Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Oct 1, 2017

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0356558.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0356558.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0356558-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0356558-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0356558-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0356558-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0356558-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0356558-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0356558-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0356558.ris

Full Text

  00000 0 0
254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
ADVERTISE
III!
5C0RDER
Additional show listings, ti
PRINT
RADIO
WEB SPOTS
BRAIN WAVES
LET S SWEETEN THE DEAL
AND MAKE IT A COMBO
JUST TALK TO
©CITR.CA
I  would like  an
annual  Subscription
(That's $20 for Canada,
$25  for U.S.A.)
11  would like  to  support
Discorder Magazine  with a
lonation! (Hey,   thanks!
(Hob much would you like to donate?)
?OTAL:
md thi.
cash or cheque to:
Discorder Magazine,
LL500-6133 University
Boulevard.
Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z1
WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
id mm ifiBcf of contents
OCT 2017
COVER:
smstamtaism
jreatures
07 - ORA COGAN
You can almost hear crickets.
08 -  HOLY HUM
The intimacy of All  Of My Bodies.
09 -  SAWDUST COLLECTOR
Season 2 is even better.
17 -  GOOD  NIGHT OUT
Does your favourite venue even care?
18 -  VANCITY  KWEENS
Vancouver's drag hype machine.
Columns + flDt&er g>tHff
04 - Hot Head
04 - Shelf Life:
Prism  International
05 - Transmissions
from PLOT:
Twenty-Three Days at Sea
04  -  In Good Humour:
Vancouver International
Improv Festival
10  - Real Live Action
live shows, comedy.
12 - Art Project
Cole Pauls
15 - October Calendar
16 -  Under Review
albums, books, podcasts
20 - On The Air:
Flex  Your Head
21 -  CiTR Program
Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 - September  charts
ADVERTISE: Ad space lor upcoming Issues
can be booked by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advenlslng@cltr.ca. Rales available
upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please contact: edltor.dlscorder@c!tr.ca. To
submit images, contact:
artdlrector.dlscorder@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE: Send In a cheque tor $20
to LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1, Vancouver, BC with your address, and we will mall
each issue ol Discorder right to your doorstep
for one year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your
business, email advertising@citr.ca. We are
always looking lor new friends.
DONATE: We are part ol CITR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you love. To
donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
Ill
j inform Discorder of an upcoming album
elease, art show or significant happening,
ase email all relevant details 4-6 weeks in
dvance to Brit Bachmann, Editor-in-Chief a
editor.dlscorder@citr.ca.
i may also direct comments, complaints e
corrections via ema
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station Manager: Hugo Noriega // Advertising
Coordinator: Sydney Thorne // Discorder Student Executive: Tintin Yang // Editor-in-Chief: Brit
Bachmann // Under Review Guest Editor: Mark Budd // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch
// Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Production Assistant: Jules Galbraith // web Content
Coordinator: Katrina Wong // Accounts Manager: Halla Bertrand // Charts: Andy Resto // Writers:
Braedon Atkinson Pauze, Brit Bachmann, Sasha Balazic, Koby Braidek, Jennifer Brule, Esmee Colbourne,
Aidan Danaher, Franko De Gayo, Clara Dubber, Leigh Empress, Fatemeh Ghayedi, Max Hill, Hailey Mah,
Graham Matheson, Lexi Melish, Samantha Peng, Jeremy Rawkins, Lauren Ray, Luciano Sabados, Indigo
Smart, Esther Sun, Sydney Thorne, Douglas Vandelay, Tintin Yang // Photographers & Illustrators:
Janee Auger, Sara Baar, Javiera Bassi De La Barrera, Colin Brattey, Amy Brereton, Sitji Chou, Olivia Di
Liberto, Erin Flemming, Miroslaw Gwiazda, Alicia Lawrence, Grace Ng, Rory Stobart, Brian Tong, Graeme
Zirk // Proofreaders: Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Brit Bachmann, Mark Budd, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo,
Jonathan Lee, Sydney Thorne, Isabelle Tolhurst, Jasper D. Wrinch
"...isn't ZsWaDJn
CanaOa"
EDITOR'S NOTE
This Editor's Note would perhaps be best as a Hot Head, but I'm feeling
indulgent. As a juror of the Polaris Music Prize; as a music lover; as an
artist, I would like to congratulate Lido Pimienta on winning the 2017
Polaris Music Prize last month with La Papessa. The album is nothing short of
revolutionary. It is a call to action to abolish patriarchy; to recognize the contributions of women and mothers; to honour the original peoples of this land, and to
protect the environment that gives us life. And it's really great to dance to.
Lido Pimienta's win was met with mixed outcries of praise and anger. The
dichotomy can be seen with a simple Internet search. Read the comment sections
on social media and online articles, and you'll see what I mean. Perhaps you don't
like Lido Pimienta's music, and that's okay. If nothing else, let the backlash to her
Polaris win serve as a reminder that racism and sexism are issues in Canada.
I'm exhausted by current affairs conversations that conclude with a statement
like, "Well, at least racism / white supremacy / sexism isn't as bad in Canada."
That's not appropriate! Prejudice and violence based on background, gender,
orientation or belonging is not quantitative. It is not something that can be tracked
based on incident reports. It either exists, or it doesn't. In Canada, it exists, though
people seem quieter about it. And while many of the aforementioned prejudice and
violence has not impacted my life directly, I see hate affect my friends and the
circles around me.
On a personal note, something that I have been working on that I encourage
others to do, is to actively identify structures of oppression in everyday life. If
you haven't considered it before, watch documentaries or read about patriarchy,
supremacy, colonialism and gender politics. Visit Spartacus Books, and join one of
their book clubs. Seek out knowledge. But as strongly as you are willing to learn, be
prepared to 'unlearn.' It is hard but necessary to recognize one's own privilege, and
reject complacency. There are a lot of big monsters in the world, but they cannot be
faced until we, as individuals, are ready to face the monsters that we have allowed
to exist within ourselves and our immediate communities.
With that said, as Naomi Klein stated in support of Lido Pimienta at the Polaris
Gala, "any revolution needs good music."
It is also worth mentioning that some local names made the Polaris Longer List
this year, including Pale Red, So Loki, Tim The Mute, Louise Burns, Gentle Party,
Daniel Terrance Robertson, Anciients, Jay Arner, The Courtneys, Japandroids, Loscil,
Needles//Pins, Spruce Trap and Carly Rae Jepsen. Congratulations!
In this issue of Discorder Magazine, Ora Cogan and Holy Hum both work through
serious topics on their new albums; James Knipe of Vancity Kweens is interviewed
about local drag; Good Night Out shares the hard truth that most mainstream
venues don't care about harm reduction; and PRISM International goes in a new
direction. For these features, reviews, and more, keep reading.
A+
BB
JOIN
Am
TIVE
AT CiTR
101.9FM!
GENDER EMPOWERMENT COLLECTIVE
Babe  Waves
INDIGENOUS COLLECTIVE '
Unceded Airwaves > -
ACCESSIBILITY COLLECTIVE
All Access Pass '       *-.-*!
NEWS COLLECTIVE '-;-.
News. 101 -    ,       '■ . ' *f   '*
DISCOflDER ON AIR COLLECTIVE   ,
Discorder Radio  *      **■-.'
ARTS COLLECTIVE*
The 'Arts,Report *;
SPORTS COLLECTIVE
Thunderbird Eye
■SOiscorder 2017 by the Student Radio Society ol the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorderis published almost monthly by
CiTR. located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, siluated on the traditional unceded territory of the henGemihem speaking Musqueam peoples, CiTR can be heard
al 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office al (604) 8221242: emaiJ CiTR at slationmanager ©citr.ca. or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Email Yolunteer@citr,ca
for more information on how to join! HOTHEAD
AMS WELCOME BACK BBQ
his year's AMS Welcome Back BBQ brought us world class m
►■ acts like Shaun Frank, Joey Bada$$, and Vanic; their performa
es conveyed a kind ot closeness that many seek out in their experience at
university and in life. It was hard not to feel the love when Vanic brounH-"
out Ekali at the end ol his set, telling the world, "this is my best friend
I love this guy." It was the kind of thing that made you want to hug the
person next to you, the kind of fraternity that makes you feel like i
are all one big family.
This kind of fraternity, however, was at odds with another tha	
itself known loud and proud throughout the night, as the MC's of the
event made their way on stage to act as hype men, spurring on the crowd
between performances. The way they chose to do so was both ii
sible in light of their role as hosts to a diverse crowd, r~~
sense of broad community conveyed by the artists on
As MC's, these individuals found themselves in a position of
influence over the prevalent culture of the event. They chose to
time to shout out their friends from frate'""
by drunkenly yelling, "let's get fucked up ,„
Not once was there any mention of looking out for one another, not once
was there an appeal made to enjoy the night responsibly. Instead, these
people chose to use their unique position to promote unsafe and selfish
■* "ley did so while creating a sense of i
.L-iarge.
This behaviour falls on the already exclusive shoulders of the event
itself, which prices its tickets in a way that makes the AMS Welcome Back
>ms to my mind
~'ly put on this
it on
ir friends?
importantly, is this the kind of leadership and community culture
that this academic environment is fostering? I would hope that tf
rience inspires us all to make the <-—
place than it was when we were I
/idence to the contrary.—Gn
.-MOTIONS OF THE LESSER KNOWN
rimarily this is to promote _'
songwriter / actor / writer:
the Lower Mainland and Al'
~ie AMS Welcom
with the way the world of homosapiens functions, yet, any music or art that
sheds any light on this, tends not to get the time of day.
Ultimately, in these dark days, I hope that artists such as myself, who are
willing to explore the more unsettling themes of the world will be given the
opportunity to share and express these difficult topics, including, racism,
sexism, narcissism, euthanasia, modern economic slavery, religious prejudices, etc. That said, please enjoy listening to my music via youtube.com,
~~book.com, soundcloud.com and hitrecord.com, entitled: the mechani-
lod PROJECT. Below are links to my music videos." Enjoy.
Ith the online version of this Hot,
ling throughout
■'c that challenges the audience to tr
o not write fluffy music about ex-girlfriends or boytrie
s or shooting someone to get street cred. My lyrical contains! the atrocities of the homosapien and the systemat-
the mass by the civilized, lawlessness of the few.
years I've watched and listened to musi
1111* M ll »J'Jl*i'1 t 'UBHIIIU P  .
that sells rec
videos associated to my music have been considered explicft. yet, they are
well crafted and written in story format, rather than the non-nonsensical
dribble that has been promoted lately. There is something seriously wrong
Hot Head Is our rant/rave section.
If you have some feedback to submit,
email it to edttor.dlscorder@citr.ca with
"Hot Head" in the subject line.
Anonymous submissions are accepted.
For more information, visit discorder.ca
SHELF LIFE
PRISM INTERNATIONAL
words by Esmee Colbourne // illustrations by Alicia Lawrence
BJ
I  riting can allow you
to inhabit an entirely
different reality and
perspective. It sounds so cliche, but that
helps strengthen our ability to empathise
and give us the experience of empathy, and
I think that empathy is an important part
of radical thinking and living and writing,"
says Kyla Jamie son, Prose Editor at PRISM.
PRISM International is proof that
Canadian writing can be deliberate,
communicative and inclusive. The oldest literary magazine in Canada, PRISM
was originally established in the Creative
Writing department at UBC in the 1950s.
Speaking with Jamieson and the Poetry
Editor, Shazia Hafiz Ramji, it is clear that
PRISM is in for some big changes over
the next year. Although it is common
for the content of literary magazines to
come across as repetitive, or the authors
exclusionary, PRISM demonstrates that it
doesn't have to be. "We have a big tradition
to work with, but it is also great to change
the direction of the issue [s] that we work
with, and challenge those within the confines
of the magazine," explains Hafiz Ramji.
PRISM readers are fortunate to get
variety. An annual changeover of PRISM's
editors means that there are always new
voices in the magazine that encourage
peer-to-peer creativity, and ultimately
balance out a "fresh editorial perspective
and editorial vision," explains Jamieson.
The current masthead is a strong collective: Hafiz Ramji won The 2017 Robert
Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry;
Jamieson has written for Vice, Sad Mag,
Poetry is Dead and Guts; Promotions Editor
Jessica Johns is the winner of Saltern
Magazine's Short Forms contest and was
recently shortlisted for the Glass Buffalo
poetry prize; and Circulation Editor Selina
Boan won Gold for Poetry at the National
Magazine Awards and was recently published in Contemporary Verse 2.
Jamieson and Hafiz Ramji are
both attracted to highly personal
content, as writers with intersec-
tional focuses themselves. "[Literacy] is
radical in that sense, because it just gives
you a sort of friendship and a sort of confidence to continue with the struggles that
you want," says Hafiz Ramji. They are part
of a new generation of Canadian writers
who are changing what CanLit means,
creating space for Indigenous perspectives,
persons of colour, and other people with
experiences of marginalization.
"We really wanted to change the types of
submissions we were receiving," explains
Hafiz Ramji. "We wanted more cross-genre
work, work that was more candid and more
challenging, that was less like the typical
Canadiana stuff that we would see, and
that magazines across Canada [would see].
We just wanted to shake it up a little bit
and bring in the possibility of challenge,"
and that's what they're doing through the
upcoming issue of PRISM.
fl
long with a new cover and layout,
the team has chosen to start
theming submissions. The Liminal
issue coming out this fall will mark the
thematic and artistic transition of the
magazine. 'Liminal' centres marginalised
perspectives and elevates diversity. Jamieson
gives the example of a piece that is set in
the Hong Kong metro system, "capturing
the total darkness that can descend on the
world around you when you are experiencing
depression and alienation."
PRISM is currently accepting submissions for their upcoming issue 'Bad.' Hafiz
Ramji explains they chose the concept
because they wanted to challenge the
status quo of evaluating pieces. "As gatekeepers, as editors of a magazine, we filter
out so much stuff [...] so we just wanted to
challenge that idea and acknowledge our
status as privileged gatekeepers in a
literary industry."
An ambitious team "with a lot of hustle"
(Jamieson), these editors have set out to
accomplish a lot in a limited time frame.
Because Jamieson and Hafiz Ramji are so
invested in highlighting new types of writing through PRISM International, I raised
the question of consistency among future
editorial boards. Both hoped that the
team's current initiatives would continue,
but Jamieson believed that part of the reason they were able to make their changes
now was the absence of continuity. They
can only hope that the future generation of
editors would put the same intentionality
into PRISM.
