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i
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•
■^1 M
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irai
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A+
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The Guv With The
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Tom Nesbf
Vancouver
White Jon
Yasemin Oz LATE SPRING
CREATIVITY THROUGH CHAOS
words by Elijah Teed // photos by Lukas Engelhardt
illustrations by Sharon Ko
Breakups are never easy. The same
sort of questions always seem to arise:
who gets to keep the dog? Why did we combine our bookshelves? Are we ever going to
see each other again? It's a reality KC Wei
and Nik Gauer, the remaining half of Late
Spring's original lineup, are well aware
of. Recently, the band has found itself in
a state of limbo, with founding members
Ryan Matheison and Nat Mooter unable to
continue with the group in light of other
serious commitments. Now, after winning
this year's Shindig, putting the finishing touches on a new record, and generally enjoying a burgeoning and unexpected
sense of success, Wei and Gauer are trying
to figure out what to do without their rock
solid rhythm section.
"I'm hopeful that it will work. I believe
in the songs, I believe in us as people and
as musicians," Wei, de facto band leader
and lifeblood of Late Spring says with firm
resolve. "I have this thing I say to myself all
the time to chill out, and it's 'Life is long.'
You don't know what's going to happen,
but life is long, and we'll figure it out."
Gauer is quick to agree, observing the
frequency with which bands go through
uncomfortable lineup changes, and have
to find ways to begin again: "Some end,
some transform, some just burn through
members, so we just have to suss it out."
"But Late Spring isn't over," Wei
assures. "It's not over until the band leader
♦ * $
says it's over, and that's not going to be for
a long time."
The two roommates and musical collaborators have recently begun the search
to find a replacement drummer and bassist. Although finding a new rhythm section is certainly a practical concern, both
Wei and Gauer acknowledge that it's also a
matter of relationship building. Regaining
the assuredness felt between the original
four members is a challenge a new lineup
would have to be quick to address if they
want to capitalize on the momentum Late
10
LATE SPRING Spring has worked hard to build.
"A part of me is worried because Nat
is gone and Ryan is gone, and we have to
try and reconfigure the band to try and
gain that same level of trust," Wei confides.
"At the end of the day I just trust those
guys to [allow me to be] myself in band
practice, and that's really naked and hard
sometimes."
"There has to be a level of trust," echoes
Gauer. "Shoulders have to be able to fall
down."
Unfortunate circumstances aside, with
an appearance at Calgary's Sled Island
festival in June, and their sophomoric
effort slated for release at the beginning of
May, Late Spring have a lot to look forward
to, and a lot to be proud of. Their upcoming album, Invisible, is a wicked follow-up
to the eponymous first release the group
put out last year. Sometimes spooky,
often noisy, and perpetually groovy, Invisible would be misclassified as a departure from Late Spring's earlier work. It also
undeniably demonstrates an evolution of
the band's sound. Recorded at The Noise
Floor Studio on Gabriola Island, the ten
new tracks are buoyant with the same
fuzzy energy Late Spring is known for,
while simultaneously exuding a newfound
sense of confidence and professionalism.
Album highlights "Jelly" and "Drink You"
each demonstrate the widening range and
capability of Wei's vocals, with Gauer's
tastefully jangly guitar riffs serving as a
perfect compliment.
"This one is ten times better," Gauer
assures. "We're just better at what we're
doing."
Wei continues, "I think with [Invisible], we're pushing ourselves more. The
songs, the structures, the sound, and the
confidence with just being weird is coming out more and I'm really excited." She
adds, "I've been making stuff all my life,
being different versions of myself in art
and music, and I feel like this is the thing
that sounds the most like what I've always
wanted."
It's a sentiment both her and Gauer
take solace in, a sense of identity and belonging in the midst of a series of subcultures
the two find overwhelmingly alienating
much of the time.
"I find that there's artist-run centre culture, and there's the underground
music scene of Vancouver, and there's this
little space in between where I really love to
be the most," Wei explains. "I feel like we're
artists making music."
Considering that the duo both hail
from visual arts backgrounds, Wei's attitude is unsurprising. While it's difficult
LATE SPRING
11 nan
ITS NOT OVER
UNTIL THE BAND
LEADER SAYS ITS
OVER, AND THAT'S
NOT
COING TO BE FOR
A LONG TIME."
to pinpoint exactly how Wei and Gauer's
backgrounds as artists have affected Late
Spring's music, it's clear that it has had
an influence on the group's process.
"There's this impatience things that I
have at least, where once [our music] is
recorded I want to work on new stuff,"
Gauer says of his own experience this past
year. Wei, however, is quick to offer an
alternative take:
"That's the opposite of me, but that's a
good tension ... For me, doing a song over,
and over, and over again is not just a learning process but a studio process. After a
while the work moves away from you and
you see it from a bit of a distance, you
become more critical and try new things."
Though its future may be murky, Late
Spring is undoubtedly in good hands. Still
riding on the high of notoriety, Wei and
Gauer are committed to making their project work no matter what obstacles occur,
and will soon have a newly minted record
on shelves to prove it. Thanks in no small
part to the trust they put in each other,
and their mutual passion for the music
they've created, it's safe to say that Late
Spring is ready to take on whatever new
challenges come their way.
Keep your eyes peeled for Invisible,
being released on vinyl and digitally May 6.
There will also be a small run of cassettes
through agony klub. Visit latespring.band-
camp, com or agonyklub.com to hear more,
or check out the ttlatespringzzz hashtag on
Instagram.
12
LATE  SPRING •■■•
1660 EAST BROADWAY
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STARRING VANILLA ICE
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?!/,;/   -   ■■:■■: MU
SIGHT AND SOUND
words by Claire Bailey // photos by Pat Valaade
illustrations by OlgaAbeleva
SO MUCH OF WHAT WE DO IS MYTHOLOGY-BUILDING
AND CHARACTER-BUILDING.1
„
When I sit down with Fraricesca Bel-
court and Brittney Rand, the forces
behind electro-pop duo Mû, they are both
exhausted. The weeks following the release
of their second EP, II (February 12), have
been something of a whirlwind. Given how
much has already been written about
their music, Mu's growing success is clear?
The release of their video for "Debauchery" supports the strength of their recent
release, demonitratirig Mu's special talent
for working with both sound and visuals.
If is undeniably beautiful. Rand and
Belcourt agree that U is a continuation of
what was present on their first, self-titled
EP, but "a bit more meditated," This likely
comes from an adjustment to their writing process; rather than writing the song§
together, verse-by-vérse, as they did on
their first EP, Rand and Belcourt wrote
songs individually, coming together only
pear the end of the process. "We're both
master everything, that's the one time we'll
bring someone else in on it. But we produce everything by ourselves."
While Mu's music ii the centre-point
of their creative output, they clearly put a
great deal of care into their visual aesthetic
as well. Go to their website and you'll find
beautifully curated photos, often featuring
the two band members in elegant, slightly
surreal outfits and poses. On their BanjJ-
camp, you'll find silk-screened T-shirts for
sale (made by Belcourt's parents on Cor-
tez Island). They feature an image and text
from the Brothers Grimm fairytale "Goose
Girl" — something Belcourt felt captured
the theme of the ER
"I think aesthetic is very significant for
us," says Rand. "So much of what we dois
mythology-building and character-building. It feels really safe sometimes to be
in [our] character and in [our] mythology, whatever that ends up being album
by album, because [we] are being so vul-
f bedroorp producers,"  Rand  says.  *A lot     nerable by writing the songs ...   And it's
ff comes from being alone and
tative."
or not they're working indi-
u is quick to stress that their
fs written and produced entirely by
"When we do music, it's just
Belcourt says.  "When we mix and
also like, what character can I play with?
There are so many different parts of myself
— like, I don't need to be myself when I'm
being my public self. I can reserve some of
that for me, and then do as I wish as I'm
performing. And I think that your imagej^
still a performance."
  ■  !.   '... ..    "<>m
MÙ
7w9?..
w*$>\ When I suggest a connection to developing an online aesthetic, Belcourt agrees
vehemently. "That's totally the same thing.
That's kind of what the idea of ["Debauchery"] comes from — that concept of having
an internet identity, and how people can
shroud their real identities." Rand adds,
"For the better, or for the worse." Belcourt
mirrors back, "For love, or for anti-love."
An emphasis on visuals comes naturally to Mu. "We're both visual artists
as well," Belcourt explains. "Brittney is
a painter. I like to illustrate. We are both
inspired by film. We like all aspects of
the creative process that that you get to
dive into [with music]."
Rand continues, "The amount of
opportunities that you get through music
is especially something that is quite
unique ... You can play with design. We
direct our photos, we style ourselves, we
can play with fashion, all of that — it's so
nice to be able to do all of that."
The video for "Debauchery," directed
by Vancouver-based photographer / filrn-
MU
• .* *"   *$■"
^^^.^^^j^J^k:  maker Mandy-Lyn, is a dark and glittery
free-for-all. Shot on a RED camera and
processed though VHS (a creative choice
of Mandy-Lyn's), the video's nostalgic fuzz-
iness contrasts Mu's typically clean and
minimalistic aesthetic. The video was
filmed in an industrial area of East Vancouver, near where Rand used to live.
"We wanted to do this very Mu, very glam
kind of big performance in a really shitty,
grungy area that we wanted to claim back,"
Rand explains. "It can be really dangerous
to be a woman down there — it's not somewhere we can really walk around that easily at night by ourselves. It was cool to just
be like 'No, this is ours.'"
The dancers (and outfits) you see in
the video will also be included in Mu's live
show, part of an effort to make more of an
experience out of their live set. Occupying
a somewhat ambiguous space between DJ,
producer and band, Mu finds that people
at their shows are often unsure how to act.
They're hoping the dancers will get people
actively involved in the show.
"A big part of stuff with us right now
is developing the stage design for live
performance," says Rand. "We're gonna
be curating our environment," Belcourt
explains. "We're collaborating with someone doing visuals, and building a big prop,
and doing all our own lighting for the show
... It's gonna be sick!"
The care Mu puts into both their sound
and visuals is easy to see. At a time when
the image-saturated internet acts so much
as our access point to music, Mu's visual
aesthetic is especially significant. Through
sight and sound, Mu is creating something
that is both beautiful and accurate.
Mu played an album release party at
the Fox Cabaret March 31. Check out the
music video for "Debauchery" on Mu's You-
liibe channel. II is released on Boompa Records, and cassettes can be purchased at
soundsofmu. bandcamp.com.
MU
17 THE POINTED STICKS
DISCORDER REVISITED
words by Erica Leiren
illustrations by Sofia Shamsunahar
photos courtesy of Erica Leiren
"You walked out took your chance,
_ You turned your back on our romance,
You said you'd found somebody new,
You said the change'd do you good."
-"What Do You Want Me To Do?" The
Pointed Sticks
s**
Oooh that beautiful, disdainful, mosquito-whine sneer of a voice. Nick Jones'
vocals were The Pointed Sticks' signature,
wrapping sinuously around each song.
Their string of singles from 1978-80 were
perfect, teen-romance melodramas.
The Pointed Sticks had, something for
everyone. Great cover art. Guitar god Bill
Napier Hemy channeling The Sonics and
Pete Townsend, but in a new, Vancou-
ver-ish way. Stylish rhythm section Tony
Bardach (bass) and Ian Tiles (drums) kicking you in the mid-section right where it
feels good. And Gord Nichol, shaking his
shiny curls and underpinning the songs
with his lush keyboard.
Lead singer Nick, seemingly a bad
boy, was so shy he often sang with his
back to the audience. When he did face
the audience, his way of leaning against
the mic stand and looking out from under
his eyelashes was utterly entrancing.
So adorable, every girl in the audience
wanted to wrap him up in her loving arms
and "just let me make it all better Baby."
In my first year at UBC, my friends
from Arts One and The Ubyssey played
me their records, and I rushed out to buy
my own copies. We were too young to get
18
DISCORDER  REVISITED into shows, but the singles were accessible. We played them over and over, singing along at top volume. Later my band,
The Debutantes, covered one of my fave
Pointed Sticks songs, "Real Thing."
At a time when in Vancouver we still
believed that "the best" of everything came
from somewhere else, finally here was a
band that spoke directly to us in our own
accent, and saw into our innocent little
suburban Vancouver hearts like nobody
had before. Yeah sure, London had the
Buzzcocks, but here in backwater Vancouver, we had our own Pointed Sticks! (Both
nearly played a local double bill in December 1979 with tickets printed and ready to
go, but the Buzzcocks cancelled. But they
had played together earlier on the tour in
San Francisco.)
