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LET S SWEETEN THE DEA
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JUST TALK 1
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(That's $2,0 for Canada,
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donation!(Hey, thanks
(How much would you like  to  donate?)'
r9TAL:
Send  thiragfiffli
cash or  cheque  to:
Discorder Magazine,
LL500-6133 University
boulevard.
Vancouver BC,   V6T 1Z1
io mm MAY 2017
COVER:
ILLUSTRATION BY BRYCE ASPINALL.
FLEXING COMPASSION
EDITOR'S NOTE
jfeature*
05 -  VANCOUVER MURAL  FESTIVAL
gentrification has a colourful by-product.
06 -  DEEP BLUE
sonic submersion.
07 -   JERICHO
North   Vanitas.
08 -  AHMAD DANNY  RAMADAN
author of The  Clothesline Swing  on Syria and love.
16   -   SAMMY  CHIEN
the artist we will never define.
18 -   (IN)ACCESSIBLE  VANCOUVER pt.I
start asking yourself...
19 -   SO  I  HAD AN ABORTH
...deal with it.
Column* + flDt&er j&tuff
04  - Homegrown Labels:
Deranged Records
04  -  Shelf Life:
KUNDERGROUND Newsstand
10  - Real Live Action
12 - Art Project
Bridget  Trout
13 -  Calendar
14 -  Under Review
20 -  On The Air Special
Access Day
21 -  CiTR Program
Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 - April  Charts
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates available upon
request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please contact: editor.discorder@citr.ca. To
submit images, contact: artdirector.discorder@
citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20
to LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1, Vancouver, BC with your address, and we will mail
each issue of Discorder right to your doorstep
for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your
business, email advertising@citr.ca. We are
always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you love. To
donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
To inform Discorder of an upcoming album
release, art show or significant happening,
please email all relevant details 4-6 weeks in
advance to Brit Bachmann, Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct comments, complaints and
corrections via email.
FOND ATI ON
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station Manager: Hugo Noriega // Advertising
Coordinator: Sydney Thorne // Discorder Student Liaison: Claire Bailey // Editor-in-Chief: Brit
Bachmann // Under Review Editor: Maximilian Anderson-Baier // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D.
Wrinch // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Production Assistant: Jules Galbraith // Web Content
Coordinator: Katrina Wong // Accounts Manager: Shea McConkey / Halla Bertrand // Charts: Andy
Resto // Discorder On Air Coordinators: Claire Bailey, Dora Dubber, Kat Kott, Matt Meuse, Jordan Wade
// Writers: Brit Bachmann, Claire Bailey, Mark Budd, Paulina Chua, Aidan Danaher, Clara Dubber, Dora
Dubber, Jules Galbraith, Inca Gunter, Courtney Heffernan, Sarah Jickling, Jonathan Kew, Oona Krieg,
Sophia Lapres, Jessica Lin, Nathan Pike, Elijah Teed, Eleanor Wearing, Leo Yamanaka-Leclerc, Tintin
Yang // Photographers & Illustrators: Olga Abeleva, Bryce Aspinall, Janee Auger, Amy Brereton, Duncan
Cairns-Brenner, Olivia Di Liberto, Jules Galbraith, Zadrien Kokar, Katie Lapi, Jen Van Houten, Konstantin
Prodanovic, Marita Michaelis, Jon Vincent // Proofreaders: Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Brit Bachmann,
Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Paulina Chua, Jules Galbraith, Sydney Thorne, Jasper D. Wrinch
I'm gonna keep this brief.
Do you care about the people around you?
This issue was planned around the theme of accessibility, leading up to
Access Day May 18 on CiTR 101.9FM — a day of special programming
that questions all aspects of accessibility, physical and otherwise. We
have a brief interview with some organizers and participants of Access Day on
page 20. Eleanor Wearing has also researched a two-part article on the accessibility, or inaccessibility, of local cultural events. Beyond that, the topic of accessibility is an undercurrent: Jules Galbraith asks Deep Blue about their accessibility in a D.I.Y. art space; Dora Dubber interviews So I had an abortion... founder
Julia Santana Parilla about accessing information on abortion; Tintin Yang interviews Vancouver Mural Festival's David Vertesi about organizing an event
that implicates everyone; and I ask Syrian author Ahmad Danny Ramadan,
"What is home?" in the context of immigration.
Are these articles really about accessibility if they are not directly related to mobility? I think so. Not to undercut the advocacy of making spaces more physically
accessible — which is the priority — the topic of accessibility is larger than that.
To seriously enact accessibility requires relearning how we move around public space in relation to other people, and how we accommodate those around us.
It involves realizing that every person processes situations differently. It involves
compassion.
A+
BB
illustration by Bryce Aspinall.
ABOUT THE LAST ISSUE...
It was brought to our attention that the illustration for the interview with Jeneen Frei
Njootli in the April issue is a direct reference to a design by Anishinaabekwe artist Quill
Christie. The image of the hand with a stitched wrist was appropriated and altered without
consent by Christie or Frei Njootli. The illustrator, Amy Brereton, did not draw her image
with the intention of inflicting harm or infringing on creative copyright, but she now understands how she did both.
The unauthorized use of Indigenous artwork perpetuates colonial violence and significantly undercuts Indigenous self-determination. As a magazine published and distributed
on unceded territory, Discorder takes full responsibility for the publication of this work, and
for failing to provide Amy with the appropriate artistic direction and context.
Brereton's illustration accompanies a very strong interview with Frei Njootli. In this
interview the artist discussed, amongst other things, the theft of Indigenous art. We are
very sorry to have inflicted our own act of appropriation in this piece. Discorder is working
to create discussions around image, identity, and cultural appropriation in future workshops. We are also incorporating training that teaches new and aspiring journalists, photographers, and illustrators to actively work against the systemic and individual acts of
colonialism that are so often perpetrated by media organizations
-Discorder Magazine
©Discorder 2017 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by
CiTR, located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the heiiqemiharh speaking Musqueam peoples. CiTR can be heard
at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 8221242, email CiTR at stationmanager® citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL600 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
EDITOR'S NOTE HOMEGROWN LABELS
DERANGED RECORDS
words  by Aldan Danaher  //   illustrations  by Zadrien Kokar
J   f you're at all interested
I   in hardcore punk, maybe
^P  Deranged Records should
ring a bell? If it doesn't, here
are a few artists that have released music through the independent label that might: Fucked
Up, White Lung, Career Suicide.
Since 1999, Deranged Records has
had over 300 releases from an
incredible repertoire, which is all
the more impressive given the label's one-man army — founder,
Gordon Dufresne.
Originally based out of Toronto,
Gordon relocated to Roberts Creek
on the Sunshine Coast with his
family in 2005. According to
Gordon, he didn't have any connections to Vancouver whatsoever,
let alone Roberts Creek. For him
and his family, a clean slate was
exactly what they were looking for.
Discussing the history of
Deranged, Gordon says, "I didn't
wake up one day and say, 'This is
something I wanted to do for the
next 20 years.' I was already involved with that scene: putting on
shows, [running] record stores,
and most of my friends were in
bands. That was something I
was always around," he tells me.
"There was definitely a specific
sound that I was interested in,
and remain interested in today ...
It's always been punk and hardcore. I guess I got involved with
that music through skateboarding,
whether it was Thrasher Magazine,
or whatever it was at the time.
Really, that's how I was exposed
to it," he explains.
On his attraction to punk,
he says plainly,
"That's just
where my focus
was. Because I
was not musically inclined, I
figured putting
out a record was
one of the ways I
could get further
involved without
needing to be a musician."
^^^  ufresne is fairly hum-
I  ble and modest when
^^P  talking about running
his label. As he says, he is "a man
of few words," while apologizing
for any lack of "sexy and exciting" details about the business.
He has always managed the label
by himself. "Most of the labels
that I like and respect that are
putting out records today are typically run by one individual, and
I think that is the right format
for me as well," he says. While
label operations are limited
to Gordon, Deranged is rather
prolific, releasing an average
of two releases per month with
pressings of 1000+ to start.
Partly because of Deranged's
focus on hardcore punk, but
also because of the label's history using U.S. distributors,
Gordon explains, "often times
I'm looked at as an American
label. I don't face the same
kind of obstacles as your typical
Canadian label." It seems that
because of his long-term presence within the punk community, Deranged Records firmly
holds its ground.
I   n talking about his re-
I   lationship with artists,
•^^   Gordon is practical
about his involvement, saying,
"As far as where I see myself
as a label, most often, [I am] a
means to an end. I think that
where a label like Deranged may
be of benefit is often times for
smaller bands, because distributors and stores will take my records based on the label itself, so
they'll take a chance on an unknown band. Same with people
who buy the records."
He laughs as he says, "As a label, you don't necessarily get the
credit that you may deserve, and
that's totally fine, that's not what
I do it for."
It is certainly evident how passionate Gordon is about his work.
While he might do all the label
business himself, he has advice
for artists doing their parts: "If
you're a touring band, depending
on how out-there you are, you're
the one that's creating that kind
of energy and buzz around you,
more-so than the label in question ... I think if someone is able
to think a little bit outside of the
box, they can create that momentum for themselves."
Visit derangedrecords.com
SHELF LIFE
KUNDERGROUND NEWSSTAND
words  by Elijah Teed  //   illustrations  by Bryce  Aspinall
fllthough it might be uncomfortable to admit,
Discorder is disposable.
This magazine, like so many
other publications of its kind,
can be picked up for free, flipped
through, and left on the bus,
at the dentist's office, or in the
recycling bin, at your leisure.
However, as writer, educator and
artist, Stephane Bernard contends, "Just because something
is meant to be disposable doesn't
mean it isn't significant."
Bernard is the creator of
KUNDERGROUND Newsstand, an
installation and interactive newsstand that highlights branches of
independent publish- I     1    )
ing in Canada over
the past 50 years.
For this installation, Bernard
has turned his
attention to
Vancouver pub
lishing history.
"Vancouver is such
a hot spot, especially in Canada,
where self-publishing really
became a vehicle for conceptual art, and at the same time
there was the whole underground
movement, that was using
self-publishing for its own reasons," he says.
Pulling a copy of the poetry
journal TISH off of the shelf in his
studio, Bernard discusses how the
University of British Columbia
was integral to the independent
publishing movement of the early
l6os, thanks to the access students had to early mimeograph
technology. That copy of TISH
from 1962, for example, contains the first published poem of
Dan McLeod, one of the original
founders and current owner of
The Georgia Straight.
The Straight is at the heart of
Bernard's exhibition, who timed
KUNDERGROUND Newsstand's
installation to coincide with
the 50th anniversary of
the renowned weekly.
"[The Georgia Straight]
is the only Canadian
publication that's still
around," says Bernard
of the early era of independent publication. "You
couldn't really call it an underground newspaper anymore, but
it still has the name, and it's
still owned by the same person, which is very interesting,
because nowhere else will you
see that happen."
For Bernard, those early
Georgia Straight issues epitomize
the cross-section inherent to independent and underground media, a publication committed to
"covering conceptual art, while
also covering those movements,
based in society, contesting what
was going on." From revolutionary politics and problems with
local authorities, to the depths of
the city's cultural underbelly, The
Straight was sweeping in its independent reporting.
now 50 years after The
Georgia Straight's inception, KUNDERGROUND
Newsstand will allow attendees to
trace its chronology, as well as examine a host of other zines, newspapers, and various paper ephemera from across the vast time and
space of Canada's independent
publication history. Stylized off
rental libraries in Japan and other
parts of East Asia, Bernard will also
be offering visitors the chance to
peruse his collection for a onetime $10 donation for the length of
the exhibition.
"I consider myself to be an artist, rather than a researcher or a
historian," Bernard says of the
project. "What I'm looking for is
to offer an opportunity for visitors
to come up with their own conclusions, having access to these
materials. I'm seeing it more as
an experiential event rather than a
historical exhibit."
Beyond aged issues
of Discorder and The
Georgia Straight,
Bernard's collection is home to a
litany of defunkt
Vancouver periodicals. Included are
editions of The Western
Gate, founded by members
of the original Straight collective; The First Citizen, a newspaper
dedicated to Indigenous culture
and issues; Vancouver Express,
created by disgruntled Vancouver
Sun and The Province writers; and
The Grape, founded by disgruntled Straight writers. While the
stock Bernard has in his studio
is impressive in its own right, he
assures it's only a quarter of what
he'll have at the installation.
Through KUNDERGROUND
Newsstand, Bernard hopes to
spark a conversation about what
we've lost and gained (for better
or worse) by moving beyond print
media and physical spaces to the
omnipresent, online news circus.
In conjunction with that, however,
he also finds it worthwhile to
grapple with the ephemeral nature
of what he's exhibiting, and how
they qualify as objets d'art.
"The medium was designed to
be thrown away, and when you
get down to the world of visual
arts, I mean, that's the antithesis
of what visual arts is supposed to
be. Historically, art is meant to be
precious objects," Bernard posits. "I'm kind of playing with
that: the idea of presenting
newspapers as precious
objects, when really
they're not."
Despite the medium's
disposability, Bernard's
installation and archival
work uses independent publishing to chart a complex and oft
forgotten history of media, journalism, and art across Canada. What
could be more precious than that?
KUNDERGROUND Newsstand (8
East Cordova Street) opens May 5
between 4~7pm, and the installation will run until May 22. Additional
hours of operation and information
can be found at owenwandering.com.
HOMEGROWN LABELS: DERANGED// SHELF LIFE: KUNDERGROUND worcM, \m TfrrtiVi Yai
illWtVaiioKi
fyerefon
^fter the first annual Vancouver
Mural Festival, a certain air of
liveliness transformed Mount
Pleasant. The streets seem more jovial,
the sidewalks busier somehow, and the
folks going about their everyday business
are now set against colourful stretches of
painted walls. Inspired by the success of
Montreal's MURAL Festival, Vancouver
Mural Festival's efforts to bring art from
the gallery to the public has seen favourable responses from a number of businesses in the area, and is now slated as
one of Vancouver's central cultural events.
Following the organization's
mandate of "transforming how
art is seen in Vancouver," VMF
has exploded out of the gate. In
2016, the festival hosted over
50 artists in creating 41 unique
murals which will remain present in their locations for at least
two years. This year's festival
will see an additional 50 murals, located mainly in Mount
Pleasant.
When I talk with David
Vertesi, co-founder and
Executive Director of the festival,
he expresses his sincere desire
to put forward a varied roster
of artists. "We want to see the
most diversity [of murals] possible, and we want the festival to
be a gateway for arts and culture
on all levels," remarks David.
