Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Feb 1, 2016

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0347372.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0347372.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0347372-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0347372-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0347372-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0347372-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0347372-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0347372-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0347372-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0347372.ris

Full Text

 THAT MAGAZINE FROM CiTFT101.9FM
FEB 2016
I
ill!
I
4 0 a % i ft t
W
EKEITHLE'
Michael Red, Dumb, Gallery Gachet, Milk, Maggie Boyd UPCOMING SHOWS
TUCKSttAW
oooooto
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
PROPAGHANDI-SOLD OUT
AFTER THE FALL, BURNING GHATS
PROPAGHANDI-SOLD OUT
AFTER THE FALL, SLIP ONS
ACT OF DEFIANCE (AT BILTMORE CABARET)
HELLCHAMBER, AGGRESSION, DEVEINED
THE TOASTERS
LOS FURIOS, JESSE LEBOURDAIS
POLYRHYTHMICS
SANTA LUCIA LFR
THE DREADNOUGHTS the skimmity hitchers,
ATD, THE GENERATORS, UPTOWN RIOT, & MORE
PARQUET COURTS
DUMB
HI
ra
|PI
1
1
■371
171
Ell CRADLE OF FILTH Ell
££] BUTCHER BABIES, NE OBLIVISCARIS ££J
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more: WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
BOWIE TRIDUTE NIGHT local bands
CELEBRATE THE WORK OF AN INSPIRING ARTIST
BLACK WIZARD (album release) mos
GENERATOR, ANCIIENTS, WAINGRO, MAN THE WOLF
BONGZILLA&DLACK COBRA
LO-PAN, AGAINST THE GRAIN
REVEREND HORTON HEAT unknown hinson,
LEGENDARY SHACK SHAKERS, LINCOLN DURHAM
DEAD ASYLUM & SAINTS OF DEATH revenger,
WITHOUT MERCY, EXTERMINATUS
CARAVAN CABARET a curious collection
OF CREATIVE collaborations
THIS WILL DESTROY YOU
VINYL WILLIAMS
GREENSKYDLUEGRASS
SHOOK TWINS
— lOFeONTENTS
Features
Columns
10        DUMB
The congregation of Beach Church
15        GALLERY GACHET
...is another person's treasure
22       JOE KEITHLEY
Musician, activist, and politician
26       MILK
Late Bloomer turns Watermelon into Milk
57        MICHAEL RED
Listen to the souns
61        UNDERGROUND VENUES
Our fav venues are going to stay illegal
04 EDITOR'S NOTE: FUNDRIVE
AND POP ALLIANCE
19 ON THE AIR
30 REAL LIVE ACTION
36 CALENDAR
38 ART PROJECT
43 UNDER REVIEW
52 GENERATION GAP
54 HOMEGROWN LABELS
65 CITR PROGRAM GUIDE
71 CHARTS
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming Issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please contact:
editor.discorder@citr.ca. To submit images, contact:
artdirector.discorder@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1, Vancouver, BC with your address, and we will
mail each issue of Discorder right to your doorstep for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your business, email
distro.discorder@citr.ca We are always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can provide you with the content you love.
To donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
vvv
■ ■ ■
To inform Discorder of an upcoming album release, art show
or significant happening, please email all relevant details 4-6
weeks in advance to Brit Bachmann, Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca. You may also direct comments,
complaints and corrections via email, or visit during office
hours at CiTR Tuesdays 4-6pm.
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CITR Station
Manager: Brenda Grunau // Student Liason: Elizabeth Holliday
//Editor-in-Chief: Brit Bachmann// Under Review Editor:
Jonathan Kew//Real Live Action Editor: Robert Catherall //
Web Content Manager: You! (pg. 35) // Art Director: Ricky
Castanedo-Laredo // Production Assistant: Jules Galbralth // Ad
Coordinator: Nashlyn Lloyd// Accounts Manager: Eleanor
Wearing // Charts: Andy Resto // Discorder Radio Producers:
Matt Meuse, Jordan Wade//Writers: August Bramhoff, Slavko
Bucifal, Sarah Charrouf, Erik Coates, Esmee Colboume, Natalie
Dee, Fraser Dobbs, Bridget Gallagher, Daniel Geddes, Patrick
Geraghty, Elizabeth Holliday Gary Jarvls, Jonathan Kew, Erica
Leiren, Alex Lenz, Charmaine Li, Theano Pavlidou, James Shaw,
Dave Snider, Sachin Turakhia, Bryce Warnes, Mat Wilkins,
Jasper D Wrinch, Chris Yee // Cover Photo: Joe Keithley by Jon
Vincent//Photographers & Illustrators: Sara Baar, August
Bramhof, Evan Buggle, Duncan Cairns-Brenner, Gillian Cole,
Lukas Engelhardt, Cristian Fowlie, Amelia Garvin, Aliz Horvath,
Danielle Jette, Alicia Marie Lawrence, Max Littledale, Curtis Logan,
Kalena Mackiewicz, Jesse Ross, Alison Sadler, Jon Vincent //
Proofreaders: Brit Bachmann, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Natalie
Dee, Jules Galbraith, Elizabeth Holliday, Jonathan Kew, Nashlyn
Lloyd, James Shaw, Sachin Turakhia
©Discorder 2015 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager®citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada. EDITOR'S NOTE
LET'S TALK CULTURE
Down a hallway covered in band stickers, and just beyond the archaic combination
lock on an office in the old CiTR station are boxes of Discorder Magazines dating back
exactly 33 years. From this chilly office (the heat doesn't work anymore), I write this
Editor's Note.
Nostalgia is substantial in this old station. It is slapped onto the walls, worn raw into
the floor, and stained on the lounge furniture. It lingers as the musty smell of old paper
surrounding the Discorders like incense.
But this nostalgia is not my own; I never knew this station. I became EIC the same
month CiTR settled into its new location in The Nest. That's the magic of CiTR and Discorder, though — once a member and supporter, you become a soft crease in a larger
fold of friends, lovers and losers who have shared and redefined independent media in
Vancouver over the last 70+ years. I don't need to have known this old station to feel a
connection to it.
For all the cynics reading the similarities between this Editor's Note and my previous
one, you're absolutely correct. And perhaps I should have saved that note for this issue.
February is busy for CiTR and Discorder, and it feels right to place this introduction in
the context of the station's longevity.
This month CiTR and Discorder are hosting a slew of events to bring you into our
extended family: February 5 is the Shindig Finals at Pat's Pub, also marking Ben Lai's
last night hosting Shindig after a solid 15 years of bad jokes-for-beer and outrageously
drawn out winner's announcements; Discorder TV, a YouTube mini-series produced by
Sam Tudor will be debuting at the Lido February 10; CiTR's annual Fundrive fundraiser
launches on February 25, culminating in a finale party at the Hindenburg March 4; and
CiTR and Mint Records are releasing Pop Alliance Compilation Vol 4 on vinyl February
26 with all sale proceeds supporting the station.
EDITORS  NOTE This year's Fundrive theme is "Grow Our Cultures," a lovingly visceral representation of the way we intend to spend money donated between February 25-March 3. Funds
raised will support the continued development of broadcasting and print publication
skills amongst our staff, volunteers and interns. For Discorder, this means providing
contributors the training and opportunities to produce an even better, and more relevant
magazine. We are a non-profit publication, and donations can help us grow our base
writers, editors, illustrators and photographers. We are already the outspoken voice of
Vancouver's independent, underground and emerging music and art culture. By donating to Fundrive this season (see page 8) you will be making our voice even louder. Your
donation makes a difference to us.
If you're wanting something tangible for your donation, we,ve got you covered. In
addition to station swag and giveaways on individual CiTR programs, some of our hottest djs and Mint Records have chosen the local artists featured on Pop Alliance Vol 4,
including Discorder favourites Mourning Coup, Cult Babies, Late Spring, and Stefana
Fratila. A few of the artists on the compilation will be performing at the Fundrive finale
/ LP release at the Hindenburg March 4. LPs (with digital download codes) are available
for pre-sale on mintrecs.com, and will be sold during and after Fundrive for $15. There
are only 500 pressings, so each one is collectable. (In case you missed the first few volumes of Pop Alliance, we are selling those, too.)
Bringing this note full circle, I want to share the contents of this month's magazine.
33 years after the first issue of Discorder featured D.O.A., we are proud to interview
D.O.A. frontman Joe Keithley again, tracing his career from punk to punk politician.
This i$sue also features Michael Red, Dumb, Milk, Maggie Boyd, Gallery Gachet, and
some dish on illegal venues. Thanks to our contributors, advertisers and donors this
month, and thanks to you for reading to the end.
My fingers are so stiff.   ■
A+,
BB
illustrations by Aliz Horvath
EDITOR'S  NOTE SUBSCRIBE TO DISCORDER!
i
Discorder is Vancouver's largest running independent magazine.
Show your support for Vane mver's independent music community
and the development of new writers, editors, designers, and artists.
GET IT SENT ALL THE WAY TO YOUR I
-fUJffliP L,KiAN ANJ|iLSUBSCTirrrONJO DISCORDER MAGAZINE ($20 F0R CANADA, S2S FOR U.S.)
■ IWOUEDME TO SUPPORT DISCORDER WITH A DONATION OF
fSENO THIS FORUKNO CASH OR CHEQUE TO:
Magazine #233-6138 SUB Blvd. Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1
II
I- CiTR HAS
GREAT
FRIENDS
f®
C+J|
f*1   I*)
L®/ o o S® o o \®
©J
FOR A FULL LIST OF BUSINESSES, VISIT US AT CITR.CA
WESTSIDE/UBC
AUSTRALIAN BOOT
COMPANY
15% off
BANYEN BOOKSANDSOUND
10% off
THE BIKE KITCHEN
10% off new parts
and accessories
DENTRY'SPUB
$6.99 wings, $11.99 pitchers
FRESH IS BEST SALSA
10% off
KOERNER'SPUB
10% off
LIMELIGHT VIDEO
10% off
ON THE FRINGE
HAIR DESIGN
10% off (does not stack with
UBC student discount)
PRUSSIN MUSIC
10% off books & accessories
RUFUS GUITAR SHOP
10% off strings & accessories
UBC BOOKSTORE
10% off UBC crested
merchandise
VANCOUVER
BREWERYTOURS
10% off
MAIN STREET
ANTISOCIAL
SKATEBOARD SHOP
10% off
DANDELION RECORDS
& EMPORIUM
10% off used records
DEVIL MAY WEAR
10% off
EAST VANITY PARLOUR
10% off
FAS IN FRANK
20% off
LUCKY'S COMICS
10% off
NEPTOON RECORDS
10% off
RED CAT RECORDS
10% off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
1 free make-your-own button with
purchases over $5
R/X COMICS
10% off
THE RAG MACHINE
15% off
THE WALLFLOWER
MODERN DINER
10% off
TRUE VALUE VINTAGE/
I FOUND GALLERY
10% off
WOO VINTAGE CLOTHING
10% off
DOWNTOWN
BANG-ON T-SHIRTS
10% off
BEAT STREET RECORDS
10% off used vinyl
THE CINEMATHEQUE
1 free bag of popcorn
COMMUNITY THRIFT
&VINTAGE
10% off
THE FALL TATTOOING
10% off
FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
No cover'Sup Fu?'Saturdays
(excluding special events)
LUKES GENERAL STORE
10% off
SELECTORS'RECORDS
10% off
SIKORA'S CLASSICAL
RECORDS
10% off used CD & Vinyl
STUDIO RECORDS
10% off
VINYL RECORDS
15%offused10%offnew
COMMERCIAL DRIVE
AUDIOPILE
10%offLPs/CDs
BOMBER BREWING
10% off
BONERATTLE MUSIC
10% off accessories
HIGHLIFE RECORDS
10% off
JEAN QUEEN (JQ) CLOTHING
15% off
MINTAGE CLOTHING
10% off
PANDORA'S BOX
REHEARSAL STUDIOS
10% off
PEOPLE'S COOP
BOOKSTORE
10% off
STORM CROW TAVERN
10% off
VINYL RECORD
STORAGE COMPANY
10% off
BAND MERCH CANADA
15% off
HORSES RECORDS
10% off
VANCOUVER MUSIC
GALLERY
2 free lessons HOW TO
DONATE
WE'LL BE AT THE PHONES READY
TO TAKE YOUR PLEDGE
Start: Thursday, Febuary 25,12pm
End: Thursday, March 3, 9pm
We'll accept donations online
before and after the Fundrive!
604-822-8648
604-UBC-UNIT
Call in during your favourite show, or listen in for the best prizes! Each
CiTR program will be offering special prizes for people who call during
their shows.
IN-PERSON
Swing by CiTR on the lower level of The Nest, and donate in person!
We'll show you our new digs, and the studios where training and
broadcast magic happens. We accept cash, cheque, credit card and
money order, and you can take your swag home with you.
ONLINE
Visit citr.ca/donate to make an online donation and support your favourite show. Online donors can choose CiTR swag, but are not eligible
for show specific prizes.
PRIVACY
Your information is collected under the authority of section 26(c) of the
British Columbia Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy
Act. UBC will use this information to process your gift, maintain contact
and keep you up-to-date with university information and events. UBC
will treat your gift as confidential. We will not disclose your identity and
contact information unless you authorize us to do so. CITR101.9 FM & DISCORDER MAGAZINE
PRESENT
FUNDRIV
FEB 25 - MAR 4
GROWING OUR
CULTURES"
604-UBC-UNIT
604-822-8648
fUNDRVE FINALE
FRIDAY, MARCH 4
AT THE HINDENBURG STOP MAKING DUMB PUNS
words by Chris Yee // photography by Sara Baar
illustration by Gillian Cole
For a band who by their own account
are good friends, some of the biggest influences on DUMB's music are surprising:
"Frustration, neuroticism, ego battles,"
summarizes guitarist and vocalist Gal
Av-Gay.
Astonishingly, these clashes are all in
good nature, and in fact facilitate DUMB's
creative process. DUMB other guitarist
Nick Short clarifies, "I feel like we argue
so frequently and we are also really close
friends that it actually doesn't ruin the
vibe."
As an example, Gal explains: "I used
to just hate everything Nick played on guitar, I used to think he was just playing it
to frustrate me... But, eventually, I'll listen
to it on recording and grow to like it, no
matter what."
Indeed, the members of the garage-punk band seem to treat being interviewed the same way — tossing talking
10
DUMB points back and forth until they reach
an answer they all agree on. The band
itself came together in a similarly piecemeal fashion, emerging from jam sessions
with friends, then going through two bassists (Shelby Vredik, then Brett Barmby)
before assuming its current form, which
in addition to Gal and Nick also features
Gal's younger brother Nir Av-Gay on bass
and Felipe Morelli on drums and backup
vocals.
DUMB is a member of choms, a collective of bands that share the same jam
space and some of the same members,
choms also includes Swim Team, Tessto-
pia, tv ugly and Fuzzy P. "I also feel like
DUMB is not just our band; I think it's
the beginning of all of our friends making
music in bands," he remarks.
Gal also plays in tv ugly, who carl be
said to be a sister band of sorts to DUMB.
Nick speaks to the bond between the two
bands:  "I think that we started at the
exact same time, more or less, so it's cool
we played shows together in the beginning
where no one knew who the hell either of
us was ... We've both sort of gotten better and bigger, [though] it's so cliched to
say sometimes." Felipe adds, "We're still
homies."
The interplay between DUMB's constituents runs to their collective musical
taste, too; While they sometimes diverge
— Nick listens to prog rock, while Gal and
Nir's ears run to melodic indie rock bands,
and Felipe is a hip-hop head — they converge too, mostly on Parquet Courts.
After Gal saw Parquet Courts perform
at Oregon's Pickathon Festival, nearly all
he listened to for a while was their 2012
album, Light Up Gold. Fast forward a few
years, and DUMB found itself playing a
game of email tag with the band, whom
Felipe emailed in the hopes of getting on a
bill with them as local support.