Those early 7" singles were produced
and  engineered by the dream team of
Bob Rock and Ron Obvious, and had epic
songs on both sides: "What Do You Want
Me To Do?" and "Somebody's Mom" were
released in '78, and "Real Thing" with "Out
of Luck" were released in '79, as was "Lies"
with "I'm Numb." The band radiated a
youthful exuberance that exactly mirrored
the energy we young Vancouverites were
feeling ourselves.
We sent our hometown heroes off to
London with great fanfare in 1980 to record with Stiff Records, but that fizzled. It
was proof when we needed to be shown
that there is really no place like home. It
was a revelation. We were finally realizing
that in Vancouver, it was possible to be the
best in the world, and that we didn't need
labels somewhere else to tell us that. The
DISCORDER  REVISITED
19 Pointed Sticks' 1980 album Perfect Youth,
with its poetic title song, was a sublime
and poignant summary.
They stormed back in 1995 with Zulu
Records' Part of the Noise compilation, followed by a fan-sponsored tour of Japan,
perhaps inspiring the charming 2007
single, "My Japanese Fan." In 2009 they
released Three Lefts Make A Right. And just
last summer, Pointed Sticks was released.
I turned 19 in the summer of 1980 after
my first year of university. Finally, I was
old enough to get into shows. My friends
and I were all super excited for the biggest
concert of our summer: Pointed Sticks at
The Cave! Everyone was going but I was
still waiting to be asked by the ambivalent
Greek god, I thought I was dating. Meanwhile, second year at Laval in Quebec City
beckoned, and my Pointed Sticks singles
were coming with me in my suitcase...
x
S&sP**»ve* LADY RADIO
ON THE AIR
words by Callie Hitchcock
illustrations by Dana Kearley
photos by Sophia Sauvageau
Fridays at 6pm, CiTR broadcasts a
chorus of voices, laughs, discussion and
music. Lady Radio was created from a
grant that founded the Women's Collective in September 2015, and is coordinated
by Elizabeth Holliday. I am lucky enough
to be one of the many dedicated programmers on the show which centres women's
voices and issues.
Growing up, discussion among women
was more than just a friendly pastime for
me. It verged into the realm of the sacred.
The conversations I had staring into the
darkness just before going to sleep at
sleepovers were where I fostered most of
my most intimate, searching and nourishing ideas and relationships. Just a
few souls lighting the room with the quiet
thoughts of life.
Lady Radio has become a space for me
and many others in the collective to find
this kind of solace, connection and solidarity. Programmer Ivanna Besenovsky
cites that the collective is "so purely and
authentically women trying to collectively
create this amazing thing, coming together
for a shared love of female power in creative and intellectual capacities ... I'm con-
ON THE AIR
21 stantly astounded by how everyone really
wants to be here and supports each other."
This support is evident in the layout
of the show. Each show is based around
themed topics. Anyone who wants to talk
about something gets a chance to address
it by leading a show with interviews, music
and discussion, and everyone else participates to encourage each other's passions.
Topics so far have ranged from female sexuality, sexual assault, tattoos, literature,
poetry, to science. Creativity is fostered
and developed with support and respect.
And largely, these topics are not interests isolated to one person in particular. As programmer Cassandra Rodgers
shares, "I come from a small town and
there was no collective for women or like-
minded women. I am overwhelmed to
share interests with so many people. I had
no idea what kind of format to share infor
mation in, I was used to bouncing ideas off
of people who didn't care."
Finding a space to be heard and discuss is the meaty raison d'être of Lady
Radio. This hour each week shines a
lamp on difficult or unknown conversations. And a lot of the conversations are
extremely personal and intimate in nature.
One programmer I interviewed told me that
during the sexual assault talk she came to
the painful realization that she had been
sexually assaulted. She says that being
present for the discussion "gave me the
chance to deal with it. It was a catalyst for
becoming complete on stuff."
Because such important dialogue can
happen on air, other people can have these
conversations with themselves or realize
that they are not alone in their more private experiences. This eliminates a lot of
shame and self-doubt not only for the pro-
22
ON THE AIR grammers, but the listeners and friends with whom
they choose to further the
line of discovery with. Lady
Radio's engagement in difficult topics opens up a
platform for larger societal
discourse and change.
Sharing experiences is N
the main vehicle for causing social change and the
consensus on the Lady
Radio community is that,
as programmer Krista
Anderson says, "We come
together for the same reason: to ask important
questions and question
things together. There is
a specific need to share
the experience of being a
woman." Rodgers similarly
states, "It is important to
learn about women and
have education instead of
competition for resources
and ideas."
The elegance of Lady
Radio lies in the little
world curated every week.
Commenting on the evolution of the show, Holli-
day says, "It's become its
own self-sustaining thing.
Everyone's become very
self-motivated and people are going out
and doing it themselves, they have the
tools now."
What was once a nebulous of ideas has
become an elegant microcosm of women
searching for truth, asking important
questions, and sharing experiences and
culture to build a better future.
Lady Radio airs every Friday on CiTR
101.9FM 6-7pm For updates on the collective or if you're looking to get involved, follow Lady Radio on Facebook or Instagram
©lady.radio, or visit citr.ca/'radio/lady-radio.
ON THE AIR
23
j STRAIGHT TO THE HEAD
BY FRASER NIXON
TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
words by Jonathan Kew
illustrations by Alicia Lawrence
"Life in Shangri-La is characterized
by the interaction between European and
Asian cultures, with the Europeans playing the paternal role. As with the social
elites of Vancouver and Victoria during the
early decades of the 20th century, the leaders of Shangri-La look to distant imperial
centres for their aesthetic ideals ... Even
the bohemian tradition of the West Coast
finds a parallel in the titillating implication
of free love that apparently marks human
relations in Shangri-La" - Rhetorics of Utopia: Early Modernism and the Canadian
West Coast, Grant Arnold (2000)
Grocers in Chinatown, SROs and
saunas on Hastings, The Planetarium,
New Town Bakery, The Sun Tower, The
Tomahawk, University Endowment Lands,
Wreck Beach, boutiques on 4th Avenue,
Little Flower Academy, beach-side parties
on Locarno, Holt Renfrew and The Bay:
this is a sample geography of Fraser Nixon's Straight to the Head. Between Bau-
haus and Blondie, Ronald Reagan and
Vander Zalm, Italian-Chinese Strathcona
and Ultra-English Shaughnessy, Straight
to the Head charts a course through 1983
in the Terminal City. The novel is Nixon's
second. Described as a neo-noir genre
blender, Straight to the Head is equally
qualified as a document and mythology
of Vancouver's bleary, out-of-focus past,
when the city was a lazy port-town on the
Pacific Rim, and not an entrepot of international finance.
Nixon's retrospect speaks to a love for
the bygone Vancouver. It spills out from
the beginning of the novel, down side-
streets, awry scents and sights. Proceeding chapter by chapter, Nixon gives near-
equal share of the fiction to three protagonists, each a pivot on which the cultural
and political dynamics of British Columbia roil. They're brought into the fold by
the disappearance of Irina Lermontov -
described at various times as dark, dangerous, and Soviet - who absconds with
$300,000 and a shipment of cocaine.
We're first introduced to Dorothy
Kwan, Irina's landlord, the Westernized
Canton-Canadian that vacillates between
Chinese girl-next-door and something else
entirely. Ted Windsor, the husband Irina
left behind, is the Canadian Classic, dirty
blond, sinewy, and cosmopolitan - a colonial anachronism and well-bred beauty.
"My family's English," he remarks late into
the novel. "You want to know how English?
My grandfather refused to eat pineapple
because the Hawaiians murdered Captain
Cook." The final protagonist is Renard, an
American bounty-hunter, well-traveled,
who calls the cops cochons, and whose
24
TEXTUALLY ACTIVE benefactor has brought him in to sort out
the mess. Each character, according to
their links to Irina, is pursued, or pursue
the crooked cops chasing after the missing
payload. Their favourite name for Renard?
Tourist
Though three-dimensional, Nixon's
players are not notable for their character
appeal. What's interesting is their cipher
quality, the way they interface with the
world around them; the way they look and
are looked at in turn. Nixon, who has an
eye for socio-political codes, quotes Yves
Saint Laurent for his epigraph, and brings
characters into sharp relief with Chanel
handbags, plainclothes officers in London
Fog trenches, and white-bread playboys
in Lacoste. In one
longer excursion into
fashion, Dorothy and
her idle-rich friend
rifle through pictures
of VMenne West-
wood's Savage, awed.
Always, Vancouverites
look elsewhere, often
to London where
our counterculture
learns to be punk
and new wave; the
conflux of metropolitan influences, cultural diaspora, and
quaint Canadian
urbanity are represented in beautiful detail, one of
the book's greatest
pleasures.
If my reliance on
lists in the past few
paragraphs is tiring,
then    it's    perhaps
«*~* that the novel's pace
slouches in its lethargic, list-like quality. At times the book has the affect of a
Douglas Coupland travelogue, a series of
witticisms and geographical remark. Nixon's writing is considered, allowing for
the flowery sign-off and wayside commentary. It's not loquacious, but fattier than it
ought to be. At times the hard-boiled edge,
or jabs at various Vancouver subcultures,
lean into the hyperbolic. But Nixon gives
himself time to take care of surroundings,
and keeps the prose and narrative, lean
enough.
Of course, the circularity of noir, where
everyone misdirects, is a genre convention.
But Straight to the Head does not pretend
to have a deep mystery at its core, and
may annoy readers uninterested in bend-
TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
25 ers at The Empress, high-end sushi, fervour about The World's Fair, or any of the
vignettes which are ultimately the novel
doing its best work.
That is the irony of the book's title.
Rather than a bullet, Straight to the Head
is a title suggesting the severity of the shift
from 20th Century Vancouver in a globalizing world. It's also wordplay that could
just as much reference the diversion of
beers and blunts scattered throughout
the book, which features multiple revelations conjured by puffs of weed. If there's
a poetry to the novel's construction, it is
the pot-laced ambivalence of the movement in Lotusland, with danger always
on the periphery, before it shocks. In this
sense, Nixon is adept at tone and reader
expectations.
So as a genre blender, Straight to the
Head peaks as a non-sentimental paean
for a disappearing Vancouver, and may one
day stand next to other realizations of the
city's 20th Century mythology, such as the
classic student-film, The Bitter Ash. The
novel is loaded with lived-in details, from
the difficulty of and transporting handguns in Canada - an interesting problem
for a crime novel - to the gentrification of
Gastown. It's not just a bohemian excursion either. Suffice to say, without spoiling the novel, in the spirit of muckraking
noir, Nixon is aware that the small-time
designs of crime will always be secondary
to the real tools of power. There's a possible complaint that the powerplay of the
central characters, according to their ethnicity, class, and identity, adhere too much
to a simplified explanation of Vancouver's
current cultural climate. But as a tale,
Straight to the Head nails the city's anxieties. Nixon knows his slice of time and
place, how to deliver it, and what it means.
Straight to the Head is pointed and political like the best noir - a shot through the
Cascadian shroud of haze.
Straight to the Head by Fraser Nixon is
published by Arsenal Pulp Press, and is set
to be released this month.
26
TEXTUALLY ACTIVE RAY
It is early March when I meet with
Trevor Kim Gray at the University of British Columbia's old student union building. Although it might be cliche to note,
having our conversation here seems significant. Anyone familiar with the university's architectural timeline will know
that "the old SUB" has been largely abandoned in favour of a newer, grander structure. When Gray discusses his (somewhat)
eponymously titled solo project Kim Gray,
he challenges the idea of 'progress'. His
upcoming full length album Perfume is a
new direction for him, but he won't necessarily argue for change with a capital C.
We discuss the merits of constructing in
new ways, and finding a bridge between
. what's familiar and what isn't.
Gray is perhaps best known for his
work as the front-man of Vancouver band
Skinny Kids, an indie rock three piece with
a sound that sits somewhere in between
The Doors and Allah-Las. Skinny Kids is
still a local fixture, and Gray's solo venture
exists less as a rejection of that band, and
more out of a need for a separate outlet.
Gray speaks of his solo project as a sort of
compartment — a new drawer to put new
music. "I had material that I wanted to
record and it's hard to say why, but I didn't
think it was appropriate to release it under
the Skinny Kids name. I wanted to write
these lovey, poppy songs, and I knew they
needed their own entity."
Gray's first solo release was Backseat
Bingo, a four track EP recorded by Drew
Wilkinson of Dead Ghosts. He cites "old
'50s and '60s girl group music" as inspira-
KIM  GRAY
27 7 WANTED TO WRITE THESE LOVI
THEY NEEDED THEIR OWN ENTITY
tions, and the comparison holds true: the
album is washed out beach pop, the cover
is a film photo of Gray outside a diner,
and the whole thing drips with nostalgia.
