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254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
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DECAPITATED & THY ART IS
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PERTURBATOR
AUTHOR &PUNISHER, WEIRD
CANDLE
OCT
THE CHURCH
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VENOM INC GOATWHORE,
TOXIC HOLOCAUST, THE
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MARSHALL CRENSHAW Y
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GIUDA BUSTER SHUFFLE, THE
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PETUNIA AND THE VIPERS
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LUNGS THE BALLANTYNES,
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RELEASE), CROATIA
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SEPT 2017
oiunus
COVER:   WOOLWORM BY COLIN BRATT
JFeatures
06
07
SEXUAL  ASSAULT AND ACCOUNTABILITY
So you know that
is an abuser, now what?
-   GEOFF DEMBICKI  ASKS,   ARE WE  SCREWED?
Local journalist (+ ex-Peace rocker) discusses climate
change in his new book
08  -  NARDWUAR'S  30TH ANNIVERSARY
"You can be Nardwuar!"
16 -  WOOLWORM
Casual interview walking Giles* dog
17 -  FREEMAN  YOUNG
Beats from the heart.
18 -c'asnavam: the city before the city
new film by Elle-Maija Tailfeathers screens at VIFF.
Column* + flDt&er £>tuff
04 - Obituary:
Aloha Dare.
05 -   In Response:
"Vancouver Mural Festival:
The  Present  is a Gift  for
Developers"  by Jesse  McKee
& Amy Nugent.
08  - Real Live Action
live music and comedy
12 - Art  Project:
RAMCHILD
13 -  September Calendar
16  - Under Review
albums, books
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates available
upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discover, please contact: editor.discorder@citr.ca. To
submit images, contact: artdirector.discorder@
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for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your
business, email advertising@citr.ca. We are
always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
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Old Things Still  Can  by
Kerria Gray
III
To inform Discorder of an upcoming album
release, art show or significant happening;
please email all relevant details 4-6 weeks
advance to Brit Bachmann, Editor-in-Chief
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct comments, complaints ai
corrections via email.
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22 -  CiTR Program Guide
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On Air Coordinators: Claire Bailey, Dora Dubber, Kat Kott, Matt Meuse, Jordan Wade // Writers: Brit
Bachmann, Koby Braidek, Mark Budd, Aidan Danaher, Joseph Doyle, Clara Dubber, Dusty Exner, Kerria
Gray, Bruce Hayward, Max Hill, Sarah Jickling, Jonathan Kew, Shebli Khoury, Oskar Kinbote, Rachel Lau,
Paige Lecoeur, Kelley Lin, Lucas Lund, Jesse McKee, Lexi Melish, Amy Nugent, Nathan Pike, Christine
Powell, Frances Schroff, Elijah Teed, Dylan Toigo, Emily Valente // Photographers & Illustrators: Simone
Badanic, Javiera Bassi De La Barrera, Colin Brattey, Amy Brereton, Duncan Cairns-Brenner, Brian Fogarty,
Jules Francisco, Sophia Lapres, Lucas Lund, James Mackenzie, D. Magee, Konstantin Prodanovic, Nolan
Sage, Alejandra Samaniego, Emily Valente // Proofreaders: Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Brit Bachmann,
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©Discorder 2017 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by
CiTR, located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiriem speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard
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Cl)ttx$ to a
jfteto Reason
EDITOR'S NOTE
[  am sunburnt and burnt out, overlooking a bog on a property somewhere
I  between Nanaimo and Ladysmith. The house I am staying at was built by a
^^  couple who met through CiTR in the early '80s, right around the time the
station got their FM license and Discorder was founded. I think about this property a
lot, and the coincidence of having friends whose parents met through CiTR around
the time Discorder was just a spark in the minds of its first editors, Jennifer Fahrni
and Mike Mines.
I have written this Editor's Note before — the "what's Discorder for" note — with
each variation a bit more confident. This is my second full year with Discorder, the
twentieth issue I've worked on, and every month I learn more about the magazine,
the contributors who fill it up, and the community who support it. It's no secret that
Discorder continues to exist, despite increasing production costs, because it is a training ground for writers, photographers and illustrators. Discorder is "that magazine
from CiTR 101.9FM." But it can also be a resource.
Since our symbolic reformat last year, we have asked our readers to observe and
reconsider their surroundings through articles that address event accessibility, lack
of diversity in festival line-ups, the stigmatization of the opioid crisis, areas of
gentrification, and more. We continue this theme in the September issue with an
article on sexual assault and accountability in music scenes; a reprint of "Vancouver
Mural Festival: The Present Is A Gift For Developers" by Jesse McKee and Amy
Nugent; and an interview with Elle-Maija Tailfeathers, the filmmaker of c'dsnaTdm:
the city before the city. There are also plenty more interviews, previews and reviews
to feast on.
This month, there is a lot of news from our extended CiTR family, including
Nardwuar's 30th Anniversary radio marathon and concert [page 08], a reformatting
of Discorder Radio [page 20], and exciting newlyknotted announcements below.
So, cheers! To brushing off the charred bits of our summer selves, and getting
back to work.
A+
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81 W. PENDER ST VANCOUVER, BC V6B 1R3, CANADA OBITUARY
ALOHA DAVE
words  by Rachel  Lau  //
photo  courtesy  of Konstantin
Prodanovic   for   The  Ubyssey
I  avid Alexander Brown, also known
I  as Aloha Dave, passed away on
^^F  February 8, 2017 at the age of 69 in
Vancouver, British Columbia. Dave was a man
of many names. Throughout his life he had
introduced himself as Rumpelstiltskin, The
Entire West Coast, and Hayseed — finally settling on Aloha Dave. Aloha Dave always wanted
to visit Hawaii and Australia, and this may be
where the "aloha" stems from. Sadly, Aloha
Dave never got the chance to visit either place.
Born in Hamilton, Ontario on September 3,
1947, Dave was a bright individual at an early
age. According to his friends and family, Dave
graduated from Grade 13 when he was only 15
years old. As a young high school graduate,
Aloha Dave dreamed of attending art school,
but due to his parents' finances and his age,
he could not pursue his dream. This may have
been the turning point that lead Aloha Dave
to pursue a more carefree lifestyle of music
and travel.
Aloha Dave was known to have travelled
frequently along the West Coast — owing
to the period of time that he called himself
The Entire West Coast. Endearingly known
as West by his friend, Richard Stepp, Dave
is described as a man who absorbed musical
influences from the communities he visited
along the West Coast. During his travels to
Los Angeles, Aloha Dave would stay with
his friends Joni Mitchell and Stephen Stills.
Returning from these southbound trips,
Aloha Dave would share new inspiration with
Stepp. Stepp, who was part of the Canadian
garage rock band The Northwest Company,
expressed how much Aloha Dave influenced
him as a songwriter and as a person. In the
words of Stepp, Aloha Dave was "undiscovered talent," and created music that was
"way ahead of his time." As an eccentric
individual, Dave was not always recognized
for his talent, but those who understood and
appreciated him for who he was celebrated
his creativity.
One of the most interesting (and
unfortunate stories) that Aloha Dave
shared with friends was about his
experience in Mexico. While Aloha Dave was
staying in a band house in Mexico, he and
his housemates were arrested for possession
of marijuana. Consequently, he spent two
months in jail, where guards used cattle prods
on him. In the end, Aloha Dave's parents paid
a ransom to get him out. According to Stepp,
Aloha Dave was always bitter about this experience because his teeth rotted in jail — the
prison did not provide him with a toothbrush.
Dave never returned to Mexico after that.
Few people knew that Aloha Dave was
a fantastic autoharp player. He wrote
and sang original songs backed by his
autoharp including, "Leisure Generation" and
"Teleportation" — a song about his travels
from "West Vancouver to L.A." Dave billed
himself as "The World's Greatest Electric
Autoharp Player." One of his dreams, in fact,
was to have his electric autoharp connected to
a major PA system, and play stadium shows
with his autoharp. In later years, this dream
evolved into orchestrating a symphony —
Aloha Dave even owned a conductor's baton
to practice.
As a member of the CiTR community,
Dave spent a lot of time hanging out at the
station. When he ran for AMS President in
2016, he was interviewed live on-air to discuss
his candidacy. Family and friends shared
that Dave was delighted to be studying at
the University of British Columbia. He often
spoke fondly of the classes he attended and
people he met on-campus. Although Aloha
Dave's day job was driving a cab in Whistler,
he would still commute all the way to UBC's
Vancouver campus to attend classes. At UBC,
Dave pursued many passion projects, like a
documentary film about Richard Stepp as the
"most famous unfamous guy around." Rick
Brown, Dave's brother, shared that Dave's
time at UBC was "one of the highest points in
his life," which says a lot.
Aloha Dave was never a man in the spotlight,
but he influenced others in a quiet manner
that lifted them up. While Dave did not build a
family of his own, he had friends he held close
and who cared for him dearly. Through his
creativity and insight, he touched the lives of
family, friends and acquaintances. Aloha Dave,
in all his enthusiasm, will be missed.
WRISTBAND
SWARM 18 PREVIEW
words by Emily Valente and Paige Lecoeur
illustration by Amy Brereton
I   hat's better than two consecutive
I   evenings of exhibition openings,
^^^^^   performances and screenings in
galleries across Vancouver? If this piques your
interest, you're in for a treat September 7-8
for SWARM 18, a free art festival organized and
hosted by artist-run centres.
SWARM marks the launch of the fall
programming season for many Vancouver
artist-run centres. Differing from commercial
art galleries or museums, artist-run centres
(ARCs) are artist collectives or non-profit
organizations that support innovative and
new works from a variety of media. They
have historically been an important agent
of cultural creation and grassroots activism,
and continue to be. Many ARCs in British
Columbia are organized under the Pacific
Association of Artist Run Centres (PAARC),
and SWARM is an annual event that brings
awareness to their alternative art spaces.
The Vancouver installment of SWARM
will take place across the city, but mainly
clustered in Chinatown, East Vancouver and
Mount Pleasant. Discorder got the scoop on
some specific programming:
fl
ccess Gallery (222 East Georgia
Street) will be hosting an opening for
Twenty-Three Days at Sea, Chapter 2:
Michael Drebert, Lili Huston-Herterich, Rebecca
Moss, Sikarnt Skoolisariyaporn on September
8. In partnership with the Burrard Arts
Foundation and the Contemporary Art Gallery,
Access has offered voyages aboard a cargo
ship from Vancouver to Shanghai to a few
emerging visual and performance artists.
Lasting 23 days, these voyages serve as
opportunities for the artists to reflect on the
roles of major port cities in the Pacific Rim.
The project challenges the role of artists as
"witnesses," as well as bringing visibility to
transport systems and industry that society
tends to overlook. It runs until October 28.
Ballery Gachet's SWARM exhibition,
The Oppenheimer Park Community Art
Show, will be the last in their current
location at 88 East Cordova before moving
to another space. It is the 10th anniversary of this exhibition, which centres the
work of artists working and living in the
Downtown Eastside. The artists and members
of the gallery will be in attendance during
the opening reception on September 8 from
6-10PM. The show runs until October 22.
UNIT/PITT (236 East Pender Street)
will be hosting an inaugural solo
show for Giovanna Swaby, a
Bahamian artist currently based in Vancouver.
We All Know Each Other is a series of stitched
portraits based around hair care. The press
release states that the exhibition "celebrates
the self-love and appreciation black women
have worked fiercely to develop." The exhibition lasts September 8-October 21.
^^ runt gallery (350 East 2nd Avenue) will
I be exhibiting Technical Problem, mixed
^J media drawings by Vancouver-based
artist Aileen Bahmanipour. Bahmanipour
draws on epic tales and texts from her Iranian
identity to explore themes related to politics
and cultural expression. The press release
describes Bahmanipour's work as "both fantastical and meticulous," informed by Persian
miniature painting. Technical Problem opens
September 7 and runs until October 14. There
is a daytime artist talk at 2PM on September 9.
DIVO Media Arts Centre (2625 Kaslo
Street) will be hosting an exhibit
called Love And Rockets conceived by
resident curator Darrick Chang. It will explore
the outlets people indulge in when inhabiting
tension, and relations of power that come
with interpersonal relationships. Featuring
works by Elizabeth Milton, Jennifer
Remenchik, Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay and
Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, the exhibit
seeks to explore "longing and everyday
feelings that provide an outlet for tensions and power dynamics that exist within
interpersonal relationships." The title is also
a casual shout-out to the '80s comic by the
Hernandez brothers. It runs until September
21 with an opening reception September 7.
This is just a few of the galleries participating in SWARM 18, but there are a dozen
more. Each space has curated thoughtful
and thought-provoking work that speaks
to the strength of their communities. As an
annual event that celebrates artist spaces,
SWARM is a consistent reminder that art
has the capacity to influence the day-
to-day. It is an event not to be missed.
Check out paarc.ca/swarmi8 for more about
SWARM 18. You can also grab a general information pamphlet on ARCs at any participating
gallery. CiTR 101.9FM and Discorder Magazine
will have a table at Access Gallery September 8 to
promote our new PLOT partnership. Come visit!
OBITUARY: ALOHA DAVE// WRISTBAND: SWARM 18 PREVIEW RESPONSE
VANCOUVER MURAL FESTIVAL: THE PRESENT IS A GIFT FOR DEVELOPERS
words by Jesse McKee and Amy Nugent
Thompson Square Park Riots, New York City, August 6, 1988. Photograph by Angel Franco, The.New York Times
Editor's Note: The following essay is a reprint of an edited
Facebook post from August u.
This letter is a response to CBC Radio One's August ii, 2017
coverage of the Vancouver Mural Festival on the program The
Early Edition.
This morning CBC's The Early Edition did a piece on
the Vancouver Mural Festival (VMF), scored by the
theme music from web series turned television
series Broad City. Broad City is based on liana Glazer and
Abbi Jacobson's (Jewish American comedians and writers)
real life friendship, and their attempt to "make it" in New
York. The show opens with a colourful animation done by
Mike Perry and the theme song is a track called "Latino &
Proud" by Chilean hip-hop and electronic music producer
DJ Raff.
Yet the intent behind this song choice is misleading.
Vancouver Mural Fest, at the core of its structure, does not
represent a culturally diverse or marginal perspective as
you might expect from a mural festival. Instead it is the
initiative of a group of predominantly white men who have
built alliances, not with the everyday people of Vancouver,
but with real estate developers, Business Improvement
Associations (BIAs) and the City government.