"Murals are a bit of a more popular artform, [and] we see it as
a chance to engage people who
would otherwise be uncomfortable going into galleries."
David suggests site-specific
neighbourhood art could be a
valuable tool to bring visibility to issues in
Vancouver communities, including gen-
trification and housing issues, Indigenous
reconciliation, and the opioid crisis. Using
murals as a medium to engage with local
organizations, VMF seeks to facilitate art
that leaves a meaningful impact. David
explains, "Murals have the potential to
bring awareness to things that need more
of it, and that's where we see the power
of the artform, and we hope to work with
people in the community to help do that."
The festival's role in assisting the installation of the Memorial Wall along the
Downtown Eastside Street Market was an
action to bring more acknowledgment of
the fentanyl crisis.
While chatting with David, he shows
concern when we start discussing negative
neighbourhood impacts. The tone shifts
to something a bit more serious, and it's
clear David has been mulling over the effects that public art and beautifying projects can have on communities.
Dancouver's gentrification is reflected in the 'revitalization' of
known low-income neighbourhoods. Most recently, areas like Mount
Pleasant, Chinatown and the Downtown
Eastside have seen an influx of development negatively change the neighborhood
landscapes, pushing out longterm residents and independent businesses.
In recent years, the tech industry has
found a home in Mount Pleasant, occasionally dubbed "Mount Pixel," one may
find the vibrantly painted head offices of
Hootsuite among others tech companies.
The industrial area fits the "downtown but
not quite downtown" allure of many other
American tech hubs, such as Capitol Hill
in Seattle. If history is to repeat itself, the
small, unassuming changes to low-income
neighbourhoods will amount to the exclusion of long-time residents. While an investment in public art in a neighbourhood
may not be a primary cause of gentrification, it certainly seems to be a result.
Bavid suggests that advocating
for cultural zoning while working closely with and meeting
the needs of the local community, businesses, and developers may address these
issues. "I believe there [are] other areas in
the city that require a different approach
both in development and not in development. [This includes] the protection of
heritage buildings and legacy businesses,
but also, culturally sustainable development," he states. David recognizes that
the introduction of beautifying practices
may be seen as threatening without the
proper guidelines to ensure that the interests of residents and businesses won't be
displaced.
"Primarily, we're an arts organization,
but we care deeply about all these issues ...
so we're always trying to understand these
issues better," says David. "We're trying
to approach it in a collaborative way and
demonstrate the power and importance of
art and creating a community and culture
that will influence future culture and the
identity of the area." It is difficult to say,
however, if the alleged cultural influence is
desired by all neighbourhood residents.
In reference to the boost in cultural
events subsidized by the City during
the 2010 Winter Olympics, VMF
wishes to evoke what was perceived
as a lively, creative atmosphere
at that time. "I think [during the
Olympics] was the first example in a
long time where Vancouver realized
'isn't it great when there's lots of
things happening and there's art and
music everywhere?' And by extension
the people who hold the purse strings
and control City policy seemed to like
it too," says David.
The 2010 Winter Games raised
Vancouver's reputation as a
world-class city. However,
one notable legacy left behind was
the wide-sweeping and sudden gentrification of the Downtown Eastside,
with wealth pouring into neighbourhoods like Gastown. Shortages
of affordable housing has left many
without adequate housing options.
The consequences of events with intentions to "improve" the city's image often result in the marginaliza-
tion of existing populations through
zones of exclusion.
Now more than ever, Vancouver must
consider how it balances the interests of
different communities that share changing
neighbourhoods. Providing more opportunities to emerging artists, planning to
modify the appearance of public buildings,
and properly respecting the vulnerability
of specific communities is a huge undertaking. Vancouver Mural Fest's attempt to
strike a collaboration between artists and
all community stakeholders is certainly
ambitious for Vancouver, but should not
be unprecedented with other festivals like
Capture and Vancouver Biennale also using
public space for installation. Vancouver
Mural Fest seems to be open to having
these discussions. Is everyone else?
VMF will once again brighten up buildings in
Mount Pleasant this summer, with a couple murals elsewhere for flavour. The official celebration
is August 12. Visit vancouvermuralfestival.com
for more information.
»•
1660 EAST BROADWAY
MAY
HIGHUGHTS
WWW.RIOTHEATRETICKETS.CA
MAY
7
KEDI
THE DESCENT
DIRECTOR NEIL MARSHALL IN ATTENDANCE!
MAY
8
ROBERT DENIR0 8ALPACIN0
IN MICHAEL MANN'S
HEAT
MAY
9
STUDIO GHIBLI DOUBLE FEATURE
PONYO + POM POKO
MAY
10
THE GENTLEMEN HECKLERS PRESENT
THE WIZARD (1989)
MAY
12
THE GEEKENDERS PRESENT
WE ALL FLOAT DOWN HERE:
A BURLESQUE TRIBUTE
TO STEPHEN KING
MAY
13
JACK NICHOLSON & FAYE DUNAWAY IN
ROMAN POLANSKI'S
CHINATOWN
MAY
14
HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY!
HAYAO MIYAZAKI'S
SPIRITED AWAY
MAY
19
"DAMN, THAT'S A FINE CUP OF COFFEE!"
TWIN PEAKS:
FIRE WALK WITH ME
MAY
24
THE FICTIONALS COMEDY CO. PRESENTS
IMPROV AGAINST
HUMANITY!
#IAHATRIO
MAY
26
27
THE GEEKENDERS PRESENT
THE EMPIRE STRIPS BACK:
A SCI-FI BURLESQUE ADVENTURE
MAY
31
THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW
A LIVE IMPROVISED EPIC FANTASY
fDNDUVE
JUNE
1
PAUL ANTHONY'S
TALENT TIME
THIRD ANNUAL SUMMER TRIP!
JUNE
2
THE GEEKENDERS & KITTY GLITTER PRESENT
LORD OF THE SCHWIHGS:
A TOLKIEN BURLESQUE NIGHT
JUNE
4
SILENT SUNDAY DOUBLE FEATURE!
NOSFERATU +
DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE
WITH ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK 11 THE INVINCIBLE CZARS
COMPLETE LISTINGS ATWWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA
VANCOUVER MURAL FEST ^^^       WAm%  Wml 0M                                                              U§k                                      W\       ^^^1  <?ep Blue has little regard for hosting par-
mW   ^mk ^L^H      ^^_                   ^^B I^^m I^^m I  ^^B                        ties as business ventures where profit margins
^^L^^g ^^mM I                              ^p^r           A^^mf  can ^e maxec[ anc[ the venue packed. Rather,
^^ Wr wW                                                       their programming reflects an emphasis on crystalliz-
DEEP BLUE
words and illustration by Jules Galbraith
... BY BEINi
A SPACE...
They have no website and no social media presence. Yet, eagle-eyed Discorder readers may have
been sharp to spot one of their posters. These,
alongside performer names and playful retro-futurist
graphics, sport the venue's name and
calling card: Deep Blue.
I am greeted at the space by Jean and Robin,
two of the co-directors, who lead me through
an entrance stocked with, among other things, a
vending machine dispensing Nap and You're Me
cassette tapes, earplugs and plastic art-trinkets;
into a cavern-like performance room where two
fishless aquariums — no doubt lit up for dreamy
atmospherics during parties — sit among scattered
amps and bass-traps. But the real riches lie hidden: as we pass, the pair nudge open studio doors, re
vealing sprawls of hardware synthesizers bristling with
knobs and cables, and records spilling over surfaces. We
sit down to discuss the space and its role in Vancouver's
pulsating underground electronic music scene.
Deep Blue is known to the public mostly as a venue,
hosting parties and music events. However, its quotidian
function is as a non-profit,
  D.I.Y. organization. They
are entirely self-funded,
.    involved in neither
federal nor provincial government grant systems. Two years
ago, the building's lease was
taken over from
New Forms Festival
co-founder Malcolm
Levy, and that genealogical connection persists in the organization's
support and cultivation of space for artists working in
electronic music, sound art and other auditory practices.
Today, Deep Blue has 11 studio spaces shared by more than
28 artists. This type of close-quarters creative space, explains Robin, means that collaboration and cross-pollination is inevitable, with many artists working with similar
equipment, and discussions constant.
many of the artists in the space
use analog equipment           ..-•• ••...
— hardware rather
than software — to produce their    /
sounds. Asked about the appeal,
Jean explains, "Musicians             /
generally have an affinity to        /
physical materials, be it tape      ;'
or records or synthesizers.          |
For a long period of time,            ';
analog equipment was more        \
accessible than digital hardware — that may have changed
since. But new equipment being
put out today tends to be influenced by old equipment, creating a             '■ •"''
renewed demand for vintage electronics.
Within the space, there's a real interest in machine-hu
man interactions."
"DEEP BLUE
DID NOT GENERATE
THE COMMUNITY,
BUT CONTRIBUTES
TO IT...
...IT CAN
MOVE
THROUGH."
ance music, in fact, is not the sole focus
of many at work in the studios. Some
artists, Jean included, have musical practices which incorporate challenging experimentations with sound, ranging from digital signal processing and manipulation to physical modeling.
Jean explains this as "a form of synthesis
where you digitally simulate the materials of an
instrument before you model the sound. So, for
example, in modeling a guitar, you could decide
whether it was made of wood or glass, and then
you could choose the material that excites it, be it
a hand, plastic pick, or whatever. This is a form of
synthesis becoming more available and accessible,
and it's coming through as a new way to design
sound, or as a new toy in the musician's box."
As Robin states, "generally speaking, everyone
here is interested in articulating an idea through
sound. There are tools and techniques, but
there's also the conceptual frameworks in which
these different practices and modes of expression
find common ground. The tools are thus, more or
less, a means for working within a commonality
and exchange of ideas that flow between disciplinary boundaries."
Of course, crowd-digestible dance and electronic music is central to the scene, for which Deep
Blue serves as a gathering place. Asked about
what the distinction between the experience of a D.I.Y. party such as the ones
they host, and a more typical club
concert, Jean answers "I would say
community. That's the glue that
holds these spaces together."
Robin continues, "The type of
music performed here is culturally located in a history that extends beyond Vancouver. Deep Blue
did not generate the community, but
contributes to it by being a place it can
move through. The people who come here
are friends, and they contribute thematically
or idea-wise. We're a house where not only music, but political and artistic discourse can take shape. New
ideas are constantly forming in the scene, and we try to be
as inviting to the discussion as possible."
ing the creative mandate of the space for public enjoyment. Showcasing conceptual innovation foregrounded in
booking talent, both emerging and established, locals and
guests. DJ fare is interspersed with live hardware sets.
Accessibility, of course, is a continuous concern.
"Unfortunately, because this is a D.I.Y. space, there are
some limitations as to the tools and resources we can provide that aid in making the space accessible to those with
mobility limitations, for instance," states Jean. "In terms
of creating a safe space and an open environment — we
come to bridges and cross them. But as a general principle, we want to be completely accessible in terms of
people's comfort." An atmosphere of chilled out self-regulation is cultivated in order to maintain the positive energy. "A lot of people take a personal interest in the space.
There are some things no one wants to see, whether that
be misogyny or oppression," explains Jean.
When further asked about the question of accessibility,
Robin goes on to explain that "the D.I.Y. ethos is fundamentally about a drive to provide access to something that
was previously absent within dominant culture. So even if
we're not able to provide everything to everyone, we hope
that this tradition of self initiative, which Deep Blue is
just one iteration, will carry through and others will carve
out their own space within the terrain we skipped over. If
Deep Blue's contribution is anything, it's in demonstrating that an alternative may be tangible and within reach."
^s of the present, Deep Blue's parties and the releases of its associated labels are the main channels by which the work fermenting in the studios
gets to the public. However, the directors have as an ongoing project in collaboration with 221A — the creation of
a digital archive, which would house sonic and visual artefacts to represent and commemorate the space.
In a city like Vancouver, so many rich creative communities are constantly faced with the precarity of locations
to work and convene. With the awareness that vital independent spaces like Deep Blue tend to have mayfly-short
lives, it becomes a matter of survival to recognize the
work, values and energy that go into shaping the vibe.
There's a website, but it's under construction.
DEEP BLUE It!
words by Courtney Heffernan II illustrations by Katie Lapi //photos by Jon Vincent
To define Jericho with a single adjective is to risk oversimplifying
the band's complex sound, which is
both at odds and in keeping with their penchant for theatricality. The Vancouver band
is as well known for their brooding psychedelic sound as they are for wearing funny
hats on stage. In both their recordings and
their live performances, Pasang Galay says,
"[We] try to make space for all of that."
Jericho has existed in several iterations
- one of which played under the moniker
the Sandra Bullocks - before settling on
the line-up they have today. The band is
currently comprised of Galay on lead vocals
and bass, Luke Tancredi on guitar, Liam
Doherty on keys and synth, Nigel Ching on
cello, and Eli Teed on drums. Of Jericho's
early iterations, Galay says, "We were
kind of always in a mode of development.
We weren't completely satisfied with the
makeup of the band. It wasn't until we
got our five members that we kind of felt
satisfied with being a full band." Teed
joined the band in September 2015 followed shortly by Doherty, who joined as
the band's fifth member.
Galay refers to Jericho's dynamic as a
relationship. He admits, "Trying to manage five people in any relationship is hard,
especially one that is creative ... Not everyone is on the same page at every moment, but I like what each person brings to
[the band]."
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Jericho's multifaceted sound is as
much a stylistic choice as it is a
function of their band line up. Teed
says, "It's part of having five people in
the band with their own musical preferences and backgrounds ... All [of us] see a
song a different way."
When it comes to writing music, differences in taste among band members
is one of Jericho's greatest strengths.
"There's a general cohesion, especially
when we're all together in a room," says
Teed. They take a collaborative approach
to songwriting. Teed continues, "It is
kind of a building block by building block
[process], and everyone contributes their
distinct musical quality to that."
To start the writing process, Tancredi often contributes a rhythm or a melody. Galay
adds a bassline as a way of "laying the
scene or figuring out what the atmosphere
of the song is," says Teed, explaining that
the rest of the band "take[s] that as a cue to
how the song is going to look and how it's
going to sound overall. We'll try to match
whatever thematic or tonal quality it has."
While Tancredi approaches songwriting
from a traditional rock development, Ching
contributes what Galay describes as a more
progressive dark quality. The result is dark
experimental rock interwoven with atmospheric cello and moody bass.