"We made a Gmail [account] to mes-
DUMB
11 ^^^^^^^^MB^X^^^^M >/:':■>.. V;V :
i
m
%
ETWEEN THEN AND NOW
D WHAT BEACH
... /FS H/AJ, 0<
ITUAL, WHIC
S LIKE A BEACH
BCH."
m
•A.   t\
J7 sage them," Nick explains. "Other than
that, we had no reason for having an email
address, so we just totally forgot we had it.
They emailed us back and we didn't even
see it for three weeks." Felipe continues, "It
was pretty cool, since I've talked to other
friends of mine who play in bands, who
have toured and done all that stuff, and
they were like, 'dude, emailing the band
never works.'"
At the time of our conversation, DUMB
was hard at work in their Coal Harbour
studio in a building dubbed the Wantoo
Lounge. The band was scrambling to the
final touches on their forthcoming cas^
sette, Beach Church, before sending it off to
Jordan Koop for mastering. As follow-up to
the slew of self-released EPs (starting with
the Friendship EP, which came out February 2015) and one single (released November 2015), the Beach Church cassette
could have been something very different.
Gal explains the initial concept of their
release: "We were going to have a full-
length that was going to be a bunch of
DUMB songs, and we also had an idea for
an album called Beach Church, which was
supposed to be slide guitar, surf-themed,
instrumental, experimental and electronic." Nick continues, "We were going to
ask four extra people to play synthesizers
and basically make like a noise album, but
it was going to be really short, essentially,
just ten minutes ... It was going to almost
just sound bad."
The two ideas slowly blended together,
but in the meantime Beach Church became
something of an inside-joke for DUMB.
"Every time we played a song Nick would
say, 'But is this Beach Church?" Gal
remarks, "and we would be just like, 'No."*
The band flirted with some deeper,
even spiritual concepts as Beach Church
took shape. Describing the album's title,
Nir explains, "Between then and now we
realized what Beach Church was ... It's
fun, but also very spiritual, which is why
it's like a beach but also a church." Nick
laments, "Now it sounds weird because of
Parquet Courts saying they're religious.''
Nevertheless, DUMB retained some of
these spiritual elements, both in the album
and in their practices and performances.
"We have these things in the album
called 'meditations,'" Gal explains. "We
[would] take breaks before doing a take
of a song or before just playing a song ...
everyone would be quiet except for Nick,
and there would always be somebody asking the question, 'Why does Nick get to
play during the meditation?'"
"Because Nick is a beach priest," Felipe
quips.
DUMB
13 DUMB credits a month of playing Devo
songs for a Halloween covers show for the
direction they eventually took for Beach
Church, all mixing wizardry and occasional forays away from straightforward
guitar music — Ridley Bishop plays sax on
one track, for instance. "I think Devo made
us go a little bit crazy," remarks Nir. "Those
songs were in some really weird time signatures and had a lot of repetition... I
think we came out the other side a little
bit weirder."
What's next for DUMB? It's an open
slate — when asked about their plans, the
band cracked as many jokes as they gave
serious answers.
Asked about touring, Nir exclaimed,
"We should go to Japan in 2019!" to his
bandmates' laughter, before they started
mulling the possibility of a Sled Island
appearance.
On the topic of future releases, Gal
said DUMB was, among other things, considering a country-themed album and a
split release with tv ugly: "It's going to be...
called Dumb and Ugly"
It's hard to tell whether DUMB is joking about this, though. After all, it's a
band which more often than not returns
to its ideas, no matter how silly it might
seem at first.
Just ask Nick about Beach Church.
DUMB will open for Parquet Courts at
the Rickshaw Theatre on February 20.
Beach Church is due out February 11. Visit
dumbband.bcu%dcamp.corn to hear their
music, or follow DUMB on Facebook for
updates.
\
14
DUMB ■i.    '.**        >.•*••     .«-u. V
: ; :::::'::
s
- *m
ERE ELSE
-,~rvis$ I photos by Lnkas Engelhardt
itttisirations)^ Amelia Garvin
till
,,.'.      :.    ...   .......   f   %     •'
•    '•     : .■    '•
In the heart of the Downtown East-
side, Gallery Gachet is a rock of resistance giving its collective of artists an outlet to express their creativity. It is part gallery and part drop-in centre. I meet with
artist and Gachet collective member June
Conley, and Programming Coordinator
Kristin Lantz at the space, and immediately feel at ease. Lantz is quick to explain
why people feel comfortable at Gachet:
"They can come in for drop-in programming. They can get some tea, work on computers and not feel like they're not welcome. We do a lot of shows and a lot of
programming that kind of speaks to that.
This show is one of them." The three of us
begin a tour of its current exhibition Voices
Of The Corridors.
This exhibition is an annual tradition.
Each year Gallery Gachet hosts a show
of works by its collective members. Lantz
explains the origins of Voices of the Corridors: "The idea started from us thinking about repressed memories, and then
we wanted to find a way to have that sort
of connect with the climate of what's happening with the space now in terms of
thinking through funding."
In September, 2015, Gallery Gachet
received notice that after a twenty-one
year funding relationship with Vancouver
Coastal Health, they were losing funding
with ninety days notice. The health board
cited a shift to "clinical services" as the
reason for the sudden notice. The funding
has since been extended to March 2016.
For a non-profit art organization already
working within tight financial constraints,
GALLERY  GACHET
15  "WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN
NEXT? HOW LONG IS IT GOING
TO BE THAT WE ARE GOING TO BE
ABLE STAY HERE?"
this has been a blow. The news impacted
both the collective and the community.
Lantz continues, "We started thinking about the ways in which there may
be oppression happening or repression of
yourself, and facing that oppression with
ideas or these creative, wonderful thoughts
that you might have, but feel like you can't
xsay." Through that process of conceptualization, the collective determined the theme
of this year's exhibition would comprise of
three main ideas: repression of the self,
repression of a movement, and oppression
of a people.
One of the artists is Pierre Leichner,
who has constructed an object that until
illuminated, is difficult to fathom. The
piece is covered in what looks like trash
and old, forgotten items. Conley points to
old pill containers and flicks a switch, and
an image comes to life. The illumination
brings into focus a shadow of a butterfly. It is a brilliant display of how thrown
away and discarded items become treasured belongings to new owners. It says a
lot about the life cycle of possessions in
an urban environment, and it is a theme
that occurs throughout the exhibition.
For the construction of this piece Leichner
had taken donations of items to build this
monument to represent the life force of the
gallery and the surrounding community.
Conley reads excerpts of Leichner's artist statement out loud: "'The idea for this
piece comes from a quote from a Leonard
Cohen song ["Anthem"] 'There is a crack in
everything, that's how the light gets in' (...)
Despite its apparent fragility, for me the
butterfly symbolizes incredible strength
and persistence. It also symbolizes transformation and beauty. This work speaks
to the power and necessity of art for our
individual well being and that of our communities. I believe it reflects what Gallery
Gachet is and does."
For the exhibition Conley created a
piece called "Angel of Anarchy." It has several interactive components, including a
timer and a wind up music box. The timer
is set in motion and there is a delicate ticking as Conley explains her creation: "The
angel of anarchy, she's kind of a guardian,
then at the same time she's a person trying to help the people in the neighbourhood. So as far as the government would
be concerned she would be an anarchist, right, because she's working with the
llf II
GALLERY  GACHET
17 people and so she's got many hands that
are juggling different things. Coming out
of the top of her head are different objects
of the people's that were destroyed when
they dumped their carts and took their
stuff away."
Conley is referring to the deliberate emptying of people's shopping carts.
All over the downtown core of Vancouver and in neighbourhoods as far as Kits-
ilano shopping carts are used to hoard
personal possessions. Unlike a vehicle a
cart can't be locked and so often people
return to find their carts emptied by zealous city workers. Ivan Drury is an organizer with Alliance Against Displacement
and is familiar with poverty issues. Asked
about the emptying of carts over Twitter he
said, "It's awful. It's just destabilizing and
dehumanizing."
The timer in "Angel of Anarchy," June
says, "reminds us of how much time we
have left," adding, 'What's going to happen
next? How long is it going to be that we are
going to be able stay here?"
Uncertainty is front and centre for
the collective members of Gallery Gachet.
Their concerns are caused by the funding
cut, but it is a similar uncertainty that is
felt all across the Downtown Eastside by
low income residents. Our attention shifts
to the art piece by Karen Ward. It is a wave
shaped metal piece with honeycomb like
holes. Upon looking through the holes we
see not only our own reflections, but also
a message etched on the mirror: "No one
like you has ever existed or will ever exist
again." As Conley, Lantz and I take turns
looking through the holes, Conley's timer
buzzes. Time's up.
Voices Of The Corridors: Repression
of the Self, Repression of a Movement,
Oppression of a People features works by
Afuwa, Sharon Burns, June Conley, Rebecca Chunn, Pierre Leichner, Tchavdar Pet-
kov, William. Nelson Pope, Bruce Ray, and
Karen Ward. The exhibition runs until February 21 at Gallery Gachet, located at 88
East Cordova Street. Gallery Gachet also
runs a micro-exhibition space and retail
store within the space called Salon Shop,
which currently features works by Andy
Morning Star and Stella Castell
18
GALLERY GACHET PEANUT BUTTER ¥ JAMS
ON THE AIR
words by Sachin Turakhia
photos by Sara Boar
Ulustrations by Max Littledale
"We have strong opinions about everything!" Brenda Grunau wants to make this
very clear, "otherwise it'd be boring!" Her
radio other-half, Jordie Yow backs her up:
"We're both very opinionated about food."
As hosts of CiTR's local food and music
show, Peanut Butter 'n' Jams, this seems
to be part of the job description. The show
sets out to provide interviews and reviews
of Vancouver's best food and music, meaning candid hosts are essential ingredients.
Luckily, neither Brenda nor Jordie hold
back on letting you know their thoughts
when it comes to food or drink. In October 2015 Jordie made his opinions on burgers very clear, on air, in an epic 15 minute
speech. When asked what else would evoke
such strong emotions, chili comes top of
the list (to his frustration, he has finished
second at a local chili cookoff for the last
three years). Similarly, when asked the
best place to get sushi in Vancouver, both
hosts reply with a split-second answer -
Toshi Sushi. These two genuinely do have
strong and clear opinions when it comes
to food.
Along with food, PBnJ is proud to
play exclusively Vancouver-based musicians. Brenda explains that with the sheer
amount of bands in Vancouver, why would
they need to look further afield? They are
both avid supporters of local music, welcoming homegrown talent. Brenda adds,
ON THE AIR
19 :
"Most bands that send their music to the
station can get on the radio. It's that easy
to get on air." So, if you're looking for a
break, PBnJ might just be the place to get
your music heard.
The show itself was conceived in 2011.
The pair had worked closely together in
what Brenda describes as "an easy working relationship" when Jordie was the
editor of Discorder (2008-11) and Brenda
CiTR station manager (a position she still
holds). After collaborating on some fill-
ins for other programs, they decided to
co-host a show and hunted for a premise
until the love of good food and drink won
out. A month of brainstorming followed to
try to find the best puns to name the show.
A "no bad ideas" policy was employed
and apparently there is a list of rejected
names on pieces of paper hiding in each
of their houses, which conveniently cannot be located in time for this interview.
But the final product, Peanut Butter 'n'
Jams, was a lightbulb moment. It goes
toe-to-toe with the most imaginative pun
names CiTR boasts: The Soulship Enterprise, Duncan's Donuts, and Kew It Up, to
name but a few.
Over the years, PBnJ has managed to
nurture a number of close relationships
with regular contributors so that even if
one of the hosts is away, there are usually
two people on air. Al Smith (a member of
the band Milk, also featured in this issue)
and Kendra Loewen are near the top of
the list. Each guest brings with them their
own areas of expertise. This, combined
with   regular   interviews,   forms   PBnJ's
20
ON THE AIR
J a place to do just *well enough' so I can
always get a table and not pay too much
money."
It seems that when it comes to music,
Peanut Butter *n* Jams seems to want to
share exciting new, local discoveries with
its listeners. If they're truly honest though,
they'd much rather their favourite restaurants remained underground — their own
personal, secret gems. It's tough being
foodies.
Peanut Butter "n" Jams is on CiTR
101.9FM alternating Thursdays between
6:30-7:30, but archived episodes are available on citr.ca.
"open door policy." Jordie describes it as
"a friendly, casual sort of vibe," and it does
come across. Brenda and Jordie make you
feel as if you're joining them for a drink
each time they're on air.
On their first show they were joined by
Vancouver food critic Andrew Morrison,
editor of Scout Magazine, who taught them
the basics of critiquing cuisine. The lesson that stuck with them is the power of a
good review. Good press has the influence
to change a restaurant's fortunes dramatically. However, this effect has made many
of their favourite places a little too successful. After the choka-blok Peaceful Noodles
was featured on TV show Diners, Drive Ins
& Dives, the restaurant raised their prices.
"It's great. They're doing really, really well,"
laments Jordie, "But sometimes I want
ON THE AIR
21 Joe Keithley
REDEFINING
POLITICIAN
words by Erica Leiren
photos by Jon Vincent
Fittingly, I catch up with Joe Keith-
ley at a coffee shop in East Van. Keithley
is, of course, the epic front-man, guitarist
and driving force of our own homegrown
D.O.A. We speak for over an hour in the
middle of his election campaign as provincial Green Party candidate for the Coquit-
lam-Burke Mountain riding by-election, a
contest that will be decided by the time you
read this. During our interview, Keithley
speaks with passion, conviction and candour on a variety of topics, his responses
laced with humour and the hard-won wisdom he's gained from a music career spanning five-continents. Politics, it seems, is a
natural progression.
I bring John Lydon's Anger Is An
Energy (2014) along to start our conversation, since both Lydon and Keithley
hold passionate views that are powerfully
stated. Has Keithley read it, I wonder? "Not
yet," he says, "but we opened at the War
Memorial for PiL." Cool, I was at that gig in
1984. Keithley wrote his own band memoir
in 2003 called I, Shithead: A Life in Punk
Rock. He tells me that he was wary of not
JOE  KEITHLEY wanting to copy anyone else's style, so he
limited his band-bio reading beforehand
to Henry Rollins'
i the Van about the
Lk band Black Flag.
that DO. A. could do the same. Early singles were pressed at the local IRC pressing plant for 75 cents, and the band sold
them to record stores for $1.25, who then
Through
Keithley    has    retailed them to fans for $1.50. "I think I
tain his integrity
when we formed] our
music business. He
the DIY credo     own label Sudden D
that D.O.A is known for: "When I was we figured: One, nobody likes us. Two. we
18 at SFU I went to some Pied Pump- have no fans. And three, we'll never get
kin shows, and they sold their records at a record deal." A too modest estimation
shows for $5." This gave Keithley the idea     of their own talents to be sure, but their
DIY ethos and "just go for it" attitude has
For their first out of town show at San
Francisco's Mabuhay Gardens in 1978,
Keithley recalls: "We had no car to tour
in. Chuck and Randy took the Greyhound
and I took the train,
with his Les Paul g
gear they borrowed from Ne
rest of the
(later, Flipper), who shared the bill.
Keithley has wide-ranging influences,
from Alice Cooper and Black Sabbath, to
CCR and Woody Guthrie. He tells me he
cut his teeth on his older sister's collection
of folk music, which included Bob Dylan,
The Weavers, and Pete Seeger. "[Seeger]
is my #1 inspiration because he inspired
people, got blacklisted, and came back
from it. He led a protest movement and
wrote great songs. 'On Top of Old Smoky'
was the first song I ever learned."
Keithley has his own music heroes and
now he is an inspiration to others. I ask
him how that feels, and he considers the
question thoughtfully before answering:
"It's a nice position to be in, to be able to
inspire people to do something positive."
