media such
as digital. It just doesn't feel natural to me.
Would you say this love of vintage media lead to the Born to be
Bad Vintage and Oddities?
Yeah, for sure. I used to run Born to be Bad Vintage,
which was an online vintage store through Etsy. About
a year ago, I decided that I was going to do photography
full time, so I stepped away from it. I found that I loved
[photography] more. I used to work in vintage stores. I
was always very D.I.Y., and I still am even now. My first
inclination when I need something for photography isn't
necessarily to go out and buy it, it's to try and figure out
how to make it. So it did feel like a natural progression to
sell vintage, and I had amassed such a large collection on
my own, it felt like a good way to move some of it.
Let's talk about @supportyourlocalbadgirls on Instagram. What
would you say is the goal?
I never started it with a goal. I got Instagram one day and
it was kind of just my private account. @Borntobebadvintage
was a business account, and I just wanted a private account
where I could just post dumb things like selfies and pictures
of my cats and things like that. I just typed it in and that
was my name, and then I started posting my photography
on it as well. When that gained momentum, I deleted all
the personal things and now it has become my photography
page. I was never expecting it to happen.
Couldyou tell us about your upcoming projects?
A couple of friends from town run Camera Traders in
Market Square, Victoria. They sell used equipment and
analog cameras, and they supply a really good selection of
film.
In February, the apartment that I lived in for a really long
time burnt down. I didn't have proper scanning equipment
for my negatives or a place to work, and [my friends from
Camera Traders] let me use their equipment and really
helped me with anything I needed for work. Eventually we
got talking and decided to make a gallery space. We're set
to open February 2018. We've just put our first submissions
call out for a group analog photography show. The gallery
is going to be focused on experimental and emerging artists
in Victoria. There are always some realms of photography
that go unseen or are deemed too weird for certain galleries.
Hopefully we can represent more of that.
Follow @supportyourlocalbadgirls on Instagram <3
'Betsy Frost'
 8I-VX0S H3THIWI 9nixDBDffl isbiooziQ
EflUfAH
T
he white, brightly lit monolith of the
new Emily Carr University of Art +
Design campus rears out of the dim
beside Great Northern Way. The south side
is separated from the road by a building still
encased in scaffolding, a banner hung on
the side reveals the building's branding as a
new office space: "South Flatz: A Community
that Inspirez." Tucked behind is one of the
entrances to ECUAD itself, but you'll have to
walk through Chip and Shannon Wilson Plaza
first — names you may know because Chip
Wilson founded Lululemon and their family
real estate company, Low Tide Properties, is a
big player in the buying up of property along
East Hastings in Strathcona. The campus sits
amidst the redeveloped False Creek Flats, once
a rail yard and industrial area, now a hotbed of
construction for the city's projected tech hub.
I meet with a group of ECUAD students
including Ali Bosley, Theo Terry, Aubin Kwon, M* and
D* who have come together to strategize about voicing
student concerns around the new campus. They call
themselves the Emily Carr Student Action Group. In
November, Terry created a public Facebook event called
"Alternative Open House," which was intended to overlap
with the official unveiling of the campus to students,
general public, and financial stakeholders. The event was
organized to address the unrest among many returning
students when they move into the new space.
"We arrived [at the new campus] and it seemed like a
significant change [occurred] in the value of artistic production, and sort of the role of the artists that they are trying to
produce here," says Terry. "It seemed in many ways like the
school wasn't built for students: it kind of feels in some way
like it's a showroom for artistic production."
EfTllLV  CfiRR  STUDEflT  nCTIOfl  GROUP
THE LEfllOn CflfllPUS
words by Keagan Perlette // illustrations by Khylin LUoodroiu //photos by Duncan Cairns-Brenner
T
Plans for ECUAD to move to a different campus
began sixteen years ago, ample time to ensure
that planners, architects, and the institution itself
were on the same page about what an art school should
look like. However, students are still encountering one of
the major setbacks of their former Granville Island home:
inadequate space to work in.
"I think there's a lack of understanding of what the
students need and of what each department needs," says
Bosley. Rather than building studio spaces where students
can store their supplies and works in progress, the architectural focus of the school is clearly on wide hallways,
massive common areas, and showy lobby spaces. "There
are so many spots in this campus that are open spaces,"
says D, "I'm thinking: 'You could have added another
floor and added more studio space [...] instead of having
this giant atrium with a million-dollar view.'"
Students have found themselves delegating space amongst
each other. "You cannot imagine the disruption that having
to navigate a space causes in someone's practice," says
M, who's found herself painting at home and commuting
with wet canvases. D tells me that she has had to invest in
an off-site studio space, on top of her tuition. A move to
accommodate design and tech-focused art education appears
to be an undercurrent in the school's structure and branding.
here are structural shortcomings of
the new campus, and the administration is reluctant to acknowledge
it. This places students in the role of
a cultural workforce, and demeans the
importance of artistic process, growth and
education. "What we're looking for in the
longterm is changing this notion that the
only value of art is economic value," Terry
says. D agrees, "It's about voicing concern
for the life of art and culture in Vancouver."
This article can only scratch the surface of
the complexity of the structures of power
in place over ECUAD, and, by extension, the
independent arts scene in Vancouver.
With a shortened semester, lack of
space, and anxiety surrounding speaking
out, it can seem impossible to gather the
energy and the resources needed to fight
back against the agenda of those who hold
the economic power in the city, and influence at the new
ECUAD campus. Stakeholders, however, are just that: they
took a financial risk, and the measures being taken to
congratulate them on that risk encourage the donors to
feel that they have made a good investment. "Arts spaces
are always used as enrichment for the community," notes
Kwon. "Developers will invest in public art and it becomes
the thing that justifies gentrification. [The investors] are
very concerned with the image of this being the centre of
art creation because that image is a really strong basis for
developments and for attracting people to invest in the
community."
flmong one of the larger issues hanging over the
campus and its students is the heavy involvement
of big-name donors from the private sector, many
known real estate developers complicit in the gentrification and re-shaping of Vancouver; donors who haven't
been open to discussing the shortfalls of the building they
invested in.