PRISM International is finished with niceties, and conforming to the conventions of
work that are published in literary journals
and magazines. Jamieson and Hafiz Ramji,
and the rest of the PRISM team are bringing
their shared experiences within the literary
community to activate new discussions
within CanLit. "I feel like the whole reason
that I am here is [because of] writing,"
explains Hafiz Ramji. "Books have really
changed me as a person, and every day I
think about how to be in the world based on
the books that I have read and [the people
who have taught me, like Jeff Derksen and
John Vigna.] [I] look at them for how I want
to be."
Want to submit to PRISM International?
Visit prismmagazine.ca/submit. And keep your
eyes out for the Liminal issue.       r
HOT HEAD // SHELF LIFE: PRISM INTERNATIONAL TRANSMISSION FROM PLOT
TWENTY-THREE DAYS AT SEA, CHAPTER 2
transcription by Fatemeh Ghayedi //   illustrations by Graeme Zirk
transmission from PLOT is a new monthly column related to CiTR and Discorder's satellite location at Access Gallery, 222 East
Georgia Street. Our residency continues until the beginning of February, during which time we will be creating and facilitating
programming around artists, organizations and initiatives based in the immediate neighbourhoods of Chinatown and the
Downtown Easrside.
For tin's first column, we have transcribed a discussion between Access Gallery's Projects Coordinator Catherine de Montreuil,
and two artists presenting in their current exhibition, Twenty-Three Days at Sea, Chapter 2: Rebecca Moss and Sikarnt
Skooiisariyaporn. Both participated in the Twenty-Three Days at Sea Residency, which saw artists travel on cargo ships from
Vancouver to Shanghai.
The following conversation is an excerpt that has been edited for clarity. The full audio will be broadcast on CiTR wi.gFM and
citr.ca in October.
CATHERINE DE MONTREUIL: For those who didn't
hear about this last year, Rebecca was aboard the Hanjin
Geneva last August and September, during which time
Hanjin shipping corporation went bankrupt. Hundreds of
ships were at sea at that time full of commodity goods,
and as a result of the bankruptcy, the ships were not
permitted to berth at any ports. Rebecca and the crew of
Hanjin Geneva were stuck at sea for nearly three additional weeks while Hanjin sorted out their business.
What role do you feel you had as a passenger and as an
artist, specifically, in the observation of this system [of
commodity transport] that often remains invisible to a
majority of people?
REBECCA MOSS: I'm not that well versed in economics,
so the way that I tell my story will be from the perspective
of an artist, and hopefully can make these experiences in
this strange world more accessible for people. But also in
my position on the boat - obviously, I was in a position of
privilege - I wasn't worried about job security whereas,
the captain and the crew were understandably very concerned. They didn't want to be too vocal [or] too critical in
the industry. Being an artist, you're very free to express
opinions on these things.
CDM: [This is] actually a question that I can direct to
Sikarnt as well. I'm wondering if this experience has left
you with any new questions about your role as an artist?
In this residency, you're there as this really direct observer
to these systems of global capital, did you feel that it has
affected your practice at this point?
SIKARNT SKOOLISARIYAPORN: Well, first of all, I
always feel I'm privileged as an artist, always educated
from high school, and [being able to talk] about these kind
of issues in the world that I'm actually not facing [in the
same way] other people are. Being on the ship kind of
took it to another level, in a way, because I was with these
people that I would never have had a chance to know or
be in contact with. You keep seeing each other everyday
for almost a month, and you have to start getting familiar
with each other. So, it's a really new experience and a new
way of relating [to] people.
CDM: What I've noticed in your work that I've seen so
far, Sikarnt, you've taken to observing some of the darker
qualities of the system. In the logbook you've produced
for us, you talk about the grotesque life of goods under
global trade. You describe the sea as a cemetery as well,
so there's definitely some dark undertones there. I was
wondering if you could elaborate on that?
SS: Well, I guess the thing that really came to me when
I was on the ship was mainly alienation in many, many
ways. [I was] alienated from land, from time, from the
connection between society. The sense that is made on
land doesn't make sense on a ship. We have our own
clock, our own time, which felt like only us synchronized
between each other and not the land. Also, alienation in
a sense of the life of a seaman that facilitates this global
capitalism, but is not really visible in the system whatsoever. I made the connection between these two, between
[alienation] in space and time, and alienated labor in
global capitalism.
The thing about containers that's really fascinating is
that they're very generic. Even the person who's super
super close to it, has touched it, whatever, wouldn't really
have an idea of what's inside. It could be human, it could
be trash, anything. As an artist, that's kind of exciting in
away.
CDM: Rebecca, you also talk about the life of commodity
objects and these containers. When the Hanjin Geneva was
at anchor, it seems that the goods had began to [expire].
RM: I think one thing that really struck me the longer
that I was on the ship was that these anonymous containers began to feel a lot less anonymous, and the
materials inside the containers began to exceed the
boundaries of this anonymity and this mysteriousness.
Chickpeas fell out and landed all over the deck. There
were animal skins, and all of this brown seepage started
trickling down the walls, all over the upper deck, and it
was a smell that would really catch in your throat. I was
thinking a lot about the materiality of the ship, about
rust and the general filthiness of it and how old it felt,
the physicality of the ship. I was really interested in this
idea of this rich materiality as resistance towards this
streamlined shipping industry, and that felt like a really
interesting philosophical realization for myself with my
work.
CDM: Totally. I find myself applying that to thinking
about human bodies as being that resistance. That capitalism is meant to be so streamlined, but in the end, we
are limited by the fact that we have physical bodies that
wear down and there's a certain limit. I often think about
machines as having such a longer life, but in the end, they
also start to wear down and fall apart and rust.
Twenty-Three Days at Sea, Chapter 2: Michael
Drebert, Lili Huston-Herterich, Rebecca Moss, Sikarnt
Skoolisariyaporn is on display at Access Gallery until October
28. More information at accessgallery.ca
Access Gallery gratefully acknowledges the support of the BC
Government Collaborative Spaces Program and Measured Architecture for
making PLOT possible. We also acknowledge the ongoing support of The
Canada Council for the Arts, the Province o/BC, the BC Arts Council and BC
Gaming Commission, the City 0/Vancouver, and our committed donors,
members, and volunteers.
TRANSMISSION FROM PLOT: TWENTY-THREE DAYS AT SEA, CHAPTER 2 IN GOOD HUMOUR
VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL IMPROV FESTIVAL
words by Jennifer Brule  //   illustrations  by Grace  Ng
■^B^^B  hat's better than one night
I  of an improvised comedy
^m^m0w  experience? Four nights
of improvised comedy experience. The
Vancouver International Improv Festival
(V1IF), in its nineteenth year, takes place
on Granville Island from October 11-14.
Founded by Alistair Cook, acting festival
director, this year is looking to be the best
one yet.
What exactly is improv, you ask? Is it
like the T.V. show, Whose Line Is it Anyway?
"That is a great comparison," says Cook.
Improv, or improvisation, is exactly how
it sounds. It is live theatre where the plot
and the characters are made up in the
moment. Some forms of improv are exactly
like Whose Line Is It Anyway?, where the
improvisors will take suggestions from
the crowd or draw on current events and
hot topics to create a hilarious skit. These
forms are known as long and short. Long
form improvisation is when the improvi-
sors take one suggestion from the audience
and create a 30-minute show where the
scenes, characters and plot are seamlessly
put together. The difference in short form
improv is that the scenes are often
unrelated to one another. Both forms are
a mix of drama and comedy, and others
are just drama. Essentially, it is theatre
without the script. For VIIF, you can expect
to see professional performances that
are highly entertaining, and all comedy.
Expect a resemblance to a live, on-the-
spot Saturday Night Live episode.
Cook's improv experience started in high
school in 1989, and he has been at it ever
since. Working at the Havana Theatre over
the past 22 years, he manages to coordinate the festival in his spare time. Improv
groups must submit to be a part of the
festival, which encourages competitive
submissions from around the world. Cook's
role as acting director of VIIF is to curate
a balance of performances. With over 4.0
shows during the festival, ranging from
local to international performers, you can
expect to see a wide range of forms. The
festival will include everything from a
puppet show (Jeff Dunham Style) to musical
improv, to a fully improvised Ted Talk
which was named Best of the Fest in 2015.
There is also a Twilight Zone improv group.
Since the beginning of the VIIF, it
has grown from an ensemble of 15
to a network of people hosting 42
different groups, and two festival ensembles comprising 30 improvisors. Over the
past 10 years, many top-name comedians
and improvisors have showcased their
talents, including SNL star Sasheer Zamata.
At this festival, you will definitely see the
emerging and upcoming talent that will
make it big.
Jf you have ever seen improv, but
did not enjoy the performance,
Alistair Cook chuckles and explains
"You don't go watch a Batman action
movie not enjoy the film, and vow never to
watch another action movie." Cook will tell
you that the beauty of improv is that it's
never the same show twice. The space, the
audience, and the improv prompts keep
the content fresh. This is where improv
differs from stand-up comedy. Stand-up
comics have rehearsed jokes, but make it
look like as though they are made up on
the spot. Many comedians will do improv
to strengthen their sets.
Learning improv is a great tool for
developing confidence and team collaboration. Much can be said about how improv
aligns with mindfulness, as you must be
present and aware to your surroundings
to allow a quick reaction. VIIF will host
workshops with some of Canada's best
instructors, taking place on October 14
and 15. The workshops are designed to
be accessible, and the cost is kept at an
affordable $40.
"The want to laugh is there", says Cook.
This festival is proof of the exploding
interest in the comedic genre across
Vancouver. There is talent coming from
all over the world which inspires locals to
work harder and perform more. It is an
extremely fun festival and if there is one
thing Cook is excited about, it is to get the
festival started and to hear the laughter.
Happy laughing everyone!
For more questions about the festival, visit
vancouverimprovfest.com or check out the Facebook
page. You can also tweet @VanImprovFest.
Cinematheque
3>amn §m$
J
October 27-31
David Lynch's
Ingmar Bergman':
Herk Harvey's
Xost >Mfll)itwy • >>our of t()e l&otf • Corniwtf of ^ouf-
Itamn 5cimjf
IStattlJ   tTiies&cuj (October
www.theCinematheque.ca | 1131 Howe Street | 604.688.8202 | Straight
IN GOOD HUMOUR: VANCOUVER INTERNATONAL IMPROV FESTIVAL HEARING CRICKETS
WORDS BY TINTIN YANG
PHOTO BY WIROSLAW GWIAZDA
ILLUSTRATIONS BY JANEE AUGER
DJ
hen I listen to Ora Cogan's upcoming
album Crickets, a persistent wall
of lush sound pushes hard against
me. The heavy, dramatic synths accompany her
wistful voice, all behind sweet strings that serve
as rich ornamentation and cutting percussion.
Ora's music is effortlessly extravagant. This is
not music made for passive listening, rather, it
is something that needs to be experienced. Ora
marks her shift from traditional folk to psych-
folk with The Quarry (2010), but this evolution has
never been more apparent than through the heavy,
experimental sound of Crickets. When I speak to
Ora on the phone, she's in Montreal. After weeks
of collaborating with other musicians and playing
a set at POP Montreal, Ora definitely knows how to
network in the name of music.
Given Ora's lengthy experience as a singer-songwriter, a change in sound is not only
welcome, but logical and exciting. "It's nice to feel uninhibited to try all sorts of stuff. I
try to focus mostly on psych-folk, but on one end it can go towards pretty grim, land-
scapey-experimental music, and on the other side it's pop," explains Ora. "Some people
see what I do as really straight-up folk music that's easy listening, and others are like,
'Whoa, this is way too intense.' Everyone has their own interpretation, and sometimes
it'll feel like either of those things to me, too."
Crickets was inspired by a love of the natural world, and a sense of urgency that Ora
felt to create music that responds to the current environmental and political climate.
As far as how physical space conflated with Ora's desire to create meaningful music,
Ora allowed the atmosphere of her location to converge with her own internal conflicts.
"There was the ethos of wanting to create a vindicating sonic space that felt good, and
then there were the actual landscapes." Ora continues, "I was in Tla-o-qui-aht territory
(Tofino) and it was during the stormy season, so there were big, big waves, and everything was dark and stormy and quite high-drama." The highly dramatic landscape is
reflected in the noisy, synth sounds, the droning and thudding guitar that propel forward
tracks like "The Wind in the Waves."
To juxtapose the ocean, Ora also draws inspiration from the desert landscape and
biodiversity of New Mexico. "There were these psychedelic grasshoppers with intricate
patterns on their back and belly, and the sound of crickets and cicadas [...] and being out
in the desert, it's the opposite of being in the Northwest when everything can be really
dark, moody, grand, lush and moist. So that arid, dry landscape and all these bright,
washed-out pastel colours [are things that] I mediate on even when I'm [performing.]"
When speaking about the songwriting process, Ora dwells mainly on the honest
connection and understanding of herself in all of the different environments she finds
herself in. "If it could be boiled down to something, it would be slowing down, being
in the desertscape, and getting space away from other human beings... enough to be in
touch with my own rhythm and connection to life."
Some songs on Crickets are based in more literal experiences. '"The Light' was very
much about being gaslighted as a female artist, and 'Wind in the Waves' was directed
towards the resource extraction industry," explains Ora, who directed a documentary
investigating the Northern Gateway Pipeline and the environmental atrocities committed with the approval of the Canadian government. It is called No Tankers Territory,
and features conversations with Heiltsuk women. "It's really political, but it's coming
from a different place than overtly telling anyone what to do. It's more introspective
and a healing process. I feel like the most political thing I can do is to help create safe,
respectful and empowering spaces."
Speaking to the importance of creating music, Ora reflects on her experience as an
artist who has been taking risks in the music industry for over a decade. Music
to her seems more like a meditation on creating something sincere and arresting.
"At this point, music is just in me, I got really fed up and disheartened for a while [...] I
tried to leave music for a couple of years, but I didn't realize what music was until I left
it. I guess over the years, [music] has become so much of my way to communicate with
people, work stuff out by myself, and also perhaps the most beautiful thing that I know
how to do. It's the most beautiful and meaningful thing I can think of, to share with
other human beings. And it's also just endlessly challenging and inspiring. It's such an
incredible way to connect with people. It's also a way to participate in culture by creating
spaces that are cathartic."
After speaking with Ora on the phone, I thank her for her honesty. Speaking to such
an experienced artist who in many ways is still figuring out how to navigate the world is
both humbling and inspiring.
Crickets, Ora Cogan's upcoming album will be
released on Novembers. There will be an album
release show at Red Gate Revue on November 2,
with LeifHall opening.
ORA COGAN Hum
words by Max Hill //photo by Javiera Bassi de la Barrera// illustration by Brian Tong
"It's this inner conflict that I have where
I want to share this, but also, I would never
share this with anyone."