When I mention that I love the song
and video for "Pipeline Fever," a song off
DO. As recent album Hard Rain Falling,
his response is personal. "I grew up on
Burnaby Mountain. The only thing these
pipelines are meant to do is make money.
We'd be taking a chance on spoiling one
of the last unspoiled places in the world."
JOE  KEITHLEY The antic and powerful music
video has D.O.A performing the song
like a television newscast, with Keithley as the anchorman. The lyrics
scroll across the screen like urgent
headlines.
Since he is on the campaign trail
when our interview takes place, I ask
Keithley about his position on forests
— an important question, as we also
witness tjie daily logging' of our city
by developers. What Keithley has to
say is simple and profound: "It's not
smart to get rid of trees. They are
there for a reason."
At the Punk Gone Green fundraiser January 15, Keithley's charisma is evident. The event is emceed
by the inimitable Ian Tiles (of Buddy
Selfish and Pointed Sticks fame) and
includes Keithley performing a reggae
dub version of the tremendous song
"War in the East" off D.O.A's 1982
War On 45 EP. Enhancing the evening are Bev Davies' freshly reprinted
action shots of early D.O.A and
friends, including superb band and
audience photos from Hardcore *81.
Hard Rain Fatting charted in the
20s on CiTR throughout late November and early December. Proffered for
your listening pleasure is an exciting set of short, sharp, new songs
— classic D.OA, yet still fresh and
thrilling. D.O.A songs are never too
long; they always leave you wanting
more. In addition to the environment,
other themes touched upon include
the resilience of the human spirit,
the message to help one another and
a clear-eyed call for tolerance and
understanding between all people.
The words and the delivery are passionate as always. Old D.O.A fans will
be very pleased, and newcomers to
the fold will love what they hear. This
24
JOE KEITHLEY ■ ' ■Hppf
il ■'"
iiilli
u
id
lili''
Charming, talented and tough as nails,
there is a depth of humanity in Keithley's
forthright gaze. He has seen the world
touring with D.O.A, yet is not world-weary.
Rather, he is ready to take on the dark
side, like a white knight riding out on our
behalf. A champion. He is not only Joey
Shithead, the punk rock warrior, but also
Joe the parent, who cares enough about
what the future holds for his children, that
he is willing to put his money where his
mouth is and do the hard slogging work
of effecting change through the political
process. He is living up to his motto: "Talk
minus action equals zero."
sw&wm
For more information on Joe Keithley,
D.O.A and Sudden Death Records, or to
hear Hard Rain Falling visit suddendeath. ANYTHING BUT HOMOGENIZED
words by Esmee Colbourne // photos by Curtis Logan
illustrations by Kalena Mackxewicz
Interviewing Milk is like trying to keep
up an incredibly hyper, sugar crazed elementary school kid with four separate brains thinking about Kraft Singles,
energy drinks, missing toes, and Peper-
ami sticks. This entertaining intensity is
discordant with their mellow and introspective new album Late Bloomer, which
showcases a very different Milk. Discorder
sat down with Thomas James (vocals
and guitar), Akanee Rose (drums), Evan
McDowell (bass), and Alex Smith (guitar),
to talk about Milk's transition from Watermelon, elements of their new release Late
Bloomer, and future tour plans.
Late Bloomer is a laid back exploration
into the past— growing up, or not so much.
Milk produces music that is emotionally
literate, and incredibly genuine. Short and
sweet, Milk has made a conscious decision to move away from effects, and showcase each instrument clearly throughout
their music. James owns up to "whatever weird sounds come out of [his] face,"
which is what made me fall in love with
the record. This could be because most of
the elements of Late Bloomer are nostalgic, influenced by different spectrums of
music, from Kurt Cobain to Jim Sullivan.
Recently, James has started hunting down
weird outsider folk to reference.
Some might recognize names from this
line-up as members of the band Watermelon, a group that was doing quite well
until they mysteriously disappeared. The
transition from Watermelon was not a hard
one, and though it was a swift change, it
was also a reasonable one. James explains
26
MILK ' W j he just wanted a change. "Watermelon was
working on an album [which] we worked
on way too much and way too long, sporadically" A recording process filled with
problems, such as having to move recording locations; eventually James just
stopped liking the process, never put the
album out, and starting a new band. Rose,
also a past member of Watermelon adds,
"I think it was the combination of a lot
of things though. We had band member
changes, and we were pretty tired of the
album".
Sink into an empty mode / I feel so
obscured / I don't want to feel well / I don't
want to be cured.
Taking a lead on most writing and
musical decisions on the album, James'
voice is definitely an influential part of
what makes Late Bloomer sing. Although
claiming to feel goofy and compensating
by not taking himself too seriously, James
is also trying to articulate images that he
finds compelling, and distinctive: "I think
it's important that some kind of personality comes across. I think the best pop
music is designed to give you a sense of the
person, or who they want you to think they
are. I like to think that I'm just being honest, but that's never been true of anybody."
"There is something weird about feeling
totally connected to [an] image of myself
28
MILK "/ THINK THE BEST POP
MUSIC IS DESIGNED TO
GIVE YOU A SENSE OF
THE PERSON, OR WHO
THEY WANT YOU TO
THINK THEY ARE. I LIKE
TO THINK THAT I'M JUST
BEING HONEST, BUT
THAT'S NEVER BEEN TRUE
OF ANYBODY."
that is a child," says James. The cover art
reflects Late Bloomefs sound. James is
confused about where all his time went,
guessing that procrastination has something to do with it. The cover is of a young
James sitting on a swing set, blurry and
double exposed, looking slightly sick and
eyes half closed.
When I ask James if he had thought he
would have grown out of his internal, weird
high school self, he replies, "I don't think
anyone who is 15 years old and considers
themselves a punk thinks that they are
going to grow out of it. You're like 'This is
my life, I'm being real, real authentic' And
then you turn into a weird, pseudo-yuppy,
and that's how life goes." Rose agrees, adding, "drinking craft beer and talking about
your kitchen renovations."
The late release of Late Bloomer was
not a big deal to Milk, as they were just
excited with the success of their release
party and completion of the album. The
Red Gate release January 15 was also a
community experiment, trying to bend the
stiff genre borders of Vancouver success
fully by bringing a mix of popular D Js and
bands. Although the show did not end up
like a highschool dance floor, the result
was an oddly empty dancefloor after the
bands played. Though it sucked that there
wasn't more interest in the other elements
of the concert, Rose admits, "it was nice to
put on a bill [with bands in it] that people
had come for, which hasn't been happening in the past year or so in Vancouver."
McDowell agrees, "and also to not have a
room full of people that know or recognise
you."
Putting the disastrous Watermelon
tour in the past, and glowing with present
success, plans to tour are definitely in
Milk's future. Although they don't really
have anything on the books, as of yet,
there will be ASAP, planning to hit the road
sometime in June 2016.
Milk's next show is February 4 at
Horses Records with the Seattle band,
Versing. To listen and purchase Late
Bloomer visit milkmUkmUk.bandcamp.com.
MILK
29 FEELS/BRASS/
ERIC CAMPBELL &
THE DIRT / DIRTY
SPELLS / PASSIVE
DECEMBER 10 / THE COBALT
December 10th at the Cobalt was supposed to be a night of surf-tinged rock.
Then Mother Nature intervened. Half an
hour before the first opener was set to take
the stage, Timbre's team posted in the
Facebook event to announce that mudslides
on the I-5 had made it impossible for FEELS
and LA Witch to make it. "Both bands tried
their darndest to be here tonight, but circumstances were beyond anyone's control. An
act of god if you will," they said. All that could
be promised was a performance by opener
Eric Campbell & the Dirt and free cover.
Though 1 knew Eric Campbell & the Dirt
put on an energized show, as an LA Witch
fan, I was patently disappointed. Having
missed their set at Levitation Fest, I had
been looking forward to finally seeeing one
of my favourite musical discoveries of the
year. So it was with reticence that I entered
the Cobalt on that late-November night. I
didn't expect much. What I got was beyond
my expectations.
In a feat of last-minute organization that
speaks volumes about the strength and
overlap of the Vancouver music community,
the bill magically fluctuated from three bands
to one, to four, to a whopping five. It can't
be easy to go into a show where people are
likely starting off disappointed, but endearingly youthful twosome PASSIVE made an
admirable if somewhat lackluster go of it.
Post-rock instrumentalists Dirty Spells put
on a good face for the second set, but sadly the last-minute nature of the performance
meant they had to go without the paper-
mache skulls they usually wear. Watching the
band play in such plain attire was a bit disjunctive with their orchestral sound. Violinist
Emily Bach and her electric violin went from
this set into the next with Eric Campbell &
the Dirt — the only guaranteed set of the
night. Promoted from opener to central set,
the constantly shifting lineup manifested in
a foursome on this specific night, with Emily
Bach, Eric Mulder, and Colby Morgan falling
in line behind the ever-enigmatic frontman.
The group is set to release a new album on
new label Eagle Time Records soon, and
possibly the late recording hours were to
blame for a somewhat sloppy set.
The energy of the confused show didn't
really pick up until BRASS hit the stage and
did their oh-so-remarkable thing. My first
30
REAL  LIVE  ACTION time seeing them, I was disappointed that
its taken me so long. Far from letting the
slapped-together style of the night throw
them off, BRASS brought their full raucous
energy and gave it to the crowd right when
they needed it most, with characteristic limbs
and beer cans flying.
Throughout the night, set lists were constantly being updated and reposted, and it
was only after PASSIVE had finished that
it was revealed FEELS would make it after
all, following a 13-hour drive through the
mountains. There isn't much of a way to
put it except that the LA four-piece, formerly known as Raw Geronimo, was a force.
Despite the 12:30 start, they put on a show
brimming with energy. Dripping with luscious harmonies backed by tight, arrhythmic
instrumentation, it was a set worth waiting
for, and one we were all privileged to see.
Both bands and spectators were thrown
somewhat off balance by the night's beginnings, but somehow by the end we collectively regained our equilibrium. There was
camaraderie in the confusion; we were all in
it together, because what else could we do?
Hopefully LA Witch makes it back to town
soon. Til then, Vancouver fans have a very
unique night to remember.
—Elizabeth Holliday
MILK/ WHITNEY K/
GAL GRACEN / JONS
JANUARY 15 @ RED GATE
Like many fledgling Discorder reviewers
before me, I eagerly stepped through the
Red Gate doors for Milk's cassette release
party at exactly the moment the poster had
told me they would open: a whole hour and
a half before the show. Though the wait
was rather grueling, I was lucky enough to
meet and speak with guitarist Al Smith of the
aforementioned headliner before the show
got underway. He introduced me to drummer
Akan^e Rose; as we chatted of jobs, school,
the station (Al was Discordefs RLA editor
some five years ago), and of course music, I
found myself becoming increasingly excited
for the performance. We all try our best not
to judge proverbial books by their proverbial
covers, but it was difficult to deny the peculiar, welcoming energy that possessed the
musicians around me.
The first band to open was Jons, a psychedelic pop outfit from Victoria. Their set began
with a delightfully well-composed instrumental track that flowed well from snappy, syncopated guitar riffs to dreamy bridges and
huge choruses that filled the room. The
REAL  LIVE ACTION
31 material that followed had a similar structure
that oscillated between the earthy and the
ethereal as the band, seemingly entranced
by their own melodies, gazed into their fret-
boards, sticks, and microphones as the tempestuous crowd bobbed and swayed to each
song.
Next up was Whitney K, a local outfit
that seems to specialize very generally in
punk-infused anthemic ballads, though their
style was pleasantly ambiguous throughout the performance. The audience, seemingly enjoying the sonic diversity, gleefully attempted to groove along to upbeat distorted strums, wild-west inspired rhythms,
and cacophonous bouts of feedback. Lead
singer Konner Whitney vacantly looked up
and to his left during much of the performance, as if trying to remember some tender memory from his past. He and the rest of
his band seemed eccentric yet subdued on
stage, which lent to their irresistibly enigmatic presence.
As Milk took to the stage, their involvement in the local scene was immediately
apparent through the many affirmative and
oddly personal shouts that erupted from
the crowd, many of which singer Thomas
Lougheed answered, directly or otherwise-
he even sent out a birthday wish to "Jess"
halfway through the performance. Though
Lougheed's banter between songs was
quite common, he and the rest of the band
became completely involved in their music
when the time came, performing their laid-
back, wistful rock with a dedicated and commendable tunnel vision. Their music possessed a seductive honesty, tinged with
the rawness of Lougheed's voice and guitar
playing as he occasionally burst into respective shouts and feedback-saturated solos.
Last to play was new wave artist Gal
Gracen, whose music was unfortunately
played to a far less substantial crowd due to
the event's late start. Gracen's songs were
a perfect finish to the evening, tinged with
a classic new wave bounciness that stirred
the crowd one last time before we all went
home with smiles on our faces, happy to
have spent our Friday night well.
—Mat Wilkins
TYSEGALL8THE
MUGGERS/CFM
JANUARY 22 / VOGUE THEATRE
By the time Ty Segall walked on stage with
his most recent backing group, The Muggers,
on the night of his sold out Vancouver show,
the Vogue had been packed for nearly two
hours in anticipation.
Openers CFM (featuring long-time Segall
cohort Charles Moothart) played a decent
set of simple, rowdy rockers. Though the
band far from re-invented the wheel musically, their familiar sound was received positively by the increasingly dense crowd.
Segall took the stage wearing the same
creepy baby mask that adorns the cover of
his most recent album Emotional Mugger
before playing most of that album's songs
over the first half of his band's tight, 90 minute set. Conspicuously absent even during
older songs, were Segall's trademark guitar
heroics, as Segall — a notorious feedback
hound — instead tried his hand at playing
Traditional Rock Frontperson, sans axe, for
the entire show.
His five-piece band ably handled all aural
duties, noisy and otherwise. The hundreds of
teenage fans at the front of the stage didn't
seem to mind Segall the Singer a bit, erupting every time he pointed at them or stuck
his mic into the audience. Such appeals
were likely a bit obvious to jaded concert
vets looking for a new experience.
Clearly, though, Segall just wasn't cater-
32
REAL  LIVE ACTION ing to older folks or long-time fans. Instead,
he spent the set focused on the younger
crowd; those who will be with him into the
future starting now. And really, even if his1,
masks and moves were fairly stock in the
grand scheme of calculated rock theatrics,
he executed all of it with awesome confidence and clearly had a great time performing — an indication that the show looked and
sounded exactly the way that Segall meant
for it to. If the show did not provide revelatory
moments that many fans and critics seem to
attribute to Segall's gigs and albums, it still
reaffirmed his reputation as a reliably solid
rock performer and songwriter.
—Dave Snider
MAJICAL CLOUDZ
/ SHE-DEVILS /
BOOKER TON ACID
JANUARY 22 / THE IMPERIAL
Majical Cloudz's show, bumped up from
the Cobalt to a sold-out Imperial, captivated.
In tow with close-knits Booker T on Acid and
She-Devils, the three acts were held together by a shared conceit. Each drew listeners,
held tight by spectacle and a venue at full
capacity, into worlds with fraying seams, with
voices in fingers that play with these seams,
or jab at them with white-knuckled fists.
Booker T on Acid, who made their live
debut here, are a project channeling Booker
T through psychedelic pastiche. Matt
Padadopoulos and Curtis Holland (though
JJJ, a producer with the band, substituted
for Holland on this night) were worlding in an
off-kilter sense. Think beach carnivalesque:
Tom Recchion's melting tape loops, optimism punctuated by collapsing jazz instru-
mentals, blown out samples. The evening's
surrogate singer kept it regular, with a laconic poise admitting a smidge of tongue-in-
cheek to the viewers — numbered around
20 at this point, each at far ends of the room.