Though the student union donated $325,000 towards the
construction of the new campus, and contributions to the
school have been made by alumni and faculty, the administration's focus appears to be on venerating their wealthy
donors. Hoping to reduce the budget allocated to the arts,
the provincial government made the switch to a private
public partnership (P3) method of funding infrastructure
for the new campus. This means that the school is relying
on the "patronage" and economic interest of potentially
problematic private donors and investors. Bosley equates
the relationship to attempting to speak with an unforgiving
landlord: "You're made to feel ashamed of wanting more
space and needing more space," she says, "[You're] being
asked to adjust your practice or your lifestyle because you
should be grateful for being in this space."
"Emily Carr Student fiction Group"
The reality of the ECUAD campus is that it is becoming
inhospitable for fine arts students, and the only way to
preserve the kind of fine arts education that the school
has provided for nearly 100 years is to activate the
student body, and to take up space in the school and in
the community. Vancouver's artists are already required
to fight for their practice, and there is no doubt that the
obstacles facing ECUAD students will evoke resilience.
"I want people to know, people who are coming to
school here and who are new to Vancouver, that the arts
community here is so rich and so tenacious in this city,"
says Bosley. "I want them to come out of this experience
being okay to say no to things, to be okay to ask for
things that they need, and knowing it's okay to voice their
concerns."
*Names have been changed.
A
 NO FUN FICTION
WORMS IN THE DIRT
words  by A.L.   //   illustrations  by Bryce  Aspinall
Oh, Prometheus. A Robin Hood to humans and a pariah
to the gods. Upsetting the status quo and paying
for it dearly. There isn't even any real moral in his
story, except "don't mess with the boss." Or maybe "No good
deed goes unpunished," though that is from the demigod
perspective.
We 'demis' also like Prometheus, though we have to shift
our opinion depending on which side of the family we're
dining with. Without him though, we probably wouldn't be
around. The mortal side of our family would likely still be
half-formed mounds of flesh with life cycles like oysters.
They'd be dying of bacterial infections like it was going out
of style, like the plague was business as usual, open 24 hours
even on holidays. They'd be living in some swamp of the earth,
unable to adapt to other climates, unable to escape the muck or
even notice it. They'd be the things our god-relatives would
have stepped on and exclaimed "Whoops!"
But then that good fellow came along and gave those
helpless clods (those humans) the gift of fire, and damn,
did that set things off. Parties became a thing; emotionally-charged decisions became a thing; moving day became a
thing.
And our boy Prometheus paid sweetly for it. You've heard
the story: guy tied to a stone, eagle pecks his liver out
everyday, liver grows back every night. Some real Saw stuff.
What you might not have heard was this: that eagle was
actually a demi being punished too. He didn't want to eat the
liver; it tasted bad and felt awful. And every day Prometheus
would scream and cry and the eagle would scream and cry
and the tourists, who often thought they were prepared for
the scene but of course, how could they be, they screamed and
cried, too.
Eventually Hercules came along, freed Prometheus
and killed the bird, and was hailed as a hero (tough shit
eagle-man, invest in a PR agent next time). And then the
gods had a real predicament on their hands. Do they continue
the punishment or reconsider their position?
You see, the gods started caring less and less about the
transgressions of this human-lover Prometheus, mostly
because they realized humans were a great source of servitude. And how much use would mortals have been as those
flesh oysters? Yeah, they would worship you, boost your ego a
bit, but who would work throughout the night lugging stones
to capture your likeness on a grand scale? Not those oysters,
that's for sure.
Also, letting Prometheus go free was an easy way to placate
the humans, most of whom really had a thing for the guy. It
was nothing to the gods and everything to the mortals, and
sometimes you just have to give the people a win. So, next
thing you know, Prometheus is released.
He wasn't fully free, it was definitely a probationary period.
For one thing, he was stripped of most of his god powers
except eternal life. The gods would never strip another god
of immortality because none of them wanted that precedent
to be set. It was, after all, their way to secure the status quo.
It's how they won every monopoly game and lawsuit and real
estate dispute, simply by outlasting their opponents. It was
their key to the damn city.
Of course, Prometheus was inevitably going to have to live
among the humans now because he would never make it in
the godland. Yeah the gods set him free, but do you think they
were about to eat with him, or talk to him, or let him visit any
of the oracles? Not a chance. So, dude was earthbound. But,
the main clause in his probation agreement was this: no more
giving away the secrets of the gods. No talk of immortality,
no talk of soothsaying, Prometheus just had to shut up and be
good.
So, there Prometheus was, stripped of almost all
power, banished to the human realm, and under a
strict gag order. And frankly, the guy was stoked. He
changed his name to Peter, moved to Boise, Idaho, and got
a job developing film at one of the last places in town that
developed film.
But maybe all this acclimatization to Earth was causing
our boy to lose his edge. Maybe he was beginning to slip
up and make some very human mistakes. Or maybe, due to
the predilection for pontification that no god could seem to
shake, our poor hero was doomed from the beginning. All I
know is, one drunken night at a dive bar in downtown Boise
coincidentally called The Apollo, the guy erred hard.
"It's the thin air. You get less oxidized, and oxidation is the
major aging agent. You wanna live long you gotta live high,
on the highest mountain you can find. Ever notice how the
powerful always live high up? The mansions are always in
in the sky? It's the thin air. We gotta head upwards," Peter
slurred to his friend. "We're living like worms in the dirt
down here."
And later, when Peter was drunkenly stumbling home,
wondering if perhaps he had said the wrong thing, he noticed
a bird circling in the sky. And it seemed to be moving ever
closer.
A.L. lives in a small apartment in Vancouver, B.C.. She spends a
lot of time thinking about t.v. commercials from her childhood. She
wonders whether water gun technology has kept progressing at the
same rapid rate.
k
NO FUN FICTION ! Worms   In  The  Dirt   by  A.L.