After several months hiatus from recording and performing, Jericho are releasing their debut EP Vanitas in May. Long
has an EP been in the works for the band.
iiaR«!«sv? WBE'i^* a*s»j
Teed says, "We've tried a couple times to
do it with different people and in different
spaces. This one is finally working out. It's
been nice to kind of jump back into things
and have them go fairly swimmingly."
Galay agrees: "[We] finally have material
that we feel is adequately recorded, as well
as adequately played."
While most of the EP recording took
place four months ago, its tracks were written between eight months to two years ago.
Teed says, "Of the four or five songs that
are on there, some were [made by] all five
of us ... Others were Pasang and Nigel in
years past. It's a bit of a hodgepodge of different times and places coming together."
^^m   n April, Jericho released a video for
I  the first track off Vanitas, "Catching
^P  Fire." It is a testament to the
creativity of Jericho's individual members, rich with stylized imagery against
a backdrop of East Vancouver. Galay says
the video is the band's "theatricality to the
[highest] degree." While costume changes
and humorous bits between songs have
long had their place in Jericho's live shows,
the band finds this performance style
hasn't been as well-received now that they
are playing to larger audiences. "The theatricality and the way we manage that has
to be addressed," Teed admits. "That element will still remain but we are going to
be reworking how that will look ... Maybe
we won't have literally so many hats on
over the course of the show."
With the release of Vanitas slated for
May 12, Jericho is thinking of the future
of the band. Teed says, "Everyone really
enjoys playing together and being able to
put out music that we all enjoy playing
and listening to. I think that's definitely
kept things going, and will continue to
keep things going."
Jericho releases Vanitas with The Trolls
(who are also releasing an EP) at SBC on May
12. More music at jericho.bandcamp.com."
JERICHO THE CLOTHESLINE SWING
AND EVERYTHING ELSE
WORDS BY BRIT BACHMANN // PHOTOS BY JEN VAN HOUTEN
JcXOs mJ' Ob- H
0
Lpto-
1  h my god, it is the worst. It is by far the
worst. It feels like the last minutes of giving
birth to something, and it's painful, and it's
bothering me. ... It is actually one of the worst feelings
ever. And a great feeling."
This isn't the reaction I expect when I ask Ahmad
Danny Ramadan how he is feeling about the release of his
debut novel, The Clothesline Swing. Granted, it is a 'debut'
in the sense that it is his first novel, but he is established.
His previously published work include short stories, regular columns, and articles for reputable international papers. I express my surprise, and Danny expands:
"The anticipation is killing me, but it is the same with
every piece that I write because at the end of the day, I am
writing in a language I don't think in. And I am writing
to people, coming from a completely different culture to
their culture."
Danny immigrated to Canada in 2014 after having been
a Syrian refugee living in Lebanon. Although Danny tells
me that he dreams in languages he doesn't even speak
— "I dream in colour" is his first response — his Syrian
identity and the poetry of his first language, Arabic, help
to define the eloquence of his speech, his perspectives, and
the themes in his writing.
The Clothesline Swing is a fictional story about two
gay men who fall in love in a complicated and beautiful
Damascus following the Arab Spring, then immigrate to
Vancouver's West End. The men are lovingly haunted by
memories of home as they grow older together, finding
comfort in the quotidian.
As Danny and I sit at Sunset Beach, blocks away from
his West End apartment, it's impossible to avoid obvious
and implied parallels between Danny and his protagonists. I ask Danny why he wrote this book, and his reply
is slow and intentional. He explains, "I think I reached a
point where I was filled with stories I wanted to tell, filled
with issues that I wasn't aware of how to deal with, and
filled with traumas that I wasn't even sure how to heal. ...
It was me just writing for the sake of me, for the sake of
telling a story that is stuck in my head, and not knowing
how to handle it."
^^^   anny is a born storyteller; like his characters;
I  like many refugees; like many people. Over our
A^fjr   conversation, it becomes apparent that there
aren't many instances where Danny and other Syrians
are given the opportunity to share their personal stories.
The narratives of Syrian refugees — and a lot of Middle
Eastern history — have been reduced to shocking headlines and xenophobic assertions. The Clothesline Swing is a
humanizing foil to the cold, spoon-fed media coverage of
Syria's political and social unrest. It is a (fictional) document of the honest experiences of queer Syrians abroad
and immigrating.
The Clothesline Swing began as a collection of short stories that wove themselves into a novel when Danny moved
to Canada. "I came here and saw how we are all viewed as
Syrian refugees, or as queer Syrian refugees, and I started
to see the tokenization that happens sometimes — the stereotyping, the misunderstandings between cultures — and
started to think that this book should be a true representation of what my culture is like, and what it means to be a
refugee, and what it means to be a gay person in Syria."
Danny describes being queer in Syria as "horrible in so
many different ways, but beautiful at the same time." He
continues, "It was so full of joy, and full of secret kisses
in the back of taxies, and lovely people that you get to
know and they become your chosen family, connections
that you never thought you would make in your life —
meaningful encounters."
^^^   uring my first reading of The Clothesline Swing, I
I  write "tender, vulnerable, brutal" in my notes.
A^fjr   The story is full of meaningful encounters in exquisite detail, beginning with an affectionate sex scene.
Danny describes it as "the first time the two lovers make
love. It's happening, and in the background there are
shootings outside. There are actual people killing each
other outside." This prologue sets the motif of Danny's
novel, best summarized by the author himself: "Survival is
not about being resilient. Survival is about finding a way
to see the beauty that you have."
There is another reason why storytelling is so valuable
— it allows the teller to begin to process their experiences. It's important now more than ever that Syrian refugees speak for themselves, rather than have media misinterpret them.
"The media forgets that each refugee carries their own
stories, and carries their own lives, and carries their own
professions. Some of them are artists, some storytellers
like myself, some farmers, some lawyers," and through
the telling of their stories, explains Danny, "[they are] releasing that sorrow, and realizing the beauty within it."
He reminds the listener to "[accept] that the story isn't
about gaining sympathy, but gaining empathy."
Asked about the shortcomings of Canada's current immigration program, Danny replies, "When we bring refugees here, we put the responsibility on their shoulders to
integrate into the community. ... We get a lot of support
from a lot of loving Canadians, which I am thankful for.
The lacking would be that we are not a mainstream culture. You don't see Syrian movies; you don't know Syrian
authors; you don't know Syrian singers; you have never
seen a traditional Syrian dance."
As a nation committed to welcoming refugees, it is the
responsibility of each Canadian to consider how they are
welcoming refugees. Danny has some advice: "I think
people should listen to our stories and read about our culture. People should try our food, for fuck's sake it's really
good! ... Learn how to say hi to us in our language. Listen
to our songs." (He suggests listening to older music by
Assala, Syria's answer to Cher.)
At some point I realize that Danny and I are only five
years apart, but it might as well be a lifetime in experiences, mine so minimal by comparison. I ask one final
question, perhaps naively: "What is home?"
"The more I bring over people like me, the more I
feel at home," answers Danny. "In Arabic we say
' U^us Lr1J| u'o-" ?' m-^lP'o-0' or heaven without people is
not even worth stepping into."
a
The Clothesline Swing is published on Nightwood Editions. It
launches Thursday, May 4 with a party and reading at The Emerald.
AHMAD DANNY RAMADAN /■
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APRIL 2017
D.O.A. ROCK THE VOTE! CAMPAIGN
KICKOFF CONCERT W/ ROOTS ROUNDUP
/ WETT STILETTOS / CHILDSPLAY
APRIL 1 / RICKSHAW THEATRE
Until I walked into the Rickshaw, I had forgotten this music used to be
my whole life. Crusty scum-punk-core. I walked in, looked around and
thought to myself, "Who are all these aging rockers?" Oh right, I am them —
they are me. My sober eyes recognized the dedicated punk rockers from my
wasted years, and as I remembered the ultra-violence of those days, almost
imperceptibly, the Rickshaw filled.
The opener was Childsplay: Jaden Faber on guitar and lead vocals,
Takumi Shimokawa on guitar and backing vocals Skyler Kummen on bass
and backing vocal, and Dane Becker on drums and backing vocals. They
have four people listed on their page, but I saw five members up there —
sorry mystery member.
The next generation has got it together. Childsplay were super tight, and
delivered a killer set. The band played beyond their ages with a clear and
dedicated purpose: to deliver skate-worthy thrash punk rock feels. Childsplay
was my favourite band of the night, and if you are new to the punk scene, or
an old timer like myself, I suggest you go right now and check them out.
Wett Stilettos were up next. They don't have an identity you can put your
finger on: crusty punk meets rocker with sweet basslines all stirred together
in a vodka collins that is just vodka, no collins. Online, the Wett Stilettos are
RC Guns, Wrangler Pinto, and Zig Zigler. The drums, on this occasion, were
executed perfectly by Christina 'Boom Boom' McBeatz from the Muff Dusters
— she might have known the songs better than the rest of the band. RC was
lackluster and even sat down at the end of the set. I found myself rooting for
her— you got this, you uncompromising rocker queen! I heard later that she
went onstage despite a concussion, now that's punk rock. Zigler and Pinto
couldn't hear each other because their sound was terrible. When a bassist
and a guitarist can't hear each other... well, you know how that goes.
Because it was a "Rock The Vote" for Joey Keithley, not of only D.O.A.
fame but also Green Party Representative, there was a short shout out to the
upcoming election. I hate actual politics in my punk rock. Punk rock is inherently political but it can be steeped in a hyper masculine, sexist, intolerant violence — just because you are punk doesn't mean you live by altruistic values.
But, if anyone I knew from the punk rock scene was going to seek justice as
an MLA, it is Joey, the consummate business punk rocker. His speech was
brief. "Fight Corruption! No Pipelines! Accountability you muther mothers!"
Then came Roots Roundup. In no particular order we have: Greg
Hathaway, David Hathaway, Barry Taylor, Keith Rose, Dym E Tree, Mark
Campbell, Ford Pier and David Macanulty. Hella yes! This band is ska-
punk-funk-folk, a Vancouver ol' school band, only a six-piece for the event.
Seriously, this band is the equivalent of a 600-year old sitka in the Vancouver
music scene, towering over us little trees, schooling the rest of us how to feel
free, jump and dance.
Then there was D.O.A. — there has always been D.O.A. After 35 years of
playing and moshing in Vancouver, they have had many incarnations via the
round robin of players, but on this occasion it was Joey "Shithead" Keithley
on guitar, Paddy Duddy on drums, and Mike Hodsall on bass. Everything that
needs to be said about D.O.A. has already been written, so I'll focus on the
crowd. Gang vocals spilled into the Rickshaw by way of a sing-along everybody singing the lyrics and skanking in the centre of the floor. I watched enviously, nursing my broken collar bone and non-alcoholic beer from the chairs
as people smiled from ear to ear and slapped each other on the back. This
is old punk, this is classic punk. Amazed that a three piece band could fill the
space left by Roots Roundup, I changed my mind. Maybe Shithead would
make a great leader — he mobilized these punkers. — Oona Krieg
WIRE /GOLDEN RETRIEVER
APRIL 7 /IMPERIAL
I t first glance, the Imperial seemed like an odd venue to host a leg-
I endary punk band. It's a far cry from a grimy dive bar, and not quite
what you'd expect to find in the area around Main and Hastings. In 2007,
the former-Chinese theater underwent a complete $2.5 million renovation.
Granted, by now, it's in the ever-growing outskirts of Gastown and the gen-
trification that creeps with it further and further into the DTES. "It's very...
Vancouver," my friend said, looking at the life-size terracotta warrior replica
tions adorning the walls and overlooking the crowd. The audience in attendance was comprised of upper-middle class and middle-aged participants,
most of whom I assume grew up listening to Wire's music. There were also a
few obvious punks scattered around, young and old.
Golden Retriever, the opening act, are an acoustic-electronic duo from
Portland. Using modular synthesizers and a bass clarinet to create melodic-atmospheric sonic dynamics, they define themselves as "acoustic-electronic." Personally, I'd never heard a bass clarinet plugged into a daisy chain
of effect pedals. The clarinet's signal, plugged in at the mouthpiece, was sent
through a pitch shifter, reverb and much more while the synthesizers droned
or oscillated underneath. I would have never guessed that those sounds
came from a clarinet, had I not seen the instrument in action.
The performance neglected the use of any continuous beat, but rather
the rhythms for each song came from the modulations of the synth. It was
an interesting opening act to say the least: not what anybody at the venue
expected, but, for once, it was something entirely new. Shortly after their set
ended, the venue was packed full as the participants who eagerly waited for
the main act.
For the uninitiated, Wire's impact on the musical world is that they laid the
foundations for the many eventual variants of punk, from post-punk to hardcore, and alt-rock as a whole. Since their debut album in 1977, Pink Flag,
they have been recognized as pioneers of art-punk for blending the grit of
the early british punks such as the Sex Pistols with the attitude and sensibilities of synthesizer art-pop, as well as a tendency for more complex song
structures. The band's commercial success does not equate to their enormous influence, but it's been over 40 years since the band's origin. Maybe
it was ironic to watch Colin Newman (frontman, rhythm guitarist and founding member) looking down at an iPad while playing, but times have certainly changed. Drummer Robert Grey displayed a stoic pose with his eyes
closed and chin up throughout the set. The entire audience sang along to the
incredibly catchy "Three Girl Rhumba," and while most of the set was comprised of their more recent material, the music never faltered. There were
plenty of shouted song titles from the slightly drunk crowd, but the band kept
their own agenda and played an incredibly well-rehearsed set, complete with
an encore. All I can really say is, "They've still got it."—Aidan Danaher
THE VELVETENS/LAYTEN KRAMER/
TANGLERS
APRIL 8 / COBALT
T anglers instantly transported me from the Cobalt to a bluesy, folky
beach concert, with people dancing playfully around a bonfire, the tall
flame flicking its tail up at the night sky, until the early morning hours. Their
jazzy rock with neo-psychedelia influence rattled me from my heart to my
fingertips, and allowed the crowd loosen up and sway as the echoey chords
and soft drums melded together. The four Tanglers — Andrew Noble, Matt
Catellier, Ross Macnab, and Cole Young — played the ideal opening set for
a night filled with delicious indie tracks.