Luckily BToA's music is conducive to feeling
as if it's being listened to by no one in particular. It's fun house hauntings occupying
a ballroom with funereal motifs on the wall:
two men on stage beside an invisible organ,
vacillating between ascetic fervour and cool
composure. They handled the crowd (lack
thereof) perfectly.
Further emphasizing Majical Cloudz's partiality, fellow friends of the band, She-Devils,
debuted in Vancouver for a gathering audience. Carrying on BToA's undercurrent of
nostalgia and menace, She-Devils actively
plied the razor's edge between Audrey Ann's
coy imperiousness and Kyle Jukka's fucked
REAL  LIVE ACTION
33 '60s surf-pop loops. Ann's ability to slide into
the creaks and rattles of her otherwise powerful voice, over hypnotic repetition, allowed
her to creep between chanteuse superego
and id in the course of a song, made explicit
with bursts of noise from Jukka. The sound
was wonderful: in the Imperial's enclosure of
smoke and bodies, samples of vinyl crackle
broached the link between dream nostalgia
and analog's reminder of physicality.
Distinguishing themselves from the opening acts, Majical Cloudz's minimalism is
non-referential. The emotive punch of Devon
Welsh's lyrics and Matthew Otto's production
are paeans to emotion meets street reportage. Spartan arrangements, in that roomless space, emerged with such dense affect
so as to communicate worlds immediately.
Otto's single notes had a punctual oomph,
whereas warped ambience —- and even
surges of noise — were warm, vulnerable.
Welsh's voice, resonant and straightforward, was a highlight. When Welsh
screamed, startling hundreds, it was unassuming, without the pretense of Byronic
mania. His high baritone was pliant, soaring
in an emotionally mature way, never maudlin. His falsetto was sobering, his lyrics matter-of-fact over the waves of synth and insistent beats. Welsh's physical performance,
pointed stances and stilted rhythmic motions
belied the typical spectator-stage relationship. Awkward banter and miscalculations
(three songs left, or is it five?) came off like
nods to the absurdity of bedroom-pop for a
large venue.
As such, unlike other sculptors of light
and dark, Majical Cloudz seemed uninterested in actively characterizing their persona. Live, the duo channelled the rapport of
musicians tuned into one another towards
their audience, as amenable acquaintances.
Given the saturation of strangers, the haze
between one another and the band ahead
of us, it was likely the truest kindness to
commit.
—-Jonathan Kew
!!!
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder
Magazine and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in
advance to Robert Catherall, Real Live Action Editor at
rla.discorder@citr.ca.
34
REAL  LIVE ACTION THE LIDO
•FREE SHOWS • NICE VIBES
mh. PSYCHEDELIC NEIGHBOURHOOD PUB^
/// k©©k*helfdo®gmail,<0m
V" 518 E. BROADWAY
)))
\;W mos\<?. \&oy*> wet
r?
lsi.*J:
■ I ■ • 1 * I ••Tf,*tl
sin
1660 EAST BROADWAY
H FEBRUARY
M      HIGHLIGHTS
^^2            WWW.RIOTHEATRETICKETS.CA
•
IJI   FEB
|4
PAUl ANTHONY'S
TAIENT TIME
8TH ANNIVERSARY LOVE FEST
(FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTHJ)
I  FEB
H5
HAIDA GWAII:
ON THE EDGE OF THE WORIO
m
FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA'S
APOCALYPSE NOW
TROPIC THUNDER
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
■   FEB
16
OSCAR-NOMINATED ANIMATED FEATURE
BOY AND THE WORLD
THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH
LABYRINTH
THE ROCKY HORROR
PICTURE SHOW   ,
ALL AGES WELCOME IN THE IAICONY!
I   FEB
Ej7
SUPER BOWL 50!
FREE SCREENING AND PARTY
|J|   FEB
19
ANNIE HALL
SECRETARY
I   FEB
P| TO
THE FICTIONALS COMEDY
CO. PRESENTS
IMPROV AGAINST
HUMANITY
"CUPID'S REVENGE"
|^^J   FEB
SAY ANYTHING...
THE GENTLEMEN HECKLERS PRESENT
THE NOTEBOOK
■   FEB
H12
CASABLANCA
AMEUE
ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF
THE SPOTLESS MIND
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
■   FEB
Dl3
VALENTINE'S WEEKEND PICK!
BURIESQUE DUOS
I   FEB
H19
THE WICKER MAN (2006)
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
■   FEB
0326
HAUSU (1977)
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE
I   FEB
128
THE RIO'S ANNUA!
OSCAR PARTY!
LIVE AND FREE ON OUR BIG SCREEN
I
^HH  MAR
Ml
THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW
A LIVE
DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS
COMEDY EXPERIENCE!
#DNDLIVE
■  MAR
pi 4
GUMMO
FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE SIMM
TUES.
WED.
The Soft Moon, Left Spine Down,
Koban 0 Venue
Like a Rolling Stone: an Exhibition
About Rock and Rock e Charles H.
Scott Gallery
2-23
Black history month ® Vancity
Theatre
WORKSHOP: MUSIC
PHOTOGRAPHY W/ RICK\
CASTANEDO ♦ K0NSTAN1
PRODANOVIC @ CITR
(MEMBERS-ONLY)
10
WORKSHOP: MUSIC FEATURES W/
ANDREA WARNER @ CITR (MEMBERS-
ONLY) J . x
art rock? @ Astoria |
..,. i
DISCORDER 1
+ FEB ISSUE
LAUNCH @
LIDO
WORKSHOP: ALBUM REVIEWS W/
ANDREW RYCE @ CITR (MEMBERS-ONLY)
Animal Teeth (WPG), Smoke Eaters,
Fuzzy P, Kiso-lsland © "redbell pepper" or
ask around
Dr. Sketchy's Anti Art School © Hot Art
Wet City
17     U~
Bright Moments Serie
Ches Smith, Craig Tab
Matt Maneri ® Wester
Front
24
Cradle of Filth, Butch*
Babies, Ne Obliviscarii
Rickshaw
WORKSHOP: LIVE SHOW
REVIEWS W/ ALAN RANI
CITR (MEMBERS-ONLY)
illustrations by Alicia Lawrence
^ppl
* THUR.
Julia Holter. Circuit
I Des Yeux 0 Cobalt      ^:ft:o
Versing, Milkj^florse^icords
Dralms, Mu © Fox Cabaret
Machine Girl, Matt Tecsbn\DJ Bloody
Sunday, Ridylan, Neon Annex, Senpai
Suicide Club © 333
GIRLBOY: InBetween © The Tdast Collective
Pierce Jordan: Winter Artist in Resjjdertce
Launch © Make \    \
X \
Scrivener's Monthly; Charles Mudedi© V
Western Front \     %
18-28 \    \
Talking Stick Festival © various locations \
25
FUNDRIVE!
thirstDays: Cease Wyss + Aaron Rice (VIVO
event) © Native Education Centre
Movie Night; The Act Of Killing © Red Gate
Trash Talk ~ Mini Indoor Ramp Skate Demo
Party ©Venue
Now 2015; Women's Open Mic Night ©
Hatch Art Gallery (
FRI.
jo passed, Gal Gracen, Supermoon,
Swim Tearu^ Red Gate
Lie, Courtroom, Swim Team, Vacant
Life © "That Red Place"
Sumac, ENDON, Black Spirituals,
Molton Lava © Biltrnore
Sissy. Spacek, Leather, Burrow Owl,
PUPQPIPI © Aik a Oueer Punk
Jenn Grant, Joshua Hyslop © Fox
Cabaret
/
FUNDRIVE!
W
/ /
SAT.
■
Parquet Courts, Dumb 0 Rickshaw
Nev/Sw/ars, Skinny Kids, Low Levels,
Dr;edput#333
V
i
27
FUNDRIVE1
Black Wizard w/ Mot Generator,
Anciients, Waingro and Man The Wolf
0 Rickshaw
*#-• MAGGIE BOYD
A DISCORDER ART PROJECT    under revi&tv
rn&uwmM am toh scale
Nap Eyes
Thought Rock Fish Scale
(Paradise of Bachelors)
In less than a minute of listening to
opener, "Mixer," you can tell that Nigel Chapman's (the songwriter, lead singer and guitarist of Nap Eyes) favourite Velvet Underground
album is their 1969 self-titled release. In
many ways, the ethos of The Velvet's intimate
masterpiece is channelled via The Vaselines,
The Clean, The Shins and The Go-Betweens
in Thought Rock Fish Scale: a self-contained,
beautiful and understatedly smart album. In
fact, that ethos is captured quite well in lyrics
from album centrepiece "Alaskan Shake:"
"People recognize you in the night, they recognize you're wrong / They recognize you're
right, even when you feel wrong / It's the reason they listen when you make a song."
With those charming words (and many
others) Halifax's Nap Eyes cash in on the
promise of intelligent quiet rock songs with
glimmers of psychedelia drowned in Alexander Keith's that their debut Whine of the
Mystic gave us. However, Thought Rock Fish
Scale is a less rollicking, airier, and more
meditative affair than their debut. For their
sophomore release Nap Eyes traded in the
dark alleys of Montreal for the north coast of
Nova Scotia, where they recorded the entire
album live to four-track tape. And this is definitely an album that is shaped by its setting. It's
as if the sea breeze eroded away everything
superfluous and left us with a raw set of literate guitar pop songs.
In bringing these songs to life Chapman
is joined by fellow Haligonians — and members of Mint Records' signees Monomyth —
Josh Salter (bass), Seamus Dalton (drums)
and Brad Loughead (lead guitar). Together
these four musicians use negative space
and deceptively simple instrumentals to
build sonic settings where Chapman's lyrics
about friendship, self-doubt and self-discovery come to life. On the bass-driven, subtly
groovy "Don't be Right" Chapman doesn't
mince words singing "Don't be right — it isn't
good for you." Instead of being right Nap Eyes
strives to be true, whether it be in the cheekiest of lines like "The light is hot / Just like the
singers of our favourite bands" or in the recognition that "Sometimes, drinking, I don't know
my best friend from my best friend." After
32 minutes the album fades out with Chapman singing "Want you to trust, trust, trust,
trust me." And by the end of the album I do
.— Erik Coates
42
UNDER  REVIEW Les Chaussettes
Les Chaussettes
(Punk Fox)
You know that moment, normally reserved
for romantic films: where by some chance
encounter, as you're going about your daily
routine, fate forces your path to cross with
someone. Sparks fly, birds sing, it's magical
- or at least the movies paint it that way. Vancouver four-piece, Les Chaussettes, make
music to compliment moments like these.
Music that washes over you and leaves you
feeling all warm and fuzzy inside: the perfect
soundtrack to a piece of French New Wave
cinema. The Vancouver rain feels like a Parisian midsummer evening with this band in your
headphones.
The band creates this atmosphere
through exemplary musicianship. The way the
swirling guitars intertwine with the bassline,
the vocal harmonies on "Don't Leave Your
Lover," shows a mastery of songwriting rarely
seen from DIY bands in a fledgling stage of
their careers. It's impressive given that bassist Maria Turner only started playing the
four-stringed instrument when the band was
formed a little over two years ago.
Les Chaussettes is a collection of songs
with lyrics which are easy to connect with.
There are tales of troubled relationships, "I
cannot live without you / Come to me, come
to me" on stand-out track "Come To Me." A
quirky twist on  heartache in  "Unrequited
Love" depicts the dilemma of fancying your
best friend's brother. The majority of listeners will have had similar experiences. It is a
showcase of how to write good pop songs.
Before I continue to wax lyrical about
what Les Chaussettes have created, it is
clear from listening to Les Chaussettes that
the band is not completely comfortable with
being pigeon-holed. The EP opens with "Triple Water," which is bookended by a thudding distorted bassline and a scuzzy guitar
solo. On "Russian Boy" the chorus is chanted
"Russian Boy! /Don't you want to party
more?" along with a Carlos Santana-esque
guitar solo thrown into the mix. These elements surrounding the brilliant songs are a
red herring more than anything, suggesting to
the listener that the infectious indie-pop is not
what defines the band.
Don't get me wrong, it isn't. But that
being said, the overall effect you get is that
warm blanket feeling. It seems to me that Les
Chaussettes need to be more comfortable
with writing these sexy pop songs. They're
very talented musicians and should wear their
hearts on their sleeves.— Sachin Turakhia
fwO
\ /i
1: *
^a|
^31
lILvJI
m
■    V
lilll
She-Devils
She-Devils
(Self-Released)
In the music video for "Come," the opening track of their self-titled EP, She-Devils
introduce themselves perfectly. The pastel
UNDER  REVIEW
43 pink hues and low contrast is reminiscent of
Wes Anderson and David Lynch; it's all too
easy to imagine Audrey Home seductively
swaying to their retro-sonic sound.
She-Devils is an admirable first release
from the Montreal-based duo of Audrey Ann
and Kyle Jukka, a collection of three tracks
that are a mishmash of contemporary techniques and vintage sounds, creating a sense
of timelessness. This mix should come as no
surprise, considering they're a sample-based
group, picking and choosing sounds from
bygone eras and spinning it into their own
brand of dreamy, lo-f i pop.
Returning to the strongest song on the
EP, "Come" is downright enchanting. The title
suggests the song's simple, hypnotic mix of
steady riffs, the subtle beat, interspersed with
effects that could have come straight out of a
sci-fi movie. Ann's vocals take the forefront,
sweetly crooning tempting lyrics such as "Hey
baby come a little closer / There are things
I want you to hear," before seducing the listener with a reverb-laden repetition of the
song's title.
Departing from the upbeat afternoon
beach vibes of "Come" is "Where There's No
One," a lengthy six-minute track that could
have ended at four. The length, however,
creates a sense of drifting and meandering:
Ann laments "Please don't go away" over and
over, drawing out each syllable, almost singing at half-speed so it blends with the elongated, crackling sounds that accompany her.
Lastly is "I Wanna Touch You," which
sounds like a dreamy little trip under the sea
with the slightest mix of elevator music — in
a good way. It's a suitable way to end the EP,
holding onto the relaxed atmosphere of the
previous track while bringing back the tropical
edge of "Come."
With just three songs, She-Devils have
managed to create an entrancing and surreal
aesthetic journey. Close your eyes, give it a
listen and let yourself drift off into their retro
world.— Natalie Dee
Rooms
It Takes a Lot to Show Up
(Pretzel)
The driving guitar riff behind "It followed
us home" opens up a record that listens like a
sketchbook you take on a spontaneous road
trip up the rainy west coast in the middle of
winter: intimate, visceral, honest and almost
conversational. Its music notes and life notes
scrawled in lo-fi ink and minimalist guitar,
underlined by heavy bass lines and occasional smatterings of harmony. Makes sense:
Besh^le Caron (Rooms' mastermind) mentions on her CBC profile that the project is a
product of years of joumaling. She reflects on
the meaning of being a feminist, life epiphanies, and of course rising rental prices in her
native Vancouver (playfully poked at by the
short but lively track "Market value.") No wonder the album sometimes reads like introspective alleyway escapes.
Yes, it does "take a lot to show up," but this
relatably-titled album is not without its highlights. Two tracks struck me sharper than the
others, "Gossip Saves" and "We share a pay-
cheque." The former expresses what Caron
described on CiTR's Lady Radio (08/01/16)
as a theme of communication and miscom-
munication that the album is built upon. The
anxious strumming in this track suggests running thoughts and the idea that perhaps the
44
UNDER  REVIEW stuff we think people say about us is actually
what we think about ourselves. The title is
curiously counter-intuitive and spurs some
food for thought, which is left to the listener
who is told to "be brave" to mull over.
"We share a paycheque" is a reworking of
an earlier song performed by Caron's previous project We Make Earthquakes. Whereas
that recording of the track is an acoustic miniature, Rooms' version underlines the track
with a more desperate bass line. And rather
than a relaxed steel-string, a hypnotic electric
guitar riff is the hooking motive that accompanies the rather relatable opening; "There
might be a boulder on my shoulders."