Discorder magazine | WINTER 2017-1E
tfllEN0£
OF
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
"You get discounts at these
FRIENDS OF CiTR + DISCORDER locations.
m b 1 n
ANTISOCIAL
SKATEBOARD SHOP
■10% off
THE BILTMORE CABARET
■10% off at the  bar
DANDELION RECORDS
S EMPORIUM
'10% off used records
DOUPIUtOUPIl
BEAT STREET RECORDS
'10% off used records
THE CINEMATHEQUE
■ One small bag of
popcorn per person
per evening.
EAST VAN GRAPHICS
DEVIL MAY WEAR
■10$ off
■10% off
EAST VANITY PARLOUR
'10% off any service
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
S ART EMPORIUM
FAS IN FRANK
■15% off
■10% off
THE PINT PUBLIC HOUSE
LUCKY'S BOOKS S
COMICS
■10% off
■ 20% discount  to
guests on food bill
SIKORA'S CLASSIC
RECORDS LTD.
NEPTOON RECORDS
'10% off of Merchandise
■10% off
VINYL RECORDS
RAG MACHINE
' 10% of New and Used
■10% off
RED CAT RECORDS
■10% off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
'A free DIY button with
any purchase over $5.
The Regional
TRUE VALUE VINTAGES
1 FOUND GALLERY
UB£
AUSTRALIAN
BOOT COMPANY
'15% off Blundstone and
& R.M.  Williams Boots
THE BIKE KITCHEN
■10% off
WOO VINTAGE CLOTHING
■ 10% off
'10% off new parts &
accessories
BANYEN BOOKS S SOUND
THE WALLFLOWER
MODERN DINER   ^fk
'10% off            ■■
'10% off
t FRESH IS BEST
1 ON BROADWAY
'   '15% off
eommeRciMi
GRANVILLE
ISLAND BREWING
AUDIOPILE RECORDS
'10% off food / 10% on
merchandise  (not beer)
■10% off
BOMBER BREWING
KOERNER'SPUB
'10% off food
■10% off
BONERATTLE MUSIC
ON THE FRINGE
HAIR DESIGN
'10% off of accessories
'10% off
THE CANNIBAL CAFE
RUFUS GUITAR SHOP
■10% off
non-alcoholic items
■ 10% new instruments
and accessories.
HIGHLIFE RECORDS
■10% off
JO CLOTHING LTD.
■10% off
MINTAGE
STORM CROW ALEHOUSE
■10% off
TAPESTRY MUSIC
'10% off  in-stock
music books
■10% off
UBC BOOKSTORE
PEOPLE'S CO-OP
BOOKSTORE
■10% off
■10% off general
me rchandise(clothing,
giftware,   stat ione ry,
general books)^^,^ a?niy.
THE RIO THEATRE      ^
•$2 off regular RioaH
Theatre movies        |^|^H
/ select events       ^|^^
STORM CROW TAVERN^
■10% off
^^
0 3 11 e r
m
BOOKWAREHOUSE
^s f
■10% off
^■^
CANADAMERCH
■15% off
(VISIT:
PANDORA'S BOX
REHEARSALSTUDIOS
CiTR
■10% off Hourly
Studio Rentals
. C a /friends
for more info.
0.)
 Tuesday December 26th & Wednesday December 27th
APDIOPILE
RECORDS & CD's
EST. 2001
2016 Commercial Drive, Vancouver, BC   Ph: 604.253.7453   www.Audiopile.ca
 Discorder magazine | WINTER  2017-lf
ON THE AIR
HOLIDAY LISTENING GUIDE
illustrations by Sunny Nestler
On The Air is a column that spotlights one program from our radio station, CiTR 101.9FM. However, some of our favourite programs
go on hiaitus over the holidays. This year we took this Winter Issue as an opportunity to show our love for some other radio stations,
programs and podcasts that get us excited. Welcome to Discorder's Holiday Listening Guide! It is not comprehensive, but it's a
good starting point. Thank you to Jennifer Brule for getting the ball rolling. This list is largely compiled by Discorder masthead and CiTR staff.
If you have relevant suggestions to add to the online version of this list, send them to editor.discorder@citr.ca.
• Broken Boxes
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or
brokenboxespodcast.com
This podcast is insanely good, incredibly relevant. As described on their website, it features
interviews with Indigenous artists, activist focused
artists, Queer artists, women identifying artists,
artists of colour and mixed/lost/stolen heritage artists.
• CANADALAND
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts and/or probably broadcasting
on one of your local campus-community radio stations throughout the week.
Visit online canadalandshow.com
Saucy in its own way. Can we say that? CANADALAND reports on the
media and media criticism. They aren't perfect, but they wear their
faults openly, and we like that. We're also a little scared of them, in a good
way. CANADALAND is the flagship podcast, but it produces other podcasts as
well. All of them are worth checking out, another one is listed here.
• CFRO
Listen to: 100.5FM in the Lower Mainland or coopradio.org
Uancouver's non-commercial, co-operative run, community radio station,
40+ years strong. Vancouver Co-op Radio is based in the Downtown
Eastside, with a mandate to provide space for underrepresented and
marginalized communities. Programming varies from metal music shows to
Indigenous current affairs. Some of our favourites are Urban Renewal Project,
Soundscapes and Redeye.
• CFUV
Listen to: 101.9FM in Victoria, or cfuv.ca
CFUV has awesome programming and their intergalactic merch branding
makes us very happy. Also, they share the same frequency as CiTR,
but in Victoria, (aka. just another reason to always keep your car radio tuned
to 101.9FM.)
• Cited
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts or citedpodcast.com
This documentary radio program is alternative, independent journalism at
its finest, balanced with storytelling and heart. And one of the producers
is Discorder's pal, Josh Gabert-Doyon.