Layten Kramer and his band took the stage next, playing higher tempo
music throughout the course of their set, due to their more poppy direction of
indie music. They started off slow with the song "Shadows." As all the instrumental elements symbiotically came together in harmony, the tension faded
away and the music emulated a dream-like state. The reverb let each final
sound to linger in the air, left afloat under the blue-green lights. Gradually,
they shifted to more new-wavey and upbeat tunes, such as "Thin White
Lies," one of the most upbeat, danceable songs of the night. The bass was
the highlight of this song without a doubt. Although there was less depth and
complexity to their music performed live compared to their recorded tracks,
there was definitely more energy. Layten Kramer's blend of so many genres,
including alternative folk, pop, psychedelic chill, country, and indie rock just
proves how versatile this group is.
Then it was time for the show we had all been waiting for: The Velveteins.
Three men walked onto stage — one with wild curly locks tamed by a baseball cap; one chillin' in the back, hidden behind his drum set; and one with
rolled up denim, revealing bare feet on the stage. At the crossroads where
Arctic Monkeys and Vampire Weekend meet, The Velveteins tastefully — yet
not sparingly — utilized rhythmic bass and cymbals throughout their set. A
lot of the older music they played, songs like "West Coast Love Affair" and
"XOXY," seemed to have almost a country twang. The crowd loved them so
much, that the set wasn't enough and after cheering them back onstage for
an encore, the band played one final song to finish the night. All of the great
music made for a rad show, and showcased the wide variety that indie rock
still has to offer.—Inca Gunter
ML YOUCANEATLAUNDRY:k COMEDY
VARIETY SHOW PRODUCED BY SOPHIA
LAPRES (REVIEWED BY SOPHIA LAPRES)
APRIL 8 / LITTLE MOUNTAIN GALLERY
On April 8, Maddy Kelly's brilliant alternative comedy variety show "All
You Can Eat Laundry Produced by Sophia Lapres" or something to
that effect, opened. The charming promotional cartoons and flyers yielded yet another sold-out crowd — the endearingly rundown Little Mountain
Gallery was packed.
One of the most crucial aspects of producing a comedy show is finding
that special somewhere between sterilized and dilapidated and I think I really knocked this one out of the park. The cherry on top? The bartender was
super cute.
Kelly strolled out to applause holding a ukulele, a staple of her early act,
and announced that she was going to be playing some older material. "I'm
not sure that it's aged too well," she said as she strummed the instrument
and belted, "I looooove The Apprenticed
At 21, Kelly has already established herself as a force in the city's comedy scene that is to her "both supportive and competitive. Especially for women." She, and her beautiful companion, Ms. Lapres, started the monthly variety show to create a fostering program of sorts for some of Vancouver's less
conventional comedians. With the success of its first two instalments, All You
Can Eat Laundry seems to be becoming just that.
The variety show treated a full house to three hours of every facet of comedy: stand-up, skits, powerpoint presentations, political sketches, characters,
and more than a few rants, all laced with Kelly's apt and biting jokes, hitting
all fronts of her and her audience's neuroses. Her jokes were about everything: ass, tits, TV advertisements, real-estate, boyfriends, organ transplants,
and some stuff I didn't hear because I had to pee — the wine I had chosen
was really good and the bartender was definitely flirting with me.
"It's hard to find a space for weird comedy," said Kelly, and All You Can
Eat Laundry has certainly made a haven for its share. The first act of her
March show featured borscht-belt humour from a boat. "Name any boat and
I'll make a joke about it," the boat (Brett Skillen) said quickly followed by a
"Fuck you!" to an audience member who yelled out "the Titanic."
Other acts included some insanely good and hilariously offensive impressions, such as racist Marge Simpson and Robin William's suicide letter, from
REAL LIVE ACTION Simon King. Kelly telephoned Kyle Paton who was on vacation in Mexico at
the time (seriously) who told a bunch of jokes that relied on physical gesturing as punchlines. Because of the experimental nature of the show, some acts
didn't get big laughs, which isn't to say they weren't entirely brilliant. They just
veered more towards the performance art side. Ian Thompson and Sophia
Larney, both retired members of UBC Improv, performed character sketches
as an entrepreneur on Dragon's Den and a man without toes respectively.
More traditional standup acts came from Fortune Feimster (of The
Mindy Project and Office Christmas Party), Chris Griffin (finalist in the San
Francisco comedy competition and winner of Vancouver's "The Yuk Off") and
Graham Clark (of Stop Podcasting Yourself).
Maddy and I hope to cement the show as a monthly staple to create a
space for experimental comedy and performance art and move towards creating a multidisciplinary place for lowbrow comedy, art and music.
Anyway, I think I really hit it out of the park. You can't learn how to produce a show, you know what I mean? No one teaches you — it's just something you gotta feel. It comes from your bones. If you have it, you have it and
if you don't, you just don't. So when Maddy asked me to produce her third
show I honestly wasn't even surprised, I was just like: "Uh-huh. You're welcome. Now go practice your jokes or whatever. Mommy has to get some liability insurance." She's lucky she's funny.—Sophia Lapres
BITS & PIECES
APRIL 10 / RED GATE
Ps I walked into Red Gate, the room had shifted from its usual bare-
floored appearance to something much cozier; the couches were
moved to form a snug semi-circle around the stage, and the floor inside this
circle was covered in blankets and cushions. The room was filled with dim
red light, and on the brightly lit stage, a blanket and heater awaited a live
model. Some attendees reclined on couches and cushions, chatting easily, while others gathered drawing boards, paper, charcoal and pencils from
a table nearby. It was Bits & Pieces: a recurring event featuring life drawing
and creative writing. For $7, guests gained the benefit of a live nude model,
drawing supplies, writing prompts, and a relaxing environment.
Organizers Roisin Trefla and Maayan Cohen, two UK exchange students
studying at UBC, put together the event series and carried out three editions, each with different themes: the theme this time was consumption. After
everyone settled in, Roisin and Maayan began the night by reminding everyone that the event was about trying new things — that those used to writing
could try focusing on drawing, or vice-versa. The inclusion of both writing
and drawing activities provided more opportunities for exploration, and probably helped to draw a larger audience.
After the short intra came two five-minute life drawing poses, followed by
two five-minute writing prompts. While most folks were shy about sharing
writing pieces, it was exciting to see all the different drawing styles and skill
levels in the room. Clearly, the room had come together not just for the drawing practice but also for the community, the atmosphere, and the opportunity to learn.
As a writing prompt, each participant drew from a jar two slips of paper,
each with one word relating to consumption written on it. We were then given
five minutes to free-write about each word, then 15 minutes to put together a
rough poem, story, or argumentative piece. I received the words "colonization"
and "sex." This was the most difficult part of the evening for me: the consciousness of others in the room felt restricting — "colonization" and "sex" were also
challenging to put together. However, the prompt was a creative way of getting
ideas flowing and held potential for more productive combinations.
After a break for sharing and conversing, drawing resumed with a 30-min-
ute pose. Roisin and Maayan advise the audience to take the first five minutes to simply look at the model, so as to remember that drawing is also
about seeing. In the dim red light of the space, with tranquil music playing in
the background (as well as the odd post-punk jam coming through the wall
from the next room), guests settled into their drawings.
The evening came to a close with the addition of several new drawings
to the world, new writing ideas floating through attendees' heads, and some
pleasant conversation. Overall, Bits & Pieces was an excellent opportunity to
brush up on an old skill or to try something new. —Claire Bailey
SEASONS FESTIVAL SO LOKI / HOOD
JOPLIN / PRADO / BAINS
APRIL 14 / VANCOUVER ARTS & LEISURE
Jf you haven't been to a So Loki show, you are missing out. Sam Lucia
and Natura have a flair for the theatrical that feels more New York
City than too-cool-to-care Vancouver. The secrecy and and care surrounding every detail of their Seasons Festival show was impressive — the other
acts weren't revealed until a few days before and the all-black dress code
was announced the morning of via an '80s video game inspired poster on
the Facebook event page. Being a veteran of typical Vancouver shows, I've
come to appreciate the general come-as-you-are atmosphere; but So Loki
makes an effective case for the thrill of purposefully dressing for the night
and taking it seriously.
I headed around the back of Vancouver Arts & Leisure, got marked off on
a fancy iPad checklist, and headed into the back room. The setup was amazing. Framing Hoop Joplin's turntables at the back of the stage there were two
massive crosses with pink and blue tinted nature videos projected onto them
and the performers, courtesy of local filmographer Lucas Hrubizna. The videos had perfectly placed crass cutouts matching the physical crosses on
the stage, each with special nature scenes from the greater projection. Like
everything else about a So Loki show, it was impressive.
The next act, Bains, performed to a black clad audience where folks
swaying and nodding were shoulder-to-shoulder with intense dancers. He
had DJ Khalid's aesthetic and slow but intense energy, mixed with the sound
of Eminem. There were people who filmed every second of his set, providing
an unexpected spotlight that refocused every second of the performance on
him. The amateur videographers' flash matched the black, gray and white
projections behind Bains.
After Bains, Prado got on stage and totally disregarded the implied black
dress code. She had bright pink pom pom earrings nestled in her curls, which
fell over a light pink silk house coat and hot pink shorts. Her stand-out style
completely suited her outstanding set. She was magnetic on stage, very natural and conversational but breaking out an intensity during the songs. It was
honestly one of the best sets I've ever seen. The audience tried to absorb as
much of her passion as possible as they moved closer to the stage.
So Loki are the only performers who could have followed Prado. They
only played songs off their new album, having just released their new single "Boo Boo" on Spotify earlier that week. They brought the drama. Natura
stood comfortably behind the keys as Lucia yelled into the microphone, losing his bandana, then his jacket, and finally shirt throughout the set. At one
point, Sam loosed a bottle of champagne onto the suffocatingly close crowd.
Then he took out a megaphone and fittingly performed "Liquid Luck."
Every So Loki show is a transformation — they have an entrancing ability
to manipulate very normal settings and make them sparkle.
In Vancouver, So Loki are coming into a scene where they don't have
much established support, and they are very aware of this. At every show,
Lucia makes a speech about the importance of the fans and the family that
the audience is now a part of, having supported them. Their championing
a space for hip hop artists in Vancouver is invaluable. Drama and pageantry aside, what they're doing is really straightforward, and it's just a perk that
they've made the ride so exciting.—Dora Dubber
HONG KONG EXILE: ROOM 2048
APRIL 15 / FIREHALL ARTS CENTRE
oom 2048 (2048 ) — a dream machine for the Cantonese diaspora.
In digital light and smoke, we pursue a history that is not ours. A living past, a dying future, and a stillborn present. We will lie. We will cheat. We
will spend a thousand years here."
Preliminarily, it's worth mentioning that Room 2048 derives the number
2048 from the year when China plans to fully reintegrate the former English
colony, Hong Kong, into the People's Republic of China. Already, exertions
into the liberal-democratic city-state by an increasingly firm Chinese government have been met with protest; but also a creeping sense of malaise
and inevitability.
But Hong Kong was always a dream: a Shangri-La of rampant neoliberal-
ism and English colonialism. Could it ever have been utopic? In light of this
complexity, Room 2048's dreamlike dissidence — lying, cheating, idling — is
charged with a laconic bravura. A multidisciplinary dance performance, the
success of Room 2048 comes from equal emphasis placed on the conceptual prowess of Hong Kong Exile (Natalie Tin Yin Gan, Milton Lim, Remy Siu),
characteristic performances from dancers Michelle Lui, Milton Lim, Alex Tarn,
and surreal FX from Remy Siu. Room 2048 is clever and technical, bracingly
smart, and as content to impress as it is to make you experience slowness
and unease.
There's a characteristic gesture in Room 2048. Hyperkinetic pop plays
over the speakers. A spotlight animates a central figure. Lights flash on and
off, in varying tempos. In the opening sequence, Lui, upright and expressionless, swivels to face another direction when the dark strikes: as if she
was entirely still and the audience's view was that of a perspective snapshot. Later, Tarn will assume the central position: staccato lights flicker as
Tarn, running in place, rotates so subtly it appears as if he's on a swivelling
platform. Room 2048 presents illusions and tricks that double as questions:
perhaps it's a question of movement without progress, or action without reaction. Room 2048 has a sense for dream logic, from the surreal to the outright
comic (during a strip-tease sequence, Tarn removes what must easily be at
least 5 sets of boxers).
The fog inundates every inch of Room 2048. Masterful sound design
during club sequences, switching between the thick of the dance floor and
muffled bass floors away, compress separate space into the single level of
a stage. In another sequence, Lim clumsily emulates Lui's moves, failing
to replicate the sharp gestures so reminiscent of Remy Liu's own decisive
light-play: as if lagging behind technologic ideation, a dream of teleology that
becomes a nightmare.
At one point, Tarn makes himself present, the narrator assuming central
stage and a bathetic purpose. He talks about his grandfather's experience of
diaspora, the complex path to today, and their time spent together with karaoke. Tarn — or the character he plays — sings Sinatra's "My Way." "Regrets,
I've had a few / But then again, too few to mention." The refrain comes across
like the cry of Nashville's American bicentennial song — "We must be doing
something right / To last 200 years." Like Altman's film, Room 2048 has a
knack for irony, bathos, and a complex love in its depiction of the homeland.
Later, in a moment of stillness and beauty, illuminated fog drapes the
stage, like a basin of vaporous cloud in a Taoist painting. Thousands of days
pass. After hyperkinetic light and sound, stillness is the centrepiece of Room
2048's final act. Trickery, which has been a game of resistance for the dancers, concludes with an act which makes the formal performance and the
expectations of genre itself a dissident no.
As the play concludes, it recurs. After the recursion, it ends as a matter
of the outside world of closing venues: rhythms apart from dream logic. Tarn
rotates around the stage in that characteristic shuffle, so subtle it appears
as if the base is rotating a still subject: like the hung screen of a video game
selection menu. Maybe it's like Elon Musk says: all sufficiently advanced civilizations avoid apocalypse by plugging themselves into simulations. Maybe
Hong Kong exiles will plug themselves into a Wong Kar-Wai simulation and
keep on dreaming. There's a power in those dreams.
"To articulate what is past does not mean to recognize "how it really was."
It means to take control of a memory, as it flashes in a moment of danger." -
Walter Benjamin, On the Concept of History.— Jonathan Kew
) have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine
and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca
RLA is also expanding to include comedy and theatre, among other
live experiences. Feel free to submit those event details to the
e-mail above.