With clean rhythms and simple motifs,
Rooms' debut tape is musically understated, but not lyrically so. Parts of it are like
unexpectedly valuable ramblings you'd discover in a conversation with a buddy. If you
hunt around, you'll find that Rooms is only
one of Caron's many projects, and the introspective, stream-of-thought approach to writing in this release suggests that this is one is
one room of many.— Charmaine Li
Cindy Lee
Act of Tenderness
(ccqsk)
Space is goddamn expensive in Vancouver, so it's rare to hear it on tape. Laptop
electronica and close-mic'd punk are easy
because they can be recorded on 50 square
feet of anything. But music that breathes —
outside of a soft-panelled recording studio or
a grandparent's basement —- is pretty hard to
find.
Cindy Lee's second album, the follow-up
to 2012's Tatlashea cassette, captures the
contours of a, particular space so precisely
that a forensic detective could probably trace
its reverberations back to an exact point of
origin (something they probably should do,
given that the album cover looks like it was
clipped from the centrefold of a serial killer's
biography). The album has a sublimely eerie
ambience, conjuring abandoned rail yards
and subterranean tunnels. Or maybe it's just
a spoooky digital effects plugin.
Either way, Act of Tenderness is a dark
and mesmerizing album, and a great use of
space, filled with haunting ballads and "European Son"-edged guitar horror. Originally
available for free download through songwriter/performer Patrick Flegel's gif-spangled
geocities website (good choice for a throwback medium), the album is a harrowing affair
that plays like an emotional vivisection of its
creator.
Flegel, formerly of Canada's much-loved
all-male band Women, takes the best and
most baroque melodic ideas from that project
and creates a starkly beautiful record, featuring dense lo-fi vocal harmonies that would
almost recall The Microphones if they weren't
infused with such a woebegone late 50s/early
60s feel (think The Fleetwoods or The Paris
Sisters, with a touch of Tiny Tim when Flegel's falsetto reaches the upper end of his
register).
Act of Tenderness exists in a pocket
universe of mournful lovers spurned ("Last
Train's Come and Gone"), exiled ("Wandering and Solitude") and otherwise vulnerable (the nearly acapella and exceptionally
heart-wrenching "Power and Possession" is
a standout track). Interspersed among these
obsidian-hued ballads are an equally effective set of guitar-frenzied noise bursts, while
UNDER  REVIEW
45 the screeching violence of "Bonsai Garden"
and the feedback-laden "Miracle of the Rose"
bring all the more gravity to the album's fragile moments.
Flegel's vocals are pitch shifted into a
mutated croon on the drum machine-led
"Operation," the album's most club-ready hit.
It's the perfect left turn located right the middle of an album by turns romantic and sinister.
The melody haunts my reverie, indeed.
— Patrick Geraghty
Marlaena Moore
Live at Wunderbar
(Sweety Pie Records)
Sometimes it can be as simple as a guitar and a voice. Edmonton native Marlaena
Moore proves just that. Her 2014 debut record, Beginner shows the versatility and depth
that can come with her enrapturing indie-
folk music. But Moore's latest release, Live
at Wunderbar strips down her songs to their
bare and beautiful bones.
Recorded at her October 7th set at
Wunderbar in Edmonton, the eight song performance rarely falls short of astounding. With
only a lone electric guitar as accompaniment,
Moore's voice and lyrics take centre stage.
Plunging directly into her most private
thoughts, Moore's lyrics equip her songs
with an emotional directness that demands
the attention of anyone listening. With lines
like "I can't stop looking at myself through
you/ Every single thing I do is all for you"
appearing within the first half of the first song
on the record, there's no wonder that not a
single sound from the audience can be heard
outside of the enveloping applause between
songs. Moore's music captivates.
Marlaena Moore is working in an already
established genre, with a slew of similar singer-songwriters gaining significant popularity in
recent years: Angel Olsen, Waxahatchee and
most recently Julien Baker, among others.
However, there is a magic in her music that
other artists in the same vein have yet to
attain.
Her songs start simply and take off. The
only song from her debut record, "Unsafe,
Unsure," begins in a sparse, slow waltz. But
as it moves on, her voice climbs upward in
volume, register and intensity, until finally, she
drops any coherent words in favour of a primal howl that ends the song.
Over the course of seven songs, and
nearly forty minutes of her unrestrained vocal
outpour, Moore ends the night and the record on a strained note. Her eighth and final
song, a cover of The Replacements' 1984
song "Androgynous," reminds the listener that
this is a live album, and people are not invincible. While Moore attempts to uphold the
level of intensity that spans the rest of the record, her voice just doesn't seem to be able
to make it. Her voice crumbles into grating
shouts, strained and painful sounding at their
peaks, exhausted and broken at their lows.
But it's a live record. It can't all be perfect.
— Jasper D Wrinch
46
UNDER  REVIEW Clusters
Teeth EP
(Self-Released)
Clusters is your next door neighbour
who drives his offspring around in a minivan,
wears sweater vests to Sunday service and
loves having his wife walk all over his naked
body in 5 inch leather boots while she yanks
the chain attached to his nipple clamps. What
I mean is that Clusters is a prototypical punk
band that also likes to get a little weird (musically, that is).
Formerly known as Sex Cult, the Montreal
band has released one other EP and a couple
singles, adopting a typical punk DIY ethos
and sound. Fortunately, the music escapes
antiquation thanks to a sprinkling of more
modern punk influences. The band's newest
EP, Teeth showcases their affinity for genre
experimentation.
Teeth opens with "Inquiline," a punch-
drunk track with choppy, yet interesting time
signature changes. Despite being only 0:53
seconds long, the track explores a few different paces and riffs. "Inquiline" is the musical
equivalent of "The Scrambler" at the PNE. It
shakes your skull like it's a goddamn rattle.
Clusters' fantastic musical experimentation is highlighted on the track "S.Y.P."
The abruptly placed breakdowns bring to
mind anti-music grindcore heroes, The
Locust."S.Y.P" is especially evocative of "A
Nice Tranquil Thumb In The Mouth" on The
Locust's self titled album. Clusters, while
more palatable than the Locust, push the limits of genre much the same way.
It's not surprising that the band expressed
their admiration for Death Grips, another
envelope pushing artist with a cult following.
Undoubtedly, Teeth's sound fits within classic
definitions of hardcore thanks to aggressive,
raspy vocals and gritty recordings. However,
when we examine the EP's creative composition and shifting time signatures it is clear
that Clusters' also takes cues from bands that
lay outside the realm of hardcore. The result
is an EP that sounds classic without being
mind numbingly overdone.
Unfortunately, the achilles heel of Teeth is
"Ants." This track lacks the emotional friction
that the rest of the EP so expertly generates,
due in part to the sample of someone saying "the most beautiful things I've seen in my
life are because I was on acid." It's a juvenile attempt to seem intelligent or enlightened.
Despite this minor weakness, Teeth remains
an impressive EP from a band that plays loud
and plays weird.— Bridget Gallagher
ghosting
Telenights
(Adhesive Sounds)
It's tempting to place g h o s t i n g's
Telenights somewhere on the vaporwave
spectrum. Some of the elements are there:
UNDER  REVIEW
47 an obsession with late-80s, early-90s kitsch
seems to be the driving force. But while many
vaporwave projects evoke a pastel-tinged
consumerist cyber-utopia beyond time and
place, ghosting has created something grittier, weirder and hyper-local.
On Telenights, VHS audio is pitch and
tempo-shifted, cut up and generally fucked
with. Announcers' voices become extraterrestrial dictations. Throwaway jingles take on the
sobriety of Gregorian chant. And the programming is constantly changing, as though
a kid with a short attention span has control
of the remote — although the transitions are
more calculated: something like a mixtape
tribute to rabbit ears.
Telenights1 real strength is in how it hones
in on juicy bits of pop and jazz, then warps
them to exploit their appealing qualities. On
"Telemiracles," a Casio bassline turns lugubrious and doom-filled. With "Late Movie,"
the percussion on a muzak track becomes
infectious. But in other places there are lo-fi
mutations: on "Wavelength," the analog ambience of a nighttime forest is degrades and
becomes ASMR-inducing.
The best are those chunks of music that,
through heavy processing and their own
inherent charms, possess emotional affect.
The listener might find themselves entranced
by a cheesy sax solo turned tragic lament,
only to suddenly discover that the sample
belongs to an advertisement for frozen french
fries, or to be informed that "the night belongs
to Michelob."
Telenights fails when the manipulation
of vocal tracks become self-indulgent. The
warped male-female dialogue of "Cathode
Girl" is presumably played for laughs, but
lands flat. Yeah, slowing down vocals from
bad TV shows makes them sound funny. But
such samples are already liberally employed
to break up sections of music and set the
theme for tracks. The real pleasure comes
from hearing throwaway kitsch transformed
by g h o s t i n g's touch.
What will stand out most of ail to listen
ers in Canada, BC specifically, are ghosting's
samples. The Blue Jays get name-dropped,
as do CHEK TV and Richmond Toyota.
Makes sense: ghosting is based in Vancouver. It's a break from the spaceless/timeless Utopia explored (and criticized) by many
vaporwave artists, a suggestion of a real
paradise that should be embraced. And it isn't
far away: just a few decades in the past, humming muffled from your parents' living room,
while you hover at the edge of sleep.— Bryce
Warnes
LNDNDRGS
Aktive
(Fools Gold)
Although G-funk has been mostly abandoned since the '90s, LNDN DRGS re-introduces the classic sound into their new
mixtape, Aktive. The duo consisting of Vancouver producer Sean House and Compton
rapper Jay Worthy have made a record to
bring us back to the glory days of Warren G
and Snoop Dogg. In fact, Aktive's coyer was
sketched by Joe Cool, the same man who
brought us the iconic album art for Snoop's
1993 classic, Doggystyle. Like many rappers
of that era, this duo has painted a self-indulgent portrait of the pimp lifestyle.
Throughout the album, LNDN DRGS flesh
out the context of the project with spoken samples woven into the songs. They present the
48
UNDER  REVIEW confidence of hustlers and pimps, and their
shameless means of making a living. These
snippets add some texture to the album, and
gave me an idea of what I was getting into
from the first listen. The album falls under the
'women, money and drugs' rap archetype, so
don't expect heavy introspection.
Regardless, I enjoyed Jay's laid-back
cadence. When spitting in a similar manner,
other rappers sound uninspired and fail to
convince. Worthy's chill flow stays entertaining throughout. Songs like "Susan" had me
hooked from the first listen, with an alluring
blend of quick, slapping guitar riffs and soulful synths. Jay outdoes himself with hard-hitting wit throughout the album, particularly on
the tracks "Choose Up" and the title song,
"Aktive." Jay has no problem getting outrageous bars stuck in your head. You'll be getting weird stares for mouthing his lyrics in
public. Also, the late A$AP Yams appears on
a few tracks so you can catch some of his last
unheard verses.
This unique, stylish tape is better suited
for jamming out and catching a good groove
than it is for stimulating conversation on the
hustling lifestyle. Though the album is somewhat one-dimensional, it plays to its strengths
tastefully. The soulful samples and occasional
sax solos contrast the simple lyrical content
quite well, and there's not much to complain
about. As for Sean House, it will be interesting to see what he will be doing with his sound
on the duo's next project.— James Shaw
Ian William Craig
Cradle For Hie Wanting
(Recital)
Cradle For The Wanting, Ian William
Craig's second release on Recital, is the
musical equivalent of several Jackson Pollock paintings layered on top of one another.
Using tape loops and a microphone, Craig
composes beautiful, desperately deep tracks
that flutter between natural and synthetic.
Unlike his 2014 Recital release, A Turn Of
Breath, Cradle was recorded in a single season and without instrumentation aside from
Craig's operatic voice.
"Doubtshapes" begins with cues from
Stars Of The Lid and their swelling sounds
before becoming increasingly chaotic and
noisy, and sets a trend for the gentle volumes
and clipping distortion that grow into themes
over the course of the record. Although Craig
is known for his avant-garde performances
and cryptic, sometimes challenging, structures, Cradle compounds his experimentation
into almost traditional sonic arrangements.
The very particular aesthetic of Ian William Craig's art is as present, and as finely-tuned as ever. A warm, ever-fuzzy flutter
is blanketed over every track from his signature reel-to-reels, and channels frequently
and intentionally clip into refracting patterns
of noise. The range of sounds that his opera-
trained vocals can emulate is impressive —
UNDER  REVIEW
49 and even while singing at his most articulate,
different tones erupt as the loop recycles over
the tape heads again and again.
Cradle For The Wanting is Ian William
Craig at his most graceful. While seemingly
intentionally stripped-back, this is Craig in his
most immediate recorded form yet. In some
ways, it seems like the "solo" record to A Turn
Of Breath's ensemble appearances, but the
bareness here only reveals more intimacy.
— Fraser Dobbs
vv*
:    :
V
!i!i!l:!?P
Daniel Caesar
Pilgrims Paradise
(Self-Released)
Daniel Caesar combines individual affinity
with spiritual pondering on his latest release,
Pilgrim's Paradise. This isn't the young Toron-
tonian's first rodeo, who put out Point Break
back in 2014: his debut EP, which was met
with great praise. Pilgrim's Paradise is seven
tracks' worth of serenading and a surprisingly
eclectic nr|ixture of genres. While Caesar's
work is rooted in R&B, Pilgrim's Paradise dips
ambience and rock to affirm his tremendous
capacity as an artist.
Caesar's gospel roots pump through the
bloodstream of Pilgrim's Paradise. Caesar's
voice is captivating as he maintains utter control over every note; reminiscent of Frank
Ocean. On "A Capella," Caesar's voice is
superimposed onto itself, echoing  like a
church choir, while "Show No Regret" begins
with the sounds of the church organ. Caesar's
father was a notable gospel singer and the
smooth textures and spiritual references on
the album reflect this influence.
In a bold move, Caesar takes on Kanye
West's "Streetlights" and refashions it into
his own version, "Streetcar." It's not easy
for a young artist to follow in the footsteps
of one of hip-hop's greatest narcissists, but
Caesar pulls it off impeccably. However, the
most noteworthy track on Pilgrim's Paradise
is "Death & Taxes," which best embodies
the juxtaposition between the spiritual realm
and the stark realities of life that is present
throughout the whole album. The song has a
ballad-like feel that hypnotizes listeners with
Caesar's mystical vocals, while the potency
of each instrument is felt.
Pilgrim's Paradise is somewhat autobiographical, combining elements of his religious
upbringing (which he has since detached
himself from) and his subsequent struggles
to find himself in the world. The intro to the
album, "Trinity Bellwoods" is bare and simple,
with simple sounds of the outdoors. Caesar
has stated that Trinity Bellwoods is the name
of a park in which he spent a few nights while
he was homeless. In this sense, Pilgrim's
Paradise gives the impression that music is a
healthy form of catharsis for Caesar. The dramatic course his life has taken in the past few
years reflects itself in his songwriting and his
growth as an artist. Lyrically, Caesar still has
some maturing to do, as he could add some
linguistic variation to his song-writing. However, Caesar's brilliant musicality and captivating voice are enough to make him one of
Canada's most promising R&B musicians.
— Alex Lenz
50
UNDER  REVIEW Sabertooth
Spaces Between
(Debt Offensive)
A flash of light and then a brief darkness. The pupils are dilated and the vision is
blurred. A strange "thock" sound still jumps on
the eardrum — dizziness. This is a real punch
to the head and Calgary's Sabertooth shows
no remorse for it. Spaces Between is a deliberate blow in cold blood.
Everything's loud, out of breath. Lusting
after electricity, strings vibrate so fast that
they're close to sublimation. It's hard not to
imagine steel-coated scratches on the guitarists' fingertips and peeled skin molecules
intertwined with the wires. Breakneck, self-
aware tunes, spilt all over the place, consciously repeat themselves to the point where
every song brings out the same atmosphere;
lightly differentiated versions of deranged
chords and drum beats.