J've known Andrew Lee for years, but as I take the
train to his studio in an empty industrial park near
Main Street station, I realise we haven't had a real
conversation since I last interviewed him for Discorder in
2015. Andrew is a friend, but we've never been close — I
get nervous around people I admire, and Andrew has long
been one of my favourite musicians, first with his band,
In Medias Res and now with his solo project Holy Hum. I
go to meet him, looking forward not only to learning more
about his music, but also to learning more about him, and
hopefully making a better friend in the process.
We're meeting to discuss the upcoming release of
Andrew's debut record, All of My Bodies. It's the culmination of all of his work as Holy Hum so far, a collection of
songs that examine the death of his father — the collapse
and its aftermath in slow motion. It begins at his father's
bedside, where Andrew is tasked with telling him he's
going to die. From there, the songs deal with everything
from his father's failed marriage to the drinking ceremony
performed at his burial. It should be a difficult listen, but it
isn't. It's a warm bath of ambience and swooning post-
rock that channels everything from Tim Hecker to Vaughan
Williams. It surges with kinetic energy and aural inventiveness. It is, quite simply, one of the best records of the year.
We begin by talking about his reticence to release the
album, given how personal it is and how much attention it
might gain him. "It's this inner conflict that I have where
I want to share this, but also, I would never share this with
anyone," Andrew says. He tells me that part of him didn't
want to release the record at all, saying that he felt he had
accomplished what he wanted to do without sharing his
work with the world. But he says that the release of other
records about death — such as Mount Eerie's A Crow Looked
at Me and Sufjan Stevens' Carrie & Lowell — inspired him to
"add [his] story to the narrative."
HOLY HUM
Andrew tells me that he thinks of his music as the "main
character," considering his lyrics as playing a supporting
role. He invites the listener to "appreciate the sounds,
appreciate the way that this album sounds and makes
you feel and hopefully that tells the story. If you want to
be extra depressed read the lyrics," he says. "The sounds
themselves are just as personal to me as what I'm saying."
^(^^  hen I ask about his father, Andrew is open
I  and honest, telling me about his successes
■^B^^^  and shortcomings. Joseph Lee was a restaurant owner and a choir director who learned Italian to
sing opera. He moved from Choeongju, South Korea to
Winnipeg, Manitoba because it was in "the middle" of
North America. Lee rarely showed affection with his children, but commanded a room at parties, and was stubborn
when it came to helping others. "Even if it was a bad idea
or he had heard 'no' a million times, he would still kind of
go for it," Andrew says. He wishes he and his father had
been closer while his father was alive, and the album's
titular track addresses this regret: "I held you close / But I
was never close to you."
Andrew still feels grief over his father's passing every
day. "I don't think that the pain or the anguish or the
trauma is any different, I just think that you as a person
are different," he says. His hope is that the album helps
him to work through that experience in a constructive
way. "I have things deep down in my psyche that I need
to deal with," he says. "I don't know if this album is that,
but I definitely went to square one."
Looking forward, Andrew is waiting on his permanent
residency, informally know as a green card, so he can
move to New York City to be with his wife, Jacqueline,
who is studying at NYU. "Being apart from the person that
you love is not worth it," he says. "I'm lucky that I have
this album coming out and that's distracting me, but if my
green card came through, I would be like, 'see you later!'"
He's also looking forward to seeing how the change of
scenery will influence Holy Hum. "There's so many people
there, that I feel more comfortable because I have more
anonymity," he says. "That kind of gives me the feeling
that I can be what I want to be."
When I point out that releasing an album about the
death of his father is about the least anonymous thing you
can do, Andrew laughs at the contradiction. "I'm such a
private person, but at the same time I've created a work
that's so deeply personal and I'm going to be making it
public," he says. "I'm super proud of it, but at the same
time I hope that no one listens to it."
Eventually, I stop trying to steer the conversation back
towards his music, and I learn more about Andrew outside
of his Holy Hum project — his love for Nirvana's In Utero,
how he and Jacqueline met, how the housing crisis in
Vancouver influenced his decision to move to the United
States. There are half-eaten bags of chips on the ground
and we share room-temperature beers while Andrew eats
instant noodles. As the evening wanes, I feel the sense of
deep calm that only a conversation with a good friend can
provide. I turn my recorder off and listen.
All Of My Bodies will be released October 6. Visit
holyhum.com for more. SAWDUST
COLLECTOR
THE DUST HAS SETTLED
words by Leigh Empress
photos by Erin Flemming
illustration by Amy Brereton
Type "Sawdust Collector" into an image search
engine, and you'll see a variety of industrial and
D.I.Y. vacuums that suck up airborne particles in
woodshops. Scroll down a page, and you may see some
cryptic text on a photograph or collage. Those images,
those weird ones, are event posters.
If you've been around a woodshop sawdust collector
and have also been to a Sawdust Collector event, you may
grapple to find parallels. Curated by Barbara Adler, James
Meger and Cole Schmidt, Sawdust Collector is a weekly
event series that sees music, theatre, dance and other disciplines sharing a spotlight in the intimate setting of Gold
Saucer Studio. There is a certain vibe to Sawdust Collector
events that isn't easily summed up, though many of the
performers come from backgrounds in experimental,
improvised or new music and dance.
...You get the idea.
The three began organizing Sawdust Collector in 2016,
following years of performing in Vancouver's music scene.
The simplest explanation for the series is that Barbara,
James and Cole wanted to do their own thing on their own
terms. Cole explains, "I think this was maybe a way to stop
asking permission from people who own these venues, [...]
and being able to fully curate what we wanted to."
A lot of the timing had to do with Gold Saucer, itself.
"I heard about this space opening up and the collective
needing more people, and I pitched it to James and Cole
thinking, 'wouldn't it be cool if we started performing
regularly in this space, and we can form a series around
us performing regularly, and just do whatever we want,'"
expresses Barbara, "and of course, what has developed is
that we stopped performing almost entirely, and have just
gotten into [...] trying to build an audience around it."
Although Sawdust Collector was intentionally created
around Barbara, James and Cole — who perform music
individually and collaboratively — the series now features other local and touring artists. Speaking to this
shift, Barbara describes it as "part of maturing something
that you have started on. [...] It is better to be cast by
someone else, than to be constantly writing for yourself."
James adds, "Lots of nice connections have been made
that wouldn't have been made if we had just been playing
every week."
The emphasis of Sawdust Collector is to develop
a sense of shared experience between the organizers, the artists and the audience. Barbara recalls
feedback from a recent performer: "I think what Aram
Bajakian said at the New Works show is something worth
putting out there; he felt that it was a safe space where
he could [...] let himself be creative. And that's not just
us, that's the kind of audience that has been attracted to
[Sawdust Collector] — that openness to be curious, and
allow themselves to be sucked in."
Expanding on this concept of creative space, James
explains, "A few people have expressed to me [...] that
they really liked being put in a context where they were
sharing a bill with music that they might not otherwise
ever share a bill with. [...] We really put care into putting
those bills together, and thinking about what interesting
combinations are, and some different ways of presenting
things we have maybe seen before."
A reputation for thoughtful, intentional programming has paid off. "Some people say they just come here
without even checking what's going on. That's flattering,"
says Cole.
September 2017 marked "Season 2" of Sawdust
Collector, borrowing terminology popularized by
serial television and podcasts. What makes Season
2 different?
"I think for me, I'm just trying to be better at all the
things we were figuring out last year," says Barbara.
"Some of the things I want to be better at is reaching out
to people we don't know yet, and trying to look at who is
in the room in terms of musical or artistic genres, but also
in terms of gender and cultural background, [...] thinking
about what kind of space we are making available."
Cole chimes in, "I think we have a good balance right
now, because we also balance the programming [between
ourselves]. We're always looking out for things. [...] I feel
like that's getting more dialed, and we're off to a pretty
good start."
Sawdust Collector is fortunate that it doesn't face a lot
of obstacles that other Vancouver event series do, but it
is also limited in its ability to expand. Barbara explains,
"I guess as long as we're okay with [the events] being
this size, and being this sort of secret that people in 'the
know' find out about, [...] and as long as we're not having
any guaranteed sources of money, then there are no roadblocks. When we start thinking about being bigger, there
are a lot of roadblocks."
Their position taps into an issue facing similar-scale
events across the city — with a shortage of affordable
and accessible, medium-sized venues for alternative and
experimental programming, there is very little room for
audience growth. Other events that the organizers suggest
checking out include Merge, hosted in a building at the
corner of Powell Street and Clark Drive, Lights Out at
China Cloud, "and everything at China Cloud," says Cole.
"I think it's really exciting that artists are becoming
producers of events," exclaims Barbara. "I have noticed
that in our peer group, a lot of people are getting more
interested in D.I.Y. and making shit happen. I think it
would be cool if we started talking to each other more. If
people think what we're doing here at Sawdust Collector is
interesting, or what Colin [Cowan] and Dan [Gaucher] are
doing at China Cloud is interesting, let's have a conversation about how we can work together. [...] It's great to
imagine people working together instead of competing
against each other for the same sliver."
Sawdust Collector. Wood slivers. There's a great closing
line in there somewhere.
Sawdust Collector is a series hosted weekly on Tuesdays
at Gold Saucer Studio in the Dominion Bui/ding, admission is
pay-what-you-can. For more information, and to see upcoming
events, visit their Facebook page, where you can also sign up for
a weekly newsletter.
SAWDUST COLLECTOR Heal tint
fiction
SEPTEMBER 2017
SLIDE SHOW 3: A NIGHT OF IMPROVISED
POWERPOINT COMEDY
SEPTEMBER 8 / LITTLE MOUNTAIN GALLERY
Slide Show 3: A Night of Improvised PowerPoint Comedy sold out
quickly — and for good reason. In my experience, improv shows are
a hit or miss and this one hit the mark. Produced and hosted by Stacey
McLachlan and Max Mitchell, in association with Blind Tiger Comedy, the
show featured six talented improvisers — Tom Hill, Nima Gholamipour, Ese
Atawo, Jenny Rube, Denea Campbell and Ryan D. Anderson.
PowerPoint slides, featuring questionable WordArt, were provided to each
of the improvisers, forcing them to act out a coherent storyline to match the
surprises appearing on the slideshow
The first thing that struck me arriving at the show was the cozy hole-in-
the-wall atmosphere of Little Mountain Gallery. To its advantage, it is a small
establishment. The intimacy of the space gave me the impression that I was
being let into an exclusive event.
As I stood by the entrance waiting to be let in, I could hear upbeat music,
laughing and excited chattering coming from inside. Once in, I was greeted
warmly by McLachlin, the host of the show, as I settled into my seat.
McLachlin really was the star of the show. Her lighthearted humour and
ability to seamlessly transition from in-charge to quick-witted was admirable.
She also had a knack for improvising silly questions to ask the show's
performers: "If you could have an extra thumb anywhere, where would you
put it?'
"I'd put it near my butthole," delivered Gholamipour without hesitation.
And that was only the beginning of the night.
All six of the improvisers left the house howling with laughter. They all
had the ability to make jokes at their own expenses, using awkward pauses
to their advantages and weaving their unexpected WordArt images into their
performances. You could tell this wasn't their first, or even twentieth, rodeo;
they were well-seasoned actors who were adaptable to audience interruption and dead ends in humour. They reeled in their audience and made us
believe in their stories.
At one point, Campbell, who was pretending to host a film festival, made
me forget I was watching an improv show, and not the breakdown of an insecure, kind of delusional, film festival producer.
The location was cozy, the people were friendly, but more importantly, the
performances were hysterical. I never expected WordArt, PowerPoint and
improv to make such a weirdly hilarious combination. But that's the beauty of
improv: you can make anything funny with a little imagination.
—Samantha Peng
PEACH PIT / DEAD SOFT / SCHWEY /
PLANETS / CLUB SOFA
SEPTEMBER 9 / WALDORF PARKING LOT
I t was a truly Vancouver variety pack at Peach Pit's Being So Normal
•^F album release show. The carefully assorted line-up offered fun for the
whole family in the Waldorf Hotel's parking lot, starting with club sofa, followed by On Planets, Schwey and Dead Soft. The night was young, just like
the early-bird crowd, who stood eagerly waiting to kick off the last weekend
of the summer with a show that would not disappoint.
club sofa opened with a balmy beach-rock vibe. Their warm and emotionally infused vocals spoke sweet truths over the high-intensity punk
instrumentals. While the crowd was not yet at its maximum, the energy they
projected from the set was welcomed by the punctual audience, who were
caught in the grips of club sofa's alluring sound.
On Planets was the most surprising set of the night. The gloomy electronic act provided those listening with an intricate collection of both remixed and
self-written tracks, complete with live vocals and electric violin. Playing to a
crowd that seemed to frequent a more indie rock scene, On Planet's dynamic sound gave them a chance to immerse themselves in something outside
of their norm.
In the short intermission between On Planets and Schwey's sets, the
cool evening sky rolled in along with a long line of eager fans ready to get
moving. Schwey, as electric as usual, seemed to perform with a touch more
euphoria — it may have to do with their recent signing to 604 Records. The
conversational energy that existed between the band and their audience was
beyond words and charged by contemporary funk flare.
The last opener was Dead Soft, a Vancouver classic. In many ways,
Dead Soft helped pave the way for the grunge rock scene that now extends
into the diverse and thriving community that exists today. Their 90s punk
infused sound brought in a crowd of committed and enthusiastic fans, who
conformed to the band's undeniable momentum. Each member showed a
deep commitment to their set, as their rapid and entrancing nature provided
an inherent pulse.
By the time Peach Pit had started setting up, the already large crowd had
somehow expanded and felt more intimate. Donning their familiar Scooby-
Doo-esque outfits and their awkward-cool demeanor, Peach Pit jumped into
a high school heartbreak themed set. The band's methodical approach to
promotion proved to be a success, as the ocean of loyal fans swayed along
to the flowery indie-pop sound, devotedly mouthing every lyric as if it were
their own. Peach Pit's performance was uniform to their newly released
album, reminding listeners of the hard work they've put in to create such a
catchy and consistent sound, while also providing a peachy-keen experience
for the sea of fans that filled the parking lot. —Lexi Melish
THE HERO SHOW: SHERO SHOW 2
SEPTEMBER 14 / THE CHINA CLOUD
Bn existential amoeba, a voodoo infomercial and a healthy dose
of necrophilia made their appearance in SHERO SHOW 2, an all
female sketch comedy revue in Vancouver's cosiest live comedy venue, the
China Cloud.
Walking up Main Street, it's possible to
miss its single doorway, with no smokers milling about. Up the stairs and you're
greeted by a quaint ticket desk in venue
that feels more like a cosy three bedroom
apartment than a comedy club.