The record is decidedly good, but seems
to act mainly as a stepping stone for what
is to come. Perfume arrives at the end of
April, but the single, "Perfume Ghost,"
was released in early February. Upon listening to it one thing is abundantly clear
— although Gray may not address it directly, this album represents a definite
change in approach. Gone are the '50s
vibes and Beach-Boys-esque "ooh babys."
In their place are synths, drum machines,
and a striking vocal melody that lacks the
innocence of past ventures. Gray seems to
have exorcised his Brian Wilson demons,
unearthing something different in the
process.
In this respect, Gray acknowledges
the contributions of friend and producer
Malcolm Biddle. A musician himself, Bid-
die is constantly recording his friends'
albums in his shed, situated twenty feet
from The Lido, a venue that has hosted
many of these performers as well. Anyone
who complains that Vancouver has a weak
music community should look towards
Biddle's studio for inspiration. Gray
recorded the entirety of Perfume there, and
speaks highly of his experience: "I am a
28
KIM GRAY Y, POPPY SONGS, AND I KNEW
big fan of everything Malcolm has done —
Capitol 6, Dada Plan, and his solo stuff.
I had no idea what was going to happen
with [Perfume], but the two of us bounced
ideas off each other and I'm really pleased
with what they became. Synths and drum
machines were something different for
me, and it made recording music feel new
again."
While discussing the release plan for
Perfume (both vinyl and cassette), I take
the opportunity to question the recent
resurgence of the cassette. Despite harbouring a fondness for tactile mediums,
three years of having a Stompin' Tom Connors cassette irreversibly lodged in my
car has led to a certain skepticism when
it comes to tape. Gray is less conflicted:
"I really like cassettes. Yes, they do sound
worse and worse as you play them. And
eventually, if you play the cassette enough
it's not going to be there. But maybe
there's something special about that. You
don't know how many more times you can
listen to that song — you better enjoy it
while you can."
In saying this Gray points to an ideal
that both he and many of his peers
uphold. It is a way of treating music with
a constant, reverent urgency. It's what
leads to new recording projects beginning before the last record is cut to vinyl.
It is four song EP's with quick turnaround
times being favored over longer form records. Although it may seem counterintuitive, the use of tapes could in fact be a
perfect representation of this notion: the
impermanence of magnetic film and plastic spools elevate the listening experience.
Like eating a sandwich or having gas in
your car, you appreciate it all the more for
knowing that it will inevitably run out.
Gray embodies this urgent productivity. With Perfume yet to be released he
is well into recording another album. His
live band has grown, now consisting of
Joon Baek, Thomas Schmidt, and Geoff
Thompson. When asked about any thematic shifts in his songwriting Gray is
pragmatic: "Writing songs has always
been therapy for myself, so I would hate
to impose my shitty feelings on those who
are listening. I write a lot of songs. A lot
of them are shit. I choose some that are
ok, and this is how I make a record. I'm
not necessarily sure if any thematic shifts
were intentional. Things change anyway."
This may actually be the best way to
think about Kim Gray's music. Discussing
'songwriting' with Gray seems strange and
forced precisely because it is something so
natural. When Perfume arrives it will be
exciting, but it is not an end goal. Just as
an old Stompin' Tom tape or an old building are placeholders for a specific time in
history, so too will Perfume be a welcome
addition to Kim Gray's already unique
body of work.
Perfume will be released digitally in
late May, with a release show date yet to be
determined. It will be on cassette through
Lolipop Records, and 12" vinyl through
Resurrection Records. Visit kimgray.band-
camp.comfor more info.
KIM  GRAY
29 ,■-'
J. ALBERT /
D. TIFFANY /
CONDUIT
MARCH 5 / SWEETPUP
It takes a friend, who knows a friend, who
knows where they're going to find Sweetpup,
and that's the way the organizers like it.
The venue is above an unassuming shop in
Chinatown, identifiable this night because of
a guy standing outside the venue smoking
a cigarette looking very cool. His presence
seemed out of place on the quiet street, and
I knew I was at the right location.
The venue itself had a silky ambiance.
The djs were backlit with blue and purple in
the main area. A more intimate room off to
the side glowed fuchsia, and included natural smoke effects.
The show had started by the time I arrived,
with Tacoma's Conduit giving early attendees a strong and consistent beat, but that's
it. The set was an endurance of the same
beat with little variety or creativity. However,
like any rhythm in a willing room, it populated
the floor. But the levels were kept low, allowing for conversations and mingling.
The transition between Conduit and D.
Tiffany featured The Delivery Boys, whose
short set was spicy and energized. It was the
perfect usher for D. Tiffany, who packed the
floor with preemptive applause.
D. Tiffany's set was a balance of beat and
tease. She introduced sudden breaks, false
drops and transitions, building the audience
to a delirium. The music was atmospheric
and mesmerizing. Any conversations disappeared into jumping and swaying, and the
floor boards bounced beneath the weight.
There was an awkward pause in the beat
before Brooklyn's J. Albert, a full few seconds
of silence, but he redeemed this taboo with a
contagious energy. He started dancing to his
own set immediately, jumping and punching
the air from behind the table, and the audience followed by example. Though more
structured and less ambient than D. Tiffany's
set, J. Albert's beats were still intuitive. He
read his audience, and matched their moves
with music that felt inspired by, genres of
dance spanning from the Caribbean to India,
and some playful '90s transitions thrown in.
The set was unusually short, however, leaving the audience blue balled.
With the option to either stay until sunrise
or spill onto the streets, most of the crowd
split, while the night continued for the few
who remained.
—Leigh Empress
30
REAL  LIVE  ACTION TV UGLY / THE
PLODES/ZIK/
SWEATER VEST
MARCH 12 @ 333
If you've ever stepped foot into 333, you
know to bring your jacket. The punk venue
stood in the heart of the industrial neighborhood, and could be easily dismissed as
just another garage. And I mean, you'd be
almost right, save for the stage, tattered
co ;h, and graffiti plastered bathroom. The
garage vibe was complete with the lack of
heating system, which most of the crowd
doesn't seem to mind, as they wait for the
first band, Sweater Vest.
I was curious to see the initial reaction of
the crowd to Sweater Vest, who were given the pleasure of being the first to play at
a small show. A large majority of the crowd
stood stagnant as they played the first half
of their set with a handful of audio problems,
screeching amps, and the like. Most of the
time, vocals were left unheard and I was left
guessing what was being said. It felt like a
miracle when the singing came through on
"Kevin's Song," as Kevin himself took the
lead vocals. It's not often that drummers are
able to keep a rhythm chugging along while
singing, but he pulled off the drum and vocal
combo in a very expressive manner.
Next up was Z!k, a garage group out of
Victoria. The crowd was warmed up by this
point, and taking command of the stage
seemed organic for Z!k. Within moments,
the mosh had begun and the crowd's energy
fed back into the band. The guitarist's fingers
were splayed across the fretboard, and his
aggressive playing and thrashing around on
stage kept everyone well entertained. Only
at the end of the set had I realized that Z!k
had brought quite a crowd, and I could have
sworn it wasn't so cold anymore.
Then came The Plodes, who are a two
person band — a nice change of pace, but
you would have thought there would be
something missing. I mean, come on: guitar,
drums and vocals couldn't be enough, right?
Wrong.
For their opening song "WaterlTree!," if I
closed my eyes, I'd swear to you that front-
man Reid Blakely was flying across the
stage, twitching like a madman, To my disbelief, he stood calm in one spot. I'd also be
lying to you if I said it wasn't odd, but the
manic drive was refreshing and a highlight
of the night.
tv ugly's set capped off the night. By this
point, most of the crowd had evaporated,
leaving only a handful of diehard fans and
supporters, and, after The Plodes' performance, the pack seemed in a more eased
state. The multi-instrumentalist group took
turns passing off their instruments, and
every song had different stylistic touches.
The shifting nature of the group kept every
song fresh and ended the night with a nice
chunk of variety.
It truly is a blessing to have this venue in
Vancouver. The age inclusive space allowed
plenty of younger listeners to wander in and
enjoy the night. With a lineups like that, I'm
sure I'll be back again to this cold garage
(with a thicker sweater).
—James Shaw
REAL  LIVE ACTION
31 DESTROY VANCOUVER
XV: PETER KUTIN
/ BILL NACE AND
GREG KELLEY /
ARMA AGHARTA
/ KATHERINE
KLINE / PETER
COURTEMANCHE /
SELECTORS' RECORDS
DJ
MARCH 12 / SFU WOODWARDS, STUDIO D
There are two preliminary notes for this
review. First, for some reason, I was initially under the impression that Destroy
Vancouver was a dance event. Second, halfway through Peter Kutin's expansive set, I
shot back into myself with the realization that
I had double-booked, and had a voucher for
a Vancouver New Music show twenty minutes away — also not a dance event.
I mention this as evidence that my mind
was elsewhere. And I extend my apologies
to Peter Courtemanche; being scattered, I
arrived late, missing the majority of his set.
While I arrived late to Destroy Vancouver,
catching the last five minutes of Peter
Couteremanche's performance was an auspicious first glance. Drawing out frequencies with a circular disc, against a pole of
distraught wire, Courtemanche's performance appeared to be the synthesis of technical installation and aural exploration that
makes Destroy Vancouver exciting. The fifteenth Destroy Vancouver, curated by Elisa
Ferrari and founder John Brennan, was an
evening of amiable noise; intrigue revealed
according to the listener's diligence. Take
for instance Selectors' Records' DJ, Brady
Cranfield in-between sets — techno as gallery object and palate cleanser.
For Katherine Kline's set, the lecture hall
lighting was extinguished, her set illuminated
by candlelight. Working with audio sampled
from seances, with the granular ambience of
worn tape, Kline's performance staged visitations from the past into the immediate. The
deformation of voice, synth, and heartbeat
drums, the shrill shrieks ofnoise conjured an
atmosphere of haunted exploration that was
as percolative and supple as it was liable to
strike.
Arma Agharta followed, a Lithuanian artist, the evening's highlight. Circuit-bending
a colorful array: Fisher-Price, See 'N Say
Farmer Says, and an LED megaphone that
belched demonic red, Arma's mania brought
to light the essential and joyful play of noise.
Cartoonish samples, zips and boops, made
Fantomas' Suspended Animation a reference point. But Arma was more interested in the improvisational flourish of combatant noise. Eventually stripped down to
sequins, Arma took Destroy Vancouver to
heart. Pointing towards the crowd, he mimed
his toy guitar, firing like an automatic-rifle.
One caveat: wearing his shirt as a keffiyeh,
Arma's gestures could suggest outrageous
ethnic stereotypes. It's certainly interesting,
an embodied history of appropriation and
'transgressive' signifiers in the noise genre
soundtracked with farmyard fart music. That
quality does not necessarily warrant thé gesture, though there is something to be said
for the cultural distance between Canada
and Lithuania. Nonetheless, Arma's performance was a highlight, circumspect and
self-deprecating: experimental music, the
academy, the noise-phallus, united in an act
of sonic masturbation.
Bill Nace and Greg Kelley followed, on guitar and trombone respectively. With a series
of acoustic and electronic effects, Nace and
Kelley were subtle masters of drone. Kelley's
32
REAL  LIVE ACTION wavering, strengthening blows, Nace's swift
bow strikes and tremolo, conjured an eerie
hum of electro-acoustic austerity. To borrow a sentiment from Michael Gira, it was
machine music that had the advantage of
being played by humans.
Peter Kutin, a Viennese artist of repute,
concluded the show with his soundscapes.
Functional as beat-music, Kutin's set
touched on the industrial imperative of Pan
Sonic, with an audio-palette of rattles and
percussion that evoked an earthier, more
human thrum. One aspect of Kutin's practice is the explosion of minute sound. Two
drums laid at the front of Kutin's kit, with
mics set against the skin. It's interesting to
consider what reverberations were picked
up that jammed Kutin's otherwise deliberate
meditations.
Again, listener diligence is important.
Luckily, on this night there was plenty to get
lost in otherwise.
—Jonathan Kew
DAUGHTER / DRALMS
MARCH 18 / VOGUE THEATRE
It's in no way a secret that Vancouver has
a problem finding spaces to host all ages
shows. While there are certain venues that
work to accommodate a younger crowd, it
is all too common for most concerts to now
almost exclusively be 19+ events. Needless
to say, it has been a hot minute since I last
attended a show where I was next to a pack
of fourteen year olds. So, as I made my way
down to the Vogue Theatre for the Daughter
concert, I made sure to keep my expectations low, and earplugs ready in case of any
high-pitched, ill-timed yelps of adoration.