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MUSIC REVIEWS
COZY
Cozy
(Self-Released)
28/04/2017
Cozy is the wise older sister every girl wishes she had growing up. The
kind of who would teach you about feminism and not giving a fuck, and
let you borrow her effortlessly cool clothes. She'd be the one who'd tell you
the plain and dirty truth about sex, and the one to pick you up and dry your
tears after your first break-up. Most of us lack this wise older sister to guide
us smoothly through adolescence and young adulthood. Instead, we are
covered in the bruises and scars that we inevitably collect while experiencing things for the first time. For those of us still figuring out our shit, Cozy's
album is far more than a musical debut. Rather, it is a much needed guide to
finding self-esteem and self-acceptance as a woman in a world dictated by
misogyny.
Cozy is Josie Aileen Patterson, a singer / rapper / producer who hops
from genre to genre without breaking a sweat. The album's opening track,
"Cozy," is dark and hypnotic. In this track she proves herself as both a producer and a rapper. Her lush production sets the tone for her evocative bars,
which brings to mind femcees like Atlanta hip hop veteran Stahhr. Her lyrics
are poetry for the intersectional feminist soul: clever, biting, and at the same
time extremely relatable. She sings, for example, of "throwing kisses to all
the misogynists" and brushes off her depressive symptoms with a desperate
"I'm getting dressed /1 swear I'm fine." A line that brings me back to those
visceral moments where I pushed myself out of bed just to prove I was an
adult, even though I just wanted to be, as Cozy puts it, "up a tree / bawling
my eyes out."
As if her flow is not enough, Cozy has a warm and powerful voice that
could be on Top Forty radio alongside Alicia Keys and Adele. Her vocals
particularly shine in her acoustic folk songs. Stripped back songs like
"Monotony" and "To Let Go" might seem out of place on a R&B album, but
the thread that holds it all together is Josie. Her personality radiates through
every single song, leaving the listener feeling like they are sitting in her living
room with a glass of wine. While listening to the album, I wanted to talk back
to her and share my experiences. Cozy has so much to say, and the album,
as a whole, feels like an intimate conversation between friends.
Cozy has enough talent for ten artists, and has the guts to sing lyrics
like "non-binary labia" at dive bars like The Roxy. In one of the final tracks,
she sings "It won't be long before I'm famous." And I cannot help but agree.
Cozy's debut album is unlike anything I've ever heard. As for how long it will
take her to be "famous?" I would give it a few months.
—Sarah Jickling
PERSON OF INTEREST
Eclipse
(Exotic Dance Records)
11 / 04/2017
fclipse is Person of Interest's second album, and first solo one, with
Exotic Dance Records. Working anonymously, they have positioned
themselves as a promising lo-fi artist, drawing from their roots in techno and
house. Straying away from their previously aggressive and at times overwhelming beats to a lighter and more playful tone, this album acts as a transition. Experimenting with previously underutilized instruments, like the disembodied vocals in "Lanes," Eclipse demonstrates Person of Interest's versatility and evolution as an artist.
On Eclipse, Person of Interest draws on their previous releases, combining the citrusy overtones of their songs like "Pompano Acid" from J. Albert
and Person of Interest EDR002 with the swelling undertones of "Keep It
Moving" from their eponymous album with L.I.E.S.. They successfully navigate disparate themes by layering kinetic percussion over sweeping beats to
create a tone that is simultaneously lively and mellow.
With "Skyline (Angel's Theme)," Person of Interest sets up this duality for the rest of the album. They also demonstrate their skill as a songwriter by lacing a bouncing melody overtop the potentially repetitive dance beat.
Similarly, the subdued steadiness and use of vocals in "Slab Code (beat
mix)" balances out the twangy brightness of "Lostl," and "En Route" draws
back on the structure of "Skyline (Angel's Theme)," maintaining continuity on
the album.
"Eclipse," the titular song, is the the purist dance beat on the album, and
the least interesting. It is fast-paced with minimal use of a mellowing under-
beat, a melody fails to cut through its repetitiveness, and it has the aggressiveness of "Lostl" without the brightening acidity. It feels like a song made
to appeal to techno and house fans on an otherwise lo-fi album.
In being able to combine the discordant themes of lively and mellow,
Eclipse is a versatile album for any mood. While at times it seems that
Person of Interest is pandering to a genre they don't work within, the use of
melody, percussion, and sweeping undertones makes this album fresh and
interesting. —Clara Dubber
CIRKLE
Extraterrestrial Research
(Deep Sea Mining Syndicate)
31 / 03/2017
fxtraterrestrial Research is best listened to in a dark room late at night,
when your mind is free to wander alongside Cirkle's mesmerizing techno
and ominous ambience. This international collaboration between Greek artist
Cirkle and Canadian record label Deep Sea Mining Syndicate will put you into
a state of hypnosis that will only dissipate once the album is over. Everything
flows so smoothly from one beat to the next that, at times, it's hard to tell when
one track ends and another begins. With five individual pieces, Extraterrestrial
Research is a tight and intimate listen, surging from one thumping loop to
another with a magnetic sense of effortlessness.
The first track is titled "Landing," and rightfully so. It gleefully indulges in
its own ambience, taking us on a journey bent on doing the album title justice. The echoey production feels almost alien, ambitiously floating us into
space in preparation for the techno that is to come. This somber opener is
indeed a landing, but the location is left up to the listener's imagination.
If "Landing" introduces us to an alien landscape, then "Kachira's Cave"
acts as an exploration. Stripping away most of the ambience in favour of a
hypnotically repetitive techno beat, this track contains enough minimalistic
energy to continuously drive forward. It never stalls, rising in an evolving tapestry of sound that only ceases when the beats fade away to make room for
the next piece, "Underwater Tunnel."
Both over six minutes long, "Underwater Tunnel" and "Extra Terrestrial
Research" build upon the energy of "Kachira's Cave" and provide Cirkle's
grandest displays of techno prowess. These tracks are the research that
Cirkle alludes to in the album title. With a multi-layered mix of striking beats
and a consistent background ambience that rises and falls with every passing moment, Cirkle seems to be probing for answers in this album's otherworldly murkiness. And whatever Cirkle's looking for, it is clearly hidden.
The album feels short, and yet there is not a wasted moment. The final
track is simply titled "Epilogue," and acts as a fittingly atmospheric conclusion to an album concerned with the mysteries of strange, far off places.
Cirkle manages to keep every piece from overstaying its welcome by building layer upon layer of sonic wonder into a dark, spacey tapestry of laid-back
techno and brooding ambience. —Leo Yamanaka-Leclerc
EASY
MONEY
EASY MONEY
COLLECTION 79-82
(Hosehead / Neon Taste)
20/03/2017
Bands live and then bands die. That's what happens sometimes.
Countless hours are spent toiling away in a jam space until time is
up. Recordings and shows are the only currency for a band's legacy. Quite
often, this fortune stays in the amygdala, collecting interest only from those
in search of the obscure.
Easy Money existed as a Victoria-based power-pop band for three years.
The group released two singles on Richards Records in 1980 and broke up
two years later. They had their pleasure and their fun. Left in obscurity are 13
songs that now appear on Collection 79-82.
These songs do not stray far from the power-pop comfort zone: the guitars are loud, the drumming is lively, and the lyrics are wrapped up in the
innocence of young love and confusion. The lyrics are typical of the genre
without getting too philosophical. The exception, however, is found on "No
Stranger to Danger" where Easy Money waxes about facism, class, and
race, before punctuating the song with a screeching guitar solo and warning
that "You're no stranger / To the danger / Of living / In the First World."
Though engaging sparingly with such thoughts of depth, Easy Money
compensates with youthful vigor and conviction. Collection's most lovable moments are the two-track, off-the-floor recordings. "Young and
Overequipped," for instance, has Easy Money foaming with disgust at living in an old man's world. The band does not let up, showing reckless dissonance as the guitar screeches along the fretboard. "It Keeps Me Living"
builds upon this frantic pace. Anxious drum fills pinch the band to the limits
of space and time before testifying that "The love you're giving / It keeps me
living." It's actually what love should feel like: frisky and confident.
The definition of power-pop was obscured as humanity burrowed deeper
into the '80s. That's what happens sometimes. But Easy Money sounds like
a power-pop band invested in the essentials. They sweeten melodic hooks
over a brisk tempo; their ragged riffs sneer back with crooked major-key
smiles. Collection 79-82 finally gives listeners a chance to cash in on otherwise hidden currency. —Mark Budd
RHUCLE
l/l/onder/and
(Beer on the Rug)
08/03/2017
Xokyos Yuta Kudo is one busy man. Covering a wide range of mediums,
be it photography, painting or sculpture, his artistic output rarely slows
down. His musical project, titled Rhucle, seems the perfect companion and
balance to these artistic leanings. In fact, I found it quite nice to look through
his gallery of published work while listening to this latest offering of music,
titled Wonderland.
Kudo's images project a feeling of calm and peace. Whether abstract
swirls of colour on canvas or photographs of nature and urban surroundings,
his work is pointed and serves its purpose well. And so it is with Rhucle's
music. While defined as chillwave or even ambient, a term Kudo himself dismisses, Rhucle reaches a bit deeper than simple terms of genre. Rather,
these songs are closer to field recordings or soundscapes. It is the music
that might play in the back of your head while taking a stroll through the forest or a quiet neighbourhood. And while the music he makes with the electronics at his disposal is pretty, it would be wholly incomplete without the
lovely real-life sounds that accompany it.
Water, for instance, plays a strong role in Kudo's work, both in his images
and music. Wonderland is no exception with its eight gently sprawling tunes
that bring to mind my favourite rustic places of recharge and contemplation.
Ultimately, Rhucle's music provides a reminder to slow down and absorb
one's surroundings. The songs flow into one another with grace and differ
only slightly. There are no bangers or ballads to be found here. Instead, you
are treated to an even keeled energy that envelops you in warm serenity, acting as a calming agent to the end of a long day, a jump off point to meditation, or perhaps a soothing candlelit soak in the tub.
Music doesn't have to be ripe with hooks and catchy melodies to be effective. Sometimes the simplest of movements are more than enough to inspire
emotion, and Rhucle's deliciously serene musical paintings prove this point.
Each song acts as a healing balm for your ears, brain and spirit.
—Nathan Pike
x^m^
GHOSTTHOUGHTS
Purple Period
(Self-Released)
10/02/2017
urple Period starts off with "David: My Father's Father's Father."
Immediately, I feel like I'm floating and I continue to feel this way
throughout the entirety of the album. It's raining outside, and the melancholic sounds streaming from my headphones suits this atmosphere perfectly.
Celina Kurtz sings about the loss of someone close, but comes to the understanding that maybe there isn't anything immediate one can do, crooning
"David lives inside me."
In the most reassuring manner, Purple Period makes sadness sound not
UNDER REVIEW so sad, like a slightly overcast sky with just enough light seeping through.
Though there is a unifying melancholic air to this album, each track features
a new voice, all tender and delightful in their own way. "Aristophanes," for
instance, builds upon the mood of "David: My Father's Father's Father" yet
remains distinct. This is a track that you can slow dance to in a dress that
moves along with you. Maybe someone's in your arms, but they soon dissolve and you are left questioning if they were ever real in the first place.
Capturing this feeling of loss and self-doubt, Allie Lynch croons "I'm lonely
when she's not with me" as the song comes to a quiet close.
Similarly, "Eintagsliebe," German for "a fleeting love," takes a hauntingly
eerie approach towards melancholy, sounding like a ghost's stream of consciousness. Here, Jessica Wright sings of this type of brief but intense affection. Throughout the track, she conveys an overwhelming amount of emotions, but she fails to fully express these feelings. When she sings, for example, "It's black and it's green and it's got a strange shape /1 don't know what
it is but it's filled with pain / It's not part of me, you put it there" we are made
to understand fleeting love as something defined by restless anticipation,
jitteriness, suspense, and maybe even suffering (a little bit). The lyrics are
reminiscent of, essentially, the beginning of any romantic experiences I have
ever had — a relatable and intense longing, riddled with anxiety.
In Purple Period, the complexities of relationships are explored in their
many forms: familial, platonic and romantic, making it entirely relatable for listeners. Each track on the album is unique in its own way, while still maintaining a tone of ethereal sadness. Are you feeling a little gloomy today? Davina
Shell, the mastermind behind the album, is here to tell you it's okay. Purple
Period feels like the warm and needed hug, and it also makes me wish my
periods were purple. —Paulina Chua
NATHAN SHUBERT
Folds
(Self-Released)
13/05/2016
PODCAST REVIEWS
Beautiful. That's the best way to describe Nathan Shubert's album
Folds. The songs evoke an intimate, homey feeling, akin to staying in
the house depicted on the album's artwork. At the same time, however, these
songs manage to be uplifting, as if you are seeing stars twinkle on a clear
cool night somewhere in the outdoors. And after a listen, you are left with a
clarity that resembles the aftermath of a rainy day washing everything clean.
Folds is Nathan Shubert's first full length release, following the two-track
EP Saga Noren, Lanskrim, Malmo. This album is classical contemporary
with minimalist piano compositions. All the songs are uplifting in their own
ways. Some tracks are fast and fill you with energy like "Svalbard Bears" and
"Saga Noren, Lanskrim, Malmo," while others are slower and more introspective. Songs like "Encampment" and "Gaze," for example, give you a feeling
of warmth that comes about when in good company. Regardless of the pace,
however, this album inspires feelings both intimate and grand.
Much of this duality is due to the album's composition. Every key very
carefully places a beautiful new addition to an intricate and precious whole.
The best example of this structure is "Folds." A rhythm is played throughout
the song with subtle changes and additions of new notes that make it both
beautiful and beautifully fragile. These slight alterations are so delightful that
the listener is overwhelmed by their sheer wonder. "Thought and Thinker" is
another example of this album's precise composition. It lives up to its name
with a brilliant harmony between Shubert's ideas and how they materialize.
Folds is a gorgeous intricate work defined by minute detail and subtlety. I
first finished listening to the album at a library and then, around dusk, I took
a walk. On that short jaunt, things looked clear and the world seemed patterned and pleasant. I'm not sure how Folds made me feel this way. Perhaps,
the music in a close intimate setting creates a form of beautiful escapism,
which, in turn, fosters a freshness of mind that you can take out into the
world. But it is hard to capture the beauty of Folds with words, you will just
have to give it a listen yourself. —Shebli Khoury
RETAIL NIGHTMARES
Podcast Series
(Self-Released)
05/07/2015-Present
Jf you've ever worked a regrettable job that left you feeling deflated,
frustrated, or lacking in empathy for the human condition than flefa/7
Nightmares is the podcast for you.