There aren't any spaces between the
tracks and the listener for mental decompression and bodily recovery, except for
the first few seconds of "Spaces Between,"
"Contusions" and "Seawater" where hints of
a refreshing twist interrupt the frenetic monotony. In total, 72 seconds of a tacit promise that Sabertooth have the urge and ability to experiment further and produce music
that will grow in character without denying its
roots. Although infused with these scintilla
tions of future excitement, Spaces Between
is all that "clone destination" punk can mean:
every song takes you to the same place by
a used car, following the same course to the
highway and turning to the same exit. Even
the pissed-off, frenzied vocals cannot make
up for it.
Why do they shout? Who do they want to
wake up? Spaces Between is both a question and an exclamation mark." Freaking out
/ freaking out" still echoes like trying to ease
a prolonged teenage angst. It's a challenge to
admit the existence of melody — maybe you'll
need 2 or 3 playbacks if you're in a bad mood.
But truth is the more you listen to it, the more
you discover its predictable earworm quality.
Surprisingly their predictability rubs
against Keith Caves' fascinating cover art
which actually uncovers our potential of an
unmaterialistic greatness and the cost to
acknowledge and reach it. No pain, no gain
after all. Rebels should have a cause. Sabertooth may have found their own inside Calgary's sterile urbanity that indulges conservatism. And progressive rebels need challenging instrumentation. As an affirmation of
their iconoclastic artistry, I expect Sabertooth
someday to break their own rules and risk a
re-coded guitar distortion.— Theano Pavlidou
!!!
To submit music for review consideration in Discorder
Magazine and online, please send a physical copy to
the station addressed to Jon Kew, Under Review Editor
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver BC, V6T1Z1. Though our contributors prioritize
physical copies, you may email download codes to
underreview.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums
sent prior to their official release dates.
UNDER REVIEW
51 LOOK AROUND, BABYSITTER
GENERATION GAP
words by Daniel Geddes
illustration by Cristian Fowlie
What is it that makes music radical?
Some music, like Run-D.M.C, Miles Pavis's
Kind Of Blue, or the Ramones' first endeavors into buzzsaw punk come from radical
origins, but are gradually assimilated into
the culture until it is hard to hear them
that way. You have to remind yourself that
this music initially sounded wild or mysterious, and represented an alternative to
everything that was around at the time.
Many sounds that were initially jarring, like
the punk played by the Ramones, eventually wind up as whole genres of music, and
are subjected to endless rehashing until
they no longer have much semblance of
the novelty or charm that once made them
so pleasurably unique. Other times, a new
genre is created, but it doesn't seem to represent anything particularly novel, or anything that really opposes social or artistic
norms. Motley Crue's Too Fast for Love may
be a crucial album in the history of hair
metal, but who cares? On the other hand,
John Coltrane's late period albums like
On% and perhaps free jazz in general, still
sound oppositional. These sounds never
really entered the popular consciousness.
Still, it seems to me that novelty does not
necessarily make something radical. Some
52
GENERATION GAP music that is not exactly foundational,
nor makes any attempt to reinvent genre,
retains its radical qualities over time.
I thought about this recently as I was
listening to the new Beat Happening retrospective, Look Around. I got into Beat Happening as a teenager in the CD era. After
pirating the song "Godsend" through Napster, I saved my allowance and bought the
comprehensive career spanning box set,
Crashing Through. Looking back, it seems
like kind of a rash move to spend sixty dollars on a box set after hearing only one
song. But I loved the song, and I didn't
regret it. Their skeletal brand of pop contained both instantly hummable songs and
all of the mysterious vibes of home recording. I remember skipping school to lie on
the hardwood floor of my childhood home
to let my musical mind be rearranged.
Beat Happening didn't sound like
other music, and they still don't. Although
they employed the standard tools of rock,
it was their approach that yielded a singular return. By rejecting musical prowess like punks, but also macho posturing,
masculinity, and rock and pop star attitude, they created work that still sounds
radical in its humbleness, and still stands
outside the bounds of mainstream culture. They also spurned some of the
transgressive elements that were popular
in the counterculture at the time (some,
like Henry Rollins, seemed eager to brush
them off as "twee" or "cute"), which made
them rebels in all circles. Their minimal
approach to songwriting, magical melodic
sense, bizarre childlike energy, and subversive lyrical tendencies add up to what
I still regard as a distinct and peculiar
perspective.
While the work of Beat Happening
was radical because it personalized and
decontextualized traditional forms, some
music aligns itself with non-traditional
ideas  by  using  aesthetic  qualities  that
seem unlikely to be absorbed by the culture. It sets itself apart, like Coltrane. I
think that Babysitter's new self-titled 2015
album has some of the personalized weird -
ness that Beat Happening was dealing in,
while also using more abrasive qualities of
outsider music gone by to set itself apart.
These are disenfranchised anthems paired
with free jazz, no-wave inspired skronk-
ing and squelching. It varies from song to
song, but the overall intent is unmistakable; these people are not concerned with
the general acceptance of their music,
in the same way that the people who
developed these sounds weren't. The tones
of the record are menacing, absurdly hilarious, and nonsensical. This referencing
of atypical musical approaches and commitment to an energizing dichotomy of
brutish rockism and smart, jazzy musical
complexity make for a bracing concoction.
But it's a strange thing: in 2016, radical musicians can simply exist, build their
small audience, and lurk quietly in the
background. They won't be assimilated.
But with the liberty granted by the internet, they also don't have to confront anything in order to exist in the way that
Beat Happening did, as ambassadors of
the underground. Will radical musicians
just go about their business in bizarro
mini-utopias? Perhaps this is an effective approach, and perhaps this is how it
has always been. But it's still hard not to
affectionately regard the direct, roundly
confrontational work of music like Beat
Happening.
GENERATION  GAP
53 words by Jasper D Wrinch
photos by Evan Buggle
illustrations by Danielle Jette
"No one's ever going to name their label
Kingfisher Bluez, are they? Except for me,
I guess. I don't know any better," says Tim
Clapp, though he obviously has some idea
about what he's doing. He's clever. Enough
to choose a name he didn't think would
need to be formally registered for $150.
Owner, operator and mastermind behind
one of Vancouver's most prolific independent record labels, Kingfisher Bluez, Clapp
has managed to build up an impressive,
yet welcoming institution within the Vancouver music scene.
Inviting Discorder into his camperized
Ford Econoline to cruise across the city,
Clapp explains what it's like to run a record label, and how he's managed to release
music for an astonishing number of artists
in Vancouver.
Sitting in the driver's seat, Clapp
describes how he first got started releasing
music: "I moved to Vancouver nine years
ago, and I thought the music scene was so
hard to break into." But when he started
the label, he found that he could provide
a highly desirable service to musicians in
the city. "People embraced it right away. I
think at the time there was a real lack of
people supporting younger, up-and-coming artists." In order to get up and running, Clapp turned to his friends for
advice and assistance. He remembers, "I
just sort of asked around the people that I
knew." With help from Ryan Dyck, the man
L
54
HOMEGROWN  LABELS behind Hockey Dad Records, Kingfisher
Bluez began pressing records in 2011.
"If I ever get the FACTOR grant," explains
Clapp, "I've got to peel off a couple bills for
him right away."
And while many artists have released
music through Kingfisher Bluez, Clapp
also uses the label to put out his own records under the name Tim the Mute. "It's
a good way to trick people into listening
to my band, I guess." Having put out several of his own records, Clapp knows that
musicians are in it "because they need to
make music ... They wake up and breath
their next project. I definitely understand
that*
Kingfisher Bluez is an outlet for musicians to distribute their creations, not
necessarily an avenue to make a fortune.
"I know there's no money in it," says Clapp.
"I think the most I've ever been paid for a
Tim the Mute show was $60. There's three
people in my band, so I made a hard $20."
With music, and not money, being the
motivating factor in the label, artists have
to have something special to be a part of
Kingfisher Bluez. "There's a lot of bands
that are great and boring, and that's just
not for me," he explains. "I'm more interested in working with people who I think
are great people, who are making music
with the right motivations."
Whether it be artists asking him for
help in releasing music, or tracking down
bands he wants to work with, Clapp has
no trouble keeping busy releasing music.
In addition to the long list of LPs and
EPs put out by the label, Kingfisher Bluez
also has a singles club, a monthly 7" record featuring various artists on the label's
roster. "If you're ambitious enough to start
a DIY label, then you probably want to do
HOMEGROWN  LABELS
55 a singles club," says Clapp.
"It takes so long to get the records out
that I can't do it every year. I have to do it
every two years," he says. Even with a 6-8
month waiting period at some factories,
Kingfisher Bluez still manages to pump
out vinyl at a feverish pace. "There's lots of
music that I like," says Clapp, and therefore lots of music to release.
Kingfisher Bluez has put out records
for Xiu Xiu, Dada Plan, Needles//Pins,
Love Cuts, B-Lines, White Poppy, Dead
Soft, OK Vancouver OK, and Holy Hum,
just to name a few. According to Clapp,
"there's about 93 vinyl releases, including
the stuff that's just about to come out."
And with the label's prolific musical
output, it's no surprise that Kingfisher
Bluez finally takes its place among Dis-
cordefs   very   own   Homegrown   Labels.
"Every month I open Discorder to see if
I've been featured as a Homegrown Label,
and finally I get the chance. It's fantastic.
It feels as good as I thought it would," says
Clapp. "Hopefully you guys have got a good
photo of me."
For more information oh upcoming
releases through Kingfisher Bluez, or to
browse their online store visit kingfisher-
bluez.com, and follow the label on social
media.
56
HOMEGROWN  LABELS i A CEREBRAL DANCE
words by Natalie Dee // photos by Duncan Cairns-Brenner
"I LIKE TO LOOK FOR
CRACKS AMD FILL IN
WHAT'S NEEDED FOR THE
OVERALL EXPERIENCE."
"It wasn't ever really a choice, honestly," Michael Red professes over a glass
of wine at Cafe Kathmandu on The Drive
speaking to how he first got into music. I'm
lucky enough to have caught him despite
his busy schedule — he spent the afternoon DJ-ing at Fortune Sound Club, and
after our interview he's set to rush off to
another performance at the Rio. If his
prolific and lengthy career hadn't already
made it obvious, Red is someone who
keeps himself busy.
Red's passion for music and sound
is unquestionable — he fell naturally into
DJ-ing at a young age, surrounded by
friends with a shared interest in music
and amassing a vinyl collection that led
him to thinking, "I may as well start trying to mix them." Since that self-described
"accident," Red has gone on to participate in a multitude of projects, everything
from the dance-heavy DJ collective Lighta!
Sound, ambient sound-art project souns,
curator for New Forms Festival, and his
own record label low indigo, all while playing gigs and making tunes under his own
name in Vancouver and beyond, souns'
latest release, Ambient A, is ranking high
on CiTR's charts this year.
The project currently occupying Red
is 9 of cats, an EP coming this March from
low indigo, a collection of tracks that fall
somewhere in-between the spacey flows
of souns and his higher-energy dance
projects. It's something he describes as
"engaging on a spiritual or cerebral level,"
aligning itself with the motif of his label. It's
not quite 'sound art,' which Red considers
to be contextual and statement-making,
though it certainly shares some of those
qualities. None of it is his typical dance
music, either, Red himself is a little hesitant to label it at all, as he regards labels
as more of a "necessity" for his work to
become known.
Instead, Red uses words and phrases
such as "not straightforward," "purposeful," and "bits and pieces of various locations and left-field," to give an idea of
what 9 of cats is all about. It is dancefloor
friendly, but only in the right context — "it
would have to be pretty cerebral or late at
night ... it's more for conversation, some-
58
MICHAEL  RED thing you actually fully pay attention to."
To add to the sonic ambiances of the
EP, Red collaborated with artist Giorgio Magnanensi in an "effortless" process to create visuals for the album. There
are swirling neon patterns that gradually shift, taking the viewer through the
journey of each track. The day after Red
sent Magnanensi the tracks he received a
so-called 'test' video, but he thought Magnanensi had already "perfectly" captured
the feel of his music.
It isn't surprising that the two worked
so well together — both Red and Magnanensi split their time between the Sunshine Coast and Vancouver. After a first
failed move to the Sunshine Coast over ten
years ago, the failure due to lack of "col
lected inspiration," Red has now amassed
enough of that inspiration to head back.
City life winds him up — he uses the Sunshine Coast to "chill out." It's paid off, with
9 of cats coming together in "that shell and
quiet" that Red finds when he's away from
the city, his mind distanced from gigs and
networking.
The EP is intrinsically linked to Year's
End, a Bandcamp Red has set up to release
archival material. "9 of cats is a statement
of 'I'm very much active and this is where
I'm at now,'" Red clarifies, describing Year's
End as something more "personal and
intimate," the kind of music he'd play "if
someone were to come over to my house."
On a whole, the project is "more about the
space it's creating for what I have next to
MICHAEL  RED make and still acknowledging the value of
the stuff that's out there."
This build-up of material is a side
effect of Red's longevity and steadfast dedication to participating in and nurturing
Vancouver's electronic scene. He oversaw
events that were "essential to keeping the
scene alive," which paid off, as Red reports
how much traction and visibility he has
seen artists gaining in recent years. Now
he's taken a more hands-off approach,
placing well-earned focus on himself as
an artist and participant in the scene, as
opposed to an organizer.
Red's newfound space and time is
already being put to good use, even beyond
the 9 of cats EP. Up next are more releases
from Chambers, described by Red as "an
outlet for another pocket of music I make"
in collaboration with local musician and
artist Gabriel Saloman. Seattle's Debacle
Records is one of several labels that will
be releasing new Chambers. While his project with Saloman arose from a fortuitous
connection between mutual friends, low
indigo's Facebook group has also served
as a platform for networking — which,
apparently, is the norm for the page. A
new label called Subtempo Records will be
releasing a souns remix as a result of first
connecting with Red over Facebook. The
networking and art that can emerge from
a simple Facebook group is something that
Red is eager to see.
While Red is established in his community, it is obvious that he is still as intent
as ever on propelling electronic music for
ward in whatever way he can. "I like to
look for cracks and fill in what's needed
for the overall experience," Red says. "I feel
like I don't need to fly the flag for any particular sound or movement if other people
are flying that flag and providing that,
that's great, that gives me opportunity to
do something different, because there's
always something different."
Michael Red will be releasing 9 of cats
on low indigo this March. He has upcoming
releases on Modern Math, Babel, Dipped
andAufect To hear his music and find links
to other projects visit michael-red.com. or follow him on soundcloud.com/michaelred.
60
MICHAEL RED GIVE US MORE
UNDERGROUND VENUES
words and photos by August Bramhoff // illustrations by Alison Sadler
My best friend's mom moved to Vancouver in the late 1960s. She never came out
as a hippy, but we have the tie-dye dresses
and Iron Butterfly albums to prove it. Her
and her posse set up shop down the street
from the BC Sugar Refinery. I remember
her telling us a story of the police getting
a search warrant for her home because a
neighbour accused them of growing weed.
Turns out it was tomato plants giving off a
rank odour, but the message of 'tolerance'
got through. Decades before, rum runners
took refuge in alleys and building basements to set up speakeasies, which, echoing similar spaces today, were unlicensed
and subject to police raids. The spirit of
rebels past remain in the stone and dirt
as the underground club scene stakes its
claim hosting shows at 'illegal' venues,
committing both a public service and hazard to their own health.
As more and more of Vancouver's past
is torn down and commodified into condo
towers by developers with questionable
intentions, and crack and meth continues
to diminish public perception of East Hastings street, the fundamentals remain.
SRO's are still available for rent. People
don't have that much money. Status,
however, means nothing when it takes
grit to express yourself, and willingness
to take risks. There are committed individuals who see beyond this city's transformation to defiantly carve out affordable
and accessible spaces for musicians and
artists.