"Could we maybe get it a little bit darker
in here? Do I get to call those shots?" asked
Christopher Smith from the front of the theatre. It was a suitable request for Dralms'
frontman, already clad in all black, along with
REAL  LIVE ACTION
33 his three bandmates. Though originally not
on the bill to perform, the local post-rockers
filled in as first act, offering up a dusky, atmospherically driven set. Weaving together
whirling, sultry synths with complex percussion and rounded out, imposing basslines,
Dralms constructed a visceral landscape, full
of swelling instrumental builds, that would
be the perfect fit to any deliciously dystopic
soundtrack. Between attempts at holding a
pseudo-awkward banter with the audience,
Dralms ended up delivering a cool, moody
performance, particularly with standout
tune "Usage" and the dark, Marxist-tinged
"Division of Labour." It was Smith's airy,
roaming vocal delivery, however, that worked
to win over a chatty crowd that was obviously impatient for their headliner to take the
stage.
After much anticipation from the audience, Daughter emerged to resounding hollers. To kick off the night, the group started off roaring with Elena Tonra's dreamy,
drawled out vocals, combined with Igpr
Haefeli's Verb-drenched guitar wails and
Remi Aguilella crashing percussion on the
track "How." Fresh off the release of their
sophomore LP Not To Disappear, the band
has continued to create a body of work from
within their brand of cathartic sad-folk tunes
that remain largely familiar to longterm fans.
However, this project has noticeably shifted
away from a more minimalist production in
favour of larger, more cinematically expansive soundscapes.
That being said, the highlight of Daughter's
act was undoubtedly hiding in between the
towering instrumentation and orchestral
backbeat of their set, and was found nestled in the quiet moments of Tonra's voice
whenever it stood alone. Its raw and heart-
breakingly vulnerable quality was drenched
in emotion, and was only matched by rising
voices from the crowd, singing along, word
for word.
Over the course of the night, Daughter
churned on an impressive seventeen song
set list that focused predominantly on their
new LP, but also made sure not to forgo older, fan favourite tracks like "Amsterdam,"
"Home," and "Smother." Of course, it was
"Youth" that drew the largest response from
the crowd, which seemed to only elevate
Tonra's voice.
Being in a venue chalk-full of teenagers
was not something I had been looking forward to. Surprisingly, the experience reminded me what it was like to be a younger music
fan, and to be barred from singing along
with your favourite artist live. If anything, the
youthful crowd seemed to help invigorate
Daughter into a performance that was both
engaging and driven. Indeed, the results
were electrifying.
—Missy Martin
ACID MOTHERS
TEMPLE 8 THE
MELTING PARAISO
U.F.O
MARCH 19 / THE COBALT
The crowd that filled the Cobalt to see
Japan's Acid Mothers Temple & the Melting
Paraiso U.F.O was an animal I don't often
see at shows in Vancouver. Absent was
the restless, nervous energy that permeates through audiences as they wait for the
headliner to take stage. In its place was a
more tame beast. One which instead waited patiently for a familiar musical tempest to
wreak its havoc.
The unusually subdued atmosphere was
likely generated by the long-time super fans
who compiled most of the audience. An older man in a Hawaiian shirt slapped his hand
against my back and told me that this was
34
REAL  LIVE ACTION going to be his sixteenth time seeing the
band. Before I could jnquire about his experiences, the Cobalt was brought alive by
cheering as Acid Mothers Temple took to
the stage-exactly one minute before their
expected start time.
The band dove straight into their set
without any introductions. In seconds, Acid
Mothers Temple managed to generate a
dizzying cloud of sound that seemed far
too expansive to come from the five piece
band that stood on stage. The bass lines
were strong and melodic, providing balance and stability within the chaos. The set-
list, though short, showcased the band's
eclectic influences. As soon as keyboardist, Higashi Hiroshi played the first few notes
of his harmonica I knew that I was in for a
Black Sabbath-soaked treat. Acid Mothers
Temple's cover of "The Wizard" managed
to pay homage to Sabbath while driving the
familiar, heavy riffs into a fresh realm of psychedelic ecstasy.
The last two songs of their set, however,
involved more meandering. After about seven minutes of experimental, musical exploration mixed with spaceship inspired synths,
I felt bored. But, then without warning I realized the music had snuck up slowly and was
now engulfing the audience like some sort of
intoxicating cloud of smoke.
Have you ever fallen asleep on a road trip
and, upon waking up, felt awash with disorientation due to your new surroundings?
In what felt like a few seconds of unconsciousness, you find that you have been
transported to a new place and a new time.
Acid Mothers Temple managed to achieve
the same experience with their music. The
slow and steady buildup made Kawabata
Makoto's heavy guitar shredding feel like the
first sip of water after living in drought.
After finishing twenty minutes early, Acid
Mothers Temple took to the floor to sell their
own merchandise. Excited fans presented
their posters to the band to be signed while
gushing their praises of the performance.
I was impressed not only by the band's
musical performance but by their promptness, professionalism, and down to earth
approach.
Soon after the set ended, a different crowd
of people entered the Cobalt looking to party. The rapid change of pace felt irreverent
somehow; like these strangers were violating something indescribably sacred that had
been created by Acid Mothers Temple just
fifteen minutes prior.
—Bridget Gallagher
III
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder
Magazine and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in
advance to Robert Catherall, Real Live Action Editor at
rla.discorder@citr.ca.
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19
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* -■■■>   Brevner
Brevner
(URBNET)
The opening track on Brevner, "Chico," samples dialogue from Scarface. Tony Montana
explains to his companion Chico what he wants:
"The world, Chico, and everything in it." Brevner's
sights are in keeping with Montana's. After releasing four albums, Matt Brevner seeks international
recognition for himself and for his city. Writing in a
Facebook post about his EP's release, he states
"It's about time that #Vancouver got some recognition on the world stage."
"Chico" features fellow Vancouver artists
Within Roots and Stevie Ross, with production
credits shared between Brevner, Within Roots'
Nico De Torres, and others. The EP's final track,
"Last Call," features vocals and production from
Calgary-based Fembot, Both tracks deftly mix
heavy beats and electronic backtracks with melodic vocals, sung hooks, and Brevner's subdued
raps. The production equally showcases the tal
ents of Brevner and his contributors.
Paired with other rappers, however, Brevner's
verses are an afterthought. His verses meld with
the ambience on "BNE," while Memphis rapper
Project Pat commands the track. Droning sub-
bass, low-key melody and heavy beats are used
to a similar effect on "Give a F*CK," with Atlanta-based Rome Fortune at the forefront of the
track with his energetic verse. Though Brevner
is at his most dynamic on "Jane Doe (A hoe like
YOU)," the track isn't stronger for Houston rapper Riff Raff's stuttering repetition of "Heart feels
like it's been ate by a shark." Given the prominent feature of Southern rappers, comparisons of
Brevner's sound to Dirty South hip-hop are justified. His production style comes through but his
narrative perspective fades.
Brevner is at his best when he subtly brings
his perspective to the forefront. "All We Know" is
one of two tracks on which Brevner is the sole
performer and producer. The track represents an
artist and a city on the border. Facing barriers to
entry — "Still gettin' searched through customs" —
is a reality for any artist travelling to America. More
particularly, it is a reality for Brevner as a Canadian hip-hop artist seeking recognition beyond
his country's borders. The video for "All We Know"
is set on Vancouver's streets, often overlooked
in favour of mountainous panoramas. Brevner
needn't describe another locale when his city has
its own culture and urban narratives.
Brevner doesn't scream Vancouver; it represents the city perceptively. To acknowledge
Brevner's work, then, is tô quietly acknowledge
Vancouver in it. — Courtney Heffernan
UNDER  REVIEW
43 French Pretzel
ii
(Self-Released)
After all these years, evidence is finally here.
//, the EP recently released/revealed by the Nova
Scotian producer, French Pretzel, might be it —
the "black box" of apocalypse.
"The first angel sounded his trumpet, and
there came hail and fire mixed with blood, and it
was hurled down on the earth. A third of the earth
was burned up, a third of the trees were burned
up, and all the green grass was burned up" (Revelation 8:7) seems to witness "Xanthan," the first
song on //, which uses its vivid, mechanical syntax
of complex, electronic sounds. The dark synthetics are constituted by the repetitive, shrill horns
and the robotic, granular drone of the static. Hearing between the lines, the seismometer needles
wobble frantically. The plangent incense burners of altar boys murmuring unintelligible prayers,
sounding the last throes of agony, fill the fiery wind
with a metallic sacredness. All comes to an end
upon a sound like flickering ashes.
"And I heard a sound from heaven like the roar
of rushing waters and like a loud peal of thunder.
The sound I heard was like that of harpists playing
their harps" (Revelation 14:2) seems to witness
"Quota," the second song. Seen from afar, huge
waves of a dark-ambient sea rinse the burned-out
land. The steady, tardy throb of the percussion
tries to comfort the anxious bells and the disori
ented strings of the automated harpsichords.
"Then I saw 'a new heaven and a new earth,'
for the first heaven and the first earth had passed
away, and there was no longer any sea" (Revelation 21:1) seems to witness "Pastoral," the third
and final song. The new woman stands on the
ground where she must build the new Garden of
Eden. A persistent ringing, drums that sound as if
rods are crashing into pillows and a constant pattern of distorted electric guitars disrupt her search
for tools in the surrounding paths. Like a benevolent siren, her long drawn-out, soft vocals keep the
new man away from the new evil.
Though punchier than on the previous album,
Kimono, French Pretzel remains faithful to electronic darkness on //. The album is a tiny pill of
condensed post-apocalyptic hallucinations; small
but effective.— Theano Pavlidou
Essaie Pas
Demain est une autre nuit
(DFA)
What do you think of when you think of electronic dark-synth? Hold onto that sound. Add
a touch of Kraftwerk, driving rhythm that beats
your heart for you, and a little monotone spoken-
word en français: this is Montreal duo Essaie Pas.
With Marie Davidson on vocals and keys and
Pierre Guerineau on vocals, keys, and produc-
44
UNDER  REVIEW tion, Essaie Pas blend French pop with sparse
synths and industrial tones reminiscent of horror
movie scores. They are most certainly no strangers to trying - and succeeding - despite what
their name may suggest, having released a handful of EPs, split single cassettes, and an LP since
they formed in the summer of 2010. Demain est
une autre nuit is their first widely available full-
length album.
The album opens slowly: unfolding static,
an alien hum, and mournful strings. "Tomorrow
is another night," the album title promises, and
this one sounds like it will never end. A woman's
voice, distorted and skipping, adds to the din, her
smooth intonation setting a tone of seduction for
the next thirty-six minutes. "Dépassée par le fantasme" introduces a throwback sequencer vibe
over factory floor beats and haunting, minor-key
organ chords with grandiose progressions that
evoke Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of
the Opera. Taken together, these elements set a
high bar for the album's energy level, and bring
us into the gritty glitter of a Nicolas Winding Refn
film. "Carcajou 3" is a sinister thriller and album
highlight, it is coldly industrial and yet also nostalgic, populated with minimal synths. Deeper into
the tracklist, "Facing The Music" has the intensity
of an EDM club banger with subtler force, beginning with a driving techno that grows darker as the
song progresses and devolves the listener into a
trance-like state.
The tracks are frantic and looping, and within
them you can feel neon lights and the animal
thrum of the big city. Songs could easily soundtrack a dance floor, a bank heist, the chase scene
of a Bond movie, or an 8-bit video game, with
a choose-your-own-adventure momentum that
aches of youthful energy not bound by a certain
time or place. In three words: panting, frenetic,
hypnotic— Hana Golightly
Black Wizard
New Waste
(Listenable Records)
Legend has it that seven-odd years ago, three
witches gathered in the heart of a fog-filled forest
with the intent to create the next greatest heavy
metal band. In their cauldron, they melted down
vinyl records from the likes of Black Sabbath,
Judas Priest, and Deep Purple, then topped it off
with cheap beer and began to chant, The musical
creation that rose from the depths with fire and
weed smoke in 2009 is known as Black Wizard.
The four piece band plays seriously heavy
stoner metal with a less than serious attitude.
Recently, Vancouver's beloved Black Wizard has
released, New Waste, an album that manages
to explore new territory while paying homage to
heavy metal forefathers.
It's hard not to compare New Wâ$te to the
band's previous brain-melting release, Young Wisdom. Notably, Black Wizard's new album breaks
away from the typical dark and stormy tone of
many metal albums. Young Wisdom feels like
walking through the towering trees of a fog-laden
forest at midnight. New Waste on the other hand
is more like sailing across volatile ocean waters
on a viking ship. Overall, the album's tone seems
lighter and more energetic. The drums on New
Waste gallop rather than thunder. Additionally,
some of the distortion has been smoothed out to
reveal a cleaner sound. That is not to say, hovy-
ever, that the band skimped on heaviness when
UNDER  REVIEW
45 producing New Waste. The steely guitar harmonies still rip through the rolling drums and melodic
bass like an arrow — a sound I've come to expect
from Black Wizard.