Alicia Tobin and Jessica Delisle are a couple of pals who get together to
chat crap and laugh a bunch. Each episode features a fun guest who joins to
flesh out sordid tales of retail life and just life in general. These guests range
from musicians, comedians, activists, and theatre types. Regardless of their
background, however, they are always eager to share and play along. As
a result, this show is very much akin to kicking back in the yard with a few
drinks and talking about the times.
As far as podcasts go, Retail Nightmares has a pretty simple premise.
As crucial as it is to discuss political matters and the dreadful nature of existence, it is refreshing to laugh and relate to something that is nearly universal: crappy work experiences. More specifically, the people who make
it crappy, and the crappy boss people who make it even worse. Add on little vignettes such as "puppo of the week" (favourite animal or person they
crossed paths with in the past few days), easy and unpretentious banter,
plenty of poo poo humour, and you have a successful podcast that is not
only relatable but highly contagious.
When hearing these all too common tales of retail hell, there are a lot of
cringe inducing moments. And while I have plenty of my own stories, such as
the guy who handed me blood soaked money or the woman at the grocery
store who curtly informed me that she had a boyfriend when I greeted and
asked how she was, I listening to the stories of others eases the sting of past
experiences and lends a bit of unity to fellow retail front liners.
Things can be rough out there. Jobs can suck and people are sometimes the worst. Bad days undeniably happen and both sides of the counter
can dish out and take the brunt of it. Whether you are answering phones or
pouring a bomb-ass espresso, just remember that you are not alone. And if
the day's toil has left you feeling spent, why not spend an hour with Jessica,
Alicia and friends? I can guarantee some juicy tales and a few good laughs,
because let's face it, laughing it off makes the nightmare just a bit less jagged. —Nathan Pike
CITED
Podcast Series
(Self-Released)
25/02/2015-Present
The dramatic irony of the United State's Commander in Chief being a climate change denier is that his estate is in Mar Al Lago, Florida; a location
known to scientists as ground zero for climate change impact. Specifically,
scientists predict that rising sea levels will submerge this area completely by
the end of the century.
In one of its most recent episodes, Cited producer Sam Fenn interviews
Professor John J. Clague PhD FRSC to discuss our globe's rising sea levels. Along with Gordon Katie, Alexander B. Kim and John Gabert-Doyon,
Fenn is a co-producer of the documentary podcast and radio show Cited,
which aims to discusses "ideas that change the world." The show addresses
a range of thought-provoking topics. One episode, for instance, centers on a
debate about the significance of genetics, an issue framed by the controversial public lectures of Charles Murphy at Middlebury College. Another episode explores the world of heroin prescriptions — how one Vancouver clinic
is prescribing the very drugs that patients are addicted to in order to help
them combat dependency. Each episode features a knowledgeable guest,
and totals roughly 45 minutes.
Like these complex topics, Fenn's interview with Dr. Clague frames something vast and overwhelming as coherent and palatable. Known as Dr. Doom
by his SFU students, Clague notes that, unlike a tornado or an earthquake,
which have an immediate and noticeable impact on our environment, rising sea levels are a "slow motion disaster." It is a catastrophe that scientists
can map, predict, and calculate. Yet, we remain unprepared. In fact, the episode's very title is "Sea Level Rise is the 'Slow Motion Disaster' We Aren't
Ready For." Even if you would prefer to have you head buried deep in the
sand when it comes to issues that are beyond our everyday control, I recommend listening to this episode.
If the horror of climate change proves too much for you, however, Cited
offers a diverse range of subject material, all grippingly fascinating and filled
with information. Cited is produced weekly out of the UBC Michael Smith
Laboratories. Episodes are updated weekly, and I encourage you to give
them a listen. One thing is for sure, I will be there listening with you.
—Sarah Charrouf
FEELIN
WEIRD
FEELIN WEIRD
Podcast Series
(Self-Released)
11 /5/2016-Present
feelin Weird is a podcast created by Kye Plant, a musician based in
Victoria, B.C.. Produced out of Plant's bedroom, each episode discusses taboo subjects, like sexuality, mental health and gender identity to raise
awareness and reduce public stigma.
They created Feelin Weird to contribute to a genre of podcast that they
found comforting, but lacking. Plant is very vocal about what makes them
"weird:" they are non-binary, have anxiety, depression, and OCD, and are
recently two-years sober. In each episode they interview a friend about their
experiences with these topics and others.
Plant does not present themselves as an expert on any of these issues,
other than an expertise that comes from firsthand experience. Because of
this required subjectivity, each conversation is rooted in circumstances that
are specific to Plant and the guest. For example, in the twelfth episode,
"Asexuality," they speak with Max Monday, a sex-positive grey asexual, who
emphasizes the singularity of her orientation and experiences. This specificity creates a sense of intimacy with the audience and allows for in-depth discussions that might otherwise be trivia-like.
Plant uses the structure of each episode to emphasize the power of
these conversations. Each interview has a similar emotional arch: the guest
is comfortable in casual conversation, then uncomfortable when beginning
the interview and finally comfortable again by its conclusion. This arch illuminates the de-stigmatizing power of these conversations and, by extension,
the podcast.
Ultimately though, the strength of this podcast is also its weakness. Plant
uses an incredibly intimate approach; each episode is in some way a discussion of their own personal growth, mental state and experiences with
each topic. While this creates a closeness with the audience and works to
de-stigmatize certain taboos, it also feels more like a person's public diary
than a project for a community. Introducing the first episode, Plant says that
Feelin Weird is "all about [them]" and then that "the point [of Feelin Weird]
is to make other people feel less weird." These opposing goals confuse the
show's message. It is simultaneously inclusive in its normalizing aims and
exclusive in its hyper-particular content.
Feelin Weird works well as an educational resource for those who are
not vocal about their "weird" traits, but for those already vocal, this podcast's
exaggerated specificity is polarizing. —Clara Dubber
Ml
ase
submit music for review consideration in Discorder Magazineand online, plea;
send a physical copy to the station addressed to Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Under Review Editor at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver BC,
V6T1Z1. Though our contributors prioritize physical copies, you may email download codes to underreview.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums sent prior to their
official release dates.
r Review is also expanding to include independent films, books and podcasts.
Feel free to submit those, too.
UNDER REVIEW SAMMY CHIEN
A CHIMERIK INTERVIEW
words by Jonathan Kew // photos by Duncan Cairns-Brenner// illustration by Olga Abeleva
The first time I see Sammy Chien, he is performing at the
Vancouver Art Gallery's FUSE for the Indian Summer Festival,
and it feels conversational. He and his partner bowed, and a faux
kung-fu sequence proceeded in front of a projected mash-up of Street
Fighter and Buddhist imagery. In this more comic incarnation, chi flew,
and the pratfalls felt fluid. It was staged, but intuitive to the immediate
audience packed and kneeling on the gallery's hardwood floor.
The second time I see Chien, he is inviting me into his apartment
complex. Ornamented in a mohair robe, he takes me to the commons,
down the stairs into a concrete room with amber lighting. Chien offers
me water and dried mango.
At this point I can say that Sammy Chien is an interdisciplinary artist who works with video, electroacoustic and drone, and dance. Chien
also participates in many collaborations that emphasize local cultures
and specific geographies. These projects take him around the world.
Just recently, he finished tenures in Berlin and Japan, and soon he'll be
pursuing further grants abroad.
During our conversation Chien talks about connection, like a basin
of collective psychic experience that allow people to transgress difference. But there's an obvious point of connection that I think we both
identify: it's uncommon enough to register when two Asian men talk
to each other about art in East Vancouver. Chien might place that coincidence on the continuum between deliberation and serendipity.
So this article plays out in a linear way. And the first thing we talk
about is his experience of being a POC artist. We start with the five
years - "that felt like 20" - he spent as a teenager growing up in
Nova Scotia. Chien mentions the racism and social isolation of the
Maritimes. And as I inquire about his most recent project, there's a
clear transmission, like he has anticipated its relevance, deliberately or
intuitively, to his formative years.
Nova Scotia is where Chien's interdisciplinary drive emerged. He
picked up filmmaking, which eventually took him to Vancouver, and
SFU's Film Production department. Chien tells me, "My first film
was about racism, so it was a medium for me to express myself. But I
would say I withstood racism with hip hop: I used to breakdance, and
DJ, and rap, and do graffiti. As an Asian male person living in such a
white town - what is the furthest I can go from the stereotype?"
Chien's perspective has subtly shifted. Anti-racism is a core focus,
and Sammy expands for me: "For some time I felt like I wanted to
avoid talking about being Asian. For me, [avoiding] it was also a way
to feel that I'm a free agent, I'm not a symbol. But I am! Like, I'm a
free individual, I'm a human! But in the end, I am still a symbol, based
on reaction, perception. If I only change the way I think, I can only go
as far as my head."
ane of Chien's ongoing projects is Chimerik ftt^Rti: a collective
of artists that want to bridge new media and art, mainstream
and underground, high and low. For Sammy, the metaphor
of a chimera — a mythical beast made of composite animals is
instructive: a mutant that defies codification, bristling against language's limits.
"Chimera is the core vision I've had for the last five years," explains
Chien. "I'm interested in obscurity, ambiguity. As human beings we're
scared of it. In a structural society, we want to define things, categorize
them. But this nature can be detrimental to certain perspectives. I think
it's something we need to talk about - how do we embrace ambiguity?"
Ambiguity is a common theme in Chien's stories. In 2016, Chien
went to Berlin for a conference on Isadora, a software program which
maps a dancer's movements to a generative visual display. "During my
residency, they put me in this guy's apartment. His name was Kazuma
Motomura. He's half Japanese, half South African. He doesn't quite
look like me. But I guess there's not a lot of Asian males in Berlin who
do crazy stuff like we do ... And then I met him on the day right before
I left. As soon as I saw him, I was like 'Dude, you're fucking Kazuma
Motomura, right?' It's crazy. I felt like I was ghosting his house, I was
living someone's life, someone's identity."
SAMMY CHIEN tf
Jm interested
in obscurity,
ambtQtiitjr
^fter connecting, Chien and Motomura met up in Japan.
Collaboratively, they performed the show Lies/Harmony: A Dance
After Fukushima for TPAM in Japan. Lies/Harmony is a work
about reconciliation in the wake of the Fukushima Accident and government dissimulation. It's an extension of his tendency to move back
and forth between the site-specific and the general: the vastness of
generational imperialism versus the specificity of Indigenous water-activism: "it's the same thing we're fighting for - just different
forms and presentations."
Chien's ideation of politics shears close to his treatment of art, parallel strands that overlap and feed into the same system. Above all, what's
impressive about Chien's practice is his drive to take ambiguity and activism into the realm of big-tent production. Artists often resign themselves to niche, but Chien wants his work to be seen, wants it to intersect with social mass and movement. It's on this note that Chien shares
a story with me about the biggest show he's ever done in Taiwan.
When I meet Chien, we have an hour to chat. I'm not sure if he's
as sensitive to this as I am, or if it's a matter of chance, but Chien's
last story builds and surges, the clear climax of our conversation, replete with a decisive and instructive finale. If embellished, it's subtle.
And if nothing else, the story demonstrates that Chien is prepared to
follow-through on the promise of his genre-blurring universalism.
"It was like a million dollar project. The progressive government
booted out the conservatives, so they put a bunch of money into arts
festivals in order to revive the culture in a particular region. They
found an advertising firm, which found Chimerik. In the very beginning it was like 'just make something cool and entertaining. People
aren't going to get your art.' I was like sure, right."
Chien does the voices for the ad execs. He does the voices the ad execs put on, too.
"It was very spiritual, about chakras and history, and the circle of
life. They were like 'it's very meaningful, but remember, people are
stupid.' So I said 'sure.' And then I just kept going," Chien laughs.
"If you believe that your vision is right, that it's going to fly, all other
questions are artifice."
"We built a stage on water, projection mapping on floating objects.
We had a really kickass dancer performing with my soundscape mixing
with Michael Red [Souns]'s music and experimental jazz — it was this
deep dub with granulation and long expansive sound. I never checked
with the exec."
Pausing, Chien continues. "After the dress run, I was like, 'Oh shit,
they're here.'"
According to Chien, the executives loved it. Happily, he and his
brother got paid. "I felt it was a big step, because it was a huge
project. We had more than 30,000 people in attendance. It was so
nerve-wracking. And I remember overhearing audiences saying - 'I
had no idea what it was about. But it was different than what I was
used to seeing. I felt something, and something had changed for me'
- and that was something I wanted to give the audience rather than
something flashy they enjoyed. To have something that might be challenging, but that they can take home with them."
Chien smiles: "I thought the show was a really good evidence of
what happens when you truly believe in yourself and know what
you're doing. But of course believing in yourself entails a lot of work,
right? Because you could be a psychopath and also believe in yourself
in killing people! But that's not the right pathway - it may take years
and years to cultivate the right kind of intuition, honestly and true
connection with our soul, and it's all interconnected."
These stories feel like happenstance, like Chien's parlance of ambiguity and connection are fed into the generative apparatus of his
own performances.
^ istory is key for Chien. Much of the activist drive in his works has
I to do with reconciliation of colonial histories and hegemonic con-
P trol. From a distance, these strands feel splayed across his life's
canvas. From a distance, early developments are manifesting in new,
myriad ways: "...in my beginning works, I did a lot of expansive trajectories. I often got the audience saying 'I feel something has changed
in me, but I'm not sure why.' I worked with drones and electroacoustic
music, brought people into long journeys and arcs."
Chien, in addition to his new media acumen and creative intuition,
is continuing to pursue dance in his own performance: "So in my last
grant I called myself a dance artist... I have to be very careful because
there are dancers who dedicate their lives to this art form. So I'm going to have to be really respectful when I say dance. But for that proposal to manifest, I had to be ready to manifest as a dance artist. I'm
really open to changes, and I think the most important thing is to be
present for the changes. What's the right thing in the right context?"
In other presentations, Chien has compared artists to messengers,
the classical motif of someone charged with divine inspiration. His
identification of a universal element, intersections that loop into each
other, apprehends a world of ebb and tide. The chimera is a morphing,
multifarious creature. Catching one of its myriad zeniths is perhaps, in
other words, a matter of the right thing in the right context.
See Sammy's work at sammychien.com and follow him on Instagram
@soar5sfor updates and whereabouts.
SAMMY CHIEN (Ifl)ACCESSIBLE
vnncouvER pt.i
words by Eleanor Wearing // illustrations by fflarita (Mchaelis
hello, we need to have this discussion,'
and so this discussion is happening,
and spaces have been taking that into
account."