As people found places to sit, the
sounds of late '90s R&B anthems blasted
over the house speakers. Before long,
the host of the evening, Ember Konopaki
graced the stage, singing along as the
music ended and setting a bar for the
energy of the night's performance. I'm not
sure if it was just the intimacy of the venue
or Konopaki's effortless charm that broke
the separation between audience and
performer, but it made the show feel like
a talent show among friends rather than a
showcase.
First up was Maddy Rafter, portraying "Martha McCooter," a motivational
speaker that wouldn't be out of place in a
Kate McKinnon sketch. Short and sweet, this performance left the audience
warmed up and well fed with (literally) a bag of Doritos.
Next was the dolphin-obsessed "Ashley B." played by Sarah Charrouf,
who in order to gain an edge over the other contestants on The Bachelor,
spent the entire season wearing a narwhal costume. Though only a
short sketch, Charrouf was able to convey a solid, yet disturbing comedic
narrative.
Carta Mah won the audience over in the next sketch with her portrayal of
a single-celled organism. Morphing seamlessly from the clinical "Ingrid E.
Bartman," a molecular biologist to the adorable amoeba. Mah gave viewers
an even mix of belly laughs and existential dread.
In an act that culminated in Ember Konopaki licking a pickled chicken's
foot, Ese Atawo portrayed "Madame Kungo," a voodoo witch doctor and info
mercial host. Though a premise at risk of becoming corny, Atawo's characterisation kept the audience laughing.
Elissa C. gave us a Hollywood pitch session as superstar Charlize
Theron (sans Afrikaans accent). Though Elissa C. performed well, the prem
ise of the act started strong but lost its teeth toward the end.
Far and away my favourite sketch of the night was "Lunch Sessions with
Loretta" by Candy R. Roberts. The character, reminiscent of Dana Carvey
in his heydey, won over the audience with witty crowd-work and light prop
comedy — definitely one to look out for.
Next was "Patricia Wrangler," a park ranger portrayed by Amy Shostack.
whose knowledge of bears could rival Dwight K. Schrute. In a hilariously
Canadian display, Patricia Wrangler gave varied mnemonic devices and poems
on camping in the B.C. wilderness.
In the final act of the night, Shirley Gnome gave a karaoke rendition of
"It's Raining Men." Showing off her broad range of talents, Gnome brought
the audience from laughter to shock as the performance culminated in a
heartwarming or perhaps stomach turning romance with the corpse of an
ex-boyfriend.
It was a night of great comedy and great laughs, and I can't wait for the
next one. I would definitely recommend checking out the 10 year anniversary of the HERO SHOW this October. —Douglas Vandelay
TENNYSON /1M U R
SEPTEMBER 18 / FOX CABARET
J t's not often that you get to be among the first to hear a whole score of
brand new tracks being performed to the public for the very first time.
It's a leveling experience where the performers get a taste of the audience's
experience and vice versa — you're all hearing these songs being played
live for the first time. On Monday, September 18, Edmonton jazz-electronica
duo Tennyson shared that experience with Vancouver.
The night's entertainment, hosted at the Fox Cabaret, began with East
Vancouver's very own I M U R. Pronounced "I am you are," this group has
existed in it's current state for just over a year, with violinist / bassist Amine
Bouzaher having played his first show with the group little over one year ago
at none other than the Fox Cabaret. The trio's humour shined through in
their performance with songs like "Fighting, Fucking, Loving" bringing forth a
knowing smile from lead singer Jenny Lea.
I had the pleasure of sitting next to guitarist Mikey J Blige's parents
during the performance. "Sorry, proud father moment," his dad leaned over
to say to me after hollering applause towards his son following a technical guitar solo. With songs that would find their place in a Bond film just as
naturally as they fit into the '90s R&B tradition, this three-piece make for a
seriously smooth performance.
The brother-sister duo Luke Tennyson and Tess Pretty, known collectively as Tennyson, hit the stage with an air of anticipation. Coming off of a
period of relatively few performances, they had a brand new set list full of
songs from their soon-to-be released EP, Uh Oh!, one of which they had
only played together for the first time that very same day. "That was a rush,"
Tess said from behind the drums after successfully completing the song, just
before leaning over to give her older brother a high-five.
It still beggars belief that a pair so young can bring such rhythmic technicality, originality and full-body performance to the stage. The sound design,
from the unconventional percussion to the high-pitched joyful synth, speaks
to a creativity that knows few bounds or limitations. I never would have
thought you could get people dancing to the sound of a digital alarm clock
or the sound a car makes when the door is open with the keys still in the
ignition. They played "Smother" and "Slippers," favourites from their previous releases, before the pair closed things off with yet another never-before-heard song.
Tennyson showed a lot of maturity as performers and accomplished a
level of showmanship that many fail to attain throughout their entire careers
— they weren't afraid to invite people into their experience. This openness,
alongside their obvious expertise as musicians, made it clear that these two
have a lot of time and space to grow to become highly influential artists. It's
hard not to be proud of them. —Graham Matheson
DOWNTOWN BOYS/LIE/TOUGH
CUSTOMER
SEPTEMBER 19 / FOX CABARET
J hadn't spent time with two old friends of mine in months — we got
caught up drinking a ten-dollar bottle of wine and laughing it up like
a bunch of wild women before realizing we were late for Tough Customer's
REAL LIVE ACTION set. We hustled as swiftly as possible to the show.
Sadly, we missed their set. I asked a few people who were lucky enough
to catch their cheeky, energetic act (that I have seen from past shows) and
all could agree it was iun" or "cool" or "good. Sucks you missed it."
It had been too long since seeing a show at the Fox, a real dazzling
venue that makes me feel like I have been transported to the '80s (although
I wouldn't have wanted to be there at that time — yikesl). Shortly after we
arrived, Lie took the stage and everybody was ready to pay close attention.
All of their serious faces were illuminated in the dark red lighting as they
started to play and didn't really stop. Their set was pulsing and vigorous as
they unapologetically slayed one song after the next. The crowd could not
help but gravitate towards the stage, close but not moving very much, paralyzed by Lie's powerful presence.
Downtown Boys arrived on stage and they immediately jumped into a
wild, upbeat set that got everybody feeling jazzed — especially with that
saxophone! I know it's a cliche comparison but it reminded me of my tender
teenage years when I was so stoked on X-Ray Spex — the excitement had
not fizzled.
Amidst the flurry of spritely and sassy music, lead singer Victoria Ruiz
prefaced each song in detail, addressing issues that every person in the
audience has likely experienced to some degree. She asked "Who taught
you to hate yourself?" and it really stuck with me, especially because social
anxiety can be very much heightened in a show setting. For a moment, it
broke down a wall, almost cleared the air. Right after, they played a song by
the same name: "The Wall," in which she talked about the white supremacy within our Western culture in regards to immigration, specifically Mexican
immigration.
Ruiz sang many songs in Spanish and although I didn't know what she
was saying, her passion was evident. She spoke about reclaiming space
and not being afraid to be exactly who you are. To be honest, I shed a tear
listening to what she had to say, but as soon as the band started up again,
I danced around with my friends like the uninhibited rascals we are. That
contrast in itself summarizes the experience I had while watching Downtown
Boys. — Lauren Ray
SHEER MAG / WOOLWORM / BB
SEPTEMBER 25 / RICKSHAW THEATRE
TZ (Z put on an electric show. Their matching leopard print unitards
■^fcP ^BF were as coordinated as the stage antics sprinkled throughout their set. Bella, BB's singer / guitarist, writhed on the ground, ripping
into a guitar solo, while bassist Meg (formerly of Wishkicker) stood directly
over her. At another point, Bella and Meg started running around in circles
around each other, before ending one of their songs with simultaneous high
kicks that created an X between the two rockers, right as the final note hit.
Their awesome stage presence parallels the power of their rowdy anthems.
Between songs, Meg confessed, "We know you came for Woolworm and
Sheer Mag because we did too!"
Woolworm had just returned from a cross-Canada tour promoting the
release of their new album, Deserve to Die, on Mint Records. I'd been listening to the album since I interviewed singer Giles Roy for last month's issue
of Discorder, and it was a thrill getting to see those songs played live. "We
wrote this song earlier today and we'd like to play it for you," Giles fibbed
before they began playing the album's second track, "Seer."
With every hit of the crash cymbal, drummer Nick Tolliday's face was
revealed from behind the cymbal, until it settled to obstruct my view again.
I have to give credit to the rhythm section: the audience was nodding along
to every beat of the bass drum or every note of Heather Black's bass. I
couldn't help but yell along, "Useless! Useless! Useless!" during their eponymous song from a few years back. Giles' confidence behind the microphone
extended into his stage banter, as the crowd chuckled after almost everything he had to say. "Time's up, you bozos," Giles chided to his bandmates
as they tuned their guitars. Overall, it was a strong set — I just wish they
played "Useless" twice.
If you'd never heard or seen Sheer Mag before, you might be intimidated
or expect the band to tear into brutal hardcore punk (like I did). Instead, their
guitar riffs sounded straight out of 70s arena rock, while Tina Halladay's
raspy and infectious melodies sang out over top. During their extra funky,
"Need to Feel Your Love," the crowd seriously grooved along. At the end of
the night, three amazing bands played three amazing sets, and a show can't
get much better than that.—Aidan Danaher
Ml
3 have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine
and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
er D, Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla,dlscorder@citrca.
\ is also expanding to include comedy and theatre, among othe
live experiences. Feel Tree to submit those event details lo the
e-mail above.
HxBIA is proud to host the Victory Square
Block Party and CiTR in our coi
HASTINGS
CROSSING
CHECK OUT WHAT WE HAVE TO OFFER AT HXBIA.COM
REAL LIVE ACTION   Unftet
Ktoitu
MUSIC
KHOTIN
New Tab
(Pacific Rhythm)
18  /  05  /  2017
rocal producer Khotin has become known recently for his low-key
vintage house sound. His music has never fit into a traditional dance
music mold despite being built around conventional 4 / 4 rhythms. On New
Tab, Khotin arranges a compelling collection of tracks that are closer to
ambient and Warp Records releases from the early '90s — a contrast to the
dance music rhythms that we've come to expect.
Khotin's ambient music reveals a strong sense of melody and sound
design through the first half of the album. Percussion appears at points, but
the tracks are often beatless. Much of the album captures sounds from '80s
and '90s era electronic music, exploring the unique limitations of the era's
machines. But the sound isn't a retro facsimile; the combination of influences
and textures gives the listener a sense that this is a 2017 release.
"Canada Line," the album's standout first track, builds and holds a synth
drone punctuated with atmospheric samples from TransLink's automated
station announcements. Well chosen samples are used throughout New Tab.
"Frog Fraction" takes delayed voice clips and stretches them with effects and
ribbits. The voice motif returns later in "Dialogue 6" — one of the album's
best — and in "Molly" with some eccentric answering machine samples. The
uniqueness of the samples holds through repeated listens.
Rhythm and beats take on more prominence through the second half of
the album, especially in the final three tracks. The breakbeat infused "Fever
Loop" exhibits deft arrangements strewn over piano and watery effects.
"New Window," the album's final track, evokes Khotin's previous work with
stutter-step bass drum, clap sounds and simple melodic interludes. As a
whole, the album's production style and subdued rhythms are reminiscent of
Aphex Twin's Selected Ambient Works albums. New Tab is a departure from
Khotin's earlier releases but is still irresistibly well-crafted music,
—Jeremy Hawkins
KIM GRAY
Compulsion
(Bad Diet Records)
11  / 08  /  2017
[H-i:,iaij^><-i:
^im Gray's Compulsion nails the stylistic element of recent indie solo
artists, delivering ten songs clearly inspired by the synth pop now
in vogue. Much of the instrumentation is woven from the same electric
yarn spun by artists like Nick Hakim. In that respect, Gray goes a hair too
far attempting to tread with the trend. The range and tone of his voice, for
instance, sounds physically and stylistically strained. The otherwise charming love song "What's in a Smile" suffers from similarity with numerous other
indie rock love songs, but with thinner vocals. The vocals on "Restless Legs"
sound genuine and melodic within the predictable accompaniment.
Compulsion still retains authenticity through creative production and
personal themes. Many songs bask in sunny mid-tempo guitar overlaid with
bright, innovative soundscapes. In this way, Gray's sound intertwines the
twangy sonics of slacker rock with a more electrified palette. "90s Baby," the
album's final track, finds Gray shaking the conventionalism of Compulsion.
The vocal delivery is skilled while the production toys with reverb, autotune
and pitch manipulation. A convincing dose of bittersweet childhood nostalgia
is conveyed in the lyrics. Combined with a distinct instrumental mix, the song
saves the album from coming across as just another drop in indie synth-
pop's bucket.
There is a playful atmosphere within the rich instrumentation and wistful lyricism. The production techniques on the album make for memorable
tracks that avoid being replicants of an already saturated genre.
—Koby Braidek
CHRIS
/ Don't Think Anything
(Art of the Uncarved Block)
17 / 09  / 2017
J Don't Think Anything is the debut EP from Chris, a Toronto post-rock
unit. The band members all have history in the post-hardcore scene,
but explore a different emotional connection with gentler, less visceral intensity. This project has manifested in a really deliberate sound from the Toronto
rock scene and positions Chris as a clear, communicative and intuitive voice.
The band stays within familiar rock parameters with a classic two guitarist, bassist, and drummer setup, and subdued-to-peak arrangements.
Within these parameters, Chris showcases outstanding expressiveness on
/ Don't Think Anything. Each track not only evokes emotion, but also seems
like a capsule of a feeling, conveyed through the song structure — whether
disillusionment, resignation or melancholy. The second track "Down There"
captures exhaustion, as its plodding drums are punctuated by manic and
energized riffs that burn out in subsequent fatigue.
The lyrics are emotive, but not necessarily revelatory. When they sing
"But someone's always spoiling it" on top of a major-minor change in "Under
the Weight," the album's first single, the lyrics specify the context of the emotion instead of doing all of the communicative work.
/ Don't Think Anything has a clear emotional arc that gives cohesive
momentum to the EP. While each track is distinct, some tend to blend together only to be jostled out of monotony. This jostling also lends to each song
being charged and staggered with a kind of stilted cyclicity. The intentional
spurting and stalling is what makes the emotionality of the EP so compelling:
the song structure parallels both the work of processing heavy emotions and
the emotions themselves.
/ Don't Think Anything is a gorgeous project of expressive instrumentalism.