What I didn't expect to hear on New Waste
was the bluesy, weeping guitar ballad "Laughing and Lost," a song marinated in 70s hard rock
influence. Frontman Adam Grant's voice deviates
from his usual powerful growl to something more
sensual and emotionally rousing. The addition of
slower songs like "Laughing and Lost," the interlude "Waiting For" and classical guitar outro on
"Vivian Girls" pierce through the heaviness to create a more complex, layered album overall.
New Waste manages to accomplish what most
music fans can only pray for. The album treads on
new territory without sacrificing the original sound
of the band. And, while the legend of their genesis
may be dubious, I am quick to believe that Black
Wizard had dark magic on their side when creating New Waste.— Bridget Gallagher
Mu
n
(Boompa)
k
-Ml
}1>f
'  it
! #f
When I find myself in the alley behind my
house, I am reminded that the world is disgusting
in new and creative ways. I've watched a clove of
garlic decompose step-by-step, seen a pet carrier
that had clearly been jail broken, and even been
astounded by the sudden appearance of twenty-
plus egg shells. Mu duo Francesca Belcourt and
Brittney Rand's newest release // is a piece of
careful, dream-pop escapism. Synth-rich, textur-
ally complex backgrounds create a land where I
can walk through my alley and see this shit without
gagging. All the gross stuff goes away, and even
transforms into whimsy.
// is confident, ambitious. Francesca Belcourt and Brittany Rand's first full-length album
from Boompa follows a successful self-titled EP
released two years ago that was less polished.
Belcourt was additionally met with warm reception for her solo album ZONGS, released through
Genero in 2015.
Songs like "Disarmed" and "Deep Woods"
build slower than Mu's previous work, with more
ceremony before the dancefloor kicks in. The
vocal melodies compete less in this release, creating consolidated harmonies. Where Mu's EP was
a piece of offhand catharsis, // is the product of
polished planning, and deliberate embellishment.
The blue haired, crowned figures on //'s cover
are a vision. The fantasy becomes more palpable
in the video for "Debauchery," which features Belcourt and Rand running around with a shopping
cart while a few of their glittered-up pals have their
own dance sesh. It's a giggly, blissful atmosphere
that complements the upbeat momentum of the
song. The two have spoken to The FADER about
how the video represents a "coming of age in an
era obsessed with itself," and the video shows
that this can be something to celebrate and even
indulge in.
The mise-en-scene is rosy but album doesn't
shy away from heavier issues. People will be
drawn to "Vampire," the glockenspiel adorned critique of Vancouver's support for independent artists. But the album reaches its emotional climax
on "Deep Woods," addressing the role of supporters for those with depression.
At just six tracks, the album and fantasy
isn't forever. Your millennial bullshit, on the other
hand...the songs don't let you escape your problems, but change the setting and the veneer.
— Christine Powell
46
UNDER  REVIEW So Loki
SUPERMANIC
(Owake)
So Loki, the Vancouver rapper Sam Lucia
and producer Natura's new mixtape Supermanic
begins like the opening of a portal to a new world.
The first track "Sleep" consists of a surreal conglomerate of futuristic beeps, tinkling and bubbling. The lyrics "consciousness suspended" are
self evident in the initial aura and tinged with
deeper emotional foreboding in the concurrent
lyrics "There must be / There has to be / More."
"Unhealthy" continues down the rabbit hole,
with Lucia half barking assertions into an audio
abyss, hoping they catch. But overall the lost feeling persists. He yells into what sounds like an
echo chamber, encountering verbal spasms of
what could be considered "the self" but remaining unsure and rolling in the discomfort of the
unknown. This separation of identity from reality sprouts from a menage of disillusionment,
doubt, and anxiety-ridden statements in contrast
with hard, confident ones. In "Unhealthy," Lucia
laments, "Is this real or just a dream?" ... "I need
shade to hide my face but I'm not phased by the
garbage /1 feel so lethargic / I'm supposed to handle this speech / But can't stop cl-cl-clenching my
teeth /1 need my sleep." Jenny Lea, the featured
artist on the track sings, "I'm tryna come up but
instead I just get high /1 said I'm tryna come up
but instead I just get by." So Loki present a com
plex confrontation with a liminal self.
"Head Out The Window" moves the album
narrative into daytime with the sounds of a couple
waking up in the morning, thus signaling that the
first two songs were a dream state. After a quick
interlude of half-lucid mutterings, the song diverts
into powerful rap spits, blasting the listener and
the album awake — no more self-doubt, just a
driving beat. "Everytime I open my mouth I hear
magic /Everytime I open my mind I feel passion /
Everytime I open my eyes I see plastics,"... "I ain't
got a car /1 just got a dream but I wish upon a star."
They are awake. They will burn down the world
with their determination.
I love that this album has a concrete narrative
thread. We move from slumber, morning, party,
all the while mapping the rise and denouement of
a relationship and contemplating other clouds of
thought. However, the abstract ideas can fall a bit
flat. "Rebelution" feels like an unclear call to arms
and "Graves" seems like an out of place contemplation of death. It takes a jarring leap from the
playful or anxious tones to an excessively morbid "We don't wanna breathe / One day we'll all
go cold." While the range of topics are a bit too
large the musical versatility is incredible. With
Supermanic, So Loki range from sax and jazz
to slow jams, fastidious audio landscapes, and
dialogue. This album oozes a hypnotic, vivid
energy.— Callie Hitchcock
Junior Boys
Big Black Coat
(City Slang)
The landscape of electronic music has been
reimagined in the ten years since Junior Boys
released the Polaris Music Prize nominated So
This Is Goodbye. Electronic music has become
a dominant genre within popular music, and
although it encompasses many sub-genres, calling music "electronic" doesn't mean very much.
After releasing It's All True in 2011, Jeremy
Greenspan and Matthew Didemus have spent the
past five years involved in various other studio
projects. This includes Greenspan's production
on Jessy Lanza's excellent debut, Pull My Hair
UNDER  REVIEW
47 Back. The duo's return, Big Black Coat, operates
as a fusion of many genres making up electronic
music. This includes elements of arpeggiated
techno, laid-back house, funk, and bedroom pop.
At its best moments, Big Black Coat blends these
elements together with perfect balance.
Take album standouts "Baby Give Up On It"
and "No One's Business" for example. The filtered
synths and grooving bass give these two songs a
full funky sound. The thumping "What You Won't
Do For Love" has a hypnotic pulse that would fill
a dance floor, but also has an ambience to it that
sounds just as good on a pair of headphones.
There are instances where Junior Boys have
potential pop songs on their hands. "Over It" feels
like it is going to explode into a big hooky chorus
at any moment. It never does however, and this
restraint is exemplary of Junior Boys experience
in their field.
The album ends with the anti-climatic title
track. It begins as a promising R&B tinged song
with glitchy drums, but it ends with what sounds
like an awkward extended remix, only this is the
original mix. Nonetheless, as a whole Big Black
Coat, is easy to relax with ("No One's Business"),
dance to ("M & P"), and may even invite introspective thoughts about failed relationships ("You
Say That"). It doesn't push many boundaries, nor
does it intend to. Instead it suggests one of the
best rationales for electronic music: tightly produced sonic landscapes. Big Black Coat accomplishes this with glossy production, and strong
songwriting. It is an authentic culmination from
these last five years in electronic music, ft means
something.—Corbin Pawer
The Inflation Kills
Grounds For Termination
(Cold Slither Tapes)
It's been almost eleven years since we last
heard from Hamilton punk four-piece, The Inflation Kills, and it seems they haven't found much to
raise their spirits in the interim. Cheery vignettes
from their latest EP include a world void of purpose and commitment, the motto that "rejection is
close to triumph" and the reassurance that if you
"turn up dead at least [your] mind won't know."
The band's core sound largely eschews the wired
fuzz of bassist David O'Connor's main group
TV Freaks, as well as the hollowed-out doom of
frontman Phil Williams' previous math-rock project Kitchens & Bathrooms. Instead, The Inflation
Kills use a much more melodic punk chug, with a
stripped-down production job that rather suits the
band's barren outlook.
While the band might describe themselves
as "discordant and angular" on their Bandcarhp,
there's nothing here that would scare off anyone
who grew up listening to so-called 'alternative'
music from the '90s. The discordant riffs that open
up the first two tracks, for example, soon give way
to barrelling guitar and drum fills, and the chorus
48
UNDER  REVIEW of "Dead Girls" is their most anthemic offering yet.
One particular highlight is the penultimate track
"Rejection," which is bookended by the band's
usual driving tempos, but morphs into a building
post-rock jam midway through. Less memorable
is the vocal-less "Saskatoon," which aptly demonstrates why instrumental punk has never become
a thing — straightforward power chords take centre stage without any major diversions to keep it
interesting.
The majority of the album feels claustrophobic, as the distortion and tar-soaked basslines
often leave no empty space behind. While this
would hinder many a fresh-faced indie band, this
actually complements The Inflation Kill's noisy
tales of desperation and destitution, where there
is no escape, and no way out. So positive vibes
be damned, this is the sound of a band who likes
nothing more than going down with the ship.—
Thomas Barker
Pugs & Crows & Tony Wilson
Everyone Knows Everyone 1 Si 2
(Self-Released)
According to their bandcamp page, Pugs &
Crows' Everyone Knows Everyone is "Dedicated
to everyone that plays or has played a part in contributing to this Vancouver music scene." With all
five members of the band — pianist Cat Toren,
violinist Meredith Bates, guitarist Cole Schmidt,
bassist  Russell  Sholberg,   and  drummer  Ben
Brown — collaborating with musicians across
the city and beyond, it's no wonder they acknowledge the community of music-makers and lovers
that surround them. And if the dedication wasn't
enough to convince you of their collaborative zeal,
Pugs & Crows brings on board Tony Wilson, one
of the West Coast's most prolific and innovative
guitarists and composers, for the entirety of their
latest release.
Despite the two parts of the double-LP being
released six months apart, Everyone Knows
Everyone 1 & 2 are meant to be experienced
together. With sixteen tracks spanning almost two
hours, the Juno-winning band's latest release is
not only a demonstration of the sextet's musical
ingenuity and endurance, but a display of their
sonic diversity.
Pugs & Crows blend careful orchestration
and free improvisation, with each musician commanding their instrument with near overwhelming
skill and restraint. Despite having twice as many
guitarists on the record than any other instrument,
Schmidt and Wilson do not crowd each other, nor
do their guitars overwhelm the rest of the band.
In fact, the instrumentation throughout the entire
double album is balanced to perfection, highlighting various aspects of each musician's unique and
advanced skill sets....— Jasper D. Wrinch
*To continue reading visit www.discorder.ca*
HI
To submit music for review consideration in Discorder
Magazine and online, please send a physical copy to
the station addressed to Jon Kew, Under Review Editor
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver BC, V6T1Z1. Though our contributors prioritize
physical copies, you may email download codes to
underreview.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums
sent prior to their official release dates.
UNDER  REVIEW
49 ASHLEY SHADOW
A LONG TIME COMING
words by Jasper D. Wrinch // illustrations by Alisa Lazear
photos by Sara Boar
"I get stressed out just thinking about
having to sing my songs in front of people,"
says Ashley Webber, the woman behind
atmospheric folk act Ashley Shadow.
Despite having recorded, performed, and
toured with countless prominent indie and
alternative musicians over the past decade, she is still somehow an emerging artist. About to release her debut, self-titled
full length, Ashley Shadow, Webber sits
down with Discorder to talk about her past
work, her present projects, and her future
plans.
While the intention of this article was
not to focus on Webber in relation to the
long list of collaborations she's done,
they're almost impossible to ignore.
"When I was in The Organ, I was so
into The Cure and Joy Division," says
Webber, "so that was a dream band at the
time. It was exactly what I wanted to be
doing." After playing bass with The Organ
from 2001 to 2005, Webber began collaborating more and more with other bands,
such as Lightning Dust, The Cave Singers,
and Bonnie Prince Billy among others.
Webber has made a name for herself as a
go-to voice to complete songs in just about
any genre.
But she admits that writing and playing her own music was always on her mind
while she was performing other people's
material. "I knew I could write a song, I just
wanted to do it finally," she explains. "It's
something that was on the back burner for
a long time, and something that I'd always
intended to do when I was getting into
music and playing with other bands."
However, heading into the studio with
her own songs for the first time, the experience was slightly different for Webber. "It
just felt more personal, I guess. I was more
excited," she says, quick to add that "I have
been very excited about working on other
people's stuff too. This was just different."
Webber brought her collection of demos
and song ideas to The Balloon Factory studio run by Joshua Wells (Black Mountain,
Lightning Dust, Sur Une Plage) to begin
recording what turned into her debut LP.