I   f someone were to ask what you
I   think about the accessibility of
•^^  Vancouver's local music scene,
what would you say? Is it something that
you have thought about? Talked about
with your friends and fellow show-goers?
If you have been talking about it, whose
perspectives have you considered? Show
attendees? Venue Staff? Performers?
If you are already having these conversations, chances are you've realized that there
is definitely more that the local music community can be doing. The intention is not
to shame some organizers. It's worth acknowledging that there are individuals and
collectives doing important research and
making substantial investments to improve
an accessibility focus. There are many other
examples, but the point is that different
things are required to make events accessible
for people, and those requirements may
not always be outwardly visible or even
discussed openly. An important step towards
improving the inclusivity of shows is
broadening our collective understanding of
what "accessible" means.
This being said, who is responsible for
ensuring the accessibility of local
events? Is it the City of Vancouver?
Venue managers? Organizers? This
is a big question. It warrants looking outside of the local music scene
Discorder has historically focused on,
to organizations working towards
a more accessible arts and culture
is the most important thing out of anything," he says. "Treating people equally,
goes a long way ... If people are trained
[about accessibility] and then trained to
follow through with that training — how
to work with people, and to identify certain
things about people with physical or emotional disabilities — it does so much."
"Tf/f froiroM lime u/irn mmccovts,
W/r# P/SA3/L/TICS GwtTTfosrmTccrs
the accessibility of their events. However,
it is also important to consider what is not
happening, and start thinking of ways to
change it.
When talking about accessibility, often
the concept that comes up first is physical
accessibility, with a focus on wheelchairs
and other mobility devices. There are
organizers in Vancouver who post physical
accessibility information on their social
media event pages — info about ramps,
width of doors, washrooms, etc. This is
undoubtedly an important development in
local event planning, but there are many
ways an event can be inaccessible that aren't
tied to physical mobility. For example, it's
worth considering how people with vision
or hearing impairments experience a show
or navigate a venue, or what makes an
event safe for people with developmental
disabilities or mental illnesses. When
thinking about the needs of trans and non-
binary show-goers, gendered bathrooms are
community in Vancouver. One organization is Kickstart Disability Arts
and Culture, a local non-profit that
supports and promotes artists who
identify as living with disabilities. Together
with Realwheels Theatre Society, a theatre
company that works towards deepening
understanding of the disability experience,
Kickstart recently published a report on the
accessibility of theatre venues in Vancouver.
The report is structured around an accessibility assessment of the Firehall Theatre,
addressing accessibility issues for artists /
performers, technicians, and patrons with
disabilities. The report was funded by the
City of Vancouver and Canada Council for
the Arts, and created over months of research and planning with a multi-disability
audit team.
"The bottom line with making codes
and making spaces, is to have people with
disabilities guide those projects," says Yuri
Arajs, director of Kickstart. Speaking to the
process of creating the report, Yuri continues, "That's why we hired the crew that
we did to go through the [Firehall Theatre]
and experience it themselves, people with
sight, hearing, physical disabilities — the
whole gamut. That info has to come from
those people, so we know what that experience is firsthand."
Yuri acknowledges the importance of
the public funding they received, as well
as the investments of both Kickstart and
Realwheels. However, he also acknowledges
that the information contained in the report, with respect to data from the accessibility audit, is only part of the picture.
"Probably the most important thing everybody who has been involved in this project has learned about accessibility in public
spaces, is that common sense and education
Adam Grant Warren is a local actor, director, playwright and teacher, with a
show opening in May titled Last Train In,
the result of a project commissioned and
supported by Kickstart. Having moved to
Vancouver almost ten years ago, he is well
versed in the ways the local arts community
can be inaccessible, but believes that important conversations are happening now.
"The more time I spend in Vancouver,
the larger my circle of colleagues and collaborators who have disabilities gets," he
says. "And the larger it gets, the more I
realize that there has to be a level playing field ... I think that Realwheels and
Kickstart have both been instrumental in putting up a hand and saying 'Hey,
w
hile talking about the difficulties of putting these ideas into
practice, Adam also notes that
the work of ensuring accessibility needs to
be shared, and prioritized. "[These conversations] can't just be theoretical discussions about steps we could take by 2020.
These things are happening now so the
discussion has to happen now about what
is available now. It comes down to the
support of the city, the support of the municipalities, and it comes down to the support of event organizers."
Speaking as someone who has organized
shows in Vancouver, I agree with this —
and I don't take it lightly. At the events that
I have helped organize and promote, accessibility has not been a priority. In some instances, it hasn't even been part of the conversation, but I will be changing that.
Beyond the organizers, it's also worth
asking ourselves what our own responsibilities are as show attendees. We have the
power to pressure for changes. How can
we make the events we attend more accessible for our communities? It's a big question with infinite answers, but that does
not mean we shouldn't talk about it.
You can find out more about Kickstart Disability
Arts and Culture, their Accessibility Report and
their upcoming events at kickstartdisability.ca.
Adam Warren's play, Last Train In, runs from
May 30 to June 4 at the rEvolver festival. More information at upintheairtheatre.com/last-train-in.
Editor's Note: This article will be a two-
part series, the first half released to coincide with Global Accessibility Awareness
Day on May 18. CiTR 101.9FM is hosting its
own GAAD event — Access Day — which
promises to address many of the issues
brought up in this series and more. Tune
your FM dial, or listen online at citr.ca.
'AN IMMERSIVE INSTALLATION OF VINTAGE EPHEMERA
5-22/2017
OWENWANDERING.COM
(IN)ACCESSIBLE VANCOUVER PT.I So, I had an abortion...
PRO CHOICE
FOR LIFE
words by Dora Dubber// illustrations by Janee Auger
photos by Konstantin Prodanovic
m^^^^^^^^^^^m
9*   1
IfLmm      1
\m\m\nm
"Or, they can see it as
somethiiag that they've
never experienced before
and it brjmgs new thiiags
to light - maybe some
compassion*"
Bisclaimer: I am firmly pro-choice and I am not
going to pretend otherwise. Abortion is an incredibly controversial topic around the world and part
of what fuels this divide is both parties' conviction in their
moral superiority, of which I am definitely guilty. But I am
not going to present a considered debate of the topic. I believe that abortion is an extension of necessary health care
and view it as a medical procedure that folks looking to undergo it should have the option of without fearing shame or
pity. Discorder's mandate of showcasing underrepresented
voices in our community includes the responsibility to uplift the people who make this decision. It's fine if you don't
agree with my politics, but I hope you keep reading.
founded So, I had an abortion... out of disillusionment with
a society that makes those who have exercised their bodily
autonomy feel shamed for their choices and to provide a
safe and inclusive space to share stories confidentially and
creatively.
flt the time of writing this article, there are only six
story submissions so far, which are released every
Wednesday and the majority of which are written narratives. Julia explains "they're all from cis gendered
women and there's definitely a breadth to those narratives,
but I intended it to be an inclusive space and it's inclusive
in theory, it's just not accrued that inclusivity quite yet."
The biggest frustration of the project thus far is its slow
engagement. Julia describes its potential: "I only started
it in January, so it's just a baby project, but I think that
ultimately it has the power to have not only the micro
impact of a person being able to cathartically reclaim and
tell their story, but also a macro impact having people talk
about it to a point that it's no longer seen as this moral
issue and seen for what it really is — which is a medical
procedure. I don't want my ego tied up in it, it's beyond
me, I just want to contribute to people talking about it."
So, I had an abortion... launched this January. The
founder, Julia Santana Parrilla, introduces the website
as "a non-binary, intersectional, QTPOC safe space."
She continues, "I invite not only people who have had
an abortion, but those who have supported loved ones in
having abortions to contribute their stories." Julia comes
from a Sociology and Public Health background, and
The site's premise lends itself to bigger events and
bigger projects. Julia's been approached for collaborative zines, showcases and readings. "I would
love to do a live storytelling event. I'm gonna hold off on
anything like that until I have more stories and I have a
better sample of abortion narratives."
Julia has had two abortions, one that went smoothly
and one not so much. The negative experience motivated her to create the website So, I had an abortion.... The
ubiquitous goal to destigmatize abortion into a regular
conversation topic is only achievable through individual
interaction and engagement with diverse abortion narratives. By providing the platform to share stories, Julia
hopes that "other people can see them as a source of solace, or they can see it as a [guide for] what to expect.
Or, they can see it as something that they've never experienced before and it brings new things to light — maybe
some compassion."
Julia relayed her experience of having a friend who had
gone through an abortion prior to her own, and found
that knowing what to expect was calming. She explains,
"I would have been far more nervous if I didn't know
what was going to happen, which is just human nature —
you're afraid of what you don't know." Speaking to how
the site came into being, "I started thinking about how I
wanted to process it, and I knew that I wanted to tell my
own story. I wrote it and rewrote it, but never finished it.
This year I decided I just couldn't not do it anymore."
fls a femme living between Canada and the United
States, the future of reproductive rights and maternal health will affect me for the rest of my
life. So, I had an abortion... feels like a modern day Vagina
Monologues, but intersectional and online. Abortion narratives are diverse and beautiful, encompassing issues
of gender, sexuality, parenthood and self that are often
overlooked in the mainstream fixation with pain, sacrifice
and loss. The basic medical right to an abortion is threatened right now by the emboldened alt-Right in the United
States, and the ripple effects through extremist groups
here and abroad. I have felt a sense of mobility and call-
to-action on this topic since November of last year, and
Julia reflects it perfectly: "I wanna be part of these conversations and I could be a part of these conversations as a
lone entity, as myself, but I want to go beyond myself and
contribute to something beyond myself." Through So I Had
an Abortion... Julia is providing that space for all of us.
So, I had an abortion... is always looking for submissions.
Check out soihadanabortion.squarespace.com to read stories and
submit. Follow So, I Had an Abortion... on social media for
updates on the project: Instagram @soihadanabortion, Twitter
@soihadanabort, and Facebook /So-l-had- an- abortion.
SO I HAD AN ABORTION... ON THE AIR SPECIAL
ACCESS DAY
words  by Jessica Lin //   illustration by Olivia
Di Liberto  // photos  by Duncan Cairns-Brenner
flccess Day is coming up May 18. It is a day of
special broadcasting on CiTR 101.9FM and other
participating community radio stations across
Canada, an opportunity to explore and address issues
around accessibility. Discorder had a chance to speak to
some of the participants and organizers from CiTR's
Accessibility Committee: Estephania Solis, Deepi Leihl
and Kelly Reaburn. Here's what they had to say—
DISCORDER MAGAZINE: Why is contributing to
Access Day important to you?
ESTEPHANIA SOLIS: It is important for me to contribute to Access Day in a way that I can apply my
skills, if it means I'll be part of a greater means to bring
awareness to the realities that people with disabilities
face in their life and community.
DEEPI LEIHL: Access Day is to bring awareness to
GAAD (Global Accessibility Awareness Day) which happens every third Thursday in May. It is important to me
because it gets everyone talking, thinking and learning
ways to make [the] environment more accessible and inclusive for people with different disabilities.
KELLY REABURN: Access Day is all about people having
difficulties with walking, seeing, hearing, and [cognitive
challenges]. As for myself, from the autism perspective,
there are some challenges that go on — saying the right
words and dealing with the surroundings, [and] what I do
[at] CiTR radio.
DM: Have you run into any challenges organizing this
event?
DL: I think one of the biggest challenges ... is to bring
the buzz around it. ... Without it, it is difficult
to bring awareness not only to our Discorder
readers, but to our CiTR listeners as well. I
actually don't know if a lot of people even
know [that] GAAD exists.
Another challenge ... is to make each
Access Day as much informative, different (not repetitive), and inclusive as far
as content goes. However, the event itself
has been fairly great to organize because
the CiTR Access Committee works together
every September [to] May to prepare for this par
ticular day.
DM: Do you think Vancouver is an access-friendly city?
KR:Depending on what levels of access-friendly city.
Translink has been the main reason why all [public]
transportation is access friendly. But Translink has more
to do with visually impaired; for example they need more
yellow mats to let people [know where] to enter the bus.
DM: Where do you think Vancouver could improve on its
accessibility?
DL: The biggest accessibility issue that I have encountered is parking. Vancouver really needs more accessible, safe parking spots available for long and oversized
vehicles. Furthermore, the cost for accessible parking is
ridiculously expensive, so I would be happy if this issue
would improve drastically.
KR: Probably right here in CiTR studio, because there's no
access code to let wheelchairs go in and out of the studio.*
Also Translink is improving the [fare gates] by a tracking
device so that your wheelchair is your ticket to enter and
[exit] the SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express.
qhjui
DM: What is the most important thing you think readers
should remember about Access Day?
ES:Let's treat every day as if it were Access Day; only then
can we raise our mindfulness of how others experience the
world we are all sharing at the moment.
DL: Most people may be interested making technologies or venues accessible for persons with disabilities. But
the reality is, they often do not know how or where to
start, so the content [the Access Committee] tries to air on
CiTR's Access Day is to answer those questions.
Access Day looks at the good and bad side of accessibility
around us ... How can we all make things around us more
accessible, and even more inclusive for everyone!
KR: Access Day isn't just for the [physically disabled].
Access Day is about challenging people who are able
to do things too. When we talk about things on
CiTR, there are many different ways to remind
readers that Access Day is for everyone either
if you're able or not.
  $
DEEPI LEIHL is a member of CiTR's
Accessibility Committee and a co-producer for CiTR's
Accessibility Collective's show, All Access Pass. Last
year she co-produced the radio documentary Inclusion
of the Underrepresented: The Beginning of Diverse-
Ability in Media, for CiTR's UBC 100 Documentary series.
KELLY REABURN is an Access Day organizer and member of CiTR's Accessibility Committee. He is the host of The
Community Living Show on CiTR Radio and Co-op Radio, and
The Late Night Show on CiTR Radio.
ESTEPHANIA SOLIS is a contributor to Access Day and
previous member of CiTR's Accessibility Committee. Lastyear
she co-produced the radio documentary Inclusion of the
Underrepresented: The Beginning of Diverse-Ability in
Media,/or CiTR's UBC 100 Documentary series.
Access Day is May 18. It will broadcast on CiTR 101.9FM and online at citr.ca. If you would like to contribute, or get involved with
the Accessibility Committee, please email volunteer@citr.ca.
♦Editor's Note: As of April 21, CiTR / Discorder purchased
automatic doors for the station studios, and they will be
installed by the end of May.