My friend's Mom said goodbye to the
refinery, the sunsets, and the DTES /
Chinatown long before I was born, and as
a kid in the sports-ridden mini-van saturated conformist suburbs, I craved the
space and opportunities that spaces like
Secret Location, The White Belt and The
UNDERGROUND VENUES
61 West Belt provided. Regardless of the generation, the desire to be a good host and
neighbour has always been at the forefront of the hidden clubs — so why do
the police repeatedly come a-knockin' with
bright flashlights and infractions checklists? Is the concept of people making art
rather than art for the people so intolerable (for those in office) that the idea must
be slaughtered? Do a different set of rules
apply for people with different income levels? Or is this merely a result of outdated
temperance society laws created in the
thick of WWI making today's venue organizers the bootleggers of the 2010s.
Last December a venue near the Balmoral Hotel was raided by police, who
apparently had no idea they were stepping
into a core venue of the Vancouver underground / indie scene. Facing serious fines
and possible jail time, the proprietor (who
wishes to remain anonymous, but we will
refer to as Proprietor X), decided to shut it
down, leaving the future of its operation
in question.
"The police showed up because someone was throwing shit off the roof near the
hotel [close by]. About 8 or 9 officers were
there; I was read the riot act, and told I
had committed a Federal offence," says X.
"Still, I think they were reasonable; they
told me they didn't really want to shut
down my party, but to just do it properly.
I think about that too...There was one
show where there was 400 people in 3,000
square feet and I was just thinking, 'What
if something happen?'"
It's no secret that not only are a majority of Vancouver's oldest buildings lining
the streets of Chinatown, Strathcona and
the DTES, but that they are also some of
the most dangerous buildings. Many of
these buildings have not seen upgrades in
a long time. No one has fun in an ambulance ride after having fallen through a
floor, but these buildings will continue to
be converted into cheap art spaces and
venues. What's preventing these buildings
from getting the needed support?
"[The main problem] has always been
that buildings that have a purpose other
than a full-time venue — such as studios, art galleries, or stores — would have
to either change their zoning or licensing
to be a venue, hall, or bar, which requires
lots of money and building upgrades ...or
[they] operate outside the law," remarks
one community organizer affiliated with
Horses Records. "The beauty of these
venues is that they operate outside of universal definitions, but that could also be
the biggest obstacle in obtaining legitimacy from the City ... If you really want to do
something badly enough you can do it. If
that means playing your first show with
an all-flute drone project to 5 people on a
Wednesday night, then we'll make it work."
Speaking to the need for more variety
of venues, Proprietor X noted, "I've had
people from all over the world tell me they
are allowed to [throw parties] where they
are from, and that Vancouver badly needs
these same kinds of spaces."
So in a city ripe with public art, such
as the Main Street Poodle, what attempts
at recognizing the local experimental arts
scene is the City of Vancouver taking?
"Recently (...) a program, [Arts Events
License] has been put into place which
allows for places like art galleries and
stores to host special events through a
different licensing program than a bar
or nightclub. This has been a major step m mi:
:    ■"',.'•  II
forward for the City." says the organizer
related to Horses Records. "[But] there
are still lots of things that can be worked
on. For example, only three licenses can
be issued per month, which correlates to
the number of liquor licenses the Province of BC will issue, but this doesn't take
into account all-ages events which don't
require a liquor license. Also, if there are
more than three events in a month, then
according to the City that equals one event
a week which means that it is not an 'occasional' use of the building, but a 'regular'
use."
In the interest of balance, Discorder
felt it was important to gather the City's
view on this, and contacted a representative of CoV Corporate Communications.
When asked what plans the City has to
work with the community and cut the red
tape, they responded by email addressing the Arts Events License Program directly: "It is important to note that the City
licences use of space. The program sets
minimum base life safety standards to
support occasional conversion of industrial, office and retail spaces for performances, safely and legally. The program is
designed to be user-friendly: one application, one licence, a lower fee ... The City
works with the Vancouver Police Department, Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services
and the Provincial Liquor Control Board to
ensure groups comply with regulations for
their event."
Whether the City's hand is guided by a
moral temperance that has morphed into
a slicked corporate stance is not the real
debate here; rather, what agenda is rendering experimental artists criminals, and
private spaces illegal? Like the hippies and
rum runners before them, illegal venue
organizers hear the beat of the people, not
politicians. Those who know this realise
that if all music is rendered into a placat-
able, controlled mechanism we lose the
elements which make it art — our selves.
If the artist is, in essence, to push boundaries and comforts, than being labelled as
outlaws by the City of Vancouver can be
the most legitimate honour they receive.
For more information about local underground venues, ask around. To research the
Arts Events License Program visit the City
of Vancouver website at vancouver.ca.
UNDERGROUND VENUES
63 THE
MASSACRE
ATHEATRESPORTS" FESTIVAL
VTSL TEAMS i INTERNATIONAL
JAN 27-FEB 6 : TEAMS FEB 9-14
THE IMPROV CENTRE, GRANVILLE ISLAND
jSfe,.
„ „ GRANVILLE ISLAND « «Jb« I      +* *+. M%
Gv^   ...<sl.„.   vtsi.com
LiveVan.com: Part of a network of concert calendars
completely updated and populated with details by
thousands of informed members of the music industry
Integrated with local profiles in the
Vancouver Musicians Directory
the CiTR Radio Sponsored
Vancouver Band Directory
- and the
Vancouver Music Service
8 Resource Directory
rehensive. Community Driven j
Study and |
GOABROADl
STUDY • TRAVEL • WORK • VOLUNTEER
THURSDAY
FEB 25
VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER
CONVENTION
CENTRE
3 pm - 7 pm
SEMINARS start at 2 pm
/w studyandgoabroad cc CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CITR EVERYDAY
■
MON
TUES
WED
THUR
FRI
SAT
SUN
■
6 AM
CITR GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICKIN*
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
6 AM
7 AM
MOON GROK
BEPICRESPAN
PRESENTS-
7 AM
MINDFUL MATTERS
8 AM
QUEER FM
SUBURBAN
VANCOUVER,
RIGHT?
THE SECTOR
8 AM
9 AM
BREAKFAST WITH
THE BROWNS
VANCOUVER:
RELOADED
JUNGLE
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
WIZE MEN
THE SATURDAY
CLASSICAL
CHAOS
9 AM
10 AM
A FACE FOR RADIO
STUDENT SPECIAL
HOUR
EDGE
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10 AM
ROCKET FROM
11 AM
UNCEDED
AIRWAVES
RUSSIA
THE REEL WHIRLED
THE CAT'S PAJAMS
11 AM
MORNING AFTER
SHOW
PETE'S PICKS
12 PM
SYNCHRONICS
THE
SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S
DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
THE ROCKER'S
SHOW
12 PM
1PM
PARTS UNKNOWN
SHINE ON
PERM
RAIN
RADIO
BVP
RADIO
STUDENT FILL-IN
FEMCONCEPT
POWER CHORD
1PM
2PM
ALBION
EXTRAENVIRO-
MENTALIST
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
RADIO ZERO
2PM
3PM
THE BURROW
RADIO FREE
THINKER
KEW IT UP
ASTROTALK
CODE BLUE
LA
FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
3PM
THUNDERBIRD EYE
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS
4 PM
LITTLE BIT OF
SOUL
VIBES & STUFF
ASIAN WAVE
STUDENT FILL-IN
4 PM
5 PM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
DISCORDER
RADIO
ARTS REPORT
ALL ACCESS PASS
NEWS 101
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6PM
SOULSHIP
ENTERPRISE
FLEX YOUR HEAD
SHARING SCIENCE
ARE
YOU
AWARE
UBC ARTS
LADY RADIO
NASHA VOLNA
CRESCENDO
6PM
SAMSQU
ANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
INNER
SPACE
PEANUT
BUTTER
N' JAMS
7PM
EXPLODING HEAD
UBC INSIDERS
NOD ON THE LIST
MORE THAN
HUMAN
7PM
TICK TALK
8PM
MOVIES
INSIDE OUT
SOUL SANDWICH
THE
SPICE
OF LIFE
NEW
ERA
AFRICAN
RHYTHMS
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8PM
9PM
CRIMES &
ALL EARS
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
SKALDS HALL
SYNAPTIC
BOOTLEGS &
B-SIDES
9PM
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
TREASONS
THE SCREEN
GIRLS
CANADA POST
ROCK
SANDWICH
TRANCENDANCE
10 PM
11 PM
WHITE NOISE
COPY/PASTE
THE MEDICINE
SHOW
11 PM
12 AM
RANDOPHONIC
12 AM
1AM
1AM
2 AM
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
THE LATE NIGHT
SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE
CITR GHC
2 AM
3 AM
ST MIX
3 AM
4 AM
INSOMNIA
4 AM
5 AM
5 AM ■ CARRIBEAN
SOCA STORM
SAT. 8(PM)
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers the latest SOCA
Music tracks out of the Caribbean. This party music
will make you jump out of your seat. This show is
the first of its kind here on CiTR and is the perfect
music to get you in the mood to go out partying!
Its Saturday, watch out STORM COMING!!!!
■ CHINESE/KOREAN
ASIAN WAVE
WED. 4(PM)
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the
best music from the Chinese language and Korean
music industries, as well the latest news coming from
the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop
scene. The latest hits from established artists, debuting
rookies, independent artists and classic songs from
both industries can all be heard on Asian Wave 101
as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of
unsigned Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
■ CINEMATIC
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
MON. 7(PM)
Join Gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes
from television and any other cinematic source, along with
atmospheric pieces, cutting-edge new tracks and strange
old goodies that could be used in a soundtrack to be.
■ CLASSICAL
CLASSICAL CHAOS
SUN. 9(AM)
From the Ancient World to the 21st century, join
host Marguerite in exploring and celebrating
classical music from around the world.
■   DANCE/ELECTRONIC
BOOTLEGS & B-SIDES
SUN. 9(pm)
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes
from soul to dubstep, ghetto funk to electro swing.
Nominated finalist for Canadian college radio show
of the year, 2012 Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards.
Soundcloud.com/doe-ran and search
"Doe-Ran" on Facebook.
COPY/PASTE
THU. 11(PM)
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full
hour DJ mix by Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud
rap to new jack techno and everything in between.
INNER SPACE
ALTERNATING WED. 6:30(PM)
Dedicated to underground electronic music,
both experimental and dance-oriented.
Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
INSIDE OUT
TUE. 8(PM)
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
FRI. 12:30(AM)
The Late Night Show features music from the
underground Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which
progresses to Industrial, Noise and Alternative No
Beat into the early morning. Following the music,
we play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
RADIO ZERO
FRI. 2(PM)
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams
from New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood,
and whatever else. Website: www.radiozero.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
SAT. 9(PM)
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s, this is the show for you!
Website: synapticsandwich.net
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
ALTERNATING SUNDAYS 8(PM)
A mix of the latest house music, tech-
house, prog-house and techno.
TRANCENDANCE
SUN. 10(PM)
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack,
Trancendance has been broadcasting from Vancouver,
B.C. since 2001. We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance, Deep Trance
and even some Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic
Trance Anthem, especially if if's remixed. Current
influences include Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery,
Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save the
Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older influences include
Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop!
Records, Tidy Trax, Platipus Records and Nukleuz.
Email: djsmileymike @trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
■   DIFFICULT
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS...
SUN. 7(AM)
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours
Of Radio Art in a snack size format! Difficult
music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-up/
collage and general Crespan© weirdness.
Twitter: @bepicrespan.
Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca
■    DRAMA/POETRY
SKALDS HALL
FRI. 9(PM)
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established and
upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald. Interested in
performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds_Hall.
■   ECLECTIC
A FACE FOR RADIO
THU. 10(AM)
A show about music with interludes about nothing.
From Punk to Indie Rock and beyond.
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THU. 6(PM)
Celebrating the message behind the music:
Profiling music and musicians that take the
route of positive action over apathy.
AURAL TENTACLES
THU. 12(AM)
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock,
the unusual and the weird, or it could be
something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
MON. 8(AM)
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter,
offer a savoury blend of the familiar and
PROGRAM   GUIDE
66 exotic in a blend of aural delights.
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
CHTHONIC BOOM!
sun. 5(pm)
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic
music from parts of the spectrum (rock, pop,
electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
FEMCONCEPT
FRI. 1(PM)
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content
relevant to women's issues (interviews with campus
groups such as the Women's Center, SASC, etc.).
Musical genres include indie-rock, electronic, punk,
with an emphasis on local and Canadian artists.
LIVE FROM THU.NDERBIRD RADIO HELL
THU. 9(PM)
Featuring live bands every week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and around the world.
THE MEDICINE SHOW
FRI. 11(PM)
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets and
entertainment industry guests whose material is
considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and
promote independent original, local live music and art.
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
TUE. 11:30(AM)
The Morning After Show every Tuesday at 11:30(am).
Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The
morning after what? The morning after whatever you
did last night. Eclectic show with live music, local
talent and music you won't hear anywhere else.
NARDWUAR
fri. 3:30(pm)
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo!
Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
PEANUT BUTTER 'N' JAMS
ALTERNATING THU. 6:30"7:30(PM)
Explore local music and food with your hosts,
Brenda and Jordie. You'll hear interviews and
reviews on eats and tunes from your neighbourhood,
and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
RANDOPHONIC
SAT. 11(PM)
Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversal
jukebox which has no concept of genre, style, political
boundaries, or even space-time relevance. But it does
know good sounds from bad. Lately, the program has
been focused on Philip Random's All Vinyl Countdown
+ Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records you probably
haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
WED. 12(PM)
Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear.
Kick back with gems of the previous years.
SHINE ON
TUE. 1(PM)
An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from the
Vancouver underground and beyond, connected through
a different theme each week. Join your host Shea
every Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
SOUL SANDWICH
WED. 8(PM)
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into
one show, from Hip Hop to Indie Rock to African jams.
Ola will play through a whirlwind of different genres, each
sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of
yummy goodness will blow your mind. It beats Subway.
STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
FRI. 10(AM)
Students play music.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
WED. 8(AM)
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host
Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information and inanity.
Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.
■ ETHIOPIAN
SHOOKSHOOKTA
SUN. 10(AM)
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that
encourages education and personal development.
■ EXPERIMENTAL
KEW IT UP
WED. 3(PM)
Fight-or-flight music. Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cateschism / half-baked philosophy
and criticism. Experimental, Electronica, Post-
Punk, Industrial, Noise: ad-nauseum
MORE THAN HUMAN
SUN. 7(pm)
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from
the past, present, and future with host Gareth
Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
POP DRONES
WED. 10-12 (AM)
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl
underground. Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage
rock all the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
■ GENERATIVE
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF INSOMNIA
SAT. 2(AM)
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o
the Absolute Value of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing your dreams or,
if sleep is not on your agenda, your reveries.
■ HIP HOP
CRIMES & TREASONS
TUE. 9(PM)
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trillish. Hosted by Jamal
Steeles, Trinidad Jules & DJ Relly Rels.
Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca.
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
NEW ERA
ALTERNATING THU. 7:30(PM)
Showcases up and coming artists who are considered
"underdogs" in the music industry. The show will
provide a platform for new artists who are looking
to get radio play. Hip-Hop music from all over the
world along with features of multi-genre artists.
NOD ON THE LIST
SAT. 7(PM)
"Nod on the List is a program featuring new urban and
alternative music, sounds of beats, hip hop, dancehall,
bass, interviews, guest hosts and more every Tuesday
at11(pm).
scads_international@yahoo.com
facebook-So Salacious"
VIBES & STUFF
TUE. 4(PM)
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered
bringing you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop
67
PROGRAM   GUIDE artist all in one segment. All the way from New Jersey and
New York City, DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing
the east coast to the west coast throughout the show. We
will have you reminiscing about the good ol' times with
Vibes and Stuff every Tuesdays afternoon from 4:00(pm)-
5:00(pm) PST. E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail.com
■ INDIAN
RHYTHMSINDIA
ALTERNATING SUN. 8(PM)
Featuring a wide range of music from India, including
popular music from the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and
Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and regional language numbers.