Webber and Wells jare far from strangers
— Ashley's sister Amber Webber is also
in Lightning Dust and Black Mountain —
and together they poured their years of
expertise into bringing Webber's songs out
of the shadows.
As she explains, "I'd never really gone
in with my own songs before, so it was
new for me. It was cool to have [Wells']
encouragement, him asking me 'What
about this?', something that I'd never
even think of." Acting as the engineer and
producer on the songs, Wells "definitely
brought them to life," Webber notes. But
even with his assistance, Ashley Shadow
is truly a solo project. Developing musical
ideas, composing lyrics, providing multiple instrumental parts, and filling out
50
ASHLEY SHADOW arrangements, Webber seized the opportunity to produce a body of music that is
wholly her own.
With the finishing touches of three
• other musicians — Ryan Beattie, Peter
La Grand, and Darcy Hancock — Webber transformed her demos into Ashley
Shadow, an airy, imposing, and truly sincere record. With a cover designed by local
artist Maggie Boyd, the album's tone is
visually set even before one listens to it.
Depicting a stark photograph of a sculpted
ceramic woman pulling off her own head,
Webber explains that "Maggie and I are
both interested in the politics of gender
so it naturally permeates the work we cre-^
ate." Spare and striking, the album artwork demonstrates the intensity and simplicity with which Webber creates music.
"I think this piece works perfectly with the
songs," she adds.
Though the tracks are often imbued"
with  ambience,  Webber's  strong vocal
melodies stand out among the haziness.
On the album opener, "All For You", the^
instrumentation creates a stark mo?
"J HAVE BEEN VER
with reverb-drenched guitars and synths
swelling and swirling around one another,
but it is clear that it is only to support her
voice. "I like music that's more melodic,"
Webber explains, "where singing is a central part of it." In fact, her focus on vocals
is fundamental to her songwriting process: "It might be because I've never mastered an instrument, but I like coming up
with vocal melodies. It's kind of how I write
songs."
Despite starting out as "catchy little
melodies", most of the songs that ended up
on the album have a markedly darker tone.
Working for seven years at Insite, a supervised injection site located in Vancouver's
Downtown Eastside, Webber admits that
"if any of the songs feel like that to you,
it's probably because of that job. It's really
hard to be around that sort of thing, to see
EXCITED ABOUT
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i people who've had such a hard life, to see
the repercussions of that on a daily basis."
While the weight of her experience working
with the at-risk and marginalized population of Vancouver certainly hangs over her
music like a cloud, Webber is clear: "Don't
say anything bad about Insite. It's a great
place. It's just that being in the middle of
that life is a heavy thing."
Luckily, the heavy atmosphere in her
music has found a home with felte records, a recently established L.A.-based
label. "It's only been around for a year and
a half, but it's a really experimental, interesting kind of music," she says. Instead of
curating the roster of bands based around
similar genres or styles, felte concentrates
on supporting artists with similar moods
or atmospheres. "I would say Jeff [Owens]
wanted to sign me~because he wanted a
more singer-songwriter kind of artist, but
still in the same vein," Webber explains. "I
think Jeff would probably want me to be
more intense, but I don't think I'll have a
problem fitting in."
And as comfortable as Webber is within
the local music scene, she still has pangs
of anxiety over taking centre stage. "I don't
know. I've never done it. I even panic about
singing backup for bands. I don't know,"
she relates. While years of playing with
other bands have formed a solid base of
confidence, Webber still feels that the step
into the spotlight is-a large_jmje^When I
was starting," she explains, "I was so shy,
just deadly shy. I would never ever had the
balls to do anything on my own." But now,
with an album complete, a record deal,
and a multitude of musical connections to
her name, Ashley Shadow is finally stepping out on her own. She's just about the
most experienced a beginner can be.
Ashley Shadow will be released April
15, with a release party at China Cloud
April 30. Visit ashleyshadow.bandcamp.
com for more information. Ashley Shadow
will also be opening for Black Mountain at
the Commodore Ballroom May 21.
52 DEVOURS
PASSION EMERGENT
words by Natalie Dee // illustrations by Danielle Jette
photos by Evan Buggle
i  à
11
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I'VE ALWAYS THOUGHT OF DEVOURS AS A PUNK PROJECT. AND
A VERY SELFISH PROJECT, BECAUSE I DO WHAT I WANT, AND I
NEED TO DO IT TO KEEP MYSELF SANE."
"I just — I devour music," Jeff Cancade
confesses when asked about the origins of
his moniker, Devours. There's a wisdom
behind his whole-hearted enthusiasm
for music as he sits down to talk about
Devours' upcoming release, Late Bloomer.
Throughout his life, Cancade has had
a ravenous appetite for music, and he has
more than paid his dues in the industry.
Growing up in Nanaimo with a musical
obsession, followed by a period attending
the University of Victoria, Cancade didn't
try to make it as a singer-songwriter until
moving to Montreal. When he relocated
to Vancouver six years ago, he was determined to survive making music, which led
him to composing music for TV and film.
Even as Cancade discusses having to
conform to the whims of directors and
producers, he embraces the challenge of
it. What really sparks the passion in Cancade, however, is Devours. He describes
the project best himself: "It's my heart and
soul. I've always thought of Devours as a
punk project, and a very selfish project,
because I do what I want, and I need to do
it to keep myself sane."
For the past five years, Devours has
been the place for Cancade to keep the
insanity at bay. However, his first EP
Dignity wasn't released until 2013, and
his first LP 21st & Main appeared a year
later. What was missing from these first
records was Cancade's voice, consisting
DEVOURS
53 'WÊÊÈÊmÊÈmÊm WmmÈËËmm of a self-described "collage-pop" that was
purely sample-based. It wasn't until 2015's
Avalon that Cancade began to incorporate his own voice, and with Late Bloomer
he has finally allowed his voice and lyrics
take centre stage.
There wasn't a spur of the moment-revelation that led Cancade back to singing
— rather, it was a gradual process. One
change was joining ESCHOIR, a choir
based in Vancouver's East Side. "I didn't
even fancy myself a singer and just wanted
to be part of something cool," Cancade
explains. "That was over two years ago and
you know what, I can sing. I don't love my
voice, but I can sing," he says, all humble
confidence.
The second reason behind the return
of his voice was that Cancade finally has
something to say. "I have so much stuff
to write about," he confesses. "[What I'm
writing] feels so genuine, and I've always
gravitated toward personal lyrics." The
lyrics in Late Bloomer contain themes of
aging, coming out, and uncertainty. This
album is about "who I was as a thirty-one
year-old... an exact representation of who
I am right now," explains Cancade, a concept he admits is still "a little terrifying."
But Cancade is ready for it. "As an
artist, you need to be in touch with how
you feel," he says. He describes the overall sound of Late Bloomer as more "personal and dense," than his earlier works,
attributing it to the inclusion of his original lyrics over sampling. To balance this
out, he knew he needed a track that was
"a little more fun and left of centre," and so
"Freddy Krueger Honeymoon Suite" came
to be. A standout track on the album, Cancade describes it as "five minutes of progressive pop through and through."
Cancade's excitement for his upcorning
release is palpable, both in person and in
his online presence. He's released several
clips on YouTube, featuring stunts such
as a mock-lipstick tutorial and a renegade poster hanging. When these stunts
are brought up to Cancade, he laughs:
"I'm always trying to get attention from my
friend group ... I feel the need to entertain,
I'm goofy."
He plans to continue entertaining with
upcoming shows, which he credits to the
perfect storm of knowing the right people
and having the right music. "I want to
get the project out there, and I think you
need to perform," Cancade says. "People
are taking a chance on me, so now it's my
time." He's also branching out by collaborating, inviting fellow ESCHOIR member Joel Gomez to sing on Late Bloomer.
Cancade admits he prefers to be in control of his own music, but he gushes about
Gomez's talents, and is eager to collaborate again.
Another contributor to Late Bloomer is
artist Andrew McGranahan, responsible
for the collage-style album art that features a black and white photo of a man
overlaid with scraps of red. Speaking to
the symbolic imagery, Cancade says, "I
love the idea of the visual of a grown man,
who's kind of sold out in a way — he's
wearing business attire — but everywhere
his skin should be is a passionate red." He
continues, "I'm older now, and I'm half in
the professional world, but I still have the
fire needed to be an artist."
Despite his corporate meanderings,
Cancade shouldn't have to prove his love
of music, but does anyway. He ruminates
on "obscure, Canadian '90s songs that I
would love to sample, but can't actually
get the acapella for," and five minutes later
praises Justin Timberlake's FutureSex/
LoveSounds. Discussing the reality of
making music as a living, he says, "You
need to be adaptable, be a chameleon ...
I've made a lot of different types of different music."
DEVOURS
55 Cancade's lifelong dedication to music
is evident in the last line of Late Bloomer,
taken from Robert DeNiro in Cape Fear.
A booming voice echoes, "Every man has
to go through hell to reach his paradise,"
and the track "Inferno" fades out. Cancade
says it's about his relationship with the
music industry — he has become jaded
as he has become older, but is far from
accepting defeat. "The music industry is a
constant uphill battle, but I know that I
was meant to do this. I'm not gonna give
up — you need to do what you're passionate about."
miÊiËimÊÊÈMÈÊMÈSSÊSi
Late Bloomer will be released digitally April 15 on Locksley Tapes. Devours
will be performing with The Ruffled
Feathers at the WISE Hall April 9. Visit
bigsmokevancouver.com/epk_devours for
more info.
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AN21 Club
$10 for CiTR Members
$15 in advanced on brownpap@rtiokets.oom
$18 at the door VERBODEN FESTIVAL
WRISTBAND
words by Mat Wilkins
illusfrations by Tara Bigdeli
photos by Han-Yu Lee
April is a lucky month for Vancouver;
it will contain the first annual instalment
of Verboden, a two day post punk, EBM,
and dark wave festival running April
8-9 at 333, the Astoria, and Red Gate.
The event is enticing, with a welcoming
DIY aesthetic, support from well-known,
community conscious venues, and tight-
knit lineups. It promises to provide festival-goers with two days of unique and
engaging entertainment in comfortable,
but not-quite-quotidian environments.
However, organizing these shows, according to Robert Katerwol (a local musician
with the band Weird Candle and Verboden
coordinator) was no small feat.
Despite apologizing for any lack of
coherence, Katerwol is surprisingly charismatic as he drinks his first coffee of the
day and outlines the intricacies of the
project. "A lot of the bands that I wanted
were planning tours around this time," he
explains, "I was able to intercept their tour
paths early enough to have them deviate
up North for a while."
Born out of the success of Dark Day —
a day-fest Katerwol assisted with in 2014
and 2015 — Verboden is touted as being a
showcase for the strong scenes spanning
the West Coast and beyond. The logistics of
the festival seem dizzyingly complex, with
local bands playing alongside others travelling from Portland, Los Angeles, Seattle,
and Chicago.
In the midst of all this, ticket prices
remain affordable. Katerwol isn't prepared
to explain the entirety of his book-balancing prowess, and rightly so — including
international acts while keeping festival
passes at $30 is certainly a formula to be
protective of. However, Discorder learns
one small secret; Katerwol has set aside a
personal reserve to subsidize the festival
58
WRISTBAND himself should the turnout be less than
expected. His reasoning is anything but
righteous, with a pragmatic belief that personal financing of a festival in its infancy is
just "part of the process." But logic doesn't
appear to be the only causal factor guiding
Katerwol's investment in the event:
"I would call about ninety per cent of
these bands my friends. I've stayed over at
their houses, eaten breakfast with them ...
I feel like maintaining friendships with the
bands you love is the first step to hosting
events like this."
And so it seems that Katerwol has
inadvertently contributed to one of the
most attractive facets of this project — a
sense of integrity between artists that will
surely come through in the event's performances and atmosphere. And though
the confluence of like-minded music fans
is an inevitable byproduct of any festival,
it's this particular energy that Katerwol
trusts will make Verboden accessible to
everyone.
In case that this familiarity between
acts verges on the exclusive, however,
future plans for open registration and policies for the avoidance of repeat acts will
curtail the recycling of performance. This
will ensure the event is "not just a gang of
WRISTBAND
59 friends," as Katerwol explains. His vision
for the future of Verboden- is strong and
ambitious, with plans to enhance the promotion and advertising of the festival, and
finance overseas performers.
For many musicians in the industry,
planning doesn't come easily. Oftentimes,
the transition from a creative role to an
adininistrative one is difficult, yet Katerwol describes this transition as second
nature. "I've been putting on shows since
around 2009, and putting [Verboden] on
is just three times the work," he explains
with calm conviction.