• CiTR
Listen to: 101.9FM in the Lower Mainland, or citr.ca
1 ell, this is weird. We hope that if you're reading this, you
^^r already know how great CiTR is because it publishes
Discorder Magazine. But actually, over the holidays CiTR will be
broadcasting some wonderful repeat and original programming.
Check out the program schedule on Page 21.
• CIVL
Listen to: 1017FM in the Lower Mainland/Fraser Valley or civl.ca
This is the campus-community radio station of
the University of the Fraser Valley, serving the
Abbotsford, Mission, and Chilliwack campuses. In
addition to great programming, they also host the
annual Fraser Valley Music Awards.
• CJSF
Listen to: 90.1 FM in the Lower Mainland or cjsf.ca
This is the loveable Burnaby-based campus-community radio station of Simon Fraser University. What more to say? We
have similar taste in music, art, activism, and CiTR + CJSF all hang out. We're
friends that work together sometimes.
•   Community Radio Toast Collective
Listen to: www.facebook.com/CRTCIive
nlso known as the CRTC, this is a Facebook Live Stream
'radio' initiative by the fine folks at Toast Collective, one of
Vancouver's best venues. They haven't done much yet, but we have
high expectations.
Digital Tattoo Project
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or every other Friday
at 7pm on CiTR 101.9FM in Vancouver or citr.ca
n collaboration between the UBC Library, the Irving K. Barber Learning
Centre, UBC's Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology,
University of Toronto's iSchool and U of T Libraries, this podcast explores our
relationship to online identity, rights and responsibilities of digital navigation.
Fashion Hags Podcast
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or fashionhagspodcast.com
Hosted by Abby, Evan and Katie, three friends who met at Fashion
Design school in Vancouver, Fashion Hags discusses fashion at the
intersection of art and activism, among other things.
• Feelin Weird
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts or feelinweird.com
This is one of our favourites! This Victoria-based
podcast is hosted by artist Kye Plant. Episodes
deal with issues around mental health, gender
identity, general life and general weird vibes.
• nIO.as
Listen to: Conveniently, their name is also their url: www.n10.as
Pronounced  'antennas'  this  Montreal-based web  radio  project was
founded out of Arbutus Records. It has featured DJs and interdisciplinary
artists from across the country. Tune in and check it out for yourselves.
• No Fun Radio
Listen to: www.nofunradio.com
This is a non-profit web radio project based in the Downtown Eastside,
intended to help promote Vancouver-based artists. It is still fairly new,
but so good. Dare we suggest it, NFR is Vancouver's response to nIO.as.
Thank you, NFR.
• Pop This! Podcast
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts or popthiscollective.tumblr.com
Hosted by well-known music journalism personalities Lisa Christiansen
and Andrea Warner, this podcasts features  intersectional  feminist
discussions around pop culture. Produced in the pop culture centre of the
universe, Vancouver.
• Here Be Monsters
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or
hbmpodcast.com
You'll notice this list is predominantly Canadian
picks (as per Discorder's focus). This podcast is
one of the exceptions. Based out of the Santa Monica
College radio station KCRW, HBM explores the topics
that make us scared. EIC BB is scared of bells. Maybe
HBM can make an episode about that.
Retail Nightmares
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or retailnightmares.
com
n dually, not just about retail, though we've all been there. This
podcast by Alicia Tobin and Jessica Delisle (Energy Slime)
interviews local artists, comedians and writers, and it's great.
Roundhouse Radio
Listen to: 98.3FM in Vancouver, or roundhouseradio.com
R
• The Imposter
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or canadalandshow.com
Produced by CANADALAND, this podcast shares its mandate with an
emphasis on highlighting underrepresented Canadian art, and questioning the country's cultural identity.
The Lapse
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or thelapse.org
Uancouver-based podcast that allows listeners an entry
point into the lives of complete strangers. Through
detailed and ensnaring narratives, complete with folly work and
the occasional renactment, guests dive into personal annect-
dotes that often prove illuminating and wide reaching.
• Love to Sew
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or lovetosewpodcast.com
n podcast that explores the burgeoning sewing community. Based out of
Vancouver, the hosts interview a range of influential guests from within
the international scene. Each podcast provides a captivating snapshot of a
re-emerging movement.
oundhouse is hit or miss, and their music selections as a
whole are mediocre at best. But for a discerning listener, some programming offers interesting insight into the nature of
community, and reporting on community. Also, they air some great syndicated
podcasts, including Radiolab, Reveal and The Moth.
• The Secret Life of Canada
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts or thesecretlifeofcanada.com
This is a history podcast that explores some untold and under-told stories
about Canada.
• Scene On Radio, "Seeing White"
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or podcast.cdsporch.org
Seeing White is Season 2 of the Scene On Radio podcast, about the
construction and function of whiteness and white identity politics from
a critical perspective. An especially good episode is #31 "Turning The Lens,
(Seeing White Part 1)"
Stop Podcasting Yourself
• Music That Matters
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or feeds.kexp.org/kexp/
musicthatmatters
KEXP is 90.3FM in Seattle. They have strong programming, and host
some really fun live sets with touring bands. This podcast, Music That
Matters, is one of the best places to find new music. Seriously.
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts or maximumfun.org/shows/
stop-podcasting-yourself
Hosted by Vancouver comedians Graham Clark and Dave Shumka, this
podcast just celebrated its 500th episode. It features other local and
international comedians, and is just generally a good time.
• The Witch Wave
Listen to: Wherever you subscribe to podcasts, or witchwavepodcast.com
n podcast for bewitching conversation about magic, creativity, and culture
hosted by Pam Grossman. As if you need more reason to listen.
bo
ON THE AIR!Holiday Listening Guide
 mm m&M
»
_n_
u     VXJ
sponfcap
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
T'RANCENDANCE
GHOST  MIX
BREAKFAST  WITH  THE
BROWNS
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
SYNCHRONICITY
PARTS  UNKNOWN
THE  BURROW
YOUR  NEW  SHOW
Cue*tmp
PACIFIC PICON"
QUEER FM
YOUR NEW SHOW
MORNING AFTER SHOW
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
PARTICLES & WAVES
INTO THE WOODS
DOUBLE
SPACE
YOUR NEW
SHOW
©UIctmc6tiap
CITR GHOST MIX
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
POP DRONES
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
ROOM TONE
KEW IT UP
ALL ACCESS PASS
Cfmratmp
CITR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
YOUR NEW SHOW
CULT!