Chris' songwriting strength and clarity comes forward on this evocative debut
EP. —Clara Dubber
SHITLORDFUCKERMAN
Invest/gate Loud Earth
(Self-Released)
06  / 08 / 2017
I ideo games have entered the realm of art. Nuanced portrayals of
mj both imagined and quasi-real worlds, like that of BioShock and Grand
Theft Auto, have altered the way we view games. Once a childish escape,
video games are now a medium of cultural heft. This recent reappraisal
has brought attention to elements of older video games. Suddenly, the full
importance of past soundtracks becomes apparent. The beeps and boops
of old Sega games, like Streets of Rage 2 and Journey into Dreams, appear
more than just backing noise. Instead, they can be seen as the influential
forebears of a broader electronic genre. And it is in these footsteps that
Vancouver's Shitlord Fuckerman walks.
Throughout 2017's Investigate Loud Earth, Shitlord toys with the constraints of electronic expression set by these Sega sounds. While repetition
was used by video game composers to imbue a scene with menace, suspense or relief, Shitlord utilizes this tool to deconstruct. On "Cicada Banana,"
for example, a repetitive host of beeps rattles on. New elements are gradually added until the song shudders and finally breaks. The hum of synthetic
noise ceases and the only remaining sound is that of a piano, playing along
to the forgotten melody. In this moment, the listener becomes acutely aware
of how these songs function.
At other times, Shitlord moves beyond the coy and the witty. Sega
appears far in the rear view mirror. Songs like "Thank You For Your Time
On Earth" elicit a genuine emotional response; a swell of notes and the
sudden lurching stop of the rhythm section leaves the listener wistful and
nostalgic. Likewise, on "111 Don't Get The Respect I Deserve So Help Me
God," Fuckerman croons behind a shield of reverb. Haunting and removed,
their voice builds until the backing ambience of electronic tones overwhelms
everything and the song is lost.
These moments of clever and emotionally genuine expression, however, only
make the weaker aspects of Investigate Loud Earth more frustrating. "Muzyki Jaja"
is an honest homage to the beeps and boops of Sega and Nintendo, but almost
painfully so. As the tempo accelerates, the listener's patience dwindles. With no
visual aid to distract, the fever pitch infuriates and one pleads for it to fucking end.
Despite these shortfallings, Investigate Loud Earth provides a compelling
and enjoyable experience. Witty and filled with energy, Shitlord Fuckerman
explores and builds upon a fruitful area of electronic music.
—Franko De Gayo
World in Space
(Big Smoke)
28  /  07   /  2017
I ancouver post-garage pop group, Reef Shark, released their latest
^■(F EP World in Space on Big Smoke this summer. Differing from their
first two albums, World in Space takes us deeper into the murky depths of
the reef. And although Vancouver's Salish Sea is not home to actual reef
sharks, the band embodies the melodic aesthetic common in the city.
The band's previous work — the 2014 album Better Weather and the
2015 EP Mind Race — carved a rather disconnected and unsure direction on
the pipeline between surf-rock and progressive psych-rock. World in Space
rides a more consistent path on the wave of garage pop.
Each song on World in Space starts lighthearted and playful before
descending quickly into conflict-filled space. The song composition is rather
uniform, using eerie guitar riffs, steady drumming and animated vocals
stitched together with rippling guitar solos. Through the loaded lyrics and
overall instrumental tone, the six-song collection intimately project the highs
and lows of early adulthood.
Despite the dark qualities of the music, World in Space remains a satisfying album to come back to. Appropriate for long bus rides, the album transforms from something simple and insignificant into a careful assemblage of
complex instrumental and lyrical content that speaks of the human apprehensions we all share. —Lexi Melish
UPTIGHTS
TIME + SPACE
1
Sill
UPTIGHTS
Time+Space
(Self-Re leased)
0+ /  07  /  17
C alfway through the first track of Time+Space, "Edge of the Earth," I
I looked back at the media player to check that it hadn't jumped to some
Blue Rodeo. Uptights have a sound that is immediately nostalgic and dated,
but endearingly so. It is everything you would expect from a power pop rock
band known to play some of Vancouver's most social pubs. A signature of
their sound is the keyboard, opening "Satellite Heart" like the soundtrack to
a revival,
Time+Space was self-released on vinyl, with "Love In The Future" marking the B-side. Whereas the first half of the album is consumed with cliched
romantic narratives and stand-alone singles, the second half shows more
consideration to flow. Lyrically and musically, the b-side is more complex.
Notable songs include "Brinkmanship" and "Used To Be Kind."
This album is a great soundtrack to patio caesars and weekend chores,
and hopefully Uptights remember that. When the cliches are stripped away,
this is the band you want to listen to while hanging out with friends and getting shit done. —Esther Sun
FAITH HEALER
Try,-)
(Mint Records)
OB  /  OS  /  2017
The winky face adorning the album cover and title of Try;-) might elicit
a groan from those sick of emojis, but it also perfectly encapsulates
the coy attitude of the album. Faith Healer's new album playfully invites you
to give in to their atmospheric pop rock that explores the ups and downs of
romantic relationships.
UNDER REVIEW Faith Healer is the creative project of Edmonton's Jessica Jalbert; her
alias created to escape the confines of the singer-songwriter label. Try;-)
finds Jalbert teaming up with drummer and multi-instrumentalist Renny
Wilson, who was also involved on 2015's Cosmic Troubles. While Try ;■)
has been self-described by Jalbert as a more straightforward album than
its predecessor, its warmth and focus doesn't take away from the surprising
amount of musical depth and flair.
The listener is enveloped by an ethereal mood with a distinctly '60s flair
the instant the dial tone sounds on "Waiting." Jalbert's voice is melodical-
ly soothing and acts as a kind of auditory analgesic as it carries the mood
of the album. On the upbeat tracks, namely "Light Of Loving" and "Sufferin'
Creature," Jalbert's voice takes the edge off, making the driving tracks not
feel out of place compared to the subdued sections of the album. The singing on Try ;■) can be so captivating that it can often distract from the intricate
work going on in the background. While the synthesizer comes to the forefront on "Sterling Silver," it is often blending into the scene, providing constant support to the album's mood. And when the classic rock inspired guitar
isn't cutting through with jarring yet somehow fitting solos, it's filling in the
gaps with small, intricate riffs.
While Try;-) is in many ways a return to basics for Faith Healer, writing
the album off as simple pop rock would be disingenuous at best. The album
gives deep consideration to both form and content, all the while packaging it
in a fun and playful immersive atmosphere. —Braedon Atkinson Pauze
TOUGH AGE
Shame
(Mint Records)
20 /  10  /  2017
tough Age delivers the opening ninety-nine instrumental seconds of
their new album Shame with nonchalant confidence. The Toronto-
based self-proclaimed not really punk at all' band claims your attention
immediately, then delivers their get-up-and-go music for thirty-two minutes.
The instrumentally driven second track "Piquant Frieze" builds momentum that is carried through the A-side of Shame. The addictively tormenting
"Me In Glue" features a prominent guitar line and Penny Clark's haunting
vocals. Clark leaves us with a catchy refrain that will be muttered unconsciously under your breath for days to come, annoying your roommates and
thoroughly freaking out anybody sitting near you on a bus.
When the sudden tone shift of "Pageantry" hits, the album takes a chilling break from pop punk with a full force collision. The song benefits from
a slower tempo and subtle layering, an uncommon stylistic shift that Tough
Age pull off with poise. The thematic shift is short-lived, however, and by
the time we reach the closing track "Shame" Tough Age has returned with
intensity.
The album's finale makes up more than a third of the total run time.
Containing several transitions reminiscent of the album's earlier tone,
"Shame" settles into a four-minute long nerve-fraying soundtrack of a horror
movie circus clown. Complete with feedback, discordant string work and low
inhuman rumbling, the album is put to rest with a sense confusion and curiosity that necessitates flipping the record over for another listen.
—indigo Smart
WHITE POPPY
The Pink Haze of Love
(Lone Hand)
1+  /   07  /  2017
I hite Poppy reaches new heights on The Pink Haze of Love for one
4Ar simple reason — the artist is vulnerable. Having made a name
for herself with turbulent electro-psych records, the musicality of Crystal
Dorval's project is almost counterintuitive to the unseasoned listener, using
disguised vocals resting on top of pop-heavy synths. Now, for the first time in
Dorval's career she grants her voice the attention it deserves in the forefront
of production.
Released under the moniker White Poppy, The Pink Haze of Love radiates
with dream-pop tendencies coupled with folk undertones. The tracks are an
esoteric mixture of atmospheric vocals blending with rhythmic finger picking
and rolling soft synths. Despite the record's multi-dimensional sound, The Pink
Haze of Love feels most epic in its moments of minimalism. Songs like "Love
Molecules" and "By My Side" finish with minute-long ambient interludes. The
emotional peaks on the album are derived from the moments of tranquility
found when Dorval breaks away from monotonous lyrics and lets her keys
echo through the speaker.
Dorval's vocals are no longer disguised by the waves of distortion
common on her previous releases. Upon first listen of the album, White
Poppy's melodies induce a trance. She tells no story, instead serving lyrics
for purely experiential purpose. Cyclical choruses like "So you'd be by my
side" on "By My Side" and "When I look into your eyes I become hypnotized"
on "Hypnotized," ushers the listener into dream-like states. It gives the album
a personal feel. Less personal for the author, but moreso catalyzing each
listener's subconscious romantic traumas or triumphs. Delving deeper
into the album, this cyclical nature begins to become overly repetitive.
Unfortunately, the same broad lyrics that create such experiences can start
to feel vague and lack depth.
White Poppy brings life to a truly delicate collection of dream-pop compositions. Showcasing her songwriting, in a first true lyrical effort, Dorval hides
her best storytelling behind vague love ballads. Nevertheless, The Pink Haze
of Love finally lets Dorval's voice stand alone, far away from the thrashing
electro-psych tunes from the past. —Sasha Balazic
PODCASTS
#j
i ^
THE
Of
CA.NAD4
THE SECRET LIFE OF
CANADA
Podcast Series
(Passport 2017)
31  / 08 /  2017-Present
The version of this country's history that many Canadians are taught
tends to gloss over, if not totally exclude, the colonialism, racism and
violence that Canada was built on. The new podcast, The Secret Life of
Canada, promises to disrupt the narratives of erasure common in typical
social studies classes and much of this year's Canada 150 programming.
The podcast is both critical and candid when shedding light on the nation's
past.
In the first episode, "The Secret Life of Banff," hosts Leah-Simone Bowen
and Falen Johnson explore the origin of the popular Alberta tourist town.
Their aim is to tell the stories of "the people who don't have a statue (...) who
are not written down in a history book," says Bowen. Through a mix of narration, interviews and historical documents, we learn that Banff is on lands
stolen from five Indigenous communities through disingenuous treaties.
Those pushed off their traditional lands included the Stoney-Nakoda people,
who were only allowed back to Banff to be exhibited as a tourist draw.
We also discover that Banff's infrastructure was built by Austro-Hungarian
immigrants, who were internment camp prisoners during the First World War.
Themes of xenophobia, displacement and resistance are related back to
current political events, encouraging listeners to consider how historical mar-
ginalization affects the present.
Throughout the episode, Bowen and Johnson establish an easygoing
rapport that is a surprise given the seriousness of the subject matter. However,
their casual tones and occasional jokes set the podcast apart from your average history lesson, creating space for the two hosts to personally engage with
the material. Both openly share their own relationships to Canada: Bowen is a
first-generation-born Canadian and Johnson is Mohawk. They set an example
by owning up to their own knowledge gaps that are discovered through the
podcast's topics. In turn, listeners are encouraged to start unpacking their own
conceptions of Canada's past.
As a somebody who was unaware of many of the injustices shared in this
particular episode, I especially appreciated how The Secret Life of Canada
ends with a call to action. It urges listeners to take the stories they've learned
and share them with others. It's an important reminder for us all that we must
actively confront Canada's unsavory histories by creating conversations
about them in the present. —Hailey Mah
CANADALAND
Podcast Series
(Canada land)
2013-Present
J t's refreshing to listen to a podcast that discusses topics pertinent to
the country we live in. Jesse Brown is a Canadian journalist and the
host of Canadaland, a podcast that produces commentary on current events.
The first thing that really stood out to me about Canadaland is the length-
iness and poorly disguised advertisements. It's fair to acknowledge funding
from financial sponsors, but there must be a better way to include advertising
into the show.
Brown attempts to disguise one advertisement during the Shortcuts
Episode #133 "We Support You, Hostile Idiot!" He tells the guest on the show
that new fathers, like the guest, could benefit from buying products from the
show's sponsor. The bit goes on for over one minute and kind of kills the
mood for the rest of the podcast. Variations of the same advertisement occur
in many episodes.
On a more positive note, Brown is an engaging speaker. He's hilarious
and makes great contributions to the general dialogue of politics in Canada.
He's not shy in his opinions, which makes for great listening content. I found
myself disagreeing with him and constructively criticizing what he says in my
head. A good podcast makes you think and Brown does just that.
He also invites interesting guests onto his show. In one episode, he
invites human rights lawyer, Richard Warm an, to speak about his experience
taking neo-nazis to court on his own time, pro bono. On other episodes, he
invites a Buzzfeed Editor, an Iraqi photojournalist and many other individuals
with unique insights. You can imagine that the conversations he has on the
show are passionately driven and riveting.
Canadaland is charming and a good listen. There are two-hundred episodes; enough to keep you entertained on your daily commute. But, maybe
skip past all the advertising. —Samantha Peng
I!!!
To submit music lor review consideration in Discorder Magazineanti online,
please send a physical copy to the stallon addressed to:
10
Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Under Review Editor at
CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver BC, VGT1Z1.
lough our contributors prioritize physical copies, you may email download codes
underreview.dlscorder@cltr.ca. We prioritize albums sent prior to Iheir official
■ase dates. Under Review is also expanding to include independent films, books
and podcasts. Feel tree lo subrnil ihose, too.
UNDER REVIEW VANCOUVER
ARTBOOKFAIR.COM
SbdS
4\nnuM
Vancouver
Onto
BOOKS
MAGAZINES
ZINES
PRINT EPHEMERA
TALKS
PERFORMANCES
ARTIST'S PROJECTS
VanCOUVer      a   British Columbia    £>accesscoPYRiGHT       £9v-
Ar+nallorv      ^ arts council |,„f,,T,7,        52 ci
ArTyaiisry    *sar—■-»««.>—.■•—»—.  -vfouMu.TioN ^
.re
™MU„    downtown  ™blish.ngOSfu l~ luscan group
VANCOUVER Vancouver
1VR  CLUICIII  [I
Straight    ffimnnm Langara.       ©bean   cmaeazine     GEIST    E^SLL°3Jua
"'   I"'  'lint) ,„[ {(nijOf Of HlCHft IEAKHINC ^^   COffee n».F.».1....Hr...,i
SAD
BAG 50    E^
SIX
vandocument     ©SSG      hindsight       cent Brick Press INN
GOOD
I   [*   U    I OLIVIA DILIBERTO
OUT
WORDS BY
BRIT BACHMANN
ILLUSTRATIONS BY
LIVIA Dl LIBERT!
^^M f you live in Vancouver and you hadn't heard of
I  Good Night Out before September, chances are they
■^P  popped onto your radar with the announcement of
a late-night harm reduction service on the Granville Strip.
Aptly named the Nightlife Street Team, the group has a
2-month pilot project patrolling Granville Street Fridays
and Saturdays until the end of October. Whereas police
patrol for obvious instances of violence and disorderly
conduct, GNO's focus is rooted in feminist ideals. Using
non-violence, GNO seeks to reduce catcalling, sexual
harassment, and everything else that gives Vancouver's
"Entertainment District" a reputation for being unsafe.
If proven significant, the program could be extended
indefinitely.
Good Night Out is a U.K. based initiative, but its
Vancouver chapter is coordinated by Stacey Forrester and
Ashtyn Bevan. In the weeks before the public announcement of the Nightlife Street Team, Discorder checked in
with Forrester and Bevan to discuss harm reduction in
mainstream and alternative venues.
"This project came out of a love for the underground
music scene, [...] and wanting others to feel [safe] regardless of what music they like, or where they hang out,"
states Forrester.
Long before the street team, GNO Vancouver focused
primarily on connecting with venues, with the intention of offering tips and training towards providing safe
party atmospheres. "Initially, we started doing audits and
workshops of places around town," says Forrester, "basically any venue that serves alcohol is within our scope.
[...] They'll listen to us talk about harm reduction, but we
can also sneak in some stuff about bystander intervention and gendered violence harm reduction. It was kind
of a carrot."
But this carrot doesn't interest everyone. GNO has
faced a lot of pushback from mainstream venues.
Bevan explains, "When we first started, we sent out
hundreds of emails to venues across the city, as well
as festivals, telling them what we do and why it is
important to have this type of training. A lot of them
said, 'this is a great idea, but we already do this. Harm
doesn't happen here.'"
Forrester adds, "A lot of the things that mainstream
nightlife economy is built around is actually rooted
in really sexist, heteronormative things. So while
[venues] don't think they have a problem, they don't
see that the whole industry is a problem. And bringing
in an outside source like Good Night Out admits that
something is wrong."
Some may think of a harmful situation and assume
it relates to bar fights, but the reality can be a lot more
complex. 'Harmful' situations can include harassment,
assault, overdoses, severe intoxication, homophobia,
transphobia, ableism, and more. Harm reduction is a commitment to compassion that not all venues are ready for.
When asked why some venues declined Good Night
Out's workshops, the excuse is pathetic.
"We know that the nightlife economy is thriving in
Vancouver, but they'll say they can't pay their staff to
come in on their nights off," explains Forrester. "We hear
a variety of excuses, and we honestly think it is bullshit.
[...] If you cater to the most vulnerable, potential patron,
then everyone less vulnerable benefits."
6 NO has managed to find a strong niche in
Vancouver by switching their target. Bevan
explains, "We found that there was such a struggle
to get in with venues, [but] most live events are not
affiliated with the venues themselves, but with club promoters." Their new approach was calculated. They credit
Groundwerk, Vancouver Arts & Leisure and Resonate for
being early supporters of GNO's outreach.
Unfortunately, the venue crisis that has affected these
organizations, Vancouver Arts & Leisure in particular, is
impacting access to safe party spaces overall. Forrester
explains, "Gentrification is creeping up on the ability for us
to have and keep alternative spaces, affordable venues for
party-throwers who do take patron safety seriously. There
are less and less places for these groups to have parties."
With music scenes across Canada beginning to publicly
address sexual assault and accountability within their
communities, conversations around harm reduction have
become more urgent. Although harm reduction seeks
to eliminate the situations that lead to harassment and
assault, organizations like GNO are usually the first ones
to hear complaints.
"In a perfect world, our Facebook shouldn't flood
with messages after a big weekend of events, of people
reporting abuse that they've encountered," says Forrester.
"Obviously [reading these messages] is what we do and
we have a reputation of acting on it, but ultimately, we
should not be the only ones. We've become an informal
reporting system for cases of harassment."
When contacted about instances of harassment, GNO
follows us with the venues or promoters involved to offer a
workshop and resource materials. One of these materials is
a checklist that encourages equal representation among staff
and security — positions which are largely male-dominant.
"Ultimately, what we're asking for when we want a
culture shift, is that we want a culture that celebrates and
values women and the queer community, and that means
more than having them just be props or fetishes for the
night," explains Forrester. "The only real way to make
that shift is understanding and recognizing that women
and femmes contribute to the nightlife and music industries on all levels."
And so GNO has now taken to the streets, demonstrating first-hand the influence of women on nightlife.
On a final note, Bevan adds, "I think for Discorder
readers, people who are hosting events and parties, feel
free to reach out to us about how to make your event
safer. If you want to get more knowledge, we are always
here to help."
For information on Good Night Out Vancouver, including their services
for venues and promoters, visit goodrtigfitoutvancoiJver.com, and
follow them on social media.
GOOD NIGHT OUT QKancity
ytyveens
Werking in Drag
words by Sydney Thorne I illustrations by Sitji Chou I photos by Sara Baar Iraq is more mainstream than ever. With
the growing popularity o/Ru Paul's
Drag Race, tongue pops and "yas queen!"
have quickly become part of our cultural lexicon.
All the while, the local drag scene remains niche.
Early this year, graphic designer and social
media maven fames Knipe noticed the incredible
amount of talent in Vancouver, and saw a need for
more promotion. I chatted with fames about the
launch ofVancity Kweens, and his plans to 'werk'
his way up to stunningly beautiful promotional
domination.
What kind of collaborations have you done so far?
I started a video series called Mirror Moments. I chose
to begin by featuring Synthia Kiss, since she's so new to
the scene and we were running parallel as new members
of this community.
I would have never known she was so new to drag!
Oh, I know. She is so talented, it's insane! I have
another video coming out soon with Karmella Barr.*
I want to showcase the stories of these drag queens
because a lot of what we see is so surface level. We see
them for their looks on Instagram and their lip syncs,
but I wanted to strip that back and have people in the
community get to know these queens — what makes
them tick, where they draw their inspiration from.
What do you have up your sleeve for the future of
Vancity Kweens?
I want to be the one stop shop for Vancouver drag.
I hope to do merchandise for the queens and run an
online store through the website, with some of the
proceeds going to DMS [Dogwood Monarchist Society]
and other charities. [...] Eventually, I would love to have
this as a full media hub where I have clients, and we do
everything for them. I know that drag is something that
is super expensive and just barely pays the bills. Almost
everything I do at this point is pro bono, but eventually
it would be great to get to a place where it can make
money. Right now, I'm happy doing this all for free.
They all work so hard, they deserve it.
I've noticed you've done a bit of promo for the alternative
and multi-gender drag community in this city. Do you find that
the different Vancouver drag scenes remain quite separate or do
they cross over?
I'm still so new to this community, so I can't say
for sure. I've heard that in the past there was a divide
between Eastside and Westside queens, but I think that's
less of an issue these days.
There are two artists, Dee Blew and P.M, who put on a
show called Finish. They do alternative performance art. I
think it's incredible for our community because that's the
direction drag is heading, right?
Without asking you to play favourites, who are you most
excited to watch come up in the scene right now?
I'm a Brat Pack fanatic 'til the end, mainly because
they have embraced Vancity Kweens with such open arms.
Kendall Gender especially, her energy and attitude is so
infectious, [...] I get such a rush watching her perform;
I love Karmella Barr, I think her winning Miss Cobalt
was so amazing [...]; Amy Grindhouse is hilarious, super
sweet, super down to earth, [...]; I'd also love to work
with [...] girls like Peach Cobblah and Carlotta Gurl. [...]
The biggest thing I'm afraid of is missing out on queens,
or people thinking I'm choosing favourites — covering
everything is a lot of work and there's so much going on,
I'm trying not to miss a thing.
If someone has never seen Vancouver drag, where would you
direct them to start?
Oh my gosh, there's so much going on! I'd say Sundays
would be your best bet, there are three shows that happen:
Legends at XY with Jaylene Tyme, then right after that is
Sanctuary at 1181 with Alma Bitches. After that Alma heads
back over to XY to do Tfie Shequel. [...] I think there's
something happening every night except Mondays.**
That's your rest day, then we're back at it Tuesday night
for more drag.
&
Check out @vancitykweens on Instagram and Facebook, or at
their website, vancitykweens.com.
*The video with Karmella Barr was released September 26.
**Adrag show has since been added to Mondays! Moist
Mondays with Misty Meadows a t XY nightclub.
SYDNEY THORNE: What is Vancity Kweens?
JAMES KNIPE: Vancity Kweens is a promotional platform that does beautiful promo for drag queens in this
city. I want to help these queens grow their art, grow their
fan base, and spread the word of drag to Vancouver and
elsewhere. Drag can be a full-time career, and as much as
it's art and performance, there's a huge business element.
I hadn't been to many drag shows in Vancouver, but I
had been obsessed with [Ru Paul's] Drag Race for such a
long time before that. In January, I decided that my New
Year's resolution was to start going to see more local drag.
I was trying to figure out where to find out about all of
these shows — as an outsider, I had no idea where to go.
I found one website that looked like a Windows 98 HTML
website and I was like, 'okay, no.'
[...]I first rolled [Vancity Kweens] out at the end of
March. In the beginning, I was going to keep it a secret
and remain anonymous, but I had a bunch of queens
message the account asking who was behind it.
Since it all started anonymously, how did it feel coming out
as the face of Vancity Kweens?
[...] I'd been going to shows for a couple of months
when I started Vancity Kweens, so when people found
out I was behind it, the community welcomed me with
open arms. It was the best feeling. For the longest time in
Vancouver I was searching for that sense of community as
I was never really part of a scene. Since starting Vancity
Kweens, it's been so much fun getting to know so many
amazing people, [...] they're like celebrities to me.
■ ■ ■   .    ■
VANCITY KWEENS ON THE AIR
FLEX YOUR HEAD
By Luciano Sabados // illustration by Bory Stobart
// photo by Colin Brattey
Up until my interview with him, I had only ever seen
Mike in passing; a quiet and gruff man that I would
watch calmly take his place behind the board through
the window in the lobby of CiTR. His show, Flex Your Head, features his voice pretty minimally, with a large portion of the hour
taken up by a myriad of punk and hardcore from across the globe
and throughout time. So ultimately I wasn't sure how well this
conversation would go. But upon finding him sitting in the corner
of the coffee shop where we had agreed to meet, I was greeted
with a welcoming smile and an unsuspected openness.
Pretty early on, I learn that Mike is simply just shy. So much so
that he almost happened upon his host responsibilities by chance,
taking over from founder and long-time host, Eric Flexyourhead
in 2004. He recalls corresponding with Eric regularly as a fan of
the show. "I'd email him once in awhile asking 'hey, can you play
these songs?'" Mike recounts, "And then one day, he said 'why
don't you come down to the show? Bring your music and we'll
play it from there.'" Flexyourhead would eventually ask Mike
to take over the radio hour. "I was a really shy kid, I didn't talk
in public [...] I don't know if this a good idea," he remembers
saying, but with some encouragement Mike took the reigns.
Close to Mike's heart is Vancouver's all-ages scene, which
has seen its fair share of hardship through the years, with
venues being shut down overnight and often little return for
organizers. But Mike has seen it better in
the past few years, toting the existence of
venues like 333 Clark, Alf House and Red
Gate playing a key role in the recent boom.
"Venues come and go, but it's always
good to have a couple of mainstays," he
concludes.
As we touch on live shows, we talk about
the most recent Flex Your Head Fundraiser,
which sported an incredibly diverse lineup, both in genre and representation
- something that is unfortunately, not the
norm in Vancouver's live scene. In part,
Mike thanks CiTR's programming
flexibility as part of the reason for the
diversity, because he wanted his live show
to reflect the variety of his radio playlists.
Secondary to this, Mike just feels like
diverse bills simply draw better crowds.
"You can either put five bands [on the
line-up] that all sound the same and bring
the same 20 kids, or throw in other kinds
of bands and have 100 kids come out to a
show."
Speaking on representational
diversity directly, I mention Discorder's
recent feature on music festival line-ups and ask Mike for his
opinion on the predominance of CIS-men-only bills in Vancouver.
"Promoters get lazy," he comments, "They don't want to search
for different acts, they just have their friends bands play without
having to go outside their little circles. They just get narrow
minded. 'This is the way it's supposed to be, these are the rules.'
I've never liked that."
Probably much to the dismay of his shy self, Mike is aware
of his notoriety within the local hardcore and punk community, but takes the respect that is cast his way as more
of a comment on his longevity within the scene. "I don't want to
say I'm respected at shows, but I think people know I'm the old
guy that's been around for a while," he remarks. "When people
are moshing, I never really get hit anymore. I don't feel like I
should have that respect, but I do like it because I don't get hit
anymore," he adds with a knowing chuckle.
On a final thought, I ask Mike if there is anything he would like
to say to Discorder readers. Confidently, he produced some sound
ON THE AIR: FLEX YOUR HEAD
advice: "Go support local bands. Your favourite band started out
as a local band. Support the local scene so they can get bigger and
tour. Go check out a band you may have never seen. Who knows,
maybe you'll like it."
Or even start by listening to his show, where you'll definitely
find something you haven't heard before. And who knows, maybe
you'll like that too.
Flex Your Head airs Tuesdays from 6-8pm on CiTR 101.9FM, or stream
at citr.ca. Check out archived episodes at citr.ca/radio/flex-your-head,
follow Flex Your Head on Facebook for updates, and visit the show's
official website atflexyourhead.net.
OF
CiTR 101.9 FM+
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
"You get discounts at these
FFIEHDS OF CiTR + D1SC0REEF locations.
m n 1 n
ANTISOCIAL
SKATEBOARD SHOP
■ 10* off
THE BILTMORE CABARET
■ 10% off at the  bar
DANDELION RECORDS
G EMPORIUM
■ 10!1 off used records
EAST VAN GRAPHICS
•10$ off
EAST VANITY PARLOUR
' 10* off any service
FAS IN FRANK
U5* off
LOCKV'S BOOKS S
COMICS
■10* off
NEPTDON RECORDS
•10% off
RAG MACHINE
■ 10* off
RED CAT RECORDS
•10* off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
'A free DIY button irlth
any purchase over $5.
WOO VINTAGE CLOTHING
THE WALLFLOWER
MODERN DINER
eommcReiTiL
AUDIOPILE RECORDS
•10* off
BOMBER BREWING
• 10* off
BONERATTLE MUSIC
"10% off of accessories
THE CANNIBAL CAFE
■ 10* off
non-alcoholic itens
HIGHLIFE RECORDS
'10* off
JO CLOTHING LTD.
'10* off
MINTAGE
' 10* off
PEOPLE'S CO-OP
BOOKSTORE
■ 10* off
THE RIO THEATRE
■$? off regular Rio
Theatre noTies
/ select events
STORM CROW TAVERN
opeR
BOOK WAREHOUSE
■ 10* off
CANADA MERCH
■ 15* off
PANDORA'S BOX
REHEARSALSTUMOS
' 10* off Hourly
Studio Rentals
©
o
Downtown
SEAT STREET RECDRDS
"10% off used records
THE CINEMATHEQUE
' One small bag of
popcorn per person
per evening.
DEVIL MAY WEAR
• LO* on'
LITTLE SISTER'S BOOK
6 ART EMPORIUM
' 10* off
THE PINT PUBLIC HOUSE
' 20% discount to
guests on food bill
SIKORA'S CLASSIC
RECORDS LTD.
' 10* off of Merchandise
VINYL RECORDS
■ 10* of Sen and Used
UBC
AUSTRALIAN
BOOT COMPANY
' 15% off Blundstone and
* R.M.  n'iUians Boots
THE BIKE KITCHEN
' 10* off nen parts *
accessories
BANYEN BOOKS & SOUND
■ 10* off
FRESH IS BEST
ON BROADWAY
GRANVILLE
ISLAND BREWING
■ 10* off food / 10% on
merchandise (not beer)
KOERNER'S PUB
■ 10* off food
ON THE FRINGE
HAIR DESIGN
■ 10* off
RUFUS GUITAR SHOP
' 10% new instruments
and accessories.
STORM CROW ALEHOUSE
■ 10* off
TAPESTRY MUSIC
" 10% off in-stock
music books
UBC BOOKSTORE
' 10% off general
merchandiseiclothing,
gi ftnare, stat i one ry,
general books) a«PL]™ *#&■
%e*J
(VISIT:
CiTR
. C a /friends
for more   info.) wm
rf??
ziuv?
\jiiU
UL>
Z~]
4Z
0
a^onDap
6AM
7AM
SAM
SAM
lOAM
11AM
12 PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
TRANCENDANCE
GHOST MIX
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
SYNCHRONIC ITY
PARTS UNKNOWN
THE BURROW
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
jrXue*Dap
PACIFIC PICKIN*
QUEER FM VANCOUVER:
RELOADED
PEXTBOOK
MORNING AFTER SHOW
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
PARTICLES 4 WAVES
INNER
SPACE
STUDENT
FILL-IN
TEXTBOOK
^etmeg&ap
3ITR  GHOST MIX
SUBURBAN  JUNGLE
POP  DRONES
rKE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
ROOM TONE
KEW IT UP
ALL ACCESS PASS
C&urg&ap
CITR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
THE YOUTH ELEMENT
PODCAST
STUDENT
FILL IN
CONVICTIONS i
CONTRADICTIONS
STUDENT
FILL-IN
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
U DO U RADIO
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
K-POP CAFE
STUDENT FILL-IN
ASTROTALK
TERRA INFORMA
THE GENDER
EMPOWERMENT MEDIA
COLLECTIVE
JFriDap
AURAL TENTACLES
CANADALAND
C1 TED!
PES WITH
& MAC
rHE REEL WHIRLED
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
FRESH SLICE
STUDENT FILL-IN
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
$>attm>ap
CITR GHOST MIX
THE SATURDAY EDGE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
POWER  CHORD
CODE  BLUE
&un&ap
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
CLASSICAL CHAOS
SHOOKSHOOKTA
THE ROCKERS SHOW
LA FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
6AM
7 AM
8AM
9 AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4PM
5 PM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
DISCORDER RADIO
ARTS REPORT
CITR CURRENT
AFFAIRS
CiTR DOCS SEASON 2
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
SPM
FINDING  THE  FUNNY
SPM
ANECDOTAL EVIDENCE
STUDENT FILL-IN
FLEX YOUR HEAD
7PM
INNER
SPACE
EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
ARE YOU
AWARE
SAMS
QUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
WINGS
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
THE INTERVIEW
'■;■■ ijI //-il
STUDENT
FILL-IN
NIGHTDRIVES5
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
CI RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SPM
STUDENT FILL-IN
MIX CASETTE
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8PM
SPM
THE NEW ERA
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
CRIMES &.  TREASONS
LIVE FROM
THUNDilRBIRD RADIO
HELL
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
TRANCENDANCE
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW-
NINTH WAVE
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
hpm
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER
ROOM
COPY / PASTE
11PM
E MEDICINE SHOW
RAND0PH0N1C
THE AFTN SOCCER
SHOW
12 AM
THE SCREEN GIRLS
12 AM
SPICY BOYS
1AM
CITR GHOST MIA
AURAL TENTACLES
CITR GHOST MIA
2AM
CITR GHOST MIX
1AM
THE  LATE  NIGHT  SHOW
THE  ABSOLUTE   VALUE
OF   INSOMNIA
CITR  GHOST  MU
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
"DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERYDAY" TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
JZAU-7AU, ELECTRON IC/DANCE
Up all nfejrut? We've gol
you, come dar>ce.
Contact: program mi ng@cHr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8AM-10AM. ECLECTIC
Your iavourhe Brownsters,
James end Peter, offer-
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exolrc in a
blend of aura1 delights
Contact: breakiastwitmhe-
brown 6@hal ma il.com
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
11AU-1SPM,  TALK''CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves Is In lis
second season! The 1eam
of Indigenous and nan-
Indigenous peeps produce the
show weekly. We talk about
Indigenous issues, current
events, and enlertalnrnem
centering Nalive voices through
Interviews and the arls. Come
make indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@cilT.ca,
Follow us @uncededaTwaves fi
I ac ebeak.com/unceded airwaves/
SYNCHRONICS
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
Feeling good- Tune in and
tap into good vlbralions that
help you remember why
you 're hero: to have fun!
Contact' sp irltu al &how@gmal I .com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, HOCK.'POP/lNDIE
Hos1 Chrissariffic lakes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a lire.
Contact' programming@cilr.ca
THE BURROW
3PM-4PM, pock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
departmed manager Andy
Reslo. the Burrow Js Noise
Rock, Alternalive, Posl-Ftock,
with a nice bte-nd ol old
'classics' and new releases.
Interviews & Live performances.
Contact" muslc@cltr.ca
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
4PM-5PW, JAZZ
Host Jade spins old recordings
of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies and molown.
Contact: program ml ng@cl1f.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM, IMTER NATIONAL
Veteran hosl Leo brings
you talk. Interviews, and
only the besl mix or Latin
American music,
Contact: leoramlrez@canadB.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm-6:30pm, talk
Finding ihe Funny is a variety
show with hosl Nico McEown &
special guesis who talk comedy.
".'.■'■■-! makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of ihe best from all Ihe resl?
Every episode you hear greai
jokes and bits Iram both lamous
and unknown comedians.
Contact" programming@cHr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM -8PM, EXPCfllMEWTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music (rom Ihe movies,
tunes from television, along
with almospherfc pieces,
cutting edge new iracks,
and si range goodies lor
soundtracks lo be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@cilr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JA77
On air since 1984,j"azz
musician Gavin Walker lakes
listeners From the past to the
future of |azz. With lealured
albums and artisls, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
Jazz player will have you
back again nexl week.
Contact: programming@cHr.ca
■ TUESDAY
THE SCREEN GIRLS
1EAU-1AM, HIP HOP.'R&B,;SOUL
The Screen Girls merge music
and art with discussions of
trends and pop cullure. and
Interviews with artists In
contemporary art. fashion and
music. We play a variety oF
music, locusfng on promoting
Canadian hip hop and R&B,
Contact: inro@thescreengirls.com
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6AM -8aM. nOOTS'FQLJ</BLUES
Bluegrass, oW-tlme music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the tovery Andrea. Berman.
Contact: paclficplckln@yahoo.com
QUEER FMSam-if>:30AM, TALK/
politics
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+-
communilies oF Vancouver,
Queer FM features music,
currpnl events, human inieresl
stories, and interviews.
Contact:
queer lmvancouvGr@qmail.eam
TEXTBOOK
TUES, 10:30-11:30, TALK
Textbook (FKA The Student
Special Hour) is a student
Show covering textbook
(and not so textbook)
approaches to sludent life.
Contact: ouireach@ciu,ca
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
12PM-1PM, HOCK / POP ' iNDItc
Oswaido Perez Cabrera plays
your Favourite eclectic rnh of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, ind»e
pop, noise, with live music,
local laient and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning aHer what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonlcvortex
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
1PM-2PM, FIOCK / POP 1 INDIE
This show Is produced by
the disabled community and
showcases special guests and
artists- Originally called "The
Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, 1he show began
in the 1990s. We showcase
BC Sell Advocates with lots
of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for
interesting music, interviews
and some Fun times. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael
Rubfein CFcgs and Friends,
contact
communityllvlngradlo@gmaU.com
PARTICLES S WAVES
2PM-3PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Like trie quantum theory it
is named ior, Particles and
Waves defies definition. Join
Mia for local indie, scl-fl prog
rock, classic soul, obscure
soundtracks, Tote's deep
cuts, and much more.
Contact: programmlng@cltr.ca
TEXTBOOK
4PM-5PM, TALK/STCtFlVTELLfNG
Textbook (Fka The Siudent
Special Hour) is a show
about studenls by students
hosted by Josh Gabert-Doyon.
CiTR's studeni programming
coordinator. There are three
segments: Feature interview,
student storytelling, & 'Tell
Me About Your Paper".
Canlact. outfeach@cilr.ca
DISCORDER RADIO
5PM-6PM,  bCLfcCIIC:,   TALK
Produced by ihe Discorder
On Air collective, this show
covers content in the magazine
and beyond. Coordinated by
Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse,
and Jordan Wade. Get In
touch to gel involved!
Contact: discorder.i-adio@ciir.ea
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, louo/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programmfng@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
9FM-11PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*l. Hosted by Jamal Steeies.
Homeboy Jules. Reliy Rels.
LuckyRich. horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: df@crimesandtreasons.com
www.cri mesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CANrAJS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Mallhew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
wflh him as he features Fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage ol Canada.
Co ntact pr ogramming@cilr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM. ECLECTIC
Uve from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information, and insanity.
Contact rij@jackvelvel.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths ol
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedfoom pop and
garage rock all the way lo harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, tCLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back wilh gems from
the past, present, and luture.
Genre need nd apply.
Contact: prDnra
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK / POP
Contact prD3ramming@0itr.ca
ROOM TONE
2PM-3PM, TALK/INTERVIEW/FILM
Room Tone is a talk show
locused on Filmmaking thai
Invites guests weekly to
discuss their slices al reality
on set, tips, past/future
projects and love far the craft!
From Directors/Producers,
lo Cinemategraphers,
Production Designers, Actors,
Composers, Writers, Editors...
anyonel (Theatre A/ideo
Gamas/Animalion/Fashian
or any olher soM of crealfve
enlertainmenl is welcome).
Cantact:
lis1entoroomtone@qmaii.com
KEW IT UP
3PM-4PM, EXPERIMENTAL/TALK
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Ca|e($)chism / hall-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Eieclrcnica,
Posl-Punk, Industrial,
Noise : ad-nausaum
Cantact: programmlng@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
4PM-5PM, tALK/ ACCESSIBILITY
POLITICS
CiTR Accessibility Collective's
new radio show, we lalk
about equity, Inclusion and
accessibility far peaple with
diverse abilities, on campus and
beyond. Tune in every week
for interviews, music, news,
events, and awesome dialogue.
Cantact:
ace essibllitycotlective@ citr.ca
DOUBLESPACE
ALTERNATING TUES 3PM"4PM, TALK f
DESIGN / f EMENl&M
Investigating interactions with our
surroundings and society. Every
week we discuss our experiences
with these interactions, how
they emerge and the impacts
of these invisible forces.
Twitter | @doublespaceshow
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arls Reporl on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
lhat likes to get weird! Based
primarily In Vancouver. BC,
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake} are on Ihe airwaves
on CiTR Radio 101.9FM,
Wednesdays from 5-6pm.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
ANECDOTAL EVIDENCE
6pu-6:30PM, talk / story telling
Anecdotal Evidence is a live
storytelling series In Vancouver,
where people share true Slories
of how they experience science
in iheir lives; stories ot lailure,
tleldwork. love, death, cosmic
loneliness and more. Tune
in for humour, humanity, and
sometimes even science.
Coniact: Twitter I ae_s1ories
INNER SPACE
AITERNATING THUH5 6:30PM-fiPM,
ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Dedicated to underground
electronic music, both
experimental and dance'
oriented- Live DJ sets and
guests throughout.
Contact: prog ram mlng@cltr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
ALTERNATING TMUftS 6:30PM-8PM.
ROCK/POP/lN DIE
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you tor.
Don't miss her spins,
every Wednesday.
■
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, HIP HOP/INOie/SOUL
A panopoly ol songs, including
the freshest riddlms and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together. In a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes tor each other (eds
loo), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@cilr.ca
THE NEW ERA
9PM-10PM, HIP HOP' R&B/ SOUL
A showcase of up n' coming artisls
who are considered "underdogs"
in ihe music industry. We provide
a platform lor new artisls who are
looking for radio play. Bringing
you different styles of Hip Hop
music from all across the Earth
and interviews with music industry
professionals. It's the NEW ERA...
Contact: programrning@cltr.ca
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and ihe
snow capped rocky mountains,
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk, and hip hop lenses.
Gonlttot Faoabooh WrtOlWi»»BfldJo
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-1ZAM, TALK / SPOHT8
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes,
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: prcgramming@cilr.ca
SPICY BOYS
12AM-1AM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
Playing music and stuff.
You can listen.
Or don't.
It's up lo you,
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM. TALK
Host Issa Arlan Introduces you
lo topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture,
and sports, issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@ciK.ca
THE YOUTH ELEMENT PODCAST
BftM-gAM, TALK / YOUTH
Welcome to Ihe Asia Pacific
Foundation of Canada's new
podcast series about youth
cultures in East Asia. Over
the next several weeks, join
CQ'hosts Justin Kwan and Linda
Qian as they travel across five
cities in East Asia: Shanghai,
Taipei, Hong Kong, Tokyo and
Seoul, to listen to the voices
of millennials and learn more
about contemporary East Asia
through their views and the
stories of their own lives.
Contact: prog ram mlng@cltr.ca
CONVICTIONS & CONTRADICTIONS
ALTERNATING THURS. gAM-g^OAM,
TALK/COMEOYi'SOCIAL OBESERVATtONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is aboul our own convictions
and contradictions about
saciety: shown through social
observational comedy. To boot,
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact; programmlngcltr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
-1 ■: 1 ■-.■-.■■ "■'■ m. pu\k
Hello hello hello! 1 interview
bands and play new,
international, and local punk
rock music Broadcasted In
by -1.i:-;-:;,-.r lim h Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact rocketlromrussia.lumblr.com,
racked ram ru sstacl t rftfrg m a 11 .com,
@tlma_tiar,
face book .com R o c Ket F rom R ussia
LJ DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM. ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread ol
electronic vibes from across
Ihe decades. Acid, Alro-beal,
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Lei Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact" programming@citr.ca
DUNCANS DONUTS
1ZPM-1PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by oonuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress corn
K-POP CAFE
1PM 2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
enlertainmenl in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean,
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Enlertainmenl Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@ciu.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
ZPM-3PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
The Accessibility Collective
radio show! They lalk equity,
Inclusion, and accessibility
(or peopte with diverse
abilities, on and off campus.
Tune in tor interviews, music,
news, events, & dialogue.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
33:30PM. TALK/SCIENCE
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TERRA INFORMA
3:30-4PM. TALK'ENVIROMENTAL
Environmental News,
syndicated from CJSR
88.5FM in Edmonton.
Contact: sports@citr.ca
THE GENDER EMPOWERMENT
MEDIA COLLECTIVE
4PM-5PM. talk/feminism/gender
EMPOWERMENT
The Gender Empowermenl
Collective's goal is to center
the voices, issues, concerns,
and experiences of women,
transgender, intersex, Two-
Spirit, genderqueer. gender
non-conforming, non-binary,
and gender fluid folks and allies.
Tune in weekly for interviews,
commentary, stories and news
from YOUR communities.
Contact:
gendere mpowerme n t@citr,ca
CITR CURRENT AFFAIRS
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS
For lans of News 101, this
Is CiTR's brnad new Current
Affairs show! Tune in weekly
tor commentary, interviews,
and headlines Irom around
the Lower mainland.
Contact: newsiOl@dtr.ca
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THURS. 6PM-7:30,
ECLECTIC
Celebrating the message
behind the music. Profiling
music and musicians lhat
take the route of positive
action over apalhy.
Contact: programming@ci!r.ca
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30PM-gpM, hip hop/hSb/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr,ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
gpM-1-IPM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ELECTRONIC
ll it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy.paste. Vibe
out wilh what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs,
Contact: music@actsofaur.ono-
my.com
AURAL TENTACLES
T2AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance,
spoken word.rock, the
unusual and the weird,
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact: auraltentacJes@holmall.
com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
87AM-8AM,  TALK/POLITICS
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news,
politics, and investigative
repoMmg. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse@canadaland-
show.eam
CITED!
8AM-3AM,  lALK/ACAOEMIA
This is a radio program aboul
how our world Is being shaped
by ihe ideas of the ivory lower.
Sometimes, In troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join muttl award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact: facebook. convened podcast, Twiiter 1 @citedpodcasi
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM, ROCK/POP'INDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
farm, we all love a good
collection of songs, Join us
every Friday morning al 10
for a live mlxlape with musical
commenlaty. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear Irom Mali McAMhur
and Drew MacDonakJI
Contact" programming©citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-1ZPM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled Is an
adventure through Ihe world of
film. Whether it's contemporary.
classic, local, or global, we
talk aboul film with passion,
mastery, and a "in dash ol
silly, Featuring music from
Ourcinemalic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings inlo locus.
COfrtaCt pr0gramrnin3@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
1ZPM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide 10
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and lalk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@gmail.com
FRESH SLICE
1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Tunos arc hot and fresh.
Talk is cheesey. Pop,
rock, DIY. pop-punk.
Contact. programmlng@citr.ca
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM. MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar. Ihe Human
Serviette lor an hour and a half
ol Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavourerJentenafnment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact
http:-'''nardwijar.com.,radi,contact''
CITR DOCS SEASON 2
5PM-6PM, taik/dooumentarv
Tune In for Insightful work
on niche topics. We cover
everything from queer
history lo environmentalism,
accesibillty, the Grunge
scene ol Ihe early '90s. and
gentrificalton in Vancouver.
Contact: Twitter | @CiTRradio
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7PM, TALK/COMEDY
6pm-7pm. Every week Jack.
Tristan and a special guesi
randomly seleci a conversation
topic (or the entire show;
ranging from God 10 unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation Is a cacophony
of segmenis and games for
your listening pleasure.Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-gpM, R&a/souLi'iNtEn-
NATIONAL
African Rhythms has beon on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host. David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
pasl, preseni, and fulure. This
Includes jazz, soul, hip-hop,
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There arc
also interviews wilh local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Gcnre: Dance
Contact" progra"rimlng@cilr.ca
THE DIGITAL TATTOO PODCAST
PROJECT
The Digital Tattoo Podcasl
Projecl raises questions,
provides examples, speaks
wilh experts, and encourages
you to think aboul your
presence online. Our goal
is to help you navigate the
issues involved in forming and
re-forming your digital identity
and learn about your righls
and responsibilities as a digital
ciliien, ll's really just aboul
making informed decisions
and your own decisions.
Contact: Twiller | @DTalUBC
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio dhama
Skalds Hall locuses on
entertainment through ihe art of
Radio Drama, Story readings,
poetry recitals, drama scenes.
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contad us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Formerly an Ckxu, Canada Post-
Rock remains committed to the
best in posi-rock, drone, ambteni,
experimental, noise and basically
anything your hosl Pbone can
put the word 'post" in from of,
Slay up, lune in, zone out
Ccmlacl: programinlng@citr.ea,
Twitler I @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, ECLECTIC/LIVE
INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
wilh LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE :■ u£ic, nduslry guests
and insight, The material
presented is iherapeutlc
reliei from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, locat
live music, art. compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vancouvermedicjneatiow@pmailcom
■ SATURDAY
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30AM-LV..M, ELECTflOHICVAUaiEHT
The Late Nighl Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise.
Alternalive No Beat takes
you Into the early morning.
Contact: citrlatenightshow@gmalt.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
BAM 12PM, ROOTS/SLUES/FOLK
Now in ils 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide 10 warld & tacts music,
with Alrican, Latin and European
music in ihe first half, followed
by CeHic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else liis!
Conlad: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM- 1PM,  PUNK.'HARDGflHfc.i'Mfc 1 AL
On the air since £002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of ihe spectrum.
Conlad:
crashnLiurrira Uio@yah00-C a
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM. LOVD^METAL
Vancouver's longest running
melal show. If you're fnio music
that's on ihe heavier/darker
side ol the specirum, then you'll
like it. Sonic assault provided
by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Contact: programmlng@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM- SPM, fiOOTS/FOLKVBLUES
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Conlad: codeblue@paulnorton ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, ELECTRO NIC/MA MTfl A/
NU-OAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces ol sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary,
and futuristic. The show
leatures an eclectic array ol
electronic and acoustic beats,
music, chams, and poeiry
from ihe diverse peoples
and places ol planel earth.
Conlad: maniraradioshow@
gmail.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PU-7PM, TALK/RUSSIAN
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Conlad: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL/AMBIENT/
CHILLWAVE
Ptug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
inte your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy,
ethereal, vaporwave (ones Iresh
from ihe web. Ideal music lor
driving down ihe Pacific Coast
Highway In your Geo Tracker,
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping lor bootleg
'r.eqr. S;il.rr ;:-TTih-:-; .,1 ;■ Honn
Kong nighl market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today?
Conlad: nicjnlrJrive95@gmafl.coni
SOCA STORM
8PM-9PM,  INTERNATIONAL/SCIC-A
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
Ihe latest SOCA Music from
1he Caribbean. This show is
Ihe first Df its kind here on
CITR and is ihe perfect music
10 gel you in ihe mood to go
out partying! 11s Salurday,
watch oul STORM COMING!!!!
Papaya" ffSOCASTORM
Conlad: progrgmming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, ELECTRONIC/RETRO/
TECHNO
Every show is lull ol eleclro
bleeps, relrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
11 you like everything from
electro f techno f trance f
Sbil music / and retro 'Bus
ihis Is the show lor you'
Conlad; programmlng@cltr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-tAM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concepl ol
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a serves. The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
ol the Prog. Rock Era ■ 1965-
79) We're not alraid of noise,
Comad: prograrnrnfngOcltr <:h
■ SUNDAY
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music Cfo the Absotule Value
ol Noise and its world famous
Generalor. Ideal tor enhancing
your dreams or. If sleep Is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Conlad: programming@oitr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
7AM-9AM. b>lPbHIMbN1 AL.'blFFiCulT
OitficuH music, harsh
eledronlcs, spoken word,
cul-up/coiiage and general
CRESPAN© welrdness.
Contact; Twitter | @BEPICRE-
SPAN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
gAM-lQAM, CLASSICAL
From the Ancient World to
the 2 t st cenlury, foln host
M&rguerile in exploring and
celebrating classical music
Irom around the world.
Contact: programming@ci1r.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AW-1ZPM, INTERNATIONAL/
AM MAR iC,1' ETHIOPIA M
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
educalion and personal
development In Canada.
Contact: programming@cllr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM -3PMt RECtGAE
All roggae, all the lime. Playrng
the besl in rods rock reggae.
Dub, Ska, Dancetiatl with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshil-caught-ln-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@ci1r.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata. Merengue,
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspol DJ.
Contact: programming@ci1r.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM. ROCK/POP/lNDIE
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music Irom
parts of the spectrum {rock,
pop. etactronlc), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@ci1r.ca
NOW WERE TALKING
6PM-7PM, TALK/COMeDY/INTEFIVIEWS
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jelf
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Conlad: nwtpod@gmall,com ,
Twiller | ^'iwlpodcast
MORE THANHJMAN
7PM-8pm, electronic
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and luture:
house, ambient, vintage
eledronics, library music, new
age, hauntotogy, lauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds,
with Inane mterjeciions and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: 1antasticcal@mac.com,
Twitter j @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, PNTERNATIONAL/BHAJANS
.'oawwal 1 g/eu fi
Preseniing several genres of
rich Indian music In different
languages, poetry and guest
Interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalfs, Traditional, Bhejans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and oM
Bollywood numbers from the
1960s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact, rhylhmsindiae@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
SPM-gPM. ELECTRON If' DEEP HOUSE
A mix o1 the latest house
music, lech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes-
Contaci; programming@cltr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
gPM-UPM, ELECTHONIC/TFANCE
Trancendance has been
broadcasting irom Vancauver.
BC since 2001. We favour
Psylrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially flit's remixed.
Contact:
dfsmileymike@tra ncenda in? rel
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCEfl
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whltecaps, MLS,
and me world of football. Est.
In 2013, the show features
raundlable chal about the
week's big talking points,
interviews wfth ihe headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latesi happenings and even
some soccer-related musk:.
il you're a Ian ol the oeautilui
game, Ihlsls a must-listen.
Contact: programming@cltr.ca
■ ISLAND OF
LOST TOYS
STUDENT FILL IN
ECLECTIC
A place lor experimentation
& learning!
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mU lo ease you from
the moonlighl. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
leasl e*pect it, and need it mosl.
CITR GHOST MIX
AN VThINOj'E VERT THING
Lale nigh), the on air studio
Is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear hoies.
We hope they're kind, but
we make na guarantees. CiTR 101 9FM SEPTEMBER CHARTS
The official line-up
for the
34th   Annual
O
IS FINALLY HERE!
-X-X-X-
27 bands, 27 winners for $6
every Tuesday
-x-x-x-
Hastings Mill Brewing Company,
FKA Pat's Pub & Brewhouse
Oct 10
Mi'ens
Modern Day Poets
The Sylvia Platters
Oct 17
Basic Instinct
Sissy Heathens
April Fools
Childrenhood
Oct 24
Kmvp
Parlour
Panther
The Dead Zones
Oct 31
Bored Decor
The Maneuver
Laverne
Nov 7
Sorry Edith
Reign Cloud
No Mothers
Nov 14
Sexy Merlin
Last Forest
Pleasure Blimps
Nov 21
The Civil Dead
Tanglers
M a m a r u d e g y a 1
Nov 28
King Buzzard
Mooshy Face
These Guy
Dec 5
The Afrolution
Dammit
Samantha
Ghulo
■s=M
Bluelight
STUDIO
Cannery Brewing
S1«-        AC
Ocent     (rxr
press   v>
PrintPrint
fast. affordable.
nimbus
SCHOCI THE LIZARD WIZARD
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
October   4
LOW ROAR
Fox Cabaret
October   6
RAINER MARIA
The Cobalt
October 7     October 7
L.A. WITCH MICKEY AVALON
Fox Cabaret    The Cobalt
October 8
GRYFFIN
Imperial
October 8 October 9 I October 10
BORIS KING GIZZARD AND THE LIZARD WIZARD   THE CRIBS
Rickshaw Theatre
Commodore Ballroom
The Cobalt
October 13
LEON
Imperial
October 14     October 14
BAD SUNS DAVID DUCHOVNY
Fortune       Imperial
October 15
NORTH MISSISSIPPI ALLSTARS
Imperial
October  15
GENERATIONALS
The Cobalt
^/.
October 16 October 20
PAUL KELLY   L0STB0YCR0W WITH PRELOW
Imperial Fox Cabaret
October 21
WAND
The Cobalt
October 22
THE BLACK ANGELS
Commodore Ballroom
October  28
HOCKEY DAD
The  Cobalt
November  1
KALI UCHIS
Biltmore
October  25
MASTODON
Orpheum Theatre
October 29   October 30
LEERANALDO   MAX FROST
The Cobalt   Fox Cabaret
November  3
6LACK
Commodore Ballroom
October 25
THE BABE RAINBOW
The  Cobalt
October  31
THE UNDERACHIEVERS
Fortune Sound Club
November  3
BLANCK MASS
Fox Cabaret
November   7
TED LEO & THE PHARMACISTS
The Cobalt
November 10
MICHL
Fox Cabaret
November 5
KING KRULE
Vogue Theatre
November 8
November 9
THE WEATHER STATION ! GAVIN TUREK
Fox Cabaret       Fox Cabaret
November 11
JAWS OF LOVE
St. James Hall
November 11     November 12
TREVOR HALL NOAH GUNDERSEN
Imperial Imperial
Tickets   & more  shows  at
imbreconcerts.com

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0356558/manifest

Comment

Related Items