In fact, it's quite easy to see a festival like Verboden as a creative product
in and of itself. And, as with any production of creative merit, it is a reflection of
its maker. We can expect great things from
Verboden this month, and in the years to
come.
Verboden runs April 8-9 at the Astoria,
Red Gate, and 333. Festival passes are
$30, available at Horses Records and Nep-
toon Records, or cover for each venue is
$10-12 at the doors. For more information
visit Verboden 2016 on Facebook.
*Note, Robert Katerwol will be playing as one half of Weird Candle alongside
Frog Eyes, The Backhomes, Malcolm Jack,
and Experience This at the Discorder Fundraiser at the Anza Club Saturday, April 23.
60
WRISTBAND THREEFORTYOKE
THE PUPPETMASTER OF PUB 340
words by Alex de Boer // photos by Sara Baar
illustrations by Cristian Fowlie
A tall man in a Môtley Crue t-shirt is
beside us. I didn't see him slide into our space
but now he appears rooted there. His proximity to me suggests I am part of the conversation, but he is talking directly to Discorder photographer Sara Baar. In honour
of the occasion, he reaches into the past for
a story,1 telling us how he once went on tour
with his band. Upon his return, he learned
that his brother (who had never even sang in
the shower) had taken a job as a karaoke host.
I trap this tale of karaoke-bewitching in the
pages of my notebook. It's Tuesday night —~
'ThreeFortyoke'karaoke night at Pub 340. My
goal for the evening is to become immersed,
to study the magic of karaoke, and to understand the secret world inside these storied
walls.
Though its name and owners have
changed many times, Pub 340 is 120-years-
old. It sits modestly near the intersection
at Hastings and Cambie, kitty-corner from
where the city's old courthouse once perched
(now Victory Square Park). The building originally operated as a middle-class hotel and
beer parlour, and has cloaked many mysterious and clandestine activities over the
years — let's just say there were rumors of
a prohibition-era cock-fighting ring in its
basement.
When I came to Pub 340 roughly two
weeks earlier, it wasn't to learn about the
bar's long history. I came to talk karaoke with one of the city's most beloved hosts, Hez
- an enthusiast and expert in the field.
That night, we sat at a high table in the
dim bar. As I watched her speak, the Spanish-style banister on the bar's mezzanine
level rested like an awkward crown on her
head. Hez's title as karaoke queen, however,
fit exactly.
The "th" in Heather is hard for Japanese
people to pronounce, so Heather Watson has
gone by Hez ever since she spent three years
teaching English in Japan. After completing
She paints me a picture: work colleagues
gather — pink petals fall lightly as snow — a
wasted salary man sings into a mic, his necktie around his head. "They all sit there and
do karaoke, looking up at the cherry trees —
and they all get shit faced"
. It's a striking image: a ravel of the serene
and the debaucherous. Hez explains, "They
don't really stigmatize those kind of drunken
shenanigans [in Japan] as much as we
would." Instead of being offended, Japanese
people appreciate the levity alcohol provides.
her B.A. at UBC, she moved to a town called
Funabashi, pronounced "fun-a-bash-ee."
Prophetically named, Hez did indeed have
fun: "In my final year they built a fancy
karaoke box right across the street from my
house, and I lost my mind."
One of Hez's favourite memories from
her three years in Japan is the cherry blossom season. She describes how the sides of
rivers were laced with cherry blossom trees,
and I imagine pastel scenery. There is a word
in Japanese which means to go and look at
flowers, Hez tells me. It's called "hanami." A
contemplative, sweet smelling activity, but
only before the karaoke machines roll out.
Integrated into cherry blossom season,
karaoke has turned the tradition of hanami
into a "little impromptu festival," Hez says.
A levity that karaoke is a perfect partner for.
And as Hez says, "that really shows you how
much you can create a culture that has karaoke inside it, in really meaningful ways."
After leaving Japan, Hez says, "I knew
that [karaoke] was a thing I was going to do
in my life as a recreation, but I didn't know I
would have the singular joy of creating it as
an occupation!"
Lucky for Hez, four years ago, her
enthusiasm evolved into a job - she became
the official host of Pub 340's bi-weekly karaoke night.
Located in the Downtown Eastside, Pub
340 is a far cry from Japan's sunny cherry
blossom festivals - and possibly an even
greater distance from Japan's liberal perspectives on alcohol consumption. Regard-
-
62
KARAOKE AT PUB 340 1
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program engages students in real-world
projects and coursework that provides
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industry connections.
find out more ► thecdm.ca
a collaboration between
DIGITAL MEDIA
emilycarr CiTR 101.9FM PROGRAM GUIDE
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CITR EVERYDAY
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SAT
SUN
6 AM
I 6 AM
CITR GHOST MIX
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MINDFUL MATTERS
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PRESENT
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WIZE MEN
CLASSICAL
CHAOS
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Lo4Af
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A FACE FOR RADIO
STUDENT SPECIAL
HOUR
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10 AM
ROCKET FROM
RUSSIA
1 «4M
UNCEDED
AIRWAVES
THE REEL WHIRLED
THE CAT'S PAJAMS
11 AM
MORNING AFTER
SHOW
PETE'S PICKS
IfiPlf
SYNCHRONICS
THE
SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S
DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
THE ROCKERS
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12 PM
1 *pw
PARTS UNKNOWN
SHINE ON
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RAIN
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STUDENT FILL-IN
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POWER CHORD
1PM
1pm
I 2PM
ALBION
EXTRAENVIRO-
NMENTAUST
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
RADIO ZERO
1 3^
THE BURROW
RADIO FREE
THINKER
KEW IT UP
ASTROTALK
CODE BLUE
LA
FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
3PM
THUNDERBIRD EYE
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS
1 4 PM
LITTLE BIT OF
SOUL
VIBES & STUFF
ASIAN WAVE
SIMORGH
4 PM
M5 PM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
DISCORDER
RADIO
ARTS REPORT
ALL ACCESS PASS
NEWS 101
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
1 6PM
SOULSHIP
ENTERPRISE
FLEX YOUR HEAD
SHARING SCIENCE
ARE
YOU
AWARE
UBC ARTS
LADY RADIO
NASHAVOLNA
CRESCENDO
6PM
SAMSQU
ANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
INNER
SPACE
PEANUT
BUTTER
'N' JAMS
| 7*M
EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
UBC INSIDERS
FILL-IN
MORE THAN
HUMAN
7PM
TICK TALK
J 8 PM
INSIDE OUT
SOUL SANDWICH
THE
SPICE
OF LIFE
NEW
ERA
AFRICAN
RHYTHMS
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8PM
J 9 AW
THE JAZZ SHOW
CRIMES &
TREASONS
ALL EARS
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
SKALDS HALL
SYNAPTIC
SANDWICH
BOOTLEGS &
B-SIDES
9PM
HoPM
THE SCREEN
GIRLS
CANADA POST
ROCK
TRANCENDANCE
10 PM
| «PM
WHITE NOISE
COPY/PASTE
THE MEDICINE
SHOW
11PM\
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CITR GHOST MIX
RANDOPHONIC
12 AM
1 f AM
Il 2 AM
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
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AURAL TENTACLES
THE LATE NIGHT
SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE
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1 ■ CARIBBEAN
SOCA STORM
SAT. 8 PM
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers the latest SOCA
music tracks out of the Caribbean. This party music
will make you jump out of your seat. This show is
the first of its kind here on CiTR and is the perfect
music to get you in the mood to go out partying!
It's Saturday, watch out STORM COMING!!!!
■ CHINESE /KOREAN
ASIAN WAVE
WED. 4 PM
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the
best music from the Chinese language and Korean
music industries, as well the latest news coming from
the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop
scene. The latest hits from established artists, debuting
rookies, independent artists and classic songs from
both industries can ail be heard on Asian Wave 101
as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of
unsigned Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
■ CINEMATIC
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
MON. 7 PM
Join Gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes
from television and any other cinematic source, along with
atmospheric pieces, cutting-edge new tracks and strange
old goodies that could be used in a soundtrack to be.
■ CLASSICAL
CLASSICAL CHAOS
SUN. 9 AM
From the ancient world to the 21st century, join
host Marguerite in exploring and celebrating
classical music from around the world.
RADIO ZERO
FRI. 2 PM
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams
from New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood,
and whatever else. Website: www.radiozero.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
SAT. 9 PM
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s, this is the show for you!
Website: synapticsandwich.net
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
ALTERNATING SUN. 8 PM
A mix of the latest house music, tech-
house, prog-house, and techno.
TRANCENDANCE
SUN. 1 PM
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack,
Trancendance has been broadcasting from Vancouver,
B.C. since 2001. We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
and even some Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic
Trance Anthem, especially if it's remixed. Current
influences include Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery,
Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save the
Robot, Liquid Soul, and Astrix. Older influences include
Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop!
Records, Tidy Trax, Platipus Records, and Nukleuz.
Email: djsmileymike @trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
■   DIFFICULT
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS...
SUN. 7 AM
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio
Art in a snack size format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word, cut-up/collage and general
Crespan© weirdness. Twitter: @bepicrespan.
Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca
■   DANCE/ELECTRONIC
BOOTLEGS & B-SIDES
SUN. 9 PM
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes
from soul to dubstep, ghetto funk to electro swing.
Nominated finalist for Canadian college radio show
of the year, 2012 Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards.
soundcloud.com/doe-ran and search
"Doe-Ran" on Facebook.
COPY/PASTE
THU. 11 PM
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full
hour DJ mix by Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud
rap to new jack techno and everything in between.
INNER SPACE
ALTERNATING WED. 6:30 PM
Dedicated to underground electronic music,
both experimental and dance-oriented.
Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
INSIDE OUT
TUE. 8 PM
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
FRI. 12:30 AM
The Late Night Show features music from the
underground Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which
progresses to Industrial, Noise, and Alternative No
Beat into the early morning. Following the music,
we play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
■ DRAMA/POETRY
SKALD'S HALL
FRI. 9 PM
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established and
upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald. Interested in
performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds_Hall.
■ ECLECTIC
A FACE FOR RADIO
THU. 10 AM
A show about music with interludes about nothing.
From Punk to Indie Rock and beyond.
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THU. 6 PM
Celebrating the message behind the music:
profiling music and musicians that take the
route of positive action over apathy.
AURAL TENTACLES
THU. 12 AM
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock,
the unusual and the weird, or it could be
something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
MON. 8 AM
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter,
offer a savoury blend of the familiar and
exotic in a blend of aural delights.
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
PROGRAM   GUIDE
66 CHTHONIC BOOM!
SUN. 5 PM
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic
music from parts of the spectrum (rock, pop,
electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
FEMCONCEPT
FRI. 1 PM
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content
relevant to women's issues (interviews with campus
groups such as the Women's Center, SASC, etc.).
Musical genres include indie rock, electronic and punk,
with an emphasis on local and Canadian artists.
LIVE FROM THU.NDERBIRD RADIO HELL
THU. 9 PM
Featuring live bands every week performing in the
CiTR lounge. Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and around the world.
THE MEDICINE SHOW
FRI. 11 PM
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets, and
entertainment industry guests whose material is
considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and
promote independent original, local live music, and art.
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
TUE. 11.'30 AM
The Morning After Show every Tuesday at 11:30(am).
Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The
morning after what? The morning after whatever you
did last night. Eclectic show with live music, local
talent and music you won't hear anywhere else.
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
FRI. 3:30 PM
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo!
Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
PEANUT BUTTER 'N' JAMS
ALTERNATING THU. 6:30-7:30 PM
Explore local music and food with your hosts,
Brenda and Jordie. You'll hear interviews and
reviews on eats and tunes from your neighbourhood
and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
RANDOPHONIC
SAT. 11 PM
Randophonlc Is best thought of as an intraversal
jukebox which has no concept of genre, style, political
boundaries, or even space-time relevance. But it does
know good sounds from bad. Lately, the program has
been focused on Philip Random's All Vinyl Countdown
+ Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records you probably
haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
WED. 12 PM
Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear.
Kick back with gems of the previous years.
SHINE ON
TUE. 1 PM
An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from
the Vancouver underground and beyond, connected
through a different theme each week. Join your host
Shea every Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
SOUL SANDWICH
WED. 8 PM
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into
one show, from Hip Hop to Indie Rock to African jams.
Ola will play through a whirlwind of different genres, each
sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of
yummy goodness will blow your mind. It beats Subway.
STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
FRI. 10 AM
Tune in to learn about on-campus events and
initiatives in-between sweet tunes.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
WED. 8 AM
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack
Velvet for an eclectic mix of music, sound bites,
information and inanity. Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.
■ ETHIOPIAN
SHOOKSHOOKTA
SUN. 10 AM
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that
encourages education and personal development.