FROM THE
UBYSSEY
CONVICTIONS &
CONTRADICTIONS
YOUR NEW
SHOW
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
U DO U RADIO
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
K-POP CAFE
VIBES & STUFF
ASTROTALK
THUNDERBIRD EYE
INTERSECTIONS
JFrifcap
AURAL TENTACLES
CANADALAND
CITED
MIXTAPES WITH
[XTAPES
MC & M.
AC
THE REEL WHIRLED
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
&>aturt>ap
CITR GHOST MIX
THE SATURDAY EDGE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
POWER  CHORD
CODE  BLUE
$>unftap
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
YOUR NEW SHOW
SHOOKSHOOKTA
THE ROCKERS SHOW
LA FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
6AM
7AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
5 PM
THE  LEO  RAMIREZ
SHOW
WORD ON   THE  STREET
ARTS REPORT
DEMOCRACY WATCH
THE UBC HAPPY HOUR
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6 PM
FINDING THE FUNNY
ANECDOTAL EVIDENCE
YOUR NEW SHOW
FLEX YOUR HEAD
7 PM
YOUR NEW
SHOW
EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
8 PM
CRIMES & TREASONS
YOUR NEW
SHOW
SAMS
QUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
NO DEAD
AIR
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
THE, DIGITAL
YOUR  NEW
SHOW
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
CI RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
MIX CASSETTE
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
THE NEW ERA
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
TRANCENDANCE
YOUR NEW SHOW
NINTH WAVE
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
YOUR NEW SHOW
COPY / PASTE
11PM
THE MEDICINE SHOW
RANDOPHONIC
THE AFTN SOCCER
SHOW
12AM
12AM
SPICY BOYS
1AM
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
1AM
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
OF INSOMNIA
CITR GHOST MIX
2AM
CITR  GHOST  MIX
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAM MANAGER AT PROGRAMMINGQCITR.CA TO LEARN HOW
"DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERY DAY."
 ■ A\ON»AV
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththe-
browns@hotmail. com
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
11AM-12PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
second season! The team
of Indigenous and non-
Indigenous peeps produce the
show weekly. We talk about
Indigenous issues, current
events, and entertainment
centering Native voices through
interviews and the arts. Come
make Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Follow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook. co m/uncededairwaves/
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail. com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE BURROW
3PM-4PM, rock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
department manager Andy
Resto, the Burrow is Noise
Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock
with a nice blend of old
classics' and new releases.
Interviews & Live performances.
Contact: music@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm-6:3opm, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TUESDAV
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
3AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmail.com
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM,  ROCK / POP / INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM,  ROCK / POP / INDIE
This show is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists. Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
contact:
communitylivingradio@gmail.com
PARTICLES* WAVES
2PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Like the quantum theory it
is named for, Particles and
Waves defies definition. Join
Mia for local indie, sci-fi prog
rock, classic soul, obscure
soundtracks, Toto's deep
cuts, and much more.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
INTO THE WOODS
TUES 3PM-4PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope:
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DOUBLE SPACE
ALTERNATING TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/
DESIGN / FEMINISM
Investigating interactions with our
surroundings and society. Every
week we discuss our experiences
with these interactions, how
they emerge and the impacts
of these invisible forces.
Twitter | @doublespaceshow
WORD ON THE STREET
5PM-6PM, rock/in die/ pop.
Hosted by the Music Affairs Collective, every episode is packed with
up-to-date content from the Lower
Mainland music communities including news, new music releases:
event reviews and upcoming events:
interviews with local musicians and
industry professionals and discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEXYOURHEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES&TREASONS
3PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www. crimesandtreasons.co m
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room:
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/ POP
Jayden targets the audience
in the Korean community in
Vancouver to introduce the
News on Korea, Korean Culture
while comparing other Asian
Cultures, plays all kinds of
Korean Music(K-POP, Hip Hop:
Indie, R&B,etc),talk about the
popular trend in the industry of
Korean Movies & Korean Drama
(aka K-Drama), TV Shows:
Korean Wave(aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, what's
going on in Korean Society here
in Vancouver, Talk with Guests.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROOM TONE
2PM-3PM, talk/interview/film
Room Tone is a talk show
focused on Filmmaking that
invites guests weekly to
discuss their slices of reality
on set, tips, past/future
projects and love for the craft!
From Di rectors/Prod ucers:
to Cinematographers:
Production Designers, Actors:
Composers, Writers, Editors...
anyone I (Theatre/Video
Games/Animation/Fashion
or any other sort of creative
entertainment is welcome).
Contact:
listentoroomtone@gmail.com
KEWIT UP
3PM-4PM, experimental/talk
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica:
Post-Punk, Industrial
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
4PM-5PM, talk/ accessibility
POLITICS
CiTR Accessibility Collective's
new radio show. We talk
about equity, inclusion, and
accessibility for people with
diverse abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every week
for interviews, music, news:
events, and awesome dialogue.
Contact:
accessibilitycollective@citr.ca
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC:
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves
on CiTR Radiol01.9FM:
Wednesdays from 5-6pm.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
ANECDOTAL EVIDENCE
6pm-6:3opm, talk / story telling
Anecdotal Evidence is a live
storytelling series in Vancouver
where people share true stories
of how they experience science
in their lives; stories of failure,
fieldwork, love, death, cosmic
loneliness and more. Tune
in for humour, humanity, and
sometimes even science.
Contact: Twitter | ae_stories
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE NEW ERA
9PM-10PM, HIP hop/ r&b/ soul
A showcase of up n' coming artists
who are considered "underdogs'
in the music industry. We provide
a platform for new artists who are
looking for radio play. Bringing
you different styles of Hip Hop
music from all across the Earth
and interviews with music industry
professionals. It's the NEW ERA...
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM, hip hop/ r&b/ soul
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk, and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr. ca
■ THURSDAV
SPICY BOYS
12AM-1AM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
Playing music and stuff.
You can listen.
Or don't.
It's up to you.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM,TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture:
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CONVICTIONS & CONTRADICTIONS
ALTERNATING THURS, 9AM"9:30AM:
talk/comedy/social OBESERVATIONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society; shown through social
observational comedy. To boot
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
CULT! FROM THE UBYSSEY
CULT! is a bi-weekly radio show/
podcast about culture at the University of British Columbia (UBC). From
The Ubyssey— UBC's independent
newspaper and a definitive source
of campus/community news — the
show will feature the rag's brightest
minds discussing the happenings
and issues in the arts and culture
scene as well as interviews with the
creators and creatives involved in
the various projects around town.
Hosted and produced by Ubyssey
staff writer Olamide Olaniyan
Contact: Twitter | @UbyssseyCulture
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocke tfromrussiacitr(3>gmail. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Rocke tFrom Russia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored bydonuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean:
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B.
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
VIBES & STUFF
2PM-3PM, HIP-HOP / R&B / SOUL
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and
Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to
contemporary hip-hop artists
all in one segment. DJ Bmatt
& Dak Genius will have you
reminiscing about the good
ol' times with Vibes and
Stuff every week! skrt skrt
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
3-3:3opm, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
3:3opm-4pm, talk/sports
Your weekly roundup of UBC
Thunderbird sports action from
both on and off campus with
your hosts Eric Thompson
Jake McGrail, and Jacob Aere
Contact: sports@citr.ca
INTERSECTIONS
4PM-5PM, talk/feminism/gender
EMPOWERMENT
The Gender Empowerment
Collective's goal is to center
the voices, issues, concerns:
and experiences of women:
transgender, intersex, Two-
Spirit, genderqueer, gender
non-conforming, non-binary
and gender fluid folks and allies.
Tune in weekly for interviews:
commentary, stories and news
from YOUR communities.
Contact:
genderempowerment@citr. ca
DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For fans of News 101, this
is CiTR's brand new Current
Affairs show! Tune in weekly
for commentary, interviews,
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
NO DEAD AIR
No Dead Air is dedicated
to shocasing jazz fusion:
experimental electronic, and
post-rock programming.
Contact: Facebook | NoDeadAir
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:3opm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ FR1DAV
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact: auraltentacles@hotmail.
com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse(3>canadalandsho w.com
CITED
3AM-9AM, TALK/ACADEMIA
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact: facebook.com/citedpod-
cast, Twitter | @citedpodcast
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion:
mastery, and a lil dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@g mail, com
MUZAK FOR THE OBESERVANT
1PM-2PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
CiTR Music department
program, highlighting the
newest/freshest cuts from the
stations bowels. Features live
interviews and performances
from local artists.
Contact: music@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter \
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp://nardwuar. com/ra d/con tact/
THE UBC HAPPY HOUR
5pm-6pm, talk/news/current
AFFAIRS
The UBC Happy Hour is
produced by the UBC Affairs
Collective, and made by
students, for students! The
show is all about what's
happening on UBC's campus.
Tune in for updates on
campus news, clubs outreach
and just about everything
else you can find at UBC!
Contact: ubcaffairs@citr.ca
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6pm - 7PM, talk/comedy
6pm-7pm, Every week Jack.
Tristan and a special guest
randomly select a conversation
topic for the entire show;
ranging from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure.Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:3opm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
imational
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop:
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE DIGITAL TATTOO PODCAST
PROJECT
ALTERNATING  FIR 7PM "7:30PM:
TALK TECHNOLOGY
The Digital Tattoo Podcast
Project raises questions:
provides examples, speaks
with experts, and encourages
you to think about your
presence online. Our goal
is to help you navigate the
issues involved in forming and
re-forming your digital identity
and learn about your rights
and responsibilities as a digital
citizen. It's really just about
making informed decisions
and your own decisions.
Contact: Twitter | @DTatUBC
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock remains committed to the
best in post-rock, drone, ambient
experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can
put the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, eclectic/live
INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vancouvermedicineshow(3>gmail. com
■ SATURDAV
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:3oam-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citrlatenightshow@gmail.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrurrr
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmail.com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hone
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmail.com
SOCASTORM
3PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
Papayo!!#SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
Sbit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
7AM-9AM, experimental/difficult
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPAN© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter\@BEPICRESPAN
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM,  INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
ALTERNATING SUN. 3PM"5PM:
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmail.com,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
3PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
3PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, DeepTrance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem.
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmileymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS:
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ ISLAND OF
LOST TOVS
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citr.ca
MOONGROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9FM NOVEMBER
MONTHLY CHARTS
U
l<
L*
u
u
u
La
M
i
pi
5>
Pi
Mi
U
Mi
l*
Mi
Mi
U
Mi
U
Mi
Mi
Mi
Mi
Mi
Mi
L»
a
L»
U
L»
Mi
Mi
»
L»
Ms
L-
t4*
L«
«
«
M5
L*
•
*
M
I  BU
Artist     JUbnm      JLaW
The Weather Station*^     Tfte Mfeatfjer Steffon
Destroyer*-
Tough Age*#
Blue Hawaii*#
Kaitlyn Aurelia Smiths
Brutal Poodle*+#
Ora Cogan*+#
Partner**
Weaves*#
Kelela#
Valiska*
Fuzzy P*+#
Off World*
St. Vincent*
Leah Abramson*+#
Makthaverskan#
The Body & Full of
Hell
Mauno*#
Beliefs*#
Peach Pyramid*#
The Pack A.D.*+#
Woolworm*+#
Odonis Odonis*
King Krule
Alex Lahey#
Devours*'
Courtney Barnett &
Kurt Vile#
METZ*
Phono Pony*+#
The Dreadnoughts*-!