A group of Mount Pleasant residents have recently
done some questioning and investigation into the funding
structure, power alliances, and implications of the City
of Vancouver's support of Vancouver Mural Festival. This
story weaves the personal lives of Mount Pleasant residents, the sun-setting of a cherished local building known
as The Belvedere, and the political and economic structures
that are driving the VMF, among other aspects of the equation. We would like to state that this criticism is directed
towards the VMF founders and leaders, not the artists
who have been hired by the festival to fulfill its goals. The
VMF is opaque about its payment policies for artists, but
they pay the artist on average $2,000 per mural. These are
adequate contracts for working artists in this city, who on
average, do not earn more than $12,000 annually.
As we have discovered, the City of Vancouver circumvented its cultural policies by providing massive startup
and operational funding for Vancouver Mural Festival.
The City granted levels of support previously unheard of
when compared to the funding received by long-standing
cultural organizations in Vancouver. The VMF sidestepped public art processes, accountability on allocation,
and adjudication procedures, receiving a unique grant
agreement based on a quota, not content system that has
increased its coverage this year to a minimum of 50 buildings. Moreover, the start-up funding provided by the City
did not arrive from the City of Vancouver Cultural Services
but rather through the Engineering budget. This was a
quick way for the city to run with a branding scheme
for neighbourhoods in a way that ultimately serves the
interests of developers, realtors, and property owners -
stakeholders Vision Vancouver is beholden to more than
working class residents who live in these areas.
flt a basic level, the Vancouver Mural Festival
represents an unprecedented cultural authority
working in parallel with corporate and landowning interests in the selection and approval of public
art. Given that the festival's programming and selection
process rests primarily on securing buildings that say
"yes" to a mural, the landlords and developers behind
these buildings end up with the power to pick and
choose what mural designs go up. The Belvedere Court
is perhaps the most painful example of this force.The
Belvedere is a beloved heritage building found at Main
and 10th and is home to dozens of artists over the last 30
years including Derya Akay, Rebecca Brewer, Julia Feyrer,
Tamara Henderson, David Lehman, Ron Tran, Alison Yip
and Jacob Gleeson among many others. The Belvedere is
also where Jean Swanson recently staged her city council
by-election campaign launch, and she drew attention to
the fact that The Belvedere's landlords are currently in the
process of renovicting residents en masse. With the vacant
units in the building now at eight (or nearly one third of
the total units) after a recent wave of evictions, bribes and
fixed-term leases signed under duress, it is expected that
the remaining tenants will be under intense pressure to
succumb to no-fault evictions in the near future.
Ironically, given Vancouver Mural Festival's message of
improving neighbourhoods and communities, their flagship
mural, titled "The Present is a Gift," adorns The Belvedere
and its painting was the catalyst that began the renoviction
process in the building this past year. At one point, the
VMF consulted with the Mount Pleasant Heritage Group
(MPHG) for the mural - one of the few instances of such
community consultation by the VMF. The MPHG proposed
the phrase "Our Place, Our Home" for the mural text. It
was rejected by the VMF in favour of the current platitude
and the building landlord blocked the muralists from using
portraits of two Belvedere residents from being used in
the final piece. VMF organizers accommodated the landlord's choice over the long-time tenants in its "community
outreach," thereby creating a sense of embitterment for
residents as they were forced to gaze at a phrase quite in
contradiction to their lived circumstances.
Speaking about the Belvedere mural, Festival Director
David Vertesi is quoted in a Vancouver Sun article as
saying, "it livens up a dead space... It is a really awesome
reminder to appreciate what you have and to see the kind
of people and diversity of people who call Mount Pleasant
home. This piece in particular means a lot to me." For
the diverse residents in the neighbourhood living precariously under threat of eviction, such comments by Vertesi
are utterly tone deaf and run roughshod over any other
narrative that is not primarily fueled by development.
VMF are acting like surveyors by priming a neighbourhood slated to be clear-cut in a truly unsustainable way.
Ultimately the backroom maneuvers and financial backing
of the VMF portray a strategic process of gentrification
that's being propelling by class interests amidst a housing
crisis. The squatters and punks who stood off against cops
at Tompkins Square Park in New York in 1988 summed it
up best: 'Gentrification is class war.' And Vancouver Mural
Festival is a blatant symptom of how class war is being
waged in Vancouver in 2017.
With mass amounts of funding from the City - $550,000
in 2 years - $300,000+ from developers this year alone,
$30,000 from Mount Pleasant BIA, and sponsorships from
tech company like Hootsuite (who got several massive
murals in the deal), all amidst the condo-fication of residential spaces and the rezoning of light industrial lands
into tech campuses, the Vancouver Mural Festival spells out
large-scale culture-washing for the Mount Pleasant neighbourhood. Queue Broad City theme: "4 and 3 and 2 and 1."
What are the motives and what are the ends?
Vancouver Mural Festival has been able to expand further
into the Downtown Eastside (DTES) with vigorous
support from Chip Wilson and his holding company Low
Tide, who now own 5 buildings in and around Hastings
and Hawks. If you look at the VMF map, many of the new
murals will be in the DTES and Strathcona and we have
the Strathcona BIA, Low Tide and VMF attempting to
rebrand Strathcona as an "arts district." Who really has
licence to decide that a neighbourhood will be an art hub
while it's still literally in a state of being torn down and
rebuilt? The placement of these murals should be at least
suspect, in their alignment with top-down corporate
strategies of urban renewal instead of a city-wide peer
assessed arms-length arts funding process.
The quota-based process that the Vancouver Mural
Festival and the City of Vancouver have mandated is aligned with the accelerated development
in these regions that is displacing residents and single
proprietor businesses. Meanwhile, leaders across several
sectors have intently encouraged this rebranding scheme
as a community amenity. Ultimately, there is a chorus
effect at work, and everyone involved in leading these
processes should be asked to reconsider how they are
working, what the real-life effects of their work are, and
to take some time to earnestly listen to the residents in
the neighbourhoods being directly affected.
IN RESPONSE: VANCOUVER MURAL FESTIVAL: THE PRESENT IS A GIFT FOR DEVELOPERS SEXUAL ASSAULT AND
ACCOUNTABILITY IN
THE MUSIC SCENE
words by Brit Bachmann // illustrations by D. Magee
Trigger warning: This article deals with topics around sexual assault and predatory behaviour
in music scenes. If you are sensitive to this, you may find yourself uncomfortable. If you are
uncomfortable, and you are not a survivor of sexual assault, I encourage you to read on.
■^B^B^B  hile researching and writing this piece I hit several walls. The informa-
I  tion I had gathered all seemed so basic. But what's important to realize,
'^fej^^F  f°r those who may find the following text redundant or repetitive, is that
many people do not consider active community response to sexual assault as common-sense. The most frequent group action towards disclosures of sexual assault or
predatory behaviour is collective discomfort and silencing. This article seeks to subvert
that response by providing an overview of what it means to acknowledge survivors and
demand accountability from abusers. It is not comprehensive or definitive, but it is a
contribution towards what needs to become a larger conversation. While sexual assault
occurs in many scenes, for the purpose of this article I will be focusing on the music
scene.
COMMUNICATION
There are sexual abusers in Vancouver who have not made public statements or
sought help for their behaviour. And yet, they continue to participate in the various
music scenes where accusations against them have been made. Finding out who these
people are, however, is difficult. Sometimes their names are scratched onto bathroom
walls, or relayed through word-of-mouth. Such word-of-mouth is often discredited as
gossip without substance. For newcomers to the Lower Mainland, without a lot of connections in the city, it is almost impossible to learn the names of abusers. The silence
around these names puts people at risk. With that said, there is no perfect way to share
the name of abusers. Some people resort to social media, opening themselves up to
public attack and possible lawsuit. Community policing through word-of-mouth is
also unideal. As Nikki Reimer points out in the essay "Hold Your Fucking Communities
Accountable," rape culture is intersectional. When stories of sexual abuse are limited to
gossip networks, there is no guarantee that everyone will hear about it. Gossip doesn't
always cross over, meaning that marginalized communities in particular may not get
relevant information about abusers. In the past, there has been talk of anonymously
posting a list of alleged abusers online, but posting names without context is not
healthy or productive. An anonymous list encourages open hostility. It has the capacity
to instill fear and pushes away abusers before they seek help for their behaviour.
Efficiently calling out abusers in the long-term is not a one-way discussion.
ACCOUNTABILITY
LEGAL RISKS
Not to be overlooked are the real legal risks to calling out sexual predators. Publishing
a call-out on Facebook or another social media platform, or circulating the names of
alleged abusers through word-of-mouth may result in legal action for damages by the
alleged abuser. Canada's defamation laws are plaintiff-friendly, in that they assume
defamatory statements are false and made with malice, and place the burden of proof on
the defendants who made or republished the statements. In the case of sexual assault
call-outs, especially instances where police reports are not filed, defamation court cases
can be complicated, lengthy and expensive for everyone involved. Some abusers have
been known to hire lawyers to send cease and desist letters to survivors and others who
openly discuss predatory behaviour. Unfortunately, this is often an effective tactic of
intimidation against survivors. Another tactic of intimidation that is most often used by
companies, but can be used by individuals, is a SLAPP suit. A Strategic Lawsuit Against
Public Participation is used to silence critics.
*****
[  f you leave this article with anything, let it be the importance of enduring
I  uncomfortable discussions about sexual assault. There is no perfect way of
^P    calling out predatory behaviour. Processes of accountability must be determined
by the community as a whole. Perhaps that means the alleged abuser makes a public
statement and seeks counselling, quits social media, or leaves a scene entirely for a
period of time. These are all hard discussions to be had as a group of venues, promoters,
media outlets, music labels and party-goers. When survivors speak up, it is the community's responsibility to listen and respond.
I read dozens of articles and zines researching for this piece, and while there were
many approaches to call-outs and accountability, there was a common belief that kept
resurfacing: People who have not publicly acknowledged disclosures of sexual assault
against them should not be supported by the community. Because sexual abusers in
music scenes are often in positions of power, this may mean avoiding events and creative initiatives organized by or featuring alleged abusers. For artists, this may mean
sacrificing opportunities for exposure. However, when the community shows solidarity
with survivors by encouraging safer music scenes, everyone benefits. Showing support
for survivors is a small action towards shaping a society that prioritizes consent and
respect.
Visit discorder.ca and citr.ca for web exclusive interviews with harm reduction organizations
PLURI and Good Night Out Vancouver, and an interview on calling out with Montreal's Catherine
Colas. For more articles and online resources, visit the following links:
:iUold Your Tucking Communities Accountable" by .Nikld Reimer, published online January 4, 2017.
tiahouse.ca/nikki-reimer-hold-Jiccking-communities-accountable
"Resources Tor Dealing With Conflict And Harm " by .Nora Samarmi, published online January .
norammaran.com/2017/01/05/resources-Jor-dealing-with-conflict-and-harm
2017
:'Stop Supporting and Protecting Abusive Men" by Aimee Cliff, Leah Mandel, Juliana Pache, AH Suliman, Laldn Starling and Ruth Saxelhy,
published online July 25, 2017. thefader.com/2017/07/25/stop-supporting-and-protecting-abusme-men
It is important to make a distinction between abusers who have not made public
statements and gotten counselling for their behaviour, and those who have. Some
abusers work to educate themselves on consent, boundaries and emotional manipulation. Seeking accountability is not the punishment or ostracization of abusers, but a
commitment towards having uncomfortable conversations and healing as a community.
This may mean eventually accepting rehabilitated abusers back into the music scenes
where they were abusive. It does not mean forgetting or silencing what happened, or
allowing abusers to return to previous positions of authority, but it does mean holding
space for ongoing discussions. Abusers are capable of being loved and participating in
community. This is a difficult concept for survivors especially, which is why it is so
important to show sensitivity and support towards them above anyone else.
BELIEVE SURVIVORS
Believe survivors. Respect the courage that survivors show in recounting traumatic
experiences and/or naming their abusers. It takes an incredible amount of emotional labour
to talk about sexual assault. To speak openly about it is an act of resistance. There is a
tendency to discredit survivors by attempting to poke holes in their stories, or justifying
the actions of their abusers. Some people may claim that survivors share their stories for
fame or notoriety, when in reality they face potential backlash and shaming. Experiences of
abuse can be difficult to remember. Whether or not all the facts of a story are 100 percent
accurate does not matter. What matters is acknowledging the pain of survivors, which is
real to them. When communities do not listen to survivors, they enable sexual assault. The
silencing of topics around sexual assault is hostility through oppression.
SEXUAL ASSAULT AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN THE MUSIC SCENE "3 bon't tjaue mud) interest in conuincing people Uitjo benji climate
science, or ttje urgency of action. 3'm preacljmg to tlje ctjoit anb trying
to get tljem rileb up, organizeb anb reabji to tear stjit bourn.'
[   'm sitting with Geoff Dembicki in his writing
I  studio. Dembicki has just finished a panel about
^P*  the oil-sands on a conservative radio show out of
Alberta. Having grown up in Edmonton, down the road
from a refinery, Dembicki has a sense of oil and economy.
That versatility is good for a journalist to have.
Perhaps most prolific in Vancouver as the lead sustain-
ability writer for the The Tyee, Dembicki is on the heels of
his new book, Are We Screwed?. The book's question is one
of climate change: a future of destruction that is tonally
disparate from the frivolity millennials typically receive.
There's a cottage-industry of think-pieces about
millennials and their childish reticence towards housing,
fabric softener, and so on. Are We Screwed? is all about "the
millennial" — specifically, the conditions which have lead
to a divergence in values from a Baby Boomer society.
Dembicki is practiced and steady in speech. He tells
me, "a lot of it was just reacting to stuff that was happening. Canada's election, Obama rejecting the Keystone
XL Pipeline, the rise of Bernie Sanders — this was driven
by young activists. I was witnessing something that went
beyond climate change: young people in the face of uncertainty fighting for a new political and economic system,
winning in big ways. So that made me feel hopeful
throughout the year. And I sent off my manuscript to the
publisher. We were going through edits. And then Donald
Trump won the election. Well, shit — does any of this still
hold up?"
Before continuing, perhaps it's best to have Dembicki
clarify what is at stake. Because although we care about
climate change, the size of the issue can
resolve into a blot on the horizon.
Over the late summer, owing to
infernos across British Columbia's
interior, smog-choked vistas have
made Vancouver feel more like an island. This is
one artifact of global warming ravaging much of North
America's forests. It's also descriptive: we're wrapped in
a smokescreen, harm is elsewhere, only worth concern
when the consequences are already here.
Perhaps it's the language. What do we actually hear
when we hear about the spectrum of "acceptable"
increases in global temperature, or the difference between
two and three degrees of warming? This is the kind of
context journalists focus on, and Dembicki's answers
come readily:
"We're talking about massive disruptions
to the Earth's conditions that have made
human life possible. Polar ice is melting,
wreaking havoc for Inuit communities.
The Great Barrier Reef is bleaching. Glaciers
melting over the Himalayas, cutting off
freshwater access for millions. And we're not even
at 1.5 degrees. A cap of 1.5 degrees would be extremely
difficult. We'd have to phase out fossil fuels and the world
governments would have to act in a concerted way that's
never been done. At 2 degrees, entire South Pacific nations
go underwater. Vancouver's harbour starts going underwater. There's more storms, massive drought in Alberta:
agriculture potentially collapses. At 4 or 5 degrees, I don't
know. There'd be entire regions of the world made uninhabitable. Countries would be collapsing. Crises like the
Syrian civil war all over the place. You'd like to think that
when that happens people overlook their differences, but
during crises people can become polarized: you have the
rise of dictators and totalitarians."
Throughout his book, Dembicki reiterates: we exist
within an economic system which fuels climate change
because it values profit above any other moral considerations. It could be repetitive, but is instead stark: what
should be a slap falls on unreceptive ears.
This is where millennials come in. Dembicki
began writing his book two years ago, following a report from climate scientist James
Hansen. "Hansen predicted worst-case scenario,
coastal cities flooding by 2065. It was 2015 at that point,
and I realized anyone that's 35 [years old] and living right
now, 50 years from now they'll be in their 80s. Anyone
older might not be around to see this doomsday scenario.
There's a clear generational cut-off point, and it ended at
the upper age range of millennials. But I also realized a lot
of people in their 20s and 30s, they're starting companies,
running for office, leading activist campaigns. With all
this time ticking down, I realized there was the potential for millennials to make a huge difference. And if we
didn't, we would have to suffer from the consequences."
For Dembicki, the link between the political surge of
our generation and our responsibilities towards climate
change are mirrored: "If I was to pick one really defining
feature of what it means to be a young person these days,
it's a real distrust of capitalism. A lot of people in their
20s and 30s came to age during the global recession.
We've lost faith in the ability of business, political leaders
to lead us in the right direction. What you see with a lot of
these new movements is to question the principles of capitalism, to think of an economy that considers the future
of the planet."
Dembicki's book charts several ways in which these
developments are happening. The chapters show us
the lives of Peter and Magdalene, back-to-landers on
Denman, Bradley Johnson, a Fort McMurray resident who
left the family trade, Saba Hafeez, a UOFI graduate who
campaigned for Bernie Sanders, and others. "I don't have
much interest in convincing people who deny climate
science, or the urgency of action. I'm preaching to the
choir, and trying to get them riled up, organized and ready
to tear shit down."
There is an arc in the book. The first chapters can feel
alienating, detailing a back-to-lander's retreat to Denman
Island or a Yale graduate's turn around from the oil-sands
he grew up in. I felt an escape from my own sense of class,
and the anxiety of retreat, its seeming ineffectiveness.
Dembicki sees it differently. "I would like to take
readers along on a journey, tell them that the despair that
might tell them about the future, and the desire to create
change, could be put to effective use [...] I wanted to show
the power of symbolism and values. That was the big idea
behind the book. People think of values, morality, as being
fluffy and not powerful. But in the second chapter we see
that when people in their 20s start to doubt capitalism, it
has a real-world impact, affects billions of dollars in new
projects. That's not even activism really, that's just a new
generation of people. And when you take those shifts, and
apply them to something, like the resistance to Trump or
Keystone, then you start having immediate effects."
hen we start talking Dembecki tells
me his interview with that conservative radio station went well because he
was able to parse things in the language of "new
industry." Green capitalism aside, there is the generational demand for an alternate system. And Are We
Screwed? is, despite its maudlin title, quite optimistic.
There's a brighter future to be had beyond averting the
destruction of Trudeau's favourite waterfront.
Dembicki makes much of these rising grassroots campaigns, because this is the precise concerted consciousness
that is being developed against climate change. "All the
instances where young voter turnout was higher than
usual, you had these crazy election shifts happen [...] I
wanted to show how powerful millennials can be. The
sense of apathy we feel all the time helps perpetuate the
hold on power that people already have. When you push
back and challenge that, that hold on power is a lot less
stable."
There's a lot of inertia. Dembicki appreciates the progressive qualms with Canada's federal Liberals. But he is
also emphatic that the rejection of Harper represents a
building political consciousness. "I think even in scenarios
where the possibility for hope is extremely slim, there's
still a lot of power in holding onto that, and acting like a
better future is possible even if it seems impossible."
If the turn around from complacency needs further
argument, just try and think of the alternative. Maybe we
can't. Being screwed is just too stark.
Are We Screwed? How a New Generation is Fighting to
Survive Climate Change was released on Bloomsbury August
22. For more writing, follow @geoffdembicki on Twitter.
GEOFF DEMBICKI: ARE WE SCREWED? NARDWUAR'S 30TH ANNIVERSARY WITH CITR
AL¥VE
AFFAIR
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It's unlikely that many people
I  in this world are capable of
^P*  name-dropping President Gerald
Ford, Tommy Chong and Lil Yachty all
in the span of a single conversation, but
there is one person that can tie the bunch
together. Nardwuar the Human Serviette
emerged from CiTR in 1987, and has
indisputably become the station's most
recognizable and notorious figure in that
time. The Hip Flip, Courtney Love, pep-
per-on-my-plate, endless repetitions of
"How do you know that!?" — there's a
good chance if you're reading this that one
(if not all) of those references is immediately recognizable; there's a good chance
that somewhere across the last 30 years,
you too have become indoctrinated into
Nardwuar's cult of personality.
Sitting in a corner DJ booth at CiTR
101.9FM before his weekly show, Nardwuar
displays trademark optimism towards his
30th anniversary at the station.
"It feels like a new beginning. It doesn't
feel like another anniversary," he says,
pointing out towards the open atrium of
UBC's Student Nest. "It's kind of weird
in the sense that we're in a new location,
Door
BOOT
•  DOo*
44'
3t feel*
like a neto
beginning/
and I love the location that we're in. It's
amazing! Anybody can look in and say 'Oh,
who's that? Oh, it's that Nardwuar guy. I
can be a DJ too!'"
Despite three decades of broadcast experience, Nardwuar is earnest in seeing
no difference between himself and a total
beginner, candidly arguing that he, the
man that has interviewed everyone from
James Brown to Mikhail Gorbachev, is in a
constant state of improvement and education. It's the image of a nervous freshman
walking into the station for the first time
that gets him the most excited.
"It's good to be scared," he says. "That's
kind of my mantra. When a person comes
into CiTR and says, 'Oh my God, I'm
scared,' that's good, because it shows you
care. It shows that you'll strive to do good."
This isn't the first time that Nardwuar
has marked a milestone, either. 1998 was
his first, lauding 11 years at CiTR, and his
20th anniversary in 2007 saw him on the
air for 20 hours straight before playing a
celebratory gig with The Evaporators —
a tradition he's carrying out again this
month. From punk rock legends to conspiracy theorists, former Prime Ministers
to rising rap stars, Nardwuar has combed
through what seems like an unending collection of interviews and past shows for
nearly a full day's worth of content beginning September 21 at 9PM.
"There will be some political stuff, there
will be some early CiTR stuff, there won't
be any cheese metal, and of course there's
going to be a lot of Snoop [...] But it's hard
to whittle it down!" he exclaims.
Nardwuar's list goes on, from a tumultuous interview with Paul Gallagher
(the forgotten older brother of Noel and
Liam), to his internal debate over including
Johnny Rotten of The Sex Pistols and not
Mick Jones of The Clash. He's also quick to
point out that he's not alone in remaining
at CiTR for so long, citing shows like The
Jazz Show, Saturday Edge, Powerchord, Aural
Tentacles and Rockers Show that have been
on the air even longer than he has.
"I'd love to think that I'm unique in
sticking around, but I guess I'm not," he
laughs. "We just love music! I love the
chance to play whatever I want to play to
the people out there in radio-land, and to
expose people to new kinds of music."
As for The Evaporators' live show,
Nardwuar isn't shy when it comes to discussing the difficulties of producing and
organizing an all-ages event.
"It's a lot of work to put on an all-ages
gig, as it always has been," he states. "You
have to rent the hall, you have to rent a
PA, you have to get insurance, you have to
pay the bands — and the whole thing will
be over by 11PM, which is when most people go out!"
But ensuring that anyone can attend
his shows is something that Nardwuar
has been adamant about since his very
first production in August 1987 titled
"Barbarella Psychedelia." He has always
had a flare for throwing memorable events,
such as another event from 1987 that was
a bizarre Christmas party themed around
the 50th anniversary of Amelia Ear hart's
disappearance, and the proposition of her
return. This year's 30th Anniversary Show
adds another layer of sentimentality, too,
with a father-daughter connection between opening act Owl Empire and The
Evaporators' drummer, Nick Thomas.
[  t's that sense of communi-
I  ty-building and communal
^P*  exploration that seems to drive
Nardwuar 30 years on. His commitment
to continuously hosting all-ages events,
instead of more convenient and more
lucrative no-minors shows, is indicative of
this. It's expressed, too, in his consistent
belief that he's no more qualified or more
capable than anyone else willing to pick up
a microphone and get on the radio.
"If I can do it, anybody can — that's
what I want to get across," he says. "I am
not unique. You can be Nardwuar! You can
be a DJ for many years at CiTR."
Sure, it's a bit of a stretch for the man
who sports a tartan hat 365 days a year to
say he isn't unique, but here's hoping his
boundless enthusiasm, tenacity, and downright zaniness carries Nardwuar through
another 30 years of outrageous broadcasting.
Tune into CiTR 101.9FM September 21 at
gPM to catch 10 hours of non-stop Nard,
concluding during his regular radio timeslot
Friday, September 22 330-5PM. Not enough
for you? Then come down to The Hall (formerly known asAstorino's) on September 23
to see The Evaporators play with Owl Empire.
The event will also feature a Video Vault of
interview archives between sets.
NARDWUAR'S 30TH ANNIVERSARY WITH CiTR  Heal Hue
fiction
AUGUST 2017
BLIND TIGER COMEDY: CRUISE
LITTLE MOUNTAIN GALLERY / JULY 26
J feel strange reviewing this show for two reasons: First, I haven't reviewed
a comedy show before, so I'm already in over my head. Second, this
Blind Tiger Comedy event was a showcase of their 15th semester of comedy
classes. Like a recital at the end of the course, these comedy students took to
the Little Mountain Gallery to show off their comedic chops.
I've never been to an improv show that doesn't start off a little rickety —
the crowd has to get comfortable, the performers have to get loose, and the
atmosphere has to settle into the necessary fever-pitch of comedic energy in
order for everyone to have a good time. So, for the first part of the evening,
Blind Tiger's house improv team set the mood on stage, and dived right in,
quickly bypassing the initial awkwardness. As soon as they got the crowd
nearly hurling with laughter, they wrapped up and made way for the students.
Intro 2 came next, a group of beginner improvisers. While it was clear that
some of the students were new to the stage, the group as a whole powered
through an impressive and hilarious set. As any good improv set should be,
they evoked a multitude of insane scenarios and characters, from a pair of
battling magicians, to a lowly potato shoveler coming across an extraterrestrial
potato case amidst his pile.
As the group left, the Sketch 1 class carried tables and chairs onto the
stage, setting up a Weekend Update style newsroom. Reading from their
scripts, the comedians told a series of quick and witty jokes, the highlight
coming from one performer trying to convince the panel that he would be a
great keyboardist for their band, despite his two broken wrists.
Throughout the first three groups, the venue heated up. Slowly and gradually, it reached a temperature no person should ever experience. As Sketch
1 concluded, and the intermission began, the giddy crowd flooded out into
the street for relief.
After a brief cool-down, the audience was called back in to witness
a short but memorable experimental comedy display. Dramatic orchestral music blared over the speakers as a lone performer paced on stage.
Growing more restless, he moved with visible anxiety as the music continued. Finally, when it looked like he couldn't take any more, the music cut out
and a cold, automated voice came over the speakers: "We are experiencing
a larger than normal call volume at the moment. You will be connected to the
first available representative. Thank you for your patience."
As the room heated up to unbearable conditions again, the final group,
Long Form 3, began. Clearly some of the most experienced Blind Tiger
students, the group jumped right into a series of hilarious characters, in a
labyrinth of semi-connected situations, all spurred on from a crowd-sourced
single word: "gazebo." It was the perfect way to end an absolute whirlwind
of a improv show. It wasn't the heat, but the laughter, that left the entire
audience gasping for breath as Blind Tiger Comedy called it a night.
—Oskar Kinbote
PLAY NICE: MUSICAL COLLISIONS
BETWEEN HUMANS AND INTELLIGENT
MACHINES
GOLD SAUCER / JULY 28
Speaking to my grandparents about modern music can be a bit trying
sometimes. Despite my most patient explanations on how the technological advancements in music equipment has fundamentally shifted
the grounds for what music is, and what it means to be a musician, their
responses are almost always the same: "But they don't even play their own
instruments — it's all computers nowadays!" As frustrating as they are, their
complaints about the apparent lack of musicianship at present contain the
seeds for what I find to be a very interesting concept. What if music was
entirely made by computers?
Arne Eigenfeldt, professor of Music and Technology at Simon Fraser
University, has obviously spent a lot more time investigating this idea.
Co-founder of the Musical Metacreation research group, Eigenfeldt's practice
involves creating musebots, "pieces of software that autonomously create
music in collaboration with other musebots." While this form of generative
music may not be entirely made by computers — it requires a human to do
the programming — it is definitely closer to human-less than most music out
there.
To showcase these futuristic music makers, Eigenfeldt, along with three
other Musebot designers — Matthew Horrigan, Paul Paroczai and Yves
Candau — joined forces with Sawdust Collector and took over the Gold
Saucer Studio to pit their intelligent machines against human collaborators.
The Musebot designers sat at a long, safety-blanket-draped desk, covered in laptops, monitors and cables stretched along the side of the studio.
In front of them, and in centre stage, the human collaborators set up their
equipment. To match the innovative mood of the event, emcee Raj Gill chose
an experimental mode of introducing the pieces. He acted as if he were an
artificially intelligent machine, learning how to emcee in the midst doing it,
while narrating his own experience of emceeing.
Eigenfeldt's bot's first piece was a collaboration with cellist Peggy Lee.
The musebot, while creating a soundscape, generated traditionally notated
music that was displayed for Lee on a screen, with which she played along.
Dark and aching tones seemed to drag themselves out of Lee's cello, alongside the musebot's ambience.
The other two pieces, both accompanied by improvised prepared guitar,
courtesy of Matthew Ariaratnam and Nathan Marsh, were significantly noisier
than the first. Having studied and analyzed the two guitarists' improvisation
styles in advance, the musebots were forced to react and adapt to the new musical situations. In essence, Eigenfeldt's bots improvised alongside the guitar.
Matthew Horrigan's musebot's piece was of a similar setup, with improvised guitar by Adrian Verdejo. Along with the musebots and guitar, David
Storen added projections of glitchy and occult images, providing an ominous
atmosphere to the distorted sonic landscape of the guitar and bot.
The most diverse performance in terms of artistic media was definitely
Yves Candau's musebot's piece, during which Sawdust Collector's Barbara
Adler sat on the floor reading poetry while Candau fluidly danced to the bot's
soft, sample-laden music played out over the room. This piece seemed to me
the most organic of the night. The human voice and human body captured
the majority of my attention, distracting me from the idea that the sounds in
the room were being generated by an artificially intelligent machine.
Inversely, Paul Paroczai's musebot's piece was the least organic. Without
any other human collaborators besides himself, Paroczai's musebots
seemed to be playing solo. In fact, Paroczai was performing alongside his
bot's, changing the parameters with which they created music. From the
audience's perspective, what Paroczai and what the musebots were actually
doing was completely opaque, since all the spectators saw was a person at
a laptop.
Conceptually, the music created by musebots is a fascinating intellectual
artifact — following the timeline of the influence of technology and computing
on music, generative music and artificially intelligent machines producing it seems to be a logical continuation. But for the performance side of
things, and for us humans wanting to experience it, I think the musebots fell
a bit short. The most engaging and interesting pieces of the night were the
ones with the most performative elements: the dancing, the projections, the
human fingers playing physical instruments.
Perhaps it isn't the fault of the musebots that I feel this way — I am
human after all. For millennia, humans have created music for humans to
experience. But now, as computers are beginning to create music on their
own, does it really make sense that humans are the ones that listen to it? —
Lucas Lund
SARAH JANE SCOUTEN / BILL JR. JR.
FOX CABARET / JULY 27
fven though the show had yet to begin, the Fox Cabaret was packed
from the door to the stage, with groups of all ages casually conversing
away. While I often attend concerts alone — and am generally quite comfortable doing so — the hum of the room made me feel like I was the only one
flying solo for this one: Sarah Jane Scouten's release show for her latest LP
When The Bloom Falls From The Rose.
Squeezing through tight gaps in the crowd, I worked my way up towards
the stage, planting myself against the wall of the venue. Bill Jr. Jr., a five-
piece alt-country band, walked onstage and the room quieted slightly.
Without a word, the Vancouver band began to play their brand of dreamy folk
songs, ornamented with soft harmonies and very tasteful trumpet, courtesy
of Caton Diab. About half of the audience had their attention on the band,
while the other half continued to socialize amidst the music.
Without pause, Bill Jr. Jr. moved into their second song, which was cut
short by the crackling and cutting-out of guitarist / vocalist Russell Gendron's
guitar. Bill Jr. Jr. picked up right where they left off after the problem was —
only temporarily — fixed. Near the end of their set, during the single off their
latest EP, "In Time," Gendron's guitar cut out again, bringing the band to a
halt. "I swear these songs have endings," Gendron joked, as he fiddled with
his cables.
Despite the technical difficulties, the band left to warm applause. I moved
toward the bar, passing by what seemed like clusters of old friends reuniting
and new friends being happily made. The atmosphere was overwhelmingly
merry, and I was still alone.
With a drink in hand, back at my spot by the wall, Sarah Jane Scouten
walked onstage, followed by her sister Anna and a four piece band, al
wearing matching tucked in black button-down shirts, embroidered with her
album artwork.
What followed was a highlight reel of everything country, roots and
folk, from Dolly Parton-esque dancing numbers, to somber ballads evoking Emmylou Harris, to Anders Sisters-style harmonies courtesy of the
Scouten sisters, and everything in between. After the first two songs, Sarah
addressed the audience for the first time. "In this band, we have two rules.
First, no shorts on my stage," gesturing at the legs of her bandmates.
"Second, we start each set with two 2-steps then a waltz. Let's go!"
As the set progressed, the joyous spectators became even more so,
splitting into pairs, and twirling each onto the dance floor. The collective
merriment reached a final crescendo during the encore when Sarah invited
anyone who would sing to join the band onstage as they played "Dreams" by
Fleetwood Mac. With the distance between performer and audience abolished, the Fox felt more like a family gathering than an album release show.
In the company of the buoyant and bright crowd, I felt a lot less alone than I
did at the start. —Lucas Lund
REAL LIVE ACTION STEFANA FRATILA / LIEF HALL / AILEEN
BRYANT
SELECTORS' RECORDS / AUGUST 17
The usually sparse atmosphere of Selectors' Records was filled up by
throngs of people, packed in tight. Mostly sitting cross-legged on the
hard concrete floor, the crowd filled every available space in the room, from
the shelves of records pushed up against the back wall, to the floor-to-ceiling
windows that look out onto the bustling corner of Pender and Carrall Streets.
Vancouver artist and vocal improvisor Aileen Bryant started the night. At
the sound of her first few hummed notes, the bustling room quieted, with all
eyes and ears paying close attention. Looping and layering her voice into
lush pads of sound, then manipulating and distorting them, Bryant drew
attention to both the creation and the destruction of the music she was creating. The effect was entrancing as her sampled voice warped alongside her
live utterances in one continuous piece. She ended her performance after
about 25 minutes, the perfect amount of time to leave the audience satisfied
but ready to hear more.
The crowd sprung up from the floor and stretched their weary knees as
Bryant moved her gear from centre stage to make room for Lief Hall, formerly of electronic duo MYTHS. After a brief break, Hall summoned the crowd
back to their seated position and began. Markedly more upbeat than Bryant,
Hall's performance largely consisted of sparse and moody electro-pop backing tracks with Hall singing overtop. Between her first and second song, she
said, "I have a smoke machine that I got for a music video, but I can never
remember to use it when I'm playing," before asking the crowd if anyone
would like to control its remote control. A hand quickly shot up, and she
handed the remote to someone sitting up front. After a quick puff of fog, she
jumped back into the music. With steady bursts of haze throughout, Hall's
set was just short of getting people up and dancing. Instead, feet tapped
along, shoulders swayed and heads bobbed among the seated crowd until
Hall's set concluded
Stefana Fratila, seated on stage beside a mixer and laptop, among other
equipment, started by playing some quiet field recordings amidst the buzz of
the room. Slowly, the crowd's attention began to veer away from their intermission conversations towards the next performance.
"You might want to sit down again for this. It's not going to be the most
ively set," Fratila spoke into the microphone. The crowd dutifully lowered
themselves back down to the floor. After a brief explanation on the sounds
she was to use during her set, Fratila began. She mixed various samples
and soundscapes, from rushing water in Jasper National Park to lively bebop
jazz, before quieting it down and softly singing overtop in Romanian.
As her music slowly transformed, eventually becoming a slow, almost
deep house groove, the lights from buildings and cars outside the venue created an immersive experience. Knowing the evening was almost over, I settled in a little deeper and let the dim mix of light and sound wash over me.
—Frances Shroff
MOUNT EERIE / NICHOLAS KRGOVICH
AUGUST 18 / CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL
mount Eerie is the project of Phil Elverum. Last July, just two years
after the birth of their daughter, he lost his wife, artist and musician Genevieve Gosselin, to cancer. Recorded entirely in the room in which
she died and using mostly her instruments, Elverum's latest album, A Crow
Looked At Me documented his grief. One year after her death, Elverum
began a one-month tour of the album in Vancouver.
The show was at the Christ Church Cathedral, an Anglican church built in
the 1890's. It took me some time to adjust to the space, with its high ceilings,
dark wood and hanging lanterns. The crowd had walked in from a summer
afternoon and looked it, contrasting with the gothic architecture.
Nicholas Krgovich, previously of NO KIDS, GIG I, and P:ANO, played
the opening set. He explained that, as a longtime friend of both Gosselin
and Elverum, he had originally wanted to play a few of Genevieve's
favourite songs, but they were either too complicated or ill-suited for the
occasion. What Krgovich ended up performing was a set of entirely new
material inspired by a break-up in May. Accompanied by a stand-up bass,
vocalist, electric guitar and bass clarinet, the group filled the cathedral
with a rich sound, exploring the heartache and confusion that comes at
the end of a relationship.
Elverum walked onto the stage and the sound left the room. Mount
Eerie is normally a revolving door of collaborators, but for this performance,
Elverum played alone with just a classical guitar. Given that the album was
recorded using her instruments, I wonder whether it was Genevieve's.
The repetitive guitar progressions provided a focal point for the performance without sharp surprises that might break concentration, both his and
ours. The effect was meditative — it allowed the dreams, memories and
feelings in A Crow to reach the audience more immediately. To this end, he
didn't often speak between songs but at one point told us that he was "actually saying a lot."
Most of the songs addressed Genevieve directly. Maybe that's why it felt
like we were collectively eavesdropping. When Elverum asked if we would
like to hear new songs, all the crowd could offer in response was a soft clap,
as if bewildered that we were being invited into the conversation. It felt that
we weren't the intended audience, but had stumbled into an intimate moment
that was in the process of being repurposed.
Despite Elverum's prolific output, all of the songs he performed were
either from A Crow or written since then. These new pieces traced the same
themes of the album, including one song in which he shared the experience
of performing A Crow at a music festival to a crowd on LSD. I thought a lot
after the show about how this was the very first stop on Mount Eerie's short
tour, and wondered how the performances will change for Elverum through
repetition. I imagine that the experience of every audience will be similar to
Vancouver's, with warmth in the room, friends holding hands, and more tenderness in their gaze. —Christine Powell
III
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine
and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
asper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
ILA is also expanding to include comedy and theatre, among other
live experiences. Feel free to submit those event details to the
e-mail above.
TWOWOLVESBREWING.CA
Proudly brewed at Factory Brewing, Vancouver
REAL LIVE ACTION  Wmmmmmmm&sm*
&******************
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HeotetD
MUSIC
THE BELLE GAME
Fear Nothing
(Arts & Craft)
38   /   09   /   2017
There is a theory that a band's sound grows as the venues they play
grow in size, height, and splendour. Artists who begin their careers
as acoustic singer-songwriters evolve into stadium rock as their ticket sales
go from filling theaters to selling out arenas. Taylor Swift went from sitting
on a stool with her guitar at the Bluebird Cafe in Nashville to running across
stages with a cordless mic and a symphony behind her.
Vancouver-based dark-pop band The Belle Game's new album, Fear
Nothing, provides further proof for this theory. While their beautiful debut
album Ritual Tradition Habit made sense in dimly lit bars like The Biltmore
Cabaret, this new album demands high ceilings, balconies and sound systems that wouldn't even fit through the door of your average Main Street
venue. This album takes up so much space, both sonically and emotionally. Where their debut album is bitter and sweet, Fear Nothing is painful and
euphoric. It has been four years since Ritual Tradition Habit, and this album
shows both how much these accomplished musicians have grown and the
scars they've acquired along the way.
It would be easy to call lead singer Andrea Lo's voice "ethereal." Fear
Nothing opens with the track "Shine," in which Lo begins in a falsetto cloaked
in dreamy reverb. But it immediately becomes apparent that Lo's vocals are
powerful and grounded, her lyrics are heavy and blunt, and there is nothing
about her that is delicate or intangible. The essence she brings to this album
is clearly influenced by both Knowles sisters' 2016 projects. There are rhythmic and thematic parallels between Fear Nothing and Beyonce's Lemonade,
especially in songs like "Low" and "High," which document the dark and light
in a complicated sexual relationship. Honest, self-aware songs like "Bring
Me" and "Spaces" are reminiscent of Solange's "A Seat at the Table," in
which Lo sings "[it] feels like I'm melting inside, feels like I know it's alright."
This atmospheric album is much more human than divine, with physical
words like "touch" and "fuck" repeated throughout the album's lyrics. The hip
hop-inspired rhythms paired with distorted synths and guitars, created by
the enormously talented Katrina Jones, Adam Nanji and Alex Andrews, pull
you into a dreamlike state, and then throw you off kilter as soon as you get
comfortable. Fear Nothing is primal, sensual and, of course, fearless. This
sophomore album is a brilliant collaboration between four unique artists, and
proves that in 2017, The Belle Game know how to take up the space they
deserve. —Sarah Jickling
WOOLWORM
Deserve To Die
(Mint Records)
25  /   08  /  2017
Jf you have ever wanted to dance on someone's grave, Woolworm's
recently released LP Deserve to Die might make for the perfect
soundtrack.
The 10-tune collection of death-centric ditties, released August 25 on
Mint Records, weaves heavy, existential lyrical content through a mix of
thick, plodding tracks like album opener "Unwise" and the lively head-bobber
"Catbird." The entire album is balanced with an unmistakable pop prowess.
With such depth, Deserve to Die ends a long wait for fans. Despite having
released a steady trickle of EPs, this is Woolworm's first full-length release
since their 2012 LP believe in ourselves.
The local four-piece, made up of Giles Roy (guitar, vocals), Alex Pomeroy
(guitar), Heather Black (bass, vocals) and Nick Tollman (drums), worked
with Jesse Gander (Japandroids, White Lung) at Rain City Recorders for
this latest effort. Gander, who recently worked on another Mint release
[Goodnight, Tomorrow from Vancouver punkers Needles//Pins), strikes again
on Deserve to Die. Without sacrificing Woolworm's signature earnestness
and simplicity, Gander delivers improved production quality and sound.
As Roy points out in the band's bio on the Mint Records website, the
"songs are about loss, regret, alienation and acceptance. And death." With
lyrics like, "I can't help but envision myself in the ground," and, "Suffer, suffer,
suffer, suffer /1 don't really care what tomorrow brings," it's hard for listeners
to escape the weight of our shared fate. Unless, of course, you're too busy
dancing to some of the classic pop particles that pepper the record like the
drum beat in the chorus of "Judgment Day."
Tightly packed into just twenty-nine minutes of playing time, Deserve
to Die never loses momentum. But there are certainly standout moments.
On one end of the spectrum, "Come With Me In," the shortest song on the
record, lays a gentle and fuzzy guitar riff under an achingly beautiful melody
to startling effect.
At the other end, title track "Deserve to Die" delivers what seems like the
album's most unhinged moment. While most of the songs deal with death in a
blunt, matter-of-fact way, the last two minutes of this track reveal the underlying
desperation and anxiety that make the album so compelling. Instead of acceptance, Roy sings, "I caught a glimpse of heaven /Turns out I wasn't ready."
If you're already of fan of Woolworm, this record will satiate your appetite
for a full-length release. If you're just discovering the band, this record will
launch you into their back-catalogue searching for more. Either way, an existential crisis has never sounded so satisfying. —Dylan Toigo
GESTURE
No Past, It Started All Over Again
(Self-Released)
14   /   06   /   2.017
ID
■ ere we to undertake an exhaustive self-scrutiny, disgust would
paralyze us..."-E. M. Cioran
Any time spent reflecting upon social interaction inevitably convenes
upon gestures, the visual vocabulary of body language that informs us both
consciously and unconsciously. Some, like Amy Cuddy, exploit their analysis
of gestures to market "power posing" for the suited masses climbing the corporate ladder, change your body language and land the job. "Fake it 'til you
become it."
Enter Gesture's glowering swan song, No Past, It Started All Over Again,
holding a mirror to Cuddy's charlatan posturing by examining the crippling
mess of a life of fakery. For just under 27 angular minutes, Andy Resto (guitar
/ vocals), Nellie Stark (bass) and Eleanor Wearing (drums / vocals) turn inward
to reflect upon the terror of the oracle's Socratic motto "Know Thyself."
The opening track "June" finds our narrator petrified by malls and parking garages, yearning for quiet, solitary spaces. But, when such a space is
found "In A Clearing," there is no repose. Instead, they find "morbid erotic
longing" and groups of faceless people treading all over them. Though
seeking an escape from superficial socializing, the stoic wonders, "Hissing.
Is it what becomes of my breathing when I'm through with speaking?" On
"Windowshades," this self-awareness builds into agoraphobia, as Resto
pulls down the blinds to hide from the faces the stare through a glass darkly.
When the album closes with "Pale Sky," we understand Resto's fear of the
others' gaze as he reveals their endgame: to scoop out his insides and
examine him, exhumed, once and for all. This is not hip cynicism, but real,
white-knuckled fear.
Though not a band of technical flourish, Gesture possess a definitive
style that mines the rich, untapped vein of Slint's "Don, Aman." Resto's guitar
ines wind in and out of harmony, passing through major and minor tonalities
only incidentally, while ultimately exploring the dissonant space between.
These winding lines are complemented by Wearing's drums, which follows
the guitar with inventive and dynamic percussive synergy as Stark's bass
urks in the shadows. As the album creeps on, intermittent major chords and
shifting meter begin to sound deeply unsettling, as if sitting quietly in the
trough of a wave.
"Pale Sky" closes the album when Resto admits that he's "out of relevant
thoughts," which seems as fine a place as any to end an album. But as the
last notes fade out, I wonder if the revelations of this album yield any catharsis. Am I still just going through the motions? Are we doomed to fakery? Are
we better off opaque from ourselves? I sit and stare, paralyzed by the incompatibility of action and self-knowledge. —Bruce Hayward
CRUELSPORT/
NICE APPLE
Cruel Apple Nice Sport
(Self-Released)
14   /   06   /   2.017
eVOg^
* ruel Apple Nice Sport at its core is an homage to the minimalistic pop of
pBeat Happening and Eric's Trip. Yet, Cruel Sport and Nice Apple spread
seeds that mark the split-tape as their own turf — throwing their fruit far
enough from the tree as to not wither in the shade.
Buzzsaw guitar chords and minimalist percussion advance Cruel Sport
through five never-over-three-minute songs. The dry vocals use straightforward narratives that dress the music with simple melodies. "Snackland" has
Cruel Sport in a hypnotic lock of distortion and robotic poetry. The magnetic
pop on "Song of love" has the three-piece intertwining instruments and voice
into an up-tempo dream. The contrast, and the gradient between the songs,
shows the ground Cruel Sport is able to cover within the pop realm.
Occupying the second half of the tape, Nice Apple play with dry guitar
notes and modest drums, punctuating five songs with fibrous texture and
tempo. The vocals sprout from hooks that bob along to strong and gritty harmonies. With the exception of the George Harrison cover, the original songs
don't escape the ninety-second mark — perhaps a byproduct of the analog
recording. Within this time constraint, Nice Apple is able to make songs like
"Make something" and "Thanks a lot" into ripe exhibits of succinct songwriting.
The split-tape Cruel Apple Nice Sport offers simplicity in the form of ten
concise pop songs. At a little over twenty minutes, Cruel Sport and Nice
Apple extend their branches past their influences, reaching toward their own
piece of sun. Headphones up and leave that auto-reverse switch on, please.
—MarkBudd
SARAH JICKLING AND HER
GOOD BAD LUCK
When I Get Better
(Self-Released)
14   /   07   /2.017
^t rom the moment I clicked play on the newly released album of Sarah
^M Jickling's When I Get Better, I found myself engulfed in a pure state of
imagination. I envisioned a stage of dancers moving fluidly under blue and
pink pastel lights, alongside Sarah, who carries the story forward as each
song comes to tell an honest and vulnerable part of her journey.
Varying from synth pop to acoustic indie, this album is as diverse in its
content as it is in the styles explored. "You let me down," the opening song,
introduces the listener to the feel of the album. Its heavy and steady beat
works in unison with the loaded lyrics, functioning like a melodically charged
mantra, reminding the listener of the repetitive nature of the pain induced by
mental illness. Although each song is distinct, each one contains a candid
message that speaks towards the uncensored realities of those living with
psychological distress.
The images of a stage with pastel light that manifested in my mind as I
sat in bed listening to Sarah's album was not far removed from reality. This
upcoming October through May, Sarah will be donning the stage both as
a solo artist and as part of the Reachout Psychosis Tour. Through the performance of live music by artists who themselves have dealt with issues of
mental health, this project encourages conversation and education about
these illnesses in secondary schools. Sarah's bubbly and animated-pop
projects light around a dark, ever-present and personal subject, which seems
almost too perfect for any audience, be it high school students or adults. As,
the album glows intrinsically, the bold vocals contrast smoothly with cotton
candy instrumentals, encouraging an open space to question and reconstruct the stigma that lingers around mental health. —Lexi Melish
MFSHABAZZ
The Nigga Tapes
(Self-Released)
2.0   I   01   I   2.017
s
inrsnAMay
rom Brooklyn to Vancouver, independent rapper Aktu El Shabazz's
The Nigga Tapes is a cool-headed force marrying influences from both
UNDER REVIEW coasts. Released under the moniker MF Shabazz, one of Vancouver's most
promising hip hop artists is slowly gaining listeners. He appears as a guest
on many local radio stations and open mic shows, oftentimes freestyling and
performing his most recent work. F.L.O.W Vol. 1, the 18-track mixtape he
dropped last year, was filled with funky old-school beats, but this summer's
The Nigga Tapes brags some of his catchiest, vibin' hooks.
On tracks like "Low," he raps with well measured bravado, "Duck down
below / This some shit to ride to / This some shit to die to / This some shit to
vibe to / Smoke one, get high to." Fitting to this steady rhythm, other songs
like "ACT 2LE" and "Fuck You" roll out jazz-R&B beats, where "Flatline" and
"O.M.L." let Shabazz show up with one-hitting one-liners. The B.C. rapper
is not shy to compare himself to some of hip hop's greats, and although that
may be ambitious, he's not wrong about his legend-demanding flow. He
starts "Swerve" with a devotion to what he does, Tma keep rappin' til the
death of me / May my raps live forever / Fuck the rest in me," and ends "ACT
2LE" without effort, break, or sweat: "Aktu El-ly / Turn your necks and back /
And back bones to jelly."
Sure, Vancouver hasn't exactly thrived in producing iconic hip hop, but
for unsigned, self-releasing rappers in West Coast Canada, MF Shabazz
sounds like he's ready to take it all. The Nigga Tapes is a seven-track,
19-minute soundtrack of a rapper rapping about rap, but its hooks and melodies grant MF Shabazz some high praise for putting it out there. —Kelley Lin
PUZZLEHEAD
Trucks
(Self-Released)
19  /   05   /   2.017
Puzzlehead's collection of garage-punk angst can be a challenge, but
by no stretch is the album unlistenable. Rather, it gives the impression of containing two kinds of songs. One type is defined by the shrieked
consideration of a mundane subject, which is nonetheless conducted with
venom. The title track, for instance, is punctuated by a piercing scream of
"trucks(!![!!!!!!]!),"which seems to function as a monosyllabic, forceful chorus.
The song is certainly a jarring intra, propped up by repetitive electric guitar
and mumbled verses.
The other type of song on Trucks is slower, more haunting, and decidedly
easier for home-listening. The album's best track, '"Detective"' is of this category. It presents the vocals of Clarence in a more ethereal and meaningful, less
aimless way. The lyrics that are audible enough to interpret ruminate darkly on
the difficulty of achieving a human connection through poetic language. The
guitar playing of Gloyadkin is forlorn to match, skillfully delivered and nicely
juxtaposed with brighter instrumentation. Along with '"Keychain"' and, to an
extent, "First Name," Trucks delivers a shadowy dose of vague, minor-key
ennui. These songs cut you to the quick with intentional flats, foreboding lyrics,
and dreary soundscapes comparable to those of Chelsea Wolfe. Their complexity is captivating, shifting between clear melodies and grainy noise-rock.
Anyone in a state of depressive vegetation (crying in bed with the blinds down)
will feel quite on-brand listening to these songs.
In contrast the other, heavier tracks on this album — like "Trucks'"— sound
better in a mosh pit. "Key Chain," for instance, possesses a melody and guitar
riff reminiscent of the post-punk sounds of Parquet Courts and Swans. But the
poor production quality of Trucks' heavier songs certainly falls short in comparison to those bands. The low fidelity and bad singing of these tracks distract
from their emotiveness. Fortunately, the less harsh songs beautifully tow the
line between listenability and rock coarseness. —Koby Braidek
TITANIUM TUNNELS
[3     The Last Cosmonaut And The Infinite
Computer...
(Positronic Recordings)
" A' .»>   A
There is a seamless emptiness to life. Stop thinking for just a moment,
and all you will hear, if you're lucky, is the wind blowing through the
trees. If you're not lucky, it will be the howl of empty space. Most music
seeks to fill that space with something else: noise, joy, love. We are afraid of
absence, so we search for ways to distract ourselves from it. We hope that
music will be our salvation.
Titanium Tunnels' The Last Cosmonaut and the Infinite Computer, on the
other hand, amplifies emptiness with sparse echoes of sound that punctuate
the void. Before the music begins, the album introduces a wave of static,
alluding to the sound of tuning a radio and beginning the deconstruction
of boundaries between sound and silence, music and noise. As the tracks
thrum along, there is always a sensation of searching, as if we are trying to
find a stable centre. We are lost in empty space, and the music might be our
only link to something real. This is not an album for the agoraphobic.
Though we never find anything solid, Titanium Tunnels' simple yet evocative music guides us seamlessly through the anxieties of a potentially meaningless existence. One track fades into another, a continuity suggested by
the ellipses in the title of each song, and slight alterations among the futuristic computer sounds give us hope that we will set our feet upon the ground.
But it is not to be. We are destined to be wanderers. As the last deep notes
sound in "E...", the final track of The Last Cosmonaut, we return, finally, to
empty space.
These are our choices: we could start again, static in our ears, and hope
to find something meaningful among the noise — or we can resign ourselves to silence, remaining steadfast in the certainty of emptiness. Titanium
Tunnels' The Last Cosmonaut And The Infinite Computer... calls us to the
former path. To remain in silence is to abandon those who continue to make
noise and fight. It is better to be lost together than a lone witness to the horrors of silence. —Joseph Doyle
SOFTSERVE
Trap Door EP
(Self-Released)
02   /   04   /   2.017
The new Soft Serve EP, Trap Door, is a whirlwind of guitar. The project is almost 17 minutes of solos, bass lines, riffs and drums, which
all combine magnificently to create a solid release. This is the band's third
outing after their Sink Deep EP and self-titled album. While Trap Door matches the quality of Soft Serve's full length, it also exhibits a much greater range
of sounds and styles.
Moving from song to song, the album increases in tempo. Throughout
the opener, "Whisper in the Wind," for instance, guitars and effects float in
out. Yet, the song remains cohesive as the rhythm is grounded by a powerful
bass line. Similarly, "Soft Soap," the final track on the EP, further illustrates
Soft Serve's ability to maintain high energy. Though only instrumental, this
track is marked by excellent guitar solos over a taut bass line. The solo halfway through the song is particularly gripping.
The guitar really shines on the album highlight "Pat's Pub Open Blues
Jam" with a simple bass line and riff that draws the listener in. Despite this
hypnotic whirlpool of guitar, the rhythm is never lost, as the song is tethered
to some crisp, no-nonsense drums. This track also has some of the most
interesting and thought-provoking lyrics on the album, "I've been thinking /1
spend most of my life thinking / I've been dreaming /1 spend too much time
awake just dreaming /... / I've been believing / that there is something out
there that I can believe in."
Building upon the contemplative "Pat's Pub Open Blues Jam," the following track, "Phantasm," begins slow and thoughtful. Then, driven by a lovely
few notes, the pace picks up. Like its predecessor, this track has affecting
lyrics. During "Phantasm," we hear about the loss of a friend and how this
devastation leaves hurt. As if permitting space to think about such subjects,
the song begins sluggish and introspective. Soft Serve then blasts the sound
again as if the pain of loss engulfs your every thought, leaving the listener
with little room to think.
Overall, Trap Door is comprised of marvellous guitar music. The strongest aspect is how the music and the lyrics
enhance each other. "Pat's Pub Open Blues
Jam," for example, utilizes a stop and go
feel which matches the optimistic theme of
the lyrics. I'm not sure what the title Trap
Door is in reference too, but the album
certainly encloses the listener in a trap of
guitar-laden hooks, which keep you listening
over and over again. —ShebliKhoury
BOOKS
m
WOODS
A YEAB   ON   f SOTECTION   ISLAND
Amber McMillan
THE WOODS: A YEAR ON
PROTECTION ISLAND
(Nightwoods Editions)
01  /  14 /  2.017
Jt takes a certain type of mentality to live out one's days in a small
community, be it a town with a population barely reaching 500 or a
tiny island with under 100 residents. It takes an even greater will to suddenly
drop big city life and move to a place that is a fraction of the size. But this is
what Amber McMillan and her family did in the summer of 2014. Weary of
the Toronto bustle, its hardened residents, and unforgiving winters, McMillan
proposed to her partner that they quite literally leave it all behind and try
living somewhere smaller. Her husband, Nate — a sweet, supportive and
very agreeable human — went along with the idea and they began to search
with no clear destination in mind.
Amber and her husband found what they were looking for: a small island
in B.C, just a stone's throw from Nanaimo Harbour, called Protection Island.
This "car-free paradise" offered a much smaller population and freedom from
Toronto's harsh weather and living expenses. The young family, carrying
only boxes of clothes and treasured possessions, made their way across the
country to begin a life on new terrain. An experiment, in a sense, to see what
taking a risk can truly look like. The results are eye opening, beautiful, and
sometimes surprising.
As is revealed in this nonfiction tale, there can be a price to pay for any
trade-off. Our environment can change and we can change with it. Or, we can
hold onto our bullshit and continue on with our strongly held personality traits.
And while lush greenery had replaced the glass and concrete spires of Toronto,
Amber and Nate found life on Protection Island complicated. This small community came with its own nuance. Like Keith and his all around handyman ways,
who despite his masculine airs, prefers dressing as a lady. And Rob, the affable
ferry skipper, who seems removed from it all, but remains a deeply-rooted resident. It is clear that simple living does not necessarily equate to simplicity.
The Woods is more than a story. It is a snapshot of a life drastically
altered, complete with moments humorous, odd, and sometimes frustratingly
lonely. Though McMillan and family "only" lasted a year, they garnered a life's
worth of experience by taking on the challenge of letting go, uprooting and
replanting in a completely foreign territory.
The effectiveness of this tale rests on McMillian's talents as a writer. She
plods along with a poetic whimsy that feels as though I am listening to an old
friend recount the past few months over the phone. She doesn't try to be a
"good writer" and she doesn't fart around with unnecessary details. Instead,
The Woods is a raw, beautiful, dark and mysterious journey that runs the
gamut of emotions, and provides food for thought as you ponder the next big
change in your life. —Nathan Pike
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Ld codes to underreview.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums sent prior to thei
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UNDER REVIEW oolworm can simultaneously be considered local veteran indie-rockers and
up-and-coming phenomenon. With a wide range of influences from Sonic Youth,
Metallica, The Chameleons and The Jayhawks, and their journey has taken them
from their earlier years on Hockey Dad Records to their latest achievement of signing to Mint
Records. Woolworm is comprised of vocalist Giles Roy, Alex Pomeroy on guitar, Heather Black
on bass and Nick Tolliday on drums. All of their hard work comes to a head with their latest LP
Deserve to Die, released on August 25. The record is equally abrasive as it is lush, with themes
of sensationalism, plenty of fuzz and reverb, and hooks that linger in the back of your brain for
days, or likely longer. While I didn't get a chance to talk to the whole band, I met with Roy on the
idiosyncratic but practical condition that we conduct our interview while walking his dog, Ludo
(a Mexican mutt, part labrador retriever, probably a bit pitbull, and maybe a hint of chihuahua),
around Trout Lake. I excitedly obliged.
WOOLWORM
Walking Giles' Dog
words byAidan Danahcr //photo by Colin Brattcy
illustrations by Alejandro. Sanmanicgo
AIDAN DANAHER: Congratulations on
signing with Mint Records! How has it been
being on a big record label?
GILES ROY: It's been a lot of action, all
the time. In the early years of the band, all
we did was write music and focus on that.
Now, somebody does everything for us,
at least all of the stuff I don't like doing.
I mean, I've always like doing the music
part, but I never tried to get any publicity
or that stuff. But it's been nonstop, since a
few months ago.
[...] The main thing is that more people
are going to hear us now. It's nice to know
that people might be listening. It has
always felt like a couple of people were
always listening. Obviously, that's why you
make a band, right?
So what's it been like, musically?
Well, we recorded the album last year,
and we didn't expect anything out of it. It
had been almost three years for it to come
to fruition, so it was almost like a last
attempt to see what would happen when
we sent it to Mint [Records].
WOOLWORM
[Ludo, hyper and full of post-pup / pre-adult
excitement, runs in circles around us as we're
walking.]
Do you mind if we sit over there? Just
that area is better for meeting other dogs.
Yeah, of course! Do you have any concerns
that come with getting more attention and
popularity being on a larger label?
I'm not too concerned. In terms of
whether or not it's cool to be on a label, I'm
way past that. Obviously there are some
bands that I love, like Weed for example, who are totally D.I.Y. and one of the
best bands in the world, as far as I can tell.
And there's lots of bands like that... "cool
bands." I like "cool bands" as much as the
next person, but I no longer care about being a "cool band." I'm just being myself. All
of us are. And I've always wanted to be on
a label. I've always been in a band for the
sake of the music, but there's this whole
side of the music industry that I don't want
to think about or deal with. To have somebody else steer that particular boat... it's
really nice, to be honest! I'm actually enjoying much more than I thought I would.
Do you thinkyou'll get to the point, eventually, where you'll be able to be full-time
musicians?
It has become easier to imagine, to be
honest, [especially] in the last few months.
That will always be what I've wanted: to
quit all my other jobs and lock myself in the
studio, that's the dream to be able to afford
that. We've always worried about money,
everything always costs money for bands,
any people prey on bands, and that's what
I'd like to get away from. I definitely don't
feel preyed upon with Mint.
Have you been preyed upon in the past?
No, I've always just avoided it, thankfully. We've had offers in the past, but
I've had this idea in my head of how it
ought to be. We've always said no. But
I've always wanted to be on a label, and
Mint has always been there. [...] It's a very
Canadian label. I'm no nationalist, but
unfortunately we are stuck in Canada. We
are not allowed into the United States.
Even to tour?
Even to tour. There's some legal issues
with one of our band members, which I
can't really explain. But I have toured the
States before. [...] If you go to California,
you could take a week [to complete the
tour]. In Canada, you have to take two or
three weeks minimum. That's time off
work, money is an issue. Also, a three-
week tour across a barren landscape is an
entirely different vibe than a quick little
jaunt down to paradise, which is what
California is to me.
One of the things I feel about being a
Canadian band, especially in Vancouver, is
that a lot of bands can't go down to the United
States, legally anyways. It costs way too
much just for a performing permit, and you
can't easily go much further east than maybe
Calgary or Kelowna.
And people end up here, it is a final destination for musicians across Western Canada.
Some of my best friends are from Edmonton
and Calgary. Heather is from Kelowna.
I think of us as a Vancouver band. There's
something about this city and the way our
band is. It's sort of a mix of everything.
Your new album gives that impression.
At any given time, we're ripping off four
or five different songs; rarely is it a whole
band. I like trying to do everything at once
and seeing what happens.
Even though we're ripping off so many
people, we're not into throwback music,
where a band will come out saying they
sound exactly like The Cure. We're trying
to avoid that. We want it to come from all
different places at once.
It reminds me of the Oscar Wilde quote,
"Talent borrows, genius steals."
That's very flattering... it's too
flattering. Another thing about that
"everything at once" approach is trying
to reach as many ears as possible — to
include as many people in our listener-
ship as possible. I know this is weird, but
I try not to exclude anybody. With lyrics,
for example, I want everybody to be able
to relate. Obviously it's coming from me,
Giles' emotions and his heart, but I try not
to use gendered terms or reference specific
situations in songs. I want it to be more
like broad, cathartic advice.
You have said you would rather be in the
studio rather than touring...
Yeah, but that's just me, personally. And
the other three members, I think, would
want to tour. I'm sure they'll humour me
and spend as much time being there as
time will allow, but I think I'm going to
get dragged out on the road a fair amount.
So if you're going to tour and be limited to
Canada's long cross-country commute, that
could put a lot of stress on a band.
My greatest fear with this band is that
we're going to write a bunch of music
while we're playing together, but then
what if we break up before we're sick of
playing those songs? In general, every
band is a family and every family stays
together. I'm not particularly worried at
the moment, but if we did break up, we're
still musicians and we'd still be family,
and I'd still be playing music with those
three people, maybe in a different capacity.
And I know for certain I'm going to be
writing songs until I die.
[...] A big theme amongst our little family
right now is living in the now. I sound like
a hippy, but it's like a wave that has washed
over us recently: living in the present.
At this point, having just released a new
album on a new label, Woolworm has no
reason to be stuck in the past.
It took a while, I guess, but we definitely
feel like the luckiest band around. We're
very grateful, for everything. We're mostly
grateful for the audience.
fTo Ludo, who has a bunch of sticks in his
mouth]
What are you eating? Don't eat that!
Anything you would want to write into this
article personally, if you had the chance?
I want to say that there's always help for
you, whoever you are, in the form of other
people. You exist, they exist. If you've got
people that are there for you, you can get
through anything. And if you don't have
people who are there for you, they are. [   n 2008, Freeman Young was suspended from high
I  school. The reason, according to him, is "neither
^^  here nor there." Armed with a pen, a pad of paper,
and the Bible, he took his lengthy in-school suspension
as an opportunity to write his first song. "I was like, give
me the notebook and the pen, and let me see what could
happen," he says. "The song was trash, but I liked the
feeling of getting my thoughts out. I still have the paper
— no one will ever read it."
Young has always been interested in music, but until
that point he had never thought of it as something he
could do for the rest of his life. Now, he has built up an
impressive following on Soundcloud releasing music
under his own name, a gorgeous mix of new-school R&B
and sunny pop that would make his heroes, among them
Frank Ocean and Joni Mitchell, proud. Young's sound is
unpretentious and warm, and feels like the kind of thing
you would listen to on repeat after falling in love with a
high school classmate who's way out of your league.
GETTING  BACK INTO IT
6 FREEM
WORDS BY MAX HILL
BY JAVIERA BASSIDE LA BARRERA
LLUSTRATIONS BY SIMONE BADANIC
"YOU OWE
YOUR ART
YOUR ENTIRE
HONESTY."
You think you've gotten over something, and
you just realize, 'Oh shit. I had just gotten used
to living life without this person, but everything
is still there.'"
ID
[   meet Young at an burger joint downtown on a
I  Sunday afternoon. His presence is as strong as
^P   his handshake, and I'm immediately put at ease.
He surprises me by bringing along his co-producer and
biggest collaborator Xander Miller, who's also a musician
in his own right. Young and Miller walk me through how
the pair's latest track, "Awreddy," came to be.
The song, Young's first public release in almost two
years, is a guitar-driven slow jam that focuses on a relationship that might not be as finished as it seems. Young's
vocals are gentle but commanding, and really shine in the
chorus as the notes push him into his upper register. The
instrumental is subtle, with a barely audible bassline and
twinkling guitars that remind of Coldplay, another one of
the pair's influences. Each verse shifts the theme, beginning with an impenetrable wall of sound before softening
into a simple acoustic strum with gorgeous background
vocals. The lyrics are strong and surprisingly biting,
matching sentiments of longing and regret with lines like
"Our love is real like white privilege."
You can probably guess what the song is about: "A shit
breakup," Young says simply. "That whole thing came
from me running into the person I wanted to grow old
with after an extended period of time not seeing them.
hen I ask if he feels uncomfortable
sharing something so personal
with his listeners, he says, "It feels
weird knowing that she's heard it." But he
respects that this vulnerability is what makes
the song special. "As an artist, you have to
know what comes with the territory. You give
up the appearance of indifference for candor,
so that people can have something to hold onto
that they can interpret as their own." He continues, "You owe your art your entire honesty."
On the production side of things, Miller says
the song was arranged "pretty quickly" despite
a slow writing process. Working with frequent
collaborators Miguel and Franco Maravilla, the
four would spend time in the studio bouncing ideas off
one another and seeing what stuck. "Whoever feels like
they have a good idea to bring to the table, we'll try it. No
idea is a bad idea." With Miller on the computer sorting
through takes, the song eventually took shape through its
instrumental, which carries an interesting obstruction.
"'Awreddy' has no drums, so that was an interesting thing
to maneuver," Miller says. To get the right effect, they
layered two basslines on top of one another "to simulate a
kick and snare kind of pattern."
Young also explains that the song's shifts in style carry
a deeper meaning. "There's two moods intentionally. The
first verse is meant to sound like California garage-band,
very teenaged, and then the second half is supposed to
sound like it's from the U.K.. The girl who the song's
about, those were the two places we always talked about
living. I wanted to make sure those moods were palpable."
"She probably won't pick up on it, but that's okay," he
says. Miller jokes, "If she reads this, then she will."
After releasing "Awreddy," Young's Soundcloud went
blackout. He deleted every one of his tracks prior to this
release. "I'm just on something else right now," he says.
"I think you get a clearer understanding of what you want
to communicate as time goes by, the more content you
curate the more certain you become of what your vision is
going forward. You can't get nostalgic or too sentimental,
even if it is your art, even if you put everything into it, it's
about what's next."
So what is next for Young? He says that his two
years off have been spent "making music in
silence." He and Miller plan to release a series
of tracks in the near future, but it's not clear when those
tracks will see the light of day. "It's not secret, but we
don't have a defined date yet," Miller adds, teasing that
their new music will be coming "soon."
Ultimately, Young wants to pursue music as a full-
time gig, something that can provide him and his friends
"with a stable living." But he's only interested in making
it big on his own terms. "I don't really chase anthems. If
we get one, cool — we're not going to be pretentious and
say we don't want anthems — but it's got to come from
an organic place," he says. "I think we know music and
songwriting enough on a chemical level that we can do
that. But for me personally, I don't want to do that. I want
to be known for something else, I want to be known as
somebody who people can feel."
"That's what I want for the rest of my life, the
autonomy to do real things and to not get fucked."
Stay tuned for more releases, visit soundcloud.com/freemanyoung.
FREEMAN YOUNG INTERVIEW WITH FILMMAKER
ELLE-MAIJA TAILFEATHERS
words by Dusty Exner
flle-Mdijd Tailfeathers is a Vancouver-based filmmaker
and actor. She is a member of the Kainai First Nation
and Sdmifrom Norway. Since 2011, Elle-Maija has been
making groundbreaking films, both short and feature-length
that challenge the dominant media narrative around the identities of Canadian Indigenous peoples, what their experiences
have been, and their lives in Canada. Her films have varied in
style, including experimental, narrative fiction, documentary,
music video and mockumentary.
Elle-Mdijd's latest full-length film, c'dsna?dm: the city
before the city, will be featured at the Vancouver International
Film Festival (VIFF) as part of the Sea to Sky program. The
film focuses on what existed before the city was named
Vancouver; the traditional, unceded Musqueam territory,
its history and geography, place names, and the struggle of
the Musqueam peoples since the time of colonization. Elle-
Mdijd's film was made in partnership and collaboration with
the Musqueam First Nation, and the curatorial team of the
three-site exhibition (of the same name) at the Museum of
Anthropology, the Museum of Vancouver, and the Musqueam
Cultural Centre.
"I FEEL A RESPONSIBILITY
TO MY COMMUNITY TO CREATE
WORK THAT IS MEANINGFUL."
DUSTY EXNER: What inspired you to tell this story?
ELLE-MAIJA TAILFEATHERS: First, I should say I can't
speak on behalf of the community, just on behalf of
myself as a filmmaker. [...] My partner is Musqueam and
co-curator of the MOA exhibit. I did all the video work for
the three museum exhibitions, which entailed filming over
30 interviews with community members. I was saddened
to think that all this video work would disappear into the
archives when the exhibit closed, so I pitched the idea of
repurposing the interview footage to turn it into a feature-length documentary.
You started out as an actor and moved into filmmaking.
Can you talk about the evolution of your filmmaking and as an
Indigenous director?
I was frustrated with the industry as an actor - as a
woman, a person of colour and an Indigenous woman for
obvious reasons like misogyny and racism. While I was
attending UBC I was able to contextualize my own issues
with the industry, and was exposed to this incredible
world of Indigenous film and art, and I decided to just try
making my own films and have been making films for
six years now. I didn't go to film school for film production so it has been a steep learning curve. Generally my
work ends up being focused on Indigenous subject matter,
which stems back to the fact that I'm very rooted in where
I come from. I feel a responsibility to my community to
create work that is meaningful.
What's been the highlight of your career so far?
Being part of imagineNATIVE has been one of the most
incredible experiences. ImagineNATIVE is the world's
largest Indigenous film festival in Toronto. That community is incredible, and it has always such a joy to have
films screened there. I'm just grateful for every opportunity and that I get to do this as a career.
casnaPam,
the city
before
• •
What's nextforyou?
I've been working on a feature-length documentary
with the National Film Board and the hotDOCs Cross
Currents Fund about the opioid crisis and addictions in
my community, the Blood Reserve in Alberta. It has been
a long process and it is heavy subject matter, but it's
inspiring to see the work that's being done in my community. I intend to highlight that important work, because so
much of what's put out there through the media has just
been tragedy, essentially trauma porn. I want to show how
hard people are working to find solutions with little to no
resources.
This year, Canada spent significant money on Canada 150.
Your film shows the double standard that the Musqueam
have faced in trying to protect their ancestry, even how going
through the proper legal channels to try and prevent development permits was fruitless. That's a very different picture of
where we're at compared to the vision of Canada put forward
during the Canada 150 celebrations. For non-Indigenous
Canadians who see this film, do you have any suggestions for
what the community at large can do to support the struggles the
Musqueam or other Indigenous nations still face as a result of
colonization?
There has been so much money that has gone into
celebrating Canada's 150th, and 150 years is really just a
split-second compared to the history of Indigenous people
in this place. We've been here since time immemorial.
And when we look at Canada 150, it goes along with the
history of erasure of Indigenous history, knowledge and
people. The first step that people can take is to learn about
the people of the land that they occupy, in particular, here
in Vancouver. This film is a wonderful opportunity for
people to learn about the First People of this land, and the
fact that this land was never ceded; there were no treaties
signed here and it is essentially stolen land.
VIFF runs from September 28 to October 13 at the Vancouver
International Film Centre (formerly known as Vancity Theatre).
c'asna?am: the city before the city is part of the Sea to Sky
program. All programs and more information can be found on
the festival's website viff.org. Follow the projects of
Elle-Maija Tailfeathers at elle-maija-tailfeathers.com.
••••1
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COMPLETE LISTINGS ATWWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA
CdSNAVdM: THE CITY BEFORE THE CITY NO FUN FICTION
OLD THINGS STILL CAN
words and photo by Kerria Gray
^ arriet pulled up to the house. There
I it stood, barely, the evening light
P lending it the romanticism of an
old ramshackle thing in a picturesque
setting. An old house under a big tree that
used to be quite small, if she remembered
correctly. How often did she remember
correctly these days? Harriet took in the
house, the overgrown yard, the barn. Her
grandson was always showing her photos
on the Internet of old barns and typewriters and the like. She couldn't believe
how much he loved all the things that for
her generation had simply represented
work. Typewriters had been replaced for
a reason, for goodness sake! She'd told
him so, rubbing one arthritic hand with
the other. He'd shown her how to use that
Instagram program once, had helped her
set up an account, but she'd forgotten how
to get back to it and then, a few days later,
she'd lost the phone her daughter had
given her for safety and so that was that.
The tree now stood above the house.
Damn that tree. She wanted very much to
climb that tree, to conquer it. To kick off her
thick old-lady sandals, (ugly and oversized,
shoes a younger self would disapprove
of, but doctor's orders!) and hike up her
muumuu (no doctor had ordered this one,
but she got so hot in the summers and it
was like a cool tent around her loosest parts,
letting in the breeze where she most needed
it) and up, up until she was above the old
house that she had once wished to burn to
the ground. And there she'd sit, picturesque
old thing above another old thing, and plus
there'd be the element of surprise! Nobody
expects an old thing up in a tree, above the
house, above the barn, conquering the tree,
conquering old age. And proving that old
things sometimes still could...
■^B^B^B   hat had she been trying to
I   think about? She looked down,
<^Q^Br    trying to remember when
she'd taken off her shoes. Her bare feet
were wide, veiny. They were the feet of a
very old lady, an old lady she could barely
recognize as being, in fact, herself, Harriet.
It unsettled her, getting old, with all of
these vast blank prairies in her mind.
But what could be done? She was old and
there was absolutely nothing to be done.
She sat down in the field, folding herself
into something small. This grief was
intolerable! Three years now of a blueish
darkness. The blank spaces in her memory
were a relief if she were perfectly honest.
They were little cigarette-breaks from the
grief and from the grieving. She missed
smoking.
^ arriet was in fact glad she'd lost
I that silly phone: she'd heard people
P could track you with it, could know
where you were in an instant. She hadn't
lost the phone, not really, though she'd
begun to believe her own story about it
- or maybe she didn't so much believe it
as she had been forgetting lately how to
access the truth (forgetting the truth was
not so terrible, she sometimes thought,
when she remembered to. The truth had
always been a slippery thing, even before
she'd begun to forget things: one of those
shimmering things on the horizon that
disappeared when you got close enough.
Forgetting the truth could be like a long
restful sleep without having to get up to
pee even once). In fact she had dropped the
phone in the woods, into a thick growth of
ferns and moss and salal a few metres from
the footpath and then she had walked away
from it, from all of it. If she were honest -
if she really focused on remembering - she
hadn't dropped it so much as thrown it,
letting out a little ragged roar of victory.
The phone had made her feel beyond hope,
but Harriet hadn't wanted to upset her
daughter or be scolded by her and so she'd
thrown it into the forest and then blamed
the empty unaccountable spaces that were a
symptom of all of this big-veined oldness.
Nonsense, all of this. She stood up, determined, brushing the front of her dress
with her left hand, using her right to cast a
shadow over her eyes so she could look up
towards the sun.
Harriet was still strong, though she was
undeniably brittle and breakable. When
she'd reached a branch far above the barn
she let go of all of the oldness like a breath
she'd been holding. She reached down
with her entire self towards the ground,
towards that place where she'd once been
something else altogether.
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NO FUN FICTION: KERRIA GRAY ON THE AIR
DISCORDER RADIO
words by Clara Dubber // photo by Brian Fogarty
illustrations by Sophia Lapres
This On The Air occupies a bizarre space in Discorder.
it is an article in CiTR ioi.9FM's magazine
about the radio station's magazine's radio show.
Discorder Radio, the Discorder Magazine and the Discorder
Radio Collective show, moves through similar layers of
community each episode, airing Tuesdays at 5PM. I talked
to the collective coordinator Dora Dubber about the show,
and how it's changing.
Last year Claire Bailey, Discorder Liaison to the CiTR
Student Executive, and producers Matt Meuse and Jordan
Wade formed the Discorder Radio Collective as a directional change toward expanding the types of content on
Discorder Radio. Dubber explains this shift as "the result of
the show catching up to the magazine in a lot of ways." As
Discorder Magazine broadened its content beyond a strictly
music focus, the radio show needed to broaden as well. For
years before this, Discorder Radio functioned as a music
show curated by longtime programmers, Meuse and Wade.
Dubber, who joined Discorder Radio Collective last year
before becoming the collective coordinator, admits that
playing music "was the point of the show, but just didn't
fit the magazine anymore."
To accommodate this change, the show has evolved
its structure: there are established segments and more
spoken word: "We've been trying to bring in contributors, and produce stuff specifically for the show — like
[Real Live Action reviews] or auditory accompaniments
to web exclusives," explains Dubber. With new members
and "new people playing what they know is happening in
the city that they want to highlight," the collective hopes
that diversity in voices will breed diversity in content.
Dubber believes that "the point of radio is that you can
say whatever you want, [...] if you find it interesting it
will be interesting. Passion is endearing and passion is
fascinating."
fls an active member of many CiTR radio collectives, a contributor to Discorder Magazine and
Vice President of the Student Executive, Dubber
is aware of Discorder Radio's unique intersections in
the CiTR community. They're actively trying to navigate how the radio show both acts as representation for
ON THE AIR: DISCORDER RADIO COLLECTIVE
the organization and is its own voice. As an extension of
Discorder Magazine, the show acts as a platform for local
and underrepresented culture, but also carves its own
niche. Right now, each episode consists of upcoming
events and music from artists associated with those
events.
Speaking to Discorder Radio as a platform, Dubber
explains,"The magazine [features] upper-low-level artists
in the city. I try to do a tier or two below that [...] because
it's so temporary. [...] I like to play artists that I think
would be excited to hear they got played on the radio. I
think that's really exciting and [...] it's something the
show can do that the magazine can't." Sometimes though,
this closeness is difficult to navigate. "[Discorder Radio] is
paired really tightly with a publication, so it has to tie into
[a] mandate [...] the collective doesn't determine. That's
kind of weird. I'm still figuring out what that means."
Right now, the Discorder Radio Collective is still fledgling. Over the summer the show has been produced
primarily by Dubber and long-time collective member and
magazine contributor Kat Kott. The collective is actively
welcoming new members: "'Collective' is a funny word
because no one's in it [yet]. [Ideally], it would be like
any other collective at the station where there are several
members who produce content," says Dubber.
Discorder Radio Collective and the weekly show is
becoming a point of access to CiTR's community. "It's
beyond the music," explains Dubber, "It's almost beyond
the content being produced and just finding out what's
going on the city. It's essentially a social portal on air."
Speaking to who can join: "Anybody. Literally, fucking
anybody. [...] [You can just] record yourself on your
phone. [...] The point of the show is to highlight and
promote people in our community who do things that we
appreciate. If it's how you want to be highlighted and
promoted, then talk about slime mold."
Discorder Radio is an aural resource for showcasing
local events and artists, and will only continue to expand
with the introduction of new members. Listeners have an
opportunity to experience in real time the shift of a show
that wants to appreciate those who make Discorder content
possible. Celebrate with us, and tune into to CiTR 101.9FM
Tuesdays at 5PM, or stream at citr.ca.
To get involved in the Discorder Radio Collective, email CiTR's
Volunteer Manager Eleanor Wearing at volunteer@citr.ca. You
can also call in to the show Tuesdays between 5-6PM by dialing
604.822.2487.
CITR 101.9 FM
^DISCORDER MAGAZINE
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6AM
TRANCENDANCE
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
6AM
7AM
GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICON"
CITR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CANADALAND
CITR GHOST MIX
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
7AM
8AM
QUEER FM VANCOUVER:
CITR GHOST MIX
CITED!
8AM
9AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
RELOADED
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
WIZE MEN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
9AM
10 AM
FEM
CONCEPT
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
MIXTAPES WITH MC
& MAC
10 AM
11AM
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
STUDENT FILL-IN
U DO U RADIO
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM
12 PM
SYNCHRGNICIT'Y
MORNING AFTER SHOW
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
THE ROCKERS SHOW
12 PM
1PM
STUDENT FILL-IN
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
K-POP CAFE
FRESH SLICE
1PM
2 PM
PARTICLES & WAVES
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
ALL ACCESS PASS
RADIO ZERO
2 PM
3 PM
THE BURROW
INNER
SPACE
STUDENT
FILL-IN
KEW IT UP
ASTROTALK
BLOOD
3 PM
TERRA INFORMA
4 PM
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
TEXTBOOK
SHOES ON A WIRE
SIMORGH
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
SADDLE
4 PM
5 PM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
DISCORDER RADIO
ARTS REPORT
ADAMANT EVE
CiTR DOCS SEASON 2
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6 PM
FINDING THE FUNNY
ANECDOTAL EVIDENCE
ARE YOU
AWARE
WINGS
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
STUDENT FILL-IN
THE INTERVIEW
7 PM
EXPLODING HEAD
INNER
SPACE
SAMS
QUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
SHOW
STUDENT FILL-IN
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
8 PM
MOVIES
INSIDE OUT
MIX CASETTE
CI RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SOGA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
THE NEW ERA
LIVE FROM
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
NINTH WAVE
HELL
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER
ROOM
COPY / PASTE
THE MEDICINE SHOW
THE AFTN SOCCER
11PM
12 AM
THE SCREEN GIRLS
SHOW
12 AM
1AM
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
1AM
2AM
CITR GHOST MIX
OF INSOMNIA
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
"DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERYDAY" TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththe-
browns@hotmail.com
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
11AM-12PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
second season! The team
of Indigenous and non-
Indigenous peeps produce the
show weekly. We talk about
Indigenous issues, current
events, and entertainment
centering Native voices through
interviews and the arts. Come
make Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Follow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves/
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE BURROW
3PM-4PM, rock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
department manager Andy
Resto, the Burrow is Noise
Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock
with a nice blend of old
classics' and new releases.
Interviews & Live performances.
Contact: music@citr.ca
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
4PM-5PM,JAZZ
Host Jade spins old recordings
of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies and motown.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm-6:30pm, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TUESDAY
THESCREEN GIRLS
12AM-1AM, HIP HOP/R&B/ SOUL
The Screen Girls merge music
and art with discussions of
trends and pop culture, and
interviews with artists in
contemporary art, fashion and
music. We play a variety of
music, focusing on promoting
Canadian hip hop and R&B.
Contact: info@thescreengirls.com
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM8am-io:30am, talk/
politics
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmail.com
FEMCONCEPT
TUES,  10:30-11:30,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
A show comprised entirely
of Fern con* music and
discussions of women's
rights and social justice
issues. Featuring all genres
of music, with an emphasis
on local and Canadian artists
and events in Vancouver.
""Femcon" is defined as
music with someone who
self-identifies as female in 2/4
categories: music composition
lyric composition, performance:
or recording engineering.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ROCK / POP / INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
PARTICLES & WAVES
2PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Like the quantum theory it
is named for, Particles and
Waves defies definition. Join
Mia for local indie, sci-fi prog
rock, classic soul, obscure
soundtracks, Toto's deep
cuts, and much more.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TEXTBOOK
4PM-5PM, talk/storytelling
Textbook (FKA The Student
Special Hour) is a show
about students by students
hosted by Josh Gabert-Doyon:
CiTR's student programming
coordinator. There are three
segments: Feature interview:
student storytelling, & "Tell
Me About Your Paper".
Contact: outreach@citr.ca
DISCORDER RADIO
5PM-6PM,  ECLECTIC, TALK
Produced by the Discorder
On Air collective, this show
covers content in the magazine
and beyond. Coordinated by
Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse,
and Jordan Wade. Get in
touch to get involved!
Contact: discorder.radio@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
INSIDE OUT
3PM-9PM, dance/electronic
Tune in weekly for dance music!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES&TREASONS
9PM-11PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels:
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room.
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PM-2PM, TALK/ POP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
2PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
The CiTR Music department
program, highlighting the
newest/freshest cuts from the
station's bowels. Featuring live
interviews and performances
from local artists.
Contact: music@citr.ca
KEWIT UP
3PM-4PM,  EXPERIMENTAL/TALK
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica:
Post-Punk, IndustriaL
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOES ON AWIRE
4PM-5PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
Take a moment to look up.
Tune in for stories, interviews:
hot takes and sweet tunes
that consider a side of
things you may not have.
Contact: Twitter | @mjeantaylor
DOUBLESPACE
ALTERNATING TUES 3PM-4PM, TALK /
DESIGN / FEMENISM
Investigating interactions with our
surroundings and society. Every
week we discuss our experiences
with these interactions, how
they emerge and the impacts
of these invisible forces.
Twitter | @doublespaceshow
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to getweird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC:
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves
on CiTR Radiol01.9FM:
Wednesdays from 5-6pm.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
ANECDOTAL EVIDENCE
6pm-6:30pm, talk / story telling
Anecdotal Evidence is a live
storytelling series in Vancouver
where people share true stories
of how they experience science
in their lives; stories of failure,
fieldwork, love, death, cosmic
loneliness and more. Tune
in for humour, humanity, and
sometimes even science.
Contact: Twitter | ae_stories
INNER SPACE
alternating thurs 6:30pm-8pm:
electronic/dance
Dedicated to underground
electronic music, both
experimental and dance-
oriented. Live DJ sets and
guests throughout.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating thurs 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE NEW ERA
9PM-10PM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
A showcase of up n' coming artists
who are considered "underdogs'
in the music industry. We provide
a platform for new artists who are
looking for radio play. Bringing
you different styles of Hip Hop
music from all across the Earth
and interviews with music industry
professionals. It's the NEW ERA...
Contact: program ming@citrca
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk, and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: program ming@citrca
■ THURSDAY
SPICY BOYS
12AM-1AM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
Playing music and stuff.
You can listen.
Or don't.
If s up to you.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture:
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
9AM-10AM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
This show is produced
by and for the disabled
community. We showcase
BC Self Advocates and
feature interviews with people
with special needs. Hosted
by Kelly Raeburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and friends.
Contact: citrlatenightshow@gmail.com
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com.
rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com,
@tima_tzar,
fac ebook.com/ Rocket From Ru ssi a
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
K-POPCAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean:
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B.
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
2PM-3PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
The Accessibility Collective
radio show! They talk equity:
inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse
abilities, on and off campus.
Tune in for interviews, music:
news, events, & dialogue.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
3-3:30pm, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TERRAINFORMA
3:30-4pm, talk/enviromental
Environmental News:
syndicated from CJSR
38.5FM in Edmonton.
Contact: sports@citr.ca
SIMORGH
4PM-5PM, talk/storytelling
Simorgh Radio is devoted
to education and literacy for
Persian speaking communities.
Simorgh the mythological
multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-
in as your mythological narrator
in the storyland; the contingent
space of beings, connecting
Persian peoples within and
to Indigenous peoples.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ADAMANT EVE
5pm-6pm, talk/interviews
Feminist news, interviews, and
commentary. Syndicated from
CJSR 88.5FM in Edmonton.
Contact: programming@citr.ca:
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM"7:30:
ECLECTIC
Celebrating the message
behind the music. Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
C1 RADIO
THURS 7:30pm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ FRIDAY
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact: auraltentacles@hotmail.
com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse@canadaland-
show.com
CITED!
3AM-9AM, TALK/ACADEMIA
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact: facebook.com/citedpod-
cast, Twitter | @citedpodcast
WIZEMEN
9AM-10AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Watch and wonder as Austin
begins to unravel the intricate
world of environmental
science right in front of your
earz. Austin's taste in music
has been praised among the
deities as the finest and most
refined in all the land. So trust
in Austin as you surrender your
ears every Friday morning.
Contact: Facebook | WizeMenRadio
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
10AM-11AM, rock/pop/indie
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from MattMcArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary:
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion:
mastery, and a lil dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@gmail.com
FRESH SLICE
1PM-2PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Tunes are hot and fresh.
Talk is cheesey. Pop:
rock, DIY, pop-punk.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RADIO ZERO
2pm-3:30pm
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams
from New Wave to foreign
electro, baile, Bollywood:
and whatever else.
Contact: programming@citr.ca:
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
http://nardwuar.com/rad/contact/
CITR DOCS SEASON 2
5PM-6PM, talk/documentary
Tune in for insightful work
on niche topics. We cover
everything from queer
history to environmentalism:
accesibility, the Grunge
scene of the early '90s, and
gentrification in Vancouver.
Contact: Twitter | @CiTRradio
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6pm - 7PM, talk/comedy
6pm-7pm,  Every week Jack
Tristan and a special guest
randomly select a conversation
topic for the entire show;
ranging from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure.Also
theSre is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30pm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
imational
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop:
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post-Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock
drone, ambient, experimental:
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca:
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, eclectic/live
INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vancouvermedicineshow@gmail.com
■ SATURDAY
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citrlatenightshow@gmail.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into music
thaf s on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll
like it. Sonic assault provided
by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary:
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmail.com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7pm-8pm, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy:
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmail.com
SOCASTORM
3PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoN #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
Sbit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ SUNDAY
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
7AM-9AM, experimental/difficult
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPAN© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @BEPICRE-
SPAN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
9AM-10AM, CLASSICAL
From the Ancient World to
the 21 st century, join host
Marguerite in exploring and
celebrating classical music
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM,  INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmail.com .
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORETHANHUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com:
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
3PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
3PM-9PM,  ELECTRONIC/DEEP HOUSE
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, DeepTrance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Antherrr
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmileymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS:
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ ISLAND OF
LOST TOYS
STUDENT FILL IN
ECLECTIC
A place for experimentation
& learning!
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees. CiTR 101.9FM AUGUST CHARTS
I           artist          album          Hlatel     |
«
White Poppy*#
The Pink Haze Of Love
Lone Hand
^
Do Make Say Think*
Stubborn Persistent Illusions
8
Constellation
»
Needles//Pins*#+
Goodnight, Tomorrow
8
Mint
*
Shrouded Amps*#+
Come Along To The
Chocolate Church
8
Self-Released
»
Nice Apple/Cruel Sport*#+
Cruel Apple Nice Sport
8
Self-Released
s
Tiny Vipers#
Laughter
8
BaDaBing!
»
Puzzlehead*#+
Trucks
8
Self-Released
•
Crystal Eyes*#
The Female Imagination
8
Sweetie Pie
1 »
Rococode*#+
Young Ones
8
Marquis
1   "
Foonyap*#
Apropos
8
Self-Released
»
Japanese Breakfasts
Soft Sounds From Another
Planet
8
Dead Oceans
O
Mac DeMarco*
This Old Dog
8
Royal Mountain         «
«
House and Lands
House and Land
8
Thrill Jockey
1m
Colin Cowan & the Elastic
Stars*+
Cosmos In Summer
8
Self-released
1   B
Devours**
Late Bloomer (reissue)
8
Locksley Tapes         «
«
Ex Eye*
Ex Eye
8
Relapse
*
Circus In Flames, The*+
Outside America
8
Self-Released
M
Whitehorse*#
Panther In The Dollhouse
8
Six Shooter
«
Kronos Quartets
Folk Songs
8
Nonesuch
a
Palm#
Shadow Expert
8
Carpark
a
Dalava*#+
The Book of Transfigurations
8
SONGLINES
£
Only A Visitor*#+
Lines
8
Self-Released
3
Hermitess*#
Hermitess
8
Self-Released
*>
An Ant And An Atom*
Exterior
8
...And An Earth         «
U
The Psychic Alliance**
Evil Against Evil
8
Self-Released
h»
Sound of the Mountain**
Amplified Clarinet & Trumpet
8
Mystery & Wonder      «
»
Naomi Punk
Yellow
8
Captured Tracks       «
*
Institute
Subordination
8
Sacred Bones
h«
Waxahatchee#
Out In The Storm
Merge
»
Not You*#
Misty
8
FUNDOG
»
F ingers#
Awkwardly Blissing Out
8
Blackest Ever Black    «
J2
Guerilla Toss#
GT Ultra
j
»
Child Actress*#
Milking a Dead Cow
8
Reccordian
»
Sick Boss*+
Sick Boss
8
Drip Audio
»
Tops*#
Sugar at the Gate
8
Arbutus
3s
Daniel Romano*
Modern Pressure
8
You've Changed        «
»
Big Thief#
Capacity
8
Saddle Creek
I.
Avey Tare
Eucalyptus
8
Domino
»
Teenanger*
Teenager
8
Telephone Explosion    «
«
The Fast Romantics**
American Love
8
Light Organ
*
Golden Retriever
Rotations
8
Thrill Jockey
N
Shilpa Ray#
Door Girl
8
Northern Spy
N
Shimmers
Shimmer
8
Drop Medium
«
Whitney K*
When the Party's Over
8
Egg Paper Factory      «
*
Bernice*#
PuffEP
8
Arts & Crafts
«
PRIORS*
Priors
8
Pentagon Black        «
»
Justin Wright*
Pattern Seeker
8
Second Best Records   «
«
Sarah Jane Scouten*#+
When the Bloom Falls from
the Rose
8
Light Organ
1*
Ciwie*#
Inheritance
8
Self-Released
|  SD
Arcade Fire*#
Everything Now
Sony Music
 i
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TOPS
""•A'
TOPS
TUESDAY SEPTEMBER t
IMPERIAL
OORS 7PM 19<
TICKETS /II^IL/IBLE V\A MRGCONCERTS.COM & RED CA\ RECORDS MAC DEMARCO
rj
\ ^"^SS^^S^d
k           CONC
ft           /'98'
ERTS
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
August 31
MIDDLE KIDS
The Biltmore
September 2
VERITE
The Cobalt
September 9
BENJAMIN BOOKER
Biltmore Cabaret
September 3
60LDR00M
Abitibi  Boat
September  9
KEITH APE
Vogue Theatre
September 7
CIGARETTES AFTER SEX
Imperial
September 10
THUNDERCAT
Commodore Ballroom
September 10
THE CHURCH
Rickshaw Theatre
September 12 & 13
MAC DEMARCO
Vogue Theatre
September 14
SZA: CTRL TOUR
Commodore Ballroom
September 17
PHOTAY & TENDER
The Cobalt
September 23
THE SADIES
Rickshaw Theatre
September 18
TENNYSON
Fox Cabaret
September 16
ANDREW BELLE
The Cobalt
September 17
CORBIN & SHL0HM0
Commodore Ballroom
September 19
DOWNTOWN BOYS
Fox Cabaret
September 24
THEE OH SEES
Commodore Ballroom
September 26
JAPANESE BREAKFAST
Fox Cabaret
September 29
AUSTRA
Imperial
October 6
RAINER MARIA
The Cobalt
September 22
60LDFRAPP
Vogue Theatre
September 25
SHEER MAG
Rickshaw Theatre
September 27
BR0CKHAMPT0N
Biltmore Cabaret
September 29
TANK AND THE BANGAS
Fox Cabaret
October 7
L.A. WITCH
Fox Cabaret
September 25
VAGABON
Fox Cabaret
September 28
ALLAH-LAS
Fortune
September 30
MOSES SUMNEY
St. James Hall
October 7
MICKEY AVALON
The  Cobalt
October  8
GRYFFIN
Imperial
October  9
KING GIZZARD AND THE LIZARD WIZARD
Commodore Ballroom
September 28
INVSN
Fox Cabaret
October  4
LOW ROAR
Fox Cabaret
October  8
BORIS
Rickshaw Theatre
October  10
THE CRIBS
The  Cobalt
October  13
LEON
Imperial
Tickets  & more  shows at
tlmbreconcerts.com

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