■ EXPERIMENTAL
KEW IT UP
WED. 3 PM
Fight-or-flight music. Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cateschism / half-baked philosophy
and criticism. Experimental, Electronica, Post-
Punk, Industrial, Noise : ad-nauseum
MORE THAN HUMAN
SUN. 7 PM
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from
the past, present, and future with host Gareth
Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
POP DRONES
WED. 10 AM
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl
underground. Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage
rock all the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
■ GENERATIVE
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF INSOMNIA
SAT. 2 AM
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o
the Absolute Value of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing your dreams or,
if sleep is not on your agenda, your reveries.
■ HIP HOP
CRIMES & TREASONS
TUE. 9 PM
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill $h*t. Hosted
by Jamal Steeles, Homeboy Jules, Relly
Rels, LuckyRich & horsepowar.
Website: www.crlmesandtreasons.com
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
NEW ERA
ALTERNATING THU. 7.'30 PM
Showcases up and coming artists who are considered
"underdogs" In the music industry. The show will
provide a platform for new artists who are looking
to get radio play. Hip-Hop music from all over the
world along with features of multi-genre artists.
VIBES & STUFF
TUE. 4 PM
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered
bringing you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop
artist all in one segment. All the way from New Jersey and
New York City, DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing
the east coast to the west coast throughout the show.
We will have you reminiscing about the good ol' times
with Vibes and Stuff every Tuesdays afternoon from 4-5
pm PST. E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail.com
67
PROQRAM   GUIDE ■ INDIAN
RHYTHMS INDIA
ALTERNATING SUN. 8 PM
Featuring a wide range of music from India, including
popular music from the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and
Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and regional language numbers.
■ JAZZ
THE JAZZ SHOW
MON. 9 PM
April 4: This month The Jazz Show will again do Jazz
Features of great and near great players that are under-
recognized even by the Jazz public. We begin with two
super players from Philadelphia, tenor saxophonist Bill
Barron and co-leader Ted Curson on trumpet. They lead
a hot quintet on an album called "Now Hear This!"
April 11 : Tonight one of the most unique and maybe
the strangest voice of the flute, Jeremy Steig. This
is Jeremy's's debut album with Dr. Denny Zeitlin
on piano also making his recording debut. This is
some strong and intense music on "Flute Fever".
April 18: One of the most respected and yet overlooked
guitar masters was Chuck Wayne. He was perhaps
the first guitarist to fully understand Charlie Parker's
concepts and adapt them to the guitar. He somehow
remains under the radar. There is a fine trio album
that puts Chuck in the spotlight, "Tapestry".
April 25 : One of the great recorded debuts was
this album by alto saxophonist Jimmy Woods called
"Awakening!"  Jimmy was a new voice who 'combined
the adventurous concepts of Omette Coleman and
Eric Dolphy with the tonal tradition of Charlie Parker
and developed his own unique and powerful voice. He
made very few recordings and eventually left music
to pursue a career in social work. Two sessions and
two different bands make up this amazing date.
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
MON. 4 PM
Old recordings of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies, and motown.
■ LATIN AMERICAN
LA FIESTA
ALTERNATING SUN. 3 PM
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and
Reggaeton with your host Gspot DJ.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
MON. 5 PM
The best mix of Latin American music
Email: leoramirez@canada.com
■ LOUD
FLEX YOUR HEAD
TUE. 6 PM
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands
and guests from around the world.
POWERCHORD
SAT. 1 PM
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If
you're into music that's on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
■ PERSIAN
SIMORGH
Thur. 4 pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy
for the Persian speaking communities and those
interested in connecting to Persian oral and written
literature. Simorgh takes you through a journey of
ecological sustainability evolving within cultural-and
social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of
tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting
Persian peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
■ PUNK
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
TUE. 10:30 AM
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play
new, international and local punk rock music.
Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in brokenish
English. Hosted by Russian Tim.
Website: http://rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com.
Email: rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com.
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RocketFromRussia.
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
SAT. 12 PM
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk
on the non-commercial side of the spectrum.    ,
Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The Foat" Kraft.
Website: generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: facebook.com/generationannihilation/
■ REGGAE
THE ROCKERS SHOW
SUN. 12 PM
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
■ ROCK/POP/INDIÈ
ALBION
TUE. 2 PM
The best new music coming out of the UK along
with the most exciting Canadian artists British
host Sachin finds as he explores Vancouver.
THE BURROW
MON. 3 PM
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a
nice blend of old 'classics' and newer releases.
Interviews and live performances.
BVP RADIO
ALTERNATING WED. 1 PM
BVP Radio is Blank Vinyl Project's radio show companion
on CiTR. It features musicians from UBC and Its
surrounding community. Interviews, performances
live on air, and advice to developing bands.
CANADA POST-ROCK
FRI. 10 PM
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now
resides on the west coast but it's still committed
to the best in post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and basically anything your
host Pbone can put the word "post" infront of.
THE CAT'S PAJAMAS
FRI. 11 AM
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/
someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's
Pajamas: a super awesome and cool radio show
featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock,
lofi and more from Vancouver and beyondl
PROGRAM   GUIDE CRESCENDO
SUN. 6 PM
Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning
and building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL
TIME, Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet
ride that you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams.
Besides overselling his show, Jed will play an eclectic
set list that builds throughout the hour and features both
old classics, and all the greatest new tracks that the
hipsters think they know about before anyone else does.
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
FRI. 12 PM
Your noon-hour guide to what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk.
DISCORDER RADIO
TUE. 5 PM
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join
us to hear excerpts of interviews, reviews and more!
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
THU. 12 PM
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted
by Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
THU. 2 PM
A program focusing on the week's highlights
from CiTR's Music Department. Plus: live in-
studio performances and artist interviews!
PARTS UNKNOWN
MON. 1 PM
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow
sandwich: soft and sweet and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and held close to a fire.
THE PERMANENT RAIN RADIO
ALTERNATING WED. 1 PM
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus
on the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an
hour of lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a variety
of artists who have been featured on our website.
thepermanentrainpress.com
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
ALTERNATING WED. 6:30 PM
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
SPICE OF LIFE
ALTERNATING THU. 7:30 PM
The spice extends life. The spice expands
consciousness. The Spice of Life brings you a
variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math Rock and
anything that else that progresses. Join host
Ben Life as he meanders whimsically through
whatever comes to mind on the walk to CITR.
■   ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
ALTERNATING SUN. 3 PM
Real cowshit-caught-ln-yer-boots country.
CODE BLUE
SAT. 3 PM
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp
honks, blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy, and Paul. Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
TUE. 6 AM
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives
with Arthur and the lovely Andrea Berman.
Email: pacificplckin@yahoo.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
SAT. 8 AM
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African,
Latin, and European music in the first half, followed by
Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
Email: steveedge3@mac.com/
■ RUSSIAN
NASHA VOLNA
SAT. 6 PM
News, arts, entertainment and music for the
Russian community, local and abroad.
Website: nashavolna.ca/
■ SACRED
MANTRA
SAT. 5PM
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers,
chants and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of
the worlds sacred sounds - traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com
■ SOUL/R&B
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
FRI. 7:30 PM
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
SOULSHIP ENTERPRISE
SAT. 7 PM
A thematlcally oriented blend of classic funk, soul,
r&b, jazz, and afrobeat tunes, Soulship Enterprise
has received great renown as the world's foremost
funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio
show hosted by people named Robert Gorwa and/
or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III.
■ SPORTS
THUNDERBIRD EYE
THU.3:30 PM
The inside edge on the latest UBC Thunderbirds
varsity teams' news and results.
■ TALK
ALL ACCESS PASS
THU. 5 PM
CITR Accessibility Collective's new radio show.
We talk about equity, Inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse abilities, on campus
and beyond. Tune in every week for interviews,
music, news, events, and awesome dialogue.
ALL EARS
WED. 9 PM
Looking for advice? Hosts Brandon and Mormel
think they can help you with that. All "Ears Is an
advice radio program where the hosts read real
questions from the UBC community and answer them
live. Other content includes Interviewing students,
consulting experts, and giving campus life advice.
Submit your question at http://ask.fm/allearsubc
ARTS REPORT
WED. 5 PM
Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film,
theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy,
and more) by hosts Ashley Park and Christine Kim.
ASTROTÀLK
THU. 3 PM
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the
night sky with a new topic every week. Death Stars,
Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars...
69
PROGRAM   GUIDE CITED!
FRI. 8:30 AM
THIS IS A RADIO PROGRAM ABOUT HOW OUR WORLD IS
BEING SHAPED BY THE IDEAS OF THE IVORY TOWER. SOMETIMES, IN TROUBLING WAYS.
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
THU. 9 AM
This show Is produced by the disabled community and'
showcases special guests and artists. The focus Is on
a positive outlook on programs and events for the entire
community. We showcase BC Self Advocates and feature
Interviews with people with special needs. Hosted by
Kelly Reaburn, Michael Rubbln Clogs and Friends.
EXTRAENVIRONMENTALIST
WED. 2 PM^
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking In on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of
sustainable economics and our global ecological crisis.
LADY RADIO
FRI. 6 PM
CiTR Women's Collective's new radio show! Rad
women talking about things they like. Tune in weekly
for interviews, music, events, commentary, and such.
MINDFUL MATTERS
MON. 7:30 AM
NEWS 101
FRI. 5 PM
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and
community newscast. Every week, we take a look back
at the week's local, national and international news,
as seen from a fully independent media perspective.
PETE'S PICKS
THU. 11:30 PM
From the CiTR Archives! Our Digital Library Coordinator
Peter Doolan shares selected gems of CiTR history,
digitized from the original audiotape reels!
QUEER FM VANCOUVER:RELOADED
TUE. 8 AM
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual
communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest
features, background-on current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RADIO FREE THINKER
TUE. 3 PM
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and
science, we examine popular extraordinary
claims and subject them to critical analysis.
THE REEL WHIRLED
THU. 11-11:30 AM
The Reel Whirled Is a half hour long escapade through
the world of cinema, focused around UBC Film Society's
program; be it contemporary or classic, local or global.
From our perspective as the UBC Film Society, we
talk about film intellectually, passionately, and goofily.
With select music from our cinematic subjects, we
pull your Thursday mornings into focus, from bleary
eyed to sharp and worthy of the silver screen.
SHARING SCIENCE
WED.   6 PM
A show by the members of UBC Sharing Science, a group
of students dedicated to making science interesting and
accessible to all members of the community. We discuss
current research and news about a different topic each f
week, providing vastly different perspectives based on
the science backgrounds of a rotating set of hosts.
SYNCHRONICITY
MON. 12 PM
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why you're here: to have fun!
UBC ARTS ON AIR
ALTERNATING WED. 6 PM
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and
unusual Interviews with members of UBC Arts world.
Tune In for programs, people and personalities in art
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
MON. 11 AM
Unceded Airwaves Is a radio show produced by CiTR's
Indigenous Collective. The team is comprised of
both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who are
passionate about radio, alternative media and Indigenous
topics and issues. We are committed to centering -
the voices of Native people and offering alternative
narratives that empower Native people and their stories.
We recognize that media has often been used as a
tool to subordinate or appropriate native voices and
we are committed to not replicating these dynamics.
VANCOUVER, RIGHT?
THU. 8 AM
Hangout with Alex Biron and Simon Armstrong
as they share personal stories of gigantic
embarrassment and accidental success.
WHITE NOISE
SAT. 8 PM
Need some comic relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half
an hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he
delves in to the most eccentric corners of radio for your
listening pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show
featuring a Q and A with the creator, actors and a guest
comic every week.
Email: whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
PROGRAM   GUIDE
70 CiTR 101.9FM
MARCH MONTHLY CHART
ARTIST   ALBUM  LABEL
ARTIST   ALBUM  LABI
1
DUMB
BEACH CHURCH
SELF-RELEASED
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AND GREEN
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CÉCILE D00-
KINGUÉ
ANYBODY LISTENING
PART 2: DIALOGUES
SELF-RELEASED
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HUSKY RESCUE
THE LONG LOST
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CATSKILLS
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BASIA BULAT
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PYE CORNER AUDIO
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VARIOUS ARTISTS
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OUTEP
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LYDIA HOL
HEADING NORTH
SELF-RELEASED
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DEMAIN EST UNE
AUTRE NUIT
DFA
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EVAN SYMONS
1 AM A BIRD
STEP AND A
HALF
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MOSS LIME
ZOO DU QUEBEC
TELEPHONE
EXPLOSION
26
27
28
29
30
31
31
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
YOU SAY PARTY
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CLOUDLAND
CANYON
AN ARABESQUE       MEDICAL
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TANZFUR
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EVERY FRIDAY ON CiTR 101.9FM 7:30-9PM
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African Rhythms Radio
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