Always*
Chelsea Wolf e#
Colleen#
Faith Healer*#
Holy Hum*
IMUR*+#
Julie & The Wrong
Guys*#
Laura Sauvage*#
Lisbon String Trio and
Karoline LeBlanc*#
Raleigh*#
Secret Pyramid*#
The Ruffled
Feathers*+#
Wares*#
The Deep Dark
Woods*
Painted Fruit*
Benjamin Clementine
Circuit des Yeux#
Shame
Tenderness
Screen Memories
The Kid
Long Time No See
Crickets
In Search Of Lost Time
Wide Open
Take Me Apart
On Pause
Amateur Alchemy
MASSEDUCTION
Song For A Lost Pod
Ascending a Mountain of
Heavy Light
Tuning
Habitat
The Centre Cannot Hold
Repeating Myself
Deserve To Die
No Pop
The OOZ
I Love You Like A Brother
Late Bloomer (reissue^
Lotta Sea Lice
Strange Peace
Death By Blowfish
Foreign Skies
Antisocialites
Hiss Spun
A Flame My Love, A
Frequency
Try;-)
All Of My Bodies
Little Death
Julie & The Wrong Guys
The Beautiful
Powerhouse Bloom
Two Shadows Collide
Hand-Me-Down Centuries
Yarrow
I Tell A Fly
Reaching For Indigo
-1*
Mint
Li
•II
Outside Mus
ju
Arbutus
>
II
Z-lLl
i Vinyl       I |       f,
 tt i-
Self-Released
JLl
Hand Drawn Dracu
You've Changed
Buzz Records
Trouble In Utopia
Self-Released
Constellation
Self-Released
Run For Cover
W
m
Hand Drawn [
Oscar Street
Cadence Music Group
Mint
Telephone Explosion
True Panther
Dead Oceans
W
Locksley Tapes       ^ ^     ?/&
Self-Released
J pi
Royal Mountain
Self-Released
Self-Released
J pi
Sargent House
Thrill Jockey
JP
Mint
J pi
Self-Released
Simone
Creative Sources
Self-Released
Self-Released
Double Lunch
Six Shooter
Self-Released
Virgin EMI
J:t
m
TOP 100 OF 2017!
Irtfet     0|(,unt      ^g^
Irtist     0|(,unt      itabei
Dalava*#+
High Plains*+
The Courtneys*#+
Pale Red*#+
Louise Burns*#+
Mi'ens*#+
Mac DeMarco*
Brasstronaut*-
The Evaporators**
Needles//Pins*#+
Fond of Tigers*+
Bored Decor*+
Timber Timbre*#
Devours*-
Faith Healer*#
Puzzlehead*#+
Do Make Say Think *
New Fries*
Colin Cowan & the
Elastic Stars*+
Century Palm*
Jerk Jails*#+
Shrouded Amps*#+
Kronos Quartet*
White Poppy*#
Austra*#
Birthday Bitch*#+
Kaitlyn Aurelia Smiths
Woolworm*#+
Sarah Davachi*#+
Sneaks#
Sore Points*+
Tiny Vipers#
Japandroids*
PC Worship
Tim Darcy*
Doug Cox and Sam
Hurrie*
Elisa Thorn Painting
Project*#+
Five Alarm Funk*-
Foonyap*#
Forager*
Dixie's Death Pool*+
Girlpool#
Gun Control*
Partner**
Phern*
Rococode*#+
The Book of
Transfigurations
Cinderland
Soft Opening
Young Mopes
Challenger
This Old Dog
S/T
Ogopogo Punk
Goodnight, Tomorrow
S/T
Sincerely Future Pollution
Late Bloomer (reissue)
Try;-)
Trucks
Stubborn Persistent
Illusions
More
Cosmos In Summer
Meet You
Magic Cities
S/T
Monument Builders
Come Along To The
Chocolate Church
Folk Songs
The Pink Haze Of Love
Future Politics
Deserve To Die
All My Circles Run
It's a Myth
Demo
Laughter
Near to the wild heart
of life
Buried Wish
The Weather Station**     The Weather Station
Saturday Night
Hue
Apropos
Scribe Stepping In and
Out of Season
Twilight, Sound Mountain
Powerplant
Volume 1
In Search Of Lost Time
Pause Clope/Cool Coma
Young Ones
-IML
Kranky
ILss
IU
Self-Released       0 p    gj)
Light Organ
ii t
Kingfisher Bluez     ^ ^    ^£j
Royal Mountain      6 ^     Sy^i
4f
Unfamiliar ^ ^    ^j
II M
Mint
1   u
II»
Rocks alt
1*
Arts & Crafts
IIM
 pr—
Locksley Tapes       j£ ^     ft* L
 I£_±i_
U  m
JMS
Self-Released       p |    |j|j
Jf
1r
Constellation        j£ ^     ft?i
 |*_
Telephone Explosion ^ ^     fj^j
i.i isi-i
Self-released       j£ ^     t\l\
 il~-—'
Deranged O    T>f|
 9. i__£rL.
Self-Released       0 p     -J]\
Self-Released       0 p    7jy)
II
Kranky $$    ^M
 ii^-—-
Self-Released       9, 9,    ~)i\
nesuch | P    Jj§
 P__
Lone Hand p |    -f§
'ink Fizz 11    Tj?J
ii
 p__
Self-Released       9, p    Tj^
Western Vinyl       9, 9,    Tj^j
 1|	
Mint ||    ,^rj
it.
Students of Decay    ^ ^     ,-EjjJ
-JL.
Merge        WW. 21
^Ierge ^ p     "{ip
 1|—-
Self-Released       9, %    ,Vr/\
 iH1
Self-Released       ^ ^    fHH
 P|	
BaDaBing! pp    gg
 &i —
Anti- fyi    33
 P| —
Northern Spy        9, 6    ,H7l
 **	
Outside Music        « «    rMrM
J AG JAG U WAR
II
ILil
;Hen        II   Ux)
Self-Released
JU
Self-Released       0 p    |J2
 P| —
Self-Released       9,9,     JJ--J
 9^-
Self-Released       9,6     iVl
I 9\   ±t
Leisure Thief
Anti- ||    $§
9.9\   it
 P| —
Self-Released       9,9,     Jfej
 9%-ZL
You1
ve Changed      j^ ^    i|fM
Fixture
JLsl
II mia
Shimmer*
The Harpoonist & the
Axe Murderer
Tim The Mute*-
Alex Cuba*'
Avec le Soleil Sortant
de sa bouche*
Cuddle Magic
Daniel Terrence
Robertson*+
The Prettys*+
Only AVisitor*#+
House and Land#
Saltland*#
Alvvays*#
Big Thief#
Echuta*-
Hermitess*#
Holy Hum*+
Hurray For The Riff
Raff*#
METZ*
Psychic Pollution*
Tops*#
Chelsea Wolfe#
Ex Eye*
Destroyer*-
Japanese Breakfast*
Julia Holter#
Nothingness**
Whitehorse*#
Chad VanGaalen*
Church of Trees*
Civvie*#
Daniel Romano*
Godspeed You! Black
Emperor*
Goldfrapp#
Jom Comyn*
Little Sprout*+#
Lydia Ainsworth*#
Moth Mouth*'
Not You*#
Oneohtrix Point Never
Phono Pony*+#
Pissed Jeans
Sam Tudor*+
The Psychic
Alliance*+
The Real McKenzies*+
Arcade Fire*#
Career Suicide*
CFCF & Jean-Michel
Blais*
Shimmer
Apocaiipstick
Take My Life...Please!
Automatic Hand
Lo Unico Constante
Pas Pire Pop
Ashes/Axis
Soiree
House and Land
A Common Truth
Antisocialites
Capacity
Morning Figure When
Absolutely Calm
All Of My Bodies
The Navigator
Strange Peace
Al Existential Intelligence
Report
Sugar at the Gate
Hiss Spun
Ex Eye
Soft Sounds From
Another Planet
Live at RAK: In The Same
Room
Being
Panther In The Dollhouse
Light Information
Primitive Creatures
Modern Pressure
Luciferian Towers
Silver Eye
Darling of the Afterglow
Mirror Universe
Misty
Good Time OST
Death By Blowfish
Why Love Now
Quotidian Dream
Evil Against Evil
Two Devils Will Talk
Everything Now
Machine Response
Cascades
Drop Medium
Self-Released
Kingfisher Bluez     0
Self-Released
Fontana North       0
Constellation        4
Northern Spy        0
Shake!
Self-Released
Thrill Jockey
Constellation        4
Polyvinyl
Saddle Creek
Agony Klub
Self-Released
Royal Mountain
Captured Tracks     4
Eat Glass
Drip Audio 4
Arbutus
Sargent House       4
Relapse
Merge 4
Dead Oceans
Domino 4
Big Smoke
Six Shooter
Self-Released       0
Self-Released
You've Changed      0
Constellation        4
 1
Mute |
Sweety Pie
Self-Released       0
Arbutus 4
Self-Released       0
Fundog 4
 1
Warp |
Self-Released
Sub Pop
Self-Released
Self-Released       0
Stomp 4
Sony Music ^
Arts & Crafts
J
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs. Artists marked (*) are Canadian, (#) indicates women-produced, and those marked (+) are local. To submit music for air-play on CiTR 101.9FM, please send a physical
copy to the station addressed to Andy Resto, Music Director at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver BC, V6T1Z1. Though we prioritize physical copies, feel free to email download codes for consideration to music@citr.ca.
You can follow up with the Music Director 1-2 weeks after submitting by emailing, or calling 604.822.8733.
 PARQUET
COURTS
YUNG
LEAN
**&
r,s*'
'^
CONCERTS
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
December  6
LEIF VOLLEBEKK
Imperial
December   9
JULIEN BAKER
Rickshaw Theatre
December 8
METZ
The Cobalt
December 8
PATTERSON HOOD
Fox Cabaret
December 12   December 21
ALEX LAHEY   XAVIER OMAR
The Cobalt   Fox Cabaret
January 12
STEVE GUNN & JULIE BYRNE
St. James Hall
January 20
BORNS
Vogue Theatre
December 9
HUNDRED WATERS
Fox Cabaret
January  9
BIG BOI W/ THE COOL KIDS
Commodore Ballroom
January 18
HIPPO CAMPUS
Imperial
January 21
K.FLAY w/ sir sly
Commodore Ballroom
January 27
FIRST AID KIT
Vogue Theatre
January 22
WAFIA
The Cobalt
February 2
DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS
Imperial
February  3
STELOUSE
Biltmore Cabaret
February 9
KIMBRA
Imperial
February 15
PARQUET COURTS & THURSTON MOORE
Imperial
February  17
BRUNO MAJOR
Fox Cabaret
February 26
BULLY
Biltmore Cabaret
January  19
CONVERGE
Rickshaw Theatre
January 24
YUNG LEAN & SAD BOYS
Vogue Theatre
February 2
JESSICA LEA MAYFIELD
The  Cobalt
February  11
MO & CASHMERE CAT     ©
Vogue Theatre
February 16
JAY SOM & JAPANESE BREAKFAST
Biltmore Cabaret
February 21
MARY TIMONY PLAYS HELIUM
The  Cobalt
February 27
ALEX CAMERON
Fox Cabaret
February  2 3
DOROTHY
Biltmore Cabaret
February 27
TUNE-YARDS
Commodore Ballroom
February 28
BETTY WHO
Imperial
Tickets  & more  shows at
timbreconcerts.com

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0364041/manifest

Comment

Related Items