CHECK OWC»mCA«M»ltKlfiSff*/*«ffiH£lH>fl®
CITR.CH DISCORDER.CH 1101.9 FM
BECOME A MEMBER AND GET SOME SWEET DEALS
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ON THE AIR SPECIAL: ACCESS DAY k>U
?■
4*4
wo-
Srftc
Mg®g^^UU
L>
@H05Sd]J1
SPonfcap
jCtieafcap
3R3etme*&ap
C&nrs&ap
JFrifcap
£>aturfcap
£>unDap
6AM
TRANCENDANCE
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
6 AM
7AM
GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICKIN'
CITR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CANADALAND
(SYNDICATE)
CITR GHOST MIX
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
7 AM
8AM
QUEER FM VANCOUVER:
CITR GHOST MIX
CITED!
8AM
9AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
RELOADED
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
MIXTAPES WITH MC
CLASSICAL CHAOS
9AM
10 AM
FEM
CONCEPT
STUDENT FILL-IN
&  MAC
IHE bAIURDAi EDGE
10 AM
11AM
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
STUDENT FILL-IN
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM
12 PM
SYNCHRONICITY
MORNING AFTER SHOW
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
THE ROCKERS SHOW
12 PM
1PM
STUDENT FILL-IN
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
K-POP CAFE
FRESH SLICE
1PM
2 PM
PARTICLES &  WAVES
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
ALL ACCESS PASS
RADIO ZERO
2 PM
3 PM
THE BURROW
THE JEFF AND KEITH
SHOW
KEW IT UP
ASTROTALK
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
3 PM
THUNDERBIRD EYE
4 PM
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
TEXTBOOK
SHOES ON A WIRE
SIMORGH
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
4 PM
5 PM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
DISCORDER RADIO
ARTS REPORT
BABE WAVES
NEWS 101
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6 PM
FINDING THE FUNNY
STUDENT FILL-IN
ARE YOU
AWARE
STUDENT
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
STUDENT FILL-IN
7 PM
EXPLODING HEAD
INNER
SPACE
SAMS
QUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
FILL-IN
STUDENT FILL-IN
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
8 PM
MOVIES
INSIDE OUT
MIX CASETTE
SOUL
SANDWICH
RIP
RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
WHITE NOISE
LIVE FROM
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
NINTH WAVE
HELL
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER
ROOM
COPY / PASTE
THE MEDICINE SHOW
THE AFTN SOCCER
11PM
12 AM
THE SCREEN GIRLS
SHOW
12 AM
1AM
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
1AM
2AM
CITR GHOST MIX
OF INSOMNIA
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
_
"DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERYDAY" ■ MONDAY
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM, ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththe-
browns@hotmail.com
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
11AM-12PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
second season! The team
of Indigenous and non-
Indigenous peeps produce the
show weekly. We talk about
Indigenous issues, current
events, and entertainment
centering Native voices through
interviews and the arts. Come
make Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Follow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves/
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PU, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE BURROW
3PU-4PU, rock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
department manager Andy
Resto, the Burrow is Noise
Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock,
with a nice blend of old
'classics' and new releases.
Interviews & Live performances.
Contact: music@citr.ca
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
4PM-5PM,JAZZ
Host Jade spins old recordings
of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies and motown.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PU-6PM, INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pu-6:30PU, talk
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television, along
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks,
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TUESDAY
THE SCREEN GIRLS
12AU-1AM, HIP HOP/R&B/ SOUL
The Screen Girls merge music
and art with discussions of
trends and pop culture, and
interviews with artists in
contemporary art, fashion and
music. We play a variety of
music, focusing on promoting
Canadian hip hop and R&B.
Contact: info@thescreengirls.com
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6AM-8AU, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM8am-io:30AU, talk/
politics
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver,
Queer FM features music,
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact: queerfmvancouver@gmail.com
FEMCONCEPT
TUES, 10:30-11:30, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
A show comprised entirely
of Femcon* music and
discussions of women's
rights and social justice
issues. Featuring all genres
of music, with an emphasis
on local and Canadian artists
and events in Vancouver.
•"Femcon" is defined as
music with someone who
self-identifies as female in 2/4
categories: music composition,
lyric composition, performance,
or recording engineering.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
12PU-1PM, ROCK/ POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music,
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
PARTICLES & WAVES
2PM-3PU, rock/pop/indie
Like the quantum theory it
is named for, Particles and
Waves defies definition. Join
Mia for local indie, sci-fi prog
rock, classic soul, obscure
soundtracks, Toto's deep
cuts, and much more.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JEFF AND KEITH SHOW
3PM-4PM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TEXTBOOK
4PU-5PM, talk/storytelling
Textbook (FKA The Student
Special Hour) is a show
about students by students
hosted by Josh Gabert-Doyon,
CiTR's student programming
coordinator. There are three
segments: Feature interview,
student storytelling, & "Tell
Me About Your Paper".
Contact: outreach@citr.ca
DISCORDER RADIO
5PM-6PM, ECLECTIC, TALK
Produced by the Discorder
On Air collective, this show
covers content in the magazine
and beyond. Coordinated by
Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse,
and Jordan Wade. Get in
touch to get involved!
Contact: discorder.radio@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6PM-8PU, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
INSIDE OUT
8PM-9PM, dance/electronic
Tune in weekly for dance music!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
9PM-11PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles,
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels,
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AU-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PU-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
KOREAN WAVE: ARIRANG HALLYU
1PU-2PM, TALK/ POP
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
2PM-3PU, rock/pop/indie
The CiTR Music department
program, highlighting the
newest/freshest cuts from the
station's bowels. Featuring live
interviews and performances
from local artists.
Contact: music@citr.ca
KEW IT UP
3PM-4PM, EXPERIMENTAL/TALK
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica,
Post-Punk, Industrial,
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOES ON A WIRE
4PU-5PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
Take a moment to look up.
Tune in for stories, interviews,
hot takes and sweet tunes
that consider a side of
things you may not have.
Contact: Twitter | @mjeantaylor
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PU, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The one and only student run
arts and culture radio show in
Vancouver, Arts Report brings
you the latest in local arts!
Your show hosts Ashley and
Christine provide a weekly
dose of reviews, interviews,
and special segments.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
INNER SPACE
6:30PM-8pm, electronic/dance
Dedicated to underground
electronic music, both
experimental and dance-
oriented. Live DJ sets and
guests throughout.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
6:30PM-8pm, rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins,
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, HIP HOP/R&B/SOUL
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
WHITE NOISE
9PM-10PM, talk/sketch comedy
Join Richard Blackmore for half
an hour of weird and wonderful
sketch comedy, as he delves
into the most eccentric corners
of radio. Then stay tuned for
the after show featuring Simon
and Connor who make sense
of it all, with the occasional
interjection of quality music.
Contact: whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM
Between the Salish sea and
the snow capped Rocky
Mountains, A-ro and Char
explore the relationships of
classic and contemporary
stylings through Jazz, Funk,
and Hip-Hop lenses.
Contact: aro.elekwent@gmail.com
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PU-12AM, TALK/SPORTS
Chase takes you into the
locker rooms of UBC for talk
with varsity athletes, coaches,
and UBC staff on everything
but sports. The Thunderbird
Locker Room gives you a
backroom perspective.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSDAY
SPICY BOYS
12AM-1AM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
Playing music and stuff.
You can listen.
Or don't.
It's up to you.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture,
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
9AU-10AU, talk/accessibility
This show is produced
by and for the disabled
community. We showcase
BC Self Advocates and
feature interviews with people
with special needs. Hosted
by Kelly Raeburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and friends.
Contact: citrlatenightshow@gmail.com
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
11AM-12PM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new,
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com.
rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com,
@tima_tzar,
facebook.com/RocketFromRussia
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
K-POP CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean,
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
2PM-3PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
The Accessibility Collective
radio show! They talk equity,
inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse
abilities, on and off campus.
Tune in for interviews, music,
news, events, & dialogue.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
3-3:30PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
3:30-4PU, talk/sports
Your weekly roundup of
UBC Thunderbird sports
action from on campus and
off with your hosts Jason
Wang and Timothy Winter.
Contact: sports@citr.ca
SIMORGH
4PM-5PM, talk/storytelling
Simorgh Radio is devoted
to education and literacy for
Persian speaking communities.
Simorgh the mythological
multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-
in as your mythological narrator
in the storyland; the contingent
space of beings, connecting
Persian peoples within and
to Indigenous peoples.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BABE WAVES
5PU-6PM, talk/cultural criticism
Babe Waves is CiTR's Gender
Empowerment Collective show.
Jazzed women-identifying and
non-binary folks sit around
and talk music, art, politics,
current events and much more.
Tune in, follow us on social
media, and get involved!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
facebook.com/citrbabewaves
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM-7:30,
ECLECTIC
Celebrating the message
behind the music. Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SOUL SANDWICH
7:30pm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/soul
A myriad of your favourite
genres all cooked into one
show. From Hip Hop to Indie
rock to African jams, Rohit
and Ola will play it all, in a
big soulful sandwich. This
perfect layering of yummy
goodness will blow your mind.
AND, it beats Subway.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
R.I.P. RADIO
alternating thurs, 8pm-9pm,
talk/hip hop/r&b/soul
R.I.P. Radio brings deceased
artists back into the spotlight
and to reveal the world of
budding artists standing
on the shoulders of these
musical giants. Each episode
is a half-hour journey back
from the musical grave.You'll
want to stay alive for it.
Contact: Instagram, @rip.radio
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ FRIDAY
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance,
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact: auraltentacles@hotmail.
com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
87AM-8AU, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news,
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse@canadaland-
show.com
CITED!
8AM-9AM, talk/academia
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact: facebook.com/citedpod-
cast, Twitter | @citedpodcast
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
9AM-11AM, rock/pop/indie
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PU, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery, and a '111 dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact: daveradiopodcast@
gmail.com
FRESH SLICE
1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Tunes are hot and fresh.
Talk is cheesey. Pop,
rock, DIY, pop-punk.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RADIO ZERO
2PM-3:30PM
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams
from New Wave to foreign
electro, baile, Bollywood,
and whatever else.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30pm-5pm, music/interviews
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact: http://nardwuar.com/rad/contact/
NEWS 101
5PM-6PM, talk/news
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and
community newscast. Fridays
tune in to hear an independent
perspective of what's going on
in the world. News 101 covers
current affairs ranging from
the local to the international.
Contact: news@citr.ca
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7PM, talk/comedy
6pm-7pm, Every week Jack,
Tristan and a special guest
randomly select a conversation
topic for the entire show;
ranging from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure.Also
theSre is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-gpM, r&b/soul/inter-
NATIONAL
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop,
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PU-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings,
poetry recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post-Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock,
drone, ambient, experimental,
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, eclectic/live
INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vancouvermedicineshow@gmail.com
■ SATURDAY
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, which progresses
to Industrial, Noise and
Alternative No Beat into the
early morning. We play TZM
broadcasts, starting at 6am.
Contact: citrlatenlghtshow@gmail.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR,
The Saturday Edge is my
personal guide to world &
roots music, with African,
Latin and European music
in the first half, followed by
Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact: crashnburnradio@
yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll
like it. Sonic assault provided
by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, electronic/mantra/
NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary,
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats,
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmail.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, TALK/RUSSIAN
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7PM-8PM, experimental/ambient/
CHILLWAVE
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy,
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker,
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmail.com
SOCA STORM
8PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoM #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
8bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ SUNDAY
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
7AM-9AM, experimental/difficult
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut- up/col I age and general
CRESPAN© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @BEPICRE-
SPAN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
9AM-10AM, CLASSICAL
From the Ancient World to
the 21st century, join host
Marguerite in exploring and
celebrating classical music
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM, INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock,
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmail.com ,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM, ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds,
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmslndla8@gmail.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver,
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmileymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS,
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points,
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ ISLAND OF
LOST TOYS
STUDENT FILL IN
ECLECTIC
A place for experimentation
& learning!
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees. CiTR 101.9FM APRIL CHARTS
artist
Pale Red*+#
High Plains*+
The Courtneys*+#
Album
Soft Opening
Cinderland
II
Magic Cities
Bored Decor
Buried Wish
All My Circles Run
Uninhabit
Jlabel
O  n"l
April Fools
l   Q>]   I KingWoman#
I   43 Lydia Ainsworth*#
;   43   I Julie Byrne#
i    45!    I Parlor Walls#
I   4a)   i       Nathan Shubert*+
The Prettys* UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
May  4
LEIF VOLLEBEKK
The Biltmore
May 6
ALL THEM WITCHES
The Cobalt
May 17
JMSN
Alexander
May 4
LYDIA AINSWORTH
Fox  Cabaret
May  5
COM TRUISE/CLARK
Imperial
May  8
THURSTON MOORE GROUP
Imperial
May 22
MATTHEW LOGAN VASQUEZ
Fox  Cabaret
May  16
KONGOS
Imperial
&j
May  23
PAUL KELLY & CHARLIE OWEN
Biltmore  Cabaret
May  24
H09909
The  Cobalt
May  24 May  24
SMINO    i THE JESUS AND MARY CHAIN
Alexander Vogue  Theatre
May  24
WOODS
Fox  Cabaret
May  25
FOXYGEN
Rickshaw
May  27
GIRLPOOL
The Biltmore
June  4
TWRP
The Cobalt
May  27
THE SHINS
Queen E.   Theatre
June   1
VALERIE JUNE
Fox  Cabaret
June  8 June   17
MOUNT KIMBIE   LOW + MONO
Imperial Imperial
June  21
(SANDY) ALEX G
The  Cobalt
June  4
POPTONE
Rickshaw
June  18
THE DESLONDES
The Cobalt
June 22 June 24
GUITAR WOLF  G0LDR00M HIGH SEAS BOAT TOUR
The Cobalt       Aboard The Abitibi Boat
June 27
!!! (CHK CHK CHK)
Fox Cabaret
July 2
JESSIE REYEZ
Alexander  Gastown
July  8
THE DISTRICTS
The  Cobalt
July  10
BEACH FOSSILS
The Biltmore
July  11
NITE JEWEL
Fox  Cabaret
July  13
ALGIERS
The  Cobalt
August  3
TY SEGALL
Vogue  Theatre
August  7
DUNGEN
Fox  Cabaret
August  9
JOHN MORELAND
The  Cobalt
Tickets  & more  shows  at   timbreconcerts.com

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