■ JAZZ
THE JAZZ SHOW
MON. 9(PM)
As this is Black History Month, The Jazz Show
will celebrate and honour it with Features that
have a a relevance to Black History:
Feb. 1: Tonight we begin with a live album led
by legendary Detroit drummer Roy Brooks with
such stellar people as trumpeter Woody Shaw
Feb 8: Drummer Max Roach's music had since the
late 50s, political and social overtones and civil rights
relevance. "Percussion: Bitter Sweet" from 1961 is no
different with Mr. Roach, the versatile Eric Dolphy on
reeds and flute, Booker Little on trumpet and singer
Abbey Lincoln. Emotional and moving music.
Feb. 15: Miles Davis' recording of the Gershwin
opera "Porgy and Bess" about black people and
their lives and loves gets a very deep instrumental
reading by Mr, Davis with a large orchestra
under the direction of Canadian Gil Evans.
Feb. 22: "The Black Saint and The Sinner Lady" by
bassist Charles Mingus is one of his great masterpieces.
His large orchestra is filled with great soloists, alto
saxophonist Charlie Mariano in particular. A deeply
emotional, powerful and moving work not to be missed.
Feb.29: We end Black History Month with an album
by guitar great Grant Green of what used to be called
"Negro spirituals". Traditional songs associated with the
black experience. "Feelin' The Spirit". Grant Green and
company with pianist Herbie Hancock.
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
MON. 4(PM)
Old recordings of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies and motown.
■   LATIN AMERICAN
LA FIESTA
ALTERNATING SUN. 3(PM)
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and
Reggaeton with your host Gspot DJ.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
MON. 5(PM)
The best of mix of Latin american music.
Email: leoramlrez@canada.com
■   LOUD
FLEX YOUR HEAD
TUE. 6(PM)
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands
and guests from around the world.
POWER CHORD
SAT. 1(PM)
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If
you're Into music that's on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
■ PUNK
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
tues. io:3o(am)
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play
new, international and local punk rock music.
Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in brokenish
English. Hosted by Russian Tim.
Website: http://rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com.
Email: rocketfrom russiacitr@gmail.com.
Facebook: https://www.facebook.comRocketFromRussia.
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
SAT. 12 (PM)
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk
on the non-commercial side of the spectrum.
Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The Foat" Kraft.
Website: generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: facebook.com/generationannihilation.
■ REGGAE
THE ROCKERS SHOW
SUN. 12(PM)
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
■ ROCK/POP/INDIE
ALBION
TUES. 2(PM)
The best new music coming out of the UK along
with the most exciting Canadian artists British
host Sachin finds as he explores Vancouver.
THE BURROW
MON. 3(PM)
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a
nice blend of old 'classics' and newer releases.
Interviews and live performances.
BVP RADIO
ALTERNATING WED. 1 (PM)
BVP Radio is Blank Vinyl Project's radio show companion
on CiTR. It features musicians from UBC and its
surrounding community. Interviews, performances
live on air, and advice to developing bands.
CANADA POST-ROCK
FRI. 10(PM)
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now
resides on the west coast but it's still committed
to the best in post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and basically anything your
host Pbone can put the word "post" infront of.
THE CATS PAJAMAS
FRI. 11(AM)
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/
someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's
Pajamas: a super awesome and cool radio show
featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock,
lofi and more from Vancouver and beyond!
CRESCENDO
SUN. 6(pm)
Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning
and building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL
TIME, Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet
ride that you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams.
Besides overselling his show, Jed will play an eclectic
set list that builds throughout the hour and features both
PROGRAM   GUIDE
68 old classics, and all the greatest new tracks that the
hipsters think they know about before anyone else does.
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
FRI. 12(PM)
Your noon-hour guide to what's happening In Music
and Theatre In Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk.
■   RUSSIAN
NASHA VOLNA
SAT. 6(PM)
News, arts, entertainment and music for the
Russian community, local and abroad.
Website: nashavoina.ca.
DISCORDER RADIO
TUE. 5(PM)
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join
us to hear excerpts of interviews, reviews and more!
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
THU. 12(PM)
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
THU. 2(PM)
A program focusing on the week's highlights
from CITR's Music Department. Plus: live in-
studio performances and artist interviews!
PARTS UNKNOWN
MON. 1(PM)
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow
sandwich: soft and sweet and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and held close to a fire.
THE PERMANENT RAIN RADIO
ALTERNATING WED. 1(PM)
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus
on the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for
an hour of lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a
variety of artists who have been featured on our website.
What website?
thepermanentrainpress.com
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
ALTERNATING WED. 6:30(PM)
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
SPICE OF LIFE
ALTERNATING THU. 7:30(PM)
The spice extends life. The spice expands
consciousness. The Spice of Life brings you a
variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math Rock and
anything that else that progresses. Join host
Ben Life as he meanders whimsically through
whatever comes to mind on the walk to CITR.
■   ROOTS / FOLK / BLUES
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
ALTERNATING SUNDAYS 3(PM)
Real cowshlt-caught-in-yer-boots country.
CODE BLUE
SAT. 3(PM)
From backwoods delta low-down slide to
urban harp honks, blues, and blues roots
with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
TUE. 6(AM)
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives
with Arthur and the lovely Andrea Berman.
Email: paclficpickin@yahoo.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
SAT. 8(AM)
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African,
Latin, and European music in the first half, followed by
Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
Email: steveedge3@mac.com.
■ SACRED
MANTRA
SAT. 5(PM)
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers,
chants and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of the
worlds sacred sounds - traditional, contemporary and
futuristic.
Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com
■ SOUL/R&B
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
FRI. 7:30(pm)
Website: www.africanrhythmsradlo.com
SOULSHIP ENTERPRISE
SAT. 7(PM)
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul,
r&b, jazz, and afrobeat tunes, The Happy Hour
has received great renown as the world's foremost
funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio
show hosted by people named Robert Gorwa and/
or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III.
■ SPORTS
THUNDERBIRD EYE
thu.3:30(pm)
The inside edge on the latest UBC Thunderbirds
varsity teams' news and results.
■ TALK
ALL ACCESS PASS
THU. 5(PM)
CITR Accessibility Collective's new radio show.
We talk about equity, inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse abilities, on campus
and beyond. Tune in every week for Interviews,
music, news, events, and awesome dialogue.
ALL EARS
WED. 9(PM)
Looking for advice? Hosts Brandon and Mormel
think they can help you with that. All Ears Is an
advice radio program where the hosts read real
questions from the UBC community and answer them
live. Other content Includes interviewing students,
consulting experts, and giving campus life advice.
Submit your question at rittp://ask.fm/aliearsubc
ARTS REPORT
WED. 5(PM)
Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film,
theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy, and
more) by host Jake Costello and the Arts Reporters.
ASTROTALK
THU. 3(PM)
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the
night sky with a new topic every week. Death Stars,
Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars...
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
THU. 9(AM)
This show is produced by the disabled community
and showcases special guests and artists. The focus
is for a positive outlook on programs and events
for the entire community. Originally called "The Self
PROGRAM   GUIDE Advocates", from Co-Op Radio CFRO, the show began
in the 1990s. We showcase BC Self Advocates with
lots of interviews from people with special needs.
Tune in for interesting music, interviews and some
fun times. This program is syndicated with the NCRA
(National Community and Campus Radio Association)
across BC and across Canada. Hosted by: Kelly
Reaburn, Michael Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
communitylivingradio.wordpress.com |
communitylivingradio@gmail.com | Community
Living Radio Show | @clivingradio
| #communitylivingradio
EXTRAENVIRONMENTALIST
WED. 2(PM)
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of
sustainable economics and our global ecological crisis.
LADY RADIO
FRI. 6(PM)
CiTR Women's Collective's new radio show! Rad
women talking about things they like. Tune in weekly
for interviews, music, events, commentary, and such.
MINDFUL MATTERS
MON. 7:30-8(am)
NEWS 101
FRI. 5(PM)
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and
community newscast. Every week, we take a look back
at the week's local, national and intemationaf news,
as seen from a fully independent media perspective.
PETE'S PICKS
THUR 11:30-12(PM)
From the CiTR Archives! Our Digital Library Coordinator
Peter Doolan shares selected gems of CiTR history,
digitized from the original audiotape reels!
QUEER FM VANCOUVER:RELOADED
TUE. 8(AM)
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual
communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest
features, background on current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RADIO FREE THINKER
TUE. 3(PM)
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and
science, we examine popular extraordinary
claims and subject them to critical analysis.
THE REEL WHIRLED
THUR. 11-11:30(AM)
The Reel Whirled is a half hour long escapade through
the world of cinema, focused around UBC Film Society's
program; be it contemporary or classic, local or global.
From our perspective as the UBC Film Society, we
talk about film intellectually, passjonately, and goofily.
With select music from our cinematic subjects, we
pull your Thursday mornings into focus, from bleary
eyed to sharp and worthy of the silver screen.
THE SECTOR
FRI. 8(AM)
Discussing the world of social justice, non-profits,
charities and activism. Join Ethan for in-depth
interviews, examinations of nonprofit missions
and causes, and discussions of everything
from philanthropy to progressive politics.
SHARING SCIENCE
WED.    6(PM)
SYNCHRONICITY
MON. 12(PM)
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that   '
help you remember why you're here*: to have fun!
UBC ARTS ON AIR
ALTERNATING WED. 6(PM)
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and
unusual interviews with members of UBC Arts world.
Tune in for programs, people and personalities in Art
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
MON. 11(AM)
Unceded Airwaves is a radio show produced by CiTR's
Indigenous Collective. The team is comprised of
both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who are
passionate about radio, alternative media and Indigenous
topics and issues. We are committed to centering
the voices of Native people and offering alternative
narratives that empower Native people and their stories.
We recognize that media has often been used as a
tool to subordinate or appropriate native voices and
we are committed to not replicating these dynamics.
VANCOUVER, RIGHT?
THU. 8(AM)
WHITE NOISE
SAT. 8(PM)
Need some comic relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half
an hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he
delves in to the most eccentric corners of radio for your
listening pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show
featuring a Q and A with the creator; actors and a guest
comic every week.
whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
PROGRAM   GUIDE
70 CITR 101.9 FM
JANUARY MONTHLY CHARTS
ARTIST   ALBUM  LABEL
ARTIST   ALBUM  LABEL
1
ROOMS**
IT TAKES A LOT
TO SHOW UP
PRETZEL
2
LOSCIL**
SINE STUDIES 2
JAZ
3
TOUGH
CUSTOMERS
THE WORST
DEMO
SELF-RELEASED
4
SOUNS**
AMBIENT A
DEEP SEA
MINING
SYNDICATE
5
MOSS LIME*
ZOO DU QUEBEC
TELEPHONE
EXPLOSION
6
GRIMES*
ART ANGELS
4AD
7
DID YOU DIE**
WEIRD LOVE
WIENER
8
MAJICAL CLOUDZ*
ARE YOU ALONE?
ARTS & CRAFTS
9
REEF SHARKS
MIND RACE
BIG SMOKE
10
SWIM TEAMS
FREEDOM/
CONSTRAINT
SELF-RELEASED
11
DAVID BOWIE
BLACKSTAR
COLUMBIA
12
SHEER AGONY*
MASTERPIECE
COUPLE SKATE
13
ESMERINE*
LOST VOICES
CONSTELLATION
14
DEAD GHOSTS**
LOVE AND DEATH
AND ALL THE
REST
BURGER
15
TELEHARMONIUM*
MOTHER
GENERATOR
SELF-RELEASED
16
LYDIA HOL*
HEADING NORTH
SELF-RELEASED
17
FUTUREKIDS*
THIS IS
EVERYTHING
SELF-RELEASED
18
MILK LINES*
CERAMIC
IN THE RED
19
BENOIT PIOULARD
NOYAUX
MORR MUSIC
20
REID JAMESON**
THE PRESLEY
SESSIONS
REVISITED
SELF-RELEASED
21
JENNYLEE
RIGHT ON
ROUGH TRADE
22
KHOTIN**
BAIKAL ACID
1080P
23
WREKMEISTER
HARMONIES
NIGHT OF YOUR
ASCENSION
THRILL JOCKEY
24
WE ARE THE CITY**
ABOVE CLUB
BOOM PA
25
TELEPHONE
MAISON*
TRANSLUCIDOPATHE
JEUNESSE
COSMIQUE
26
27
28
29
30
31
31
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
BUCKMAN C0E*h
MALAMA KA AINA     TONIC
SOFT SERVE**
SOFT SERVE
SELF-RELEASED
GALERIE
STRATIQUE*
FAUX WORLD
STATIK
MICHAEL AND THE
SLUMBERLAND
BAND**	
THOUSAND
YEARS UNDER
THE SUN
SELF-RELEASED
PET SUN
SHADE DRIVER
SLEEPLESS
FLOATING POINTS        ELAENIA
LUAKA BOP
KELLEY STOLTZ
IN TRIANGLE
TIME	
CASTLE FACE
ROCOCODE*
PANIC ATTACK
MARQUIS
THE WAINWRIGHT
SISTERS*	
SONGS IN THE
DARK	
MAPLEMUSIC
TRACES*
EP
SELF-RELEASED
TALVIHORROS
DISCORDIA
JAZ
YACHT
I THOUGHT THE
FUTURE WOULD
BE COOLER
DOWNTOWN
OVERBURNT
AFTERDRIVE
SELF-RELEASED
PYRAMID//INDIGO*
PYRAMID//
INDIGO
REVERSING FALLS*
REVERSING
FALLS 2
SELF-RELEASED
D'ARRAST*
SOMETHING
UNDERWAY
BEEKEEPERS
STUBBS GROUP
36?/ASHLEY
HUNDRED*
SPLIT
SELF-RELEASED
QASIM NAQVI
PREAMBLE
NNA TAPES
THE DEARLY
BEREFT*
FUNERAL MUSIC      SELF-RELEASED
CAR SEAT
HEADREST
TEENS OF STYLE     MATADOR
LITTLE YOU LITTLE
ME*	
I'D WATCH THE
DAY TIL IT DIED
MONOPOLIZED
PUGS AND
CROWS AND TONY
WILSON**	
EVERYONE
KNOWS
EVERYONE 1 & 2
NOSCHMO
BASIA BULAT*
GOOD ADVICE
m
111
2  „-S
Ill
SELF-RELEASED       f|$
Q Q.OJ
"1?!
ill
5> £=
ill
m
SECRET CITY ||1
LANGUAGE ARTS*
ABLE ISLAND
MAPLEMUSIC vinylrecords
Vancouver
facebook.com/
vinylrecords ca
Wiwd
jfonfa
OPEN 12-6 PM DAILY
321W HASTINGS ST
©VICTORY SQUARE
604.488.1234
CHECK OUT DAVID LOVE JONES' AFRICAN RHYTHMS RADIO
EVERY FRIDAY ON CiTR 101.9FM 7:30-9PM
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
African Rhythms Radio
COME AND CHECK
OUT OUR VAST
SELECTION OF
NEW, USED AND
RARE RECORDS
Nina Simone
NINA SIMONE-
LITTLE GIRL
BLUE REMIXED
- DJ MAESTRO
DOWNTEMPOJAZZ
DEEP HOUSE
180 GRM2LP $68.95
FICA TWIGS -
M3LL155X
-2016 UK TRIP HOP
D0WNTEMP0 5TRK
12" EP $29.95
CAGE THE ELEPHANT-
TELL ME I'M PRETTY
-2015 INDIE ALT ROCK
180GRMLP*
INSERT $ 26.95

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0347372/manifest

Comment

Related Items