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 WoL 34 I j£o,31 3$sue, 388
April 2017
"that salty magazine from GTR101.9FM
, JForeber Jlocal, Jfl 254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
UPCOMING SHOWS
ADVERTISE
7/1 I
APR D.O.A.
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STILETTOS, CHILDSPLAY
APR AMORPHIS
3       SWALLOW THE SUN, GROSS
MISCONDUCT, THE WANING
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am
WMMfm
M
APR ELECTRIC SIX
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APR  VANCOUVER WORLD MUSIC
7     FESTIVAL FEAT. H'SAO
LOCARNO, BREAKING
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"\ 4    WITH GUESTS
APR EARLY SHOW (7PM):
15  COMEDY SHOCKER XII:
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APR REAL ESTATE
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fo tsBg APRIL 2017
COVER:
JENEEN FREI NJOOTLI BY EMMANUEL El
ifeaturejet
04   -  POLITICS  OF MOSHING
watch who you're pushing around.
04   -  BC  MUSIC  FUND
06
07
14
we were hopeful.
-   "GENTRICIDE
si
colonialism perpetuated in the DTES.
JENEEN  FREI   NJOOTLI
caribou, art, and ReMatriate.
•  CHANCE LOVETT and
The  Broken Hearted
from a fairy ring of Chanterelles.
18 -   IAN WILLIAM  CRAIG
"Ostensibly,   I've made  it,   right?"
19 -  THE  PSYCHIC  ALLIANCE
cursed, but we still love 'em.
Column* + spore
03   -  Hot  Head
05  -  Textually Active:
fine.
08  - Real Live Action
10  - Record Store
Day Special
12
13  -  Calendar
Art Project
Temporary Investments
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates available upon
request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please contact: editor.discorder@citr.ca. To
submit images, contact: artdirector.discorder@
citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20
to LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1, Vancouver, BC with your address, and we will mai
each issue of Discorder right to your doorstep
for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorderm your
business, email advertising@citr.ca. We are
always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you love. To
donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
16  - Under Review
20 -  On The  Air:
A Little  Bit   of  Soul
21 -  CiTR Program Schedule
22 - Program Descriptions
23 -  March Charts
!!!
To inform Discorder of an upcoming album
release, art show or significant happening,
please email all relevant details 4-6 weeks in
advance to Brit Bachmann, Editor-in-Chief at
editor.discorder@citr.ca.
You may also direct comments, complaints and
corrections via email.
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station Manager: Hugo Noriega // Advertising
Coordinator: Sydney Thorne // Discorder Student Liaison: Claire Bailey // Editor-in-Chief: Brit
Bachmann // Under Review Editor: Maximilian Anderson-Baier // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper
D. Wrinch // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Production Assistant: Jules Galbraith // Web
Content Coordinator: Katrina Wong // Accounts Manager: Shea McConkey // Charts: Andy Resto
// Discorder On Air Coordinators: Claire Bailey, Dora Dubber, Kat Kott, Matt Meuse, Jordan Wade //
Online Communications Coordinator: Keagan Perlette // Writers: Brit Bachmann, Claire Bailey, Taylor
Benn, Ivanna Besenovsky, Victoria Canning, Aidan Danaher, Joey Doyle, Dora Dubber, Bridget Gallagher,
Fatemeh Ghayedi, Sophie Gray, Inca Gunter, Courtney Heffernan, Sarah Jickling, Kat Kott, Oona Krieg,
Lucas Lund, Hailey Mah, Nathan Pike, Maddy Rafter, Andrew Smith, Emily Valente, Harry Varley, Leo
Yamanaka-Leclerc, Tintin Yang // Photographers & Illustrators: Bryce Aspinall, Janee Auger, Maxwell
Babiuk, Amy Brereton, Evan Buggle, Hildegard Daug, Emmanuel Etti, Sharon Ko, Katie Lapi, Lucas Lund,
Sophia Lapres, Roz Maclean, Philip Moussavi, Christine Phang, Michael Shantz, Pat Valade, Emily Valente,
Alisha Weng// Proofreaders: Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Brit Bachmann, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Jules
Galbraith, Jonathan Kew, Kat Kott, Sydney Thorne, Eleanor Wearing, Jasper D. Wrinch, Tintin Yang
©Discorder 2017 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by
CiTR, located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the haiiqeminerh speaking Musqueam peoples. CiTR can be heard
at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 8221242, email CiTR at stationmanagerScitr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL600 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
WE ARE LISTENING
EDITOR'S NOTE
few months ago we created an online Readership Survey, and we're just looking over results now. Thank
you everyone who answered! We learned some real interesting stuff. Like, contrary to a lot of business
owners and tech people who have passed through CiTR 101.9FM with a bottom line, you don't think print is dead.
Most of you are reading this Editor's Note in a physical magazine, which is good, because we printed 8,000 of
them.
We also learned that while you don't want the magazine to disappear, you also want Discorder to do more online.
You want to see web exclusive content, premieres, and timely news related to Discorder's community. Lucky for you,
we soft-launched Web Exclusives on citr.ca / discorder.ca in January — featuring interviews, music debuts, calls for
submission, and more. We will continue expanding Web Exclusives over the next several months to incorporate more
CiTR radio content, which is another thing y'all said you wanted.
Apart from one individual who wishes we would stop featuring established touring bands and focus on
Vancouver content [?], we now know that most of you like our balance of music, art, and community coverage.
Some of you even gave us topic suggestions, which we'll write about over the next few issues.
Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we found out that you appreciate what finds its way into these pages.
You are more likely to go to an event if it is mentioned in Discorder, to support the music and initiatives of artists
we interview, and to frequent businesses that advertise with us. Thank you for supporting our community, and
being a part of it yourselves.
There is a lot of talk about expectations in the April issue of Discorder — the expectations that we set for ourselves and others — and how we act when our expectations are not met. Jeneen Frei Njootli is a Gwich'in artist that, among other things, advocates for the protection of caribou; Oona Krieg dissects the term gentricide as
it relates to Vancouver's DTES; Ian William Craig discovers success may not be as glamorous as he thought; a
fine, show finds a home at The Lido; Bridget Gallagher considers moshing from a new perspective; Under Review
reviews some books and podcasts; and I shatter your hopeful delusions about the BC Music Fund.
Welcome to a new season.
A+
BB
PS. April 22 is Record Store Day! Pull out our calendar of April events to see a map of Vancouver record stores
on the reverse side, and flip to page 10 for a map of additional record stores from select towns across the province. The record stores were compiled by Dora Dubber and illustrated by Sharon Ko. CiTR 101.9FM and Discorder
in collaboration with our friends CJSF are hosting a RSD Afterparty at Red Gate April 23 with additional record
vendors, and performances by Co-op, Jerk Jails, Sad Photography, Elisa Thorn and Pale Red. $5 entry. See you
there
HOTHEAD
Hot Head is Discorder's feedback column, encouraging any comments on the magazine or the community we serve. All
submissions are welcome and will be considered for print unless they contain hateful language. To submit to Hot Head, email
comments to editor.discorder@citr.ca clearly indicating whether or not the submission is anonymous. Physical submissions can
be left for Discorder Editor-in-Chief Brit Bachmann at the CiTR Station in the UBC Nest. To submit to Hot Head is to consent to being
published in the magazine and online at discorder.ca
RICH PEOPLE CONTINUE TO CAPITALIZE ON
THE CLOUT OF ARTISTIC COOL
f'om what I saw last summer, that majority of pieces commissioned by mural fest went up on walls around
Wain street. In the months since, shadowed by the ever growing beacon on displacement aptly dubbed "The
Independent" (giant condo tower on the corner of Main & Broadway built for and marketed to white yuppie hipsters,
see independentatmain.com for details), we've lost many long standing institutions that made anyone enjoy the area of
Mount Pleasant around Main and Broadway in the first place. It's no secret that arts and performance spaces, queers,
and students are the earliest indications that an area is being gentrified, (see also, Chinatown), but I'm so fucking sick
of watching neighbourhoods I love tarted up so we can all be pushed out. In the last 6 months we've lost, Foundation,
Hot Art Wet City, and we are soon to lose the Brickhouse. Before that, we lost Vivo (replaced by VAL), the Rumpus
Room, and a number of clothing stores who could no longer afford rent in the area. Cynics may say, "Snooty veggie
restaurant w/ rude staff, weird art gallery, and musty bar, who cares?" But these are the spaces that bring people who
don't like the downtown core, and can't afford Kits of gastown into the area. And these people are the people who
make this area cool. Many of whom happen to be artists who participated in Van Mural Fest.
For the record, I think the exposure given to local artists by the festival is overall a great thing. Artists deserve to be
paid, they deserve to have their work displayed, and there should be more public works in Vancouver, because god
knows grey stucco is fucking ugly. That said, the fact that Van Mural Fest is recommended to receive 40% of this year's
Public Art Boost funding (Georgia Straight, Charles Smith, March 26th), is highly suspect. Condos in "the Independent"
are currently sold out before construction has even finished. As I mentioned before, the majority of murals for Van
Mural Fest have beautified the neighbourhood around the Independent. Grunt Gallery is slated to receive $60,000 from
Boost to set up a projection space on the side of the "the Independent" once it's finished. The funds mentioned come
out of $1.5 million over three years allocated by the city of Vancouver to support public art. I suppose that's nice, but
really, nice for whom? This public beautification project benefits developers and rich people who can afford to buy an
apartment "starting at $219,000", not artists, their communities, or neighbourhoods.
So yeah, it's been said before, but R.I.P.* East Van. Let's all move and make Burnaby sexy.
—Pissed, poor, and precocious
*R.I.P. = Revel In Prosperity
EDITOR'S NOTE/ HOT HEAD THE POLITICS m >i«SWl\(.
WORDS BY BRIDGET GALLAGHER      ILLUSTRATION BY MICHAEL SHANTZ
The stench of blood, sweat and alcohol seeps from a pulsating mass of limbs.
Guttural human cries and the shrieking song of flesh bending nylon wire fills the
air. This is a mosh pit. From the outside looking in, a group of young guys slamming their sweaty bodies into each other while yelling is the pinnacle of toxic machismo.
But for those inside the pit, this is the cathartic bonding ritual that steals them away
from the expectations and pressures of everyday life.
It seems irrational, but moshing serves a purpose in metal and punk sub
cultures. People use moshing to let go of things they can't express elsewhere. This especially applies to men who feel stigmatized for show
ing emotion. Once you look a little deeper, moshing is actually kind
of beautiful. Except, if you look even deeper, you realize that it's a
physical manifestation of the sexism and ableism that breeds in the
metal and punk scene. "If you don't want to get hit just move to
the back!" cry avid moshers. If you can't handle the pit then you
are both metaphorically and literally pushed out of the scene. If
you are not an able bodied, young male, stepping into a pit suddenly makes you realize just how out of place you really are. Your
differences, whether it be size, age or disability are highlighted by
the unforgiving life force that is the pit. Now the question is, do
the political implications of moshing negate the positives? Should
we ban moshing at concerts to promote inclusivity? I think ridding
the subculture of moshing would be like Funky Winker Beans without Wendy Thirteen - it was kind of the best part. But something still
needs to change.
First, let's dive into the history of the issue. Moshing was a fixture of
the L.A. hardcore punk scene from 1967-1980. From there, it was injected
into the metal scene by way of crossover thrash bands. The aggression of moshing paralleled the anger and frustration of a generation that wanted to change the world
Punk and metal were born to dissent. Gigs were places of solace for kids who felt left
behind by mainstream society. The outpouring of emotion and bodily fluid at punk and
metal shows was intoxicating, and bonded people into fiercely loyal subcultures.
However, moshing is not loved by all. Hardcore heavyweights Fugazi have criticized
audiences that dance too violently. In 1996, Smashing Pumpkins banned all moshing at
their shows after a 17 year old girl was crushed to death. A young woman took a steel-
toed boot to the face by way of a spin kicking mosher in a Code Orange pit. She left on a
stretcher with her jaw on the opposite side of her face and a brain swollen with blood.
Beside the inevitable injuries, people are speaking out about the ableism and sexism that moshing perpetuates. For instance, people with physical disabilities
may require extra space or certain accommodations to mosh themselves, and
aggressive pits of destruction are not conducive to these needs. Alternatively, people with
less obvious disabilities like mental illness or a developmental disability may feel unsafe in an environment with so much unhinged beligerence flying around. Many women
have expressed fear of mosh pits due to being groped, mocked or crushed by their male
peers. That is not to say that all women are too frail or weak to mosh. There are plenty
of badass ladies that dive into pits and show off the resulting bruises like it's their first
hickey. But, the point being, not all people are physically or mentally prepared
for mosh pits. This shouldn't mean that their experience of the show is less
valid. The violent and aggressive mosh pit atmosphere creates an unwelcoming space for those who can't participate or whose participation is
conditional.
These subcultures were built to be transgressive. Yet, moshing
creates environments that are unwelcoming to certain marginalized
groups, and enforces a norm of what is acceptable and expected.
These scenes are now doing exactly what they were built to rail
against back in the l8os. Perhaps part of the issue comes from the
fact that what it means to be transgressive has changed since the
time that punk and metal came to fruition. Early punk, in particular, focused on supporting individualism, rebellion and breaking down establishments. Modern society is more aware of social
inequalities that just weren't talked about in the l8os. This can include LGBTQ+ rights, women's equality, racism and ableism. It can't
be denied that many of the issues that punks and metalheads fought
for back in the l8os still exist today, but maybe it's time for subcultures to adapt and include contemporary issues in their fight as well.
Do I think this means banning mosh pits? No. But, I think punk and
metalheads need to be more aware of the people standing beside them at
shows. Everyone is there to express themselves and to feel something bigger than
their everyday existence.
To those moshing, don't take that experience away from someone because you get too
rough or aggressive. I urge you to scream your heart out and thrash around. Mosh. But,
maintain that ounce of self control that might prevent someone from being pushed away
from the scene forever. And for the love of god, don't wear steel-toed boots into the pit if
you're going to do a spin kick.
THE
BUSINE
OFMU
BC MUSIC FUND
WORDS BY BRIT BACHMANN
ILLUSTRATIONS BY BRYCE ASPINALL
Holding the door open for me at Little Mountain
Sound, a man asks, "Are you here for the workshop?"
"Urn, info session?" I reply with uncertainty.
"Sure, whatever it is," he says with a chuckle.
later found out this man was Mike Schroeder, CEO
of Nimbus School of Recording & Media. And while
his statement at the door was made in passing, a
jovial slip, the interaction seemed to capture so many personal sentiments towards the BC Music Fund; predominantly, "I don't fucking belong here."
On February 11, 2016, the provincial government announced a $i5-million dollar investment in British
Columbia's music industry in the form of the BC Music
Fund, to be managed and distributed by Creative BC.
Although initially it seemed that the BC Music Fund would
help support emerging artists by way of stimulating the
growth of the music industry, it became clear early on that
the government and Creative BC's understanding was different. In fact, phase one of their first funding initiative,
the Sound Recording Program, was only made accessible
to incorporated businesses, which disqualified many of
those featured in Discorder. (It's worth noting that Creative
BC opened up eligibility for the second round of Sound
Recording Program intakes.)
An additional controversy of the Sound Recording
Program was that funding was granted first-come-first-
serve, without any juried selection or evaluation of merit.
Not all recipients of the Sound Recording Program have
been announced yet, but of those that have, artists signed
to big labels received more funding. This is, in part, because bigger companies were able to match the funds allotted by Creative BC. It also due to larger labels having
the staff and resources to hunt for funding for their artists
100 percent of the time, whereas smaller labels — especially local ones managed by people working multiple jobs
— do not have the luxury of dropping everything, and
rushing to compete for a slice of money alongside companies like Nettwerk or Universal Music Canada.
However, in an interview with Creative BC CEO Gill,
she pointed out that the Sound Recording Program wasn't
strictly intended for the artists, or even for the labels:
"The intention of the Sound Recording Program was
designed as an economic stimulus for B.C.'s recording industry, and it did that. Recording facilities were busy, all
kinds of recording facilities across the province. So, the
first-come-first-serve nature of the program also made
the funding available to a diverse range of artists that
don't necessarily often access public funding." True, these
artists don't usually have access to public funding.
n speaking with several musicians previously featured in Discorder, finding out about Creative BC's
business focus is what made many of them give up
on the BC Music Fund. It was perceived as inaccessible,
because actually being an emerging artist — a scratch-
your-way-to-the-top-but-still-buying-groceries-at-
NoFrills artist — is not lucrative or sustainable. It's rare
to meet someone who can earn a living wage through
music, but some technically 'emerging' artists can. This
highlights the disparity between underground emerging
artists and partially-emerged artists. The difference is
perseverance to a certain extent, but also luck, and usually
some private funding.
The music industry, as with most creative industries,
is more about business than it is about art. Once able to
accept that, if you want to play the industry game, you
can rise to the challenge. (And if you want to qualify for
Creative BC funding, the first step appears to be getting a
business number.)
reative BC has seven funding programs for the BC
Music Fund. They include Sound Recording, Live
Music, Research, Industry Initiatives, Careers of BC
Artists, Music Company Development, and Innovation. All
programs are detailed on the Creative BC website, including Innovation, which was just announced March 31. Every
program has a different structure, different criteria of eligibility, and different application process. Moving forward, Creative BC intends to choose BC Music Fund recipients based on jury selection.
Speaking to this, Prem Gill explained, "We are working
closely with our Advisory Committee. We are also talking
to other programs — like FACTOR and BC Arts Council,
The POLITICS of MOSHING// BC MUSIC FUND who both use peer and industry juries — to determine the
right process depending on the program that we're going
to fund. As an example, for the Live Music [Program], we
will be creating an industry panel for the evaluation of
applications."
While Gill denied the assertion, it
seems that Creative BC has learned from
the backlash of first-come-first-serve.
Although short-term project funding
can be met with criticism, Gill insisted
that the benefits of the BC Music Fund
will be felt for years to come. "I think
you'll see with programs like Careers of
BC Artists ... that type of program will
help artists in different capacities, not
just sound recording, but also marketing, promotion and development, which will hopefully be
a part of longterm strategies ... [it] is intended to trigger
some development in the local industry across the province," said Gill.
I have a lot of respect for Creative BC's handling of the
BC Music Fund. Their flexible approaches to stimulating
different sectors of the music industry have been creative
and efficient. The handing of the BC Music Fund programs
has demonstrated that Creative BC isn't a stuffy organization of suits, but a group of individuals who are clearly
very passionate about the business of music,
and celebrating artists and producers in British
Columbia.
I also understand that the BC Music Fund is
not meant for underground emerging artists.
As with any government-funded project, the
allocation of the BC Music Fund is as much
about aesthetic and outward appearance as it is
about business or general philanthropy. Your
favourite Abbotsford garage band doesn't clean
up as nice as the label-signed local artists
you hear on 102.7 The Peak, and they probably
don't have their shit together enough to register a business number. They aren't the musicians that politicians
like Christy Clark want to be photographed with or have
representing Canada internationally. Nobody's going to
trust them to leverage a lump sum of money into quality
production and sustainable marketing strategies, the way
they trust a more polished and established group with an
easily-defined musical genre.
But don't be offended. It's not personal. It's just business.
For those seeking funding through the BC Music Fund, we
suggest acting fast! The deadline for Careers of BC Artists is
May 1, and next Live Music intake is June 1. Visit creativebc.com
for more information. And if you have questions, ask them directly. They don't bite, we think.
TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
FINE.
words  by  Iyanna  Besenovsky  //  photos  by Philip Moussavi //   illustrations  by  Roz Maclean
Cince moving to Vancouver
seven years ago from
small-town Alberta,
Cole Nowicki has devoted himself to various literary and creative realms throughout the city
— comedy, poetry, design, and
plenty of work in between. It's no
surprise that Nowicki's most recent project, fine., has generated
such well-deserved enthusiasm
from the get-go. The monthly
event, distinct in its emphasis on
storytelling, has drawn an audience from every corner of the city
— a reach that has extended well
beyond just the literary community. With performances from
a diverse pool of local comedians, poets, writers, and musicians — like hazy, Mourning
Coup, and Milk — fine, offers a
story for every listener. "There's
a lot of cool stuff happening in
Vancouver, but I wanted to get a
little weirder, so I set up a platform for myself and other stand-
ups and storytellers and writers.
There are a lot of talented folk,"
says Nowicki.
Moving onto its fourth event,
fine, has pulled in a full crowd
each night, with transfixed listeners leaning in from floor seats,
couch corners, and clustered
chairs, slunk back among friends
and plenty of beer. Nowicki explains, "It's a good atmosphere.
It's cozy. In terms of a storytelling event, it's a comfortable
space, [and it's] where my friends
and I go hang out regularly, so
it's familiar."
Despite the Lido's central-
ity and treasured appeal, fine.'s
popularity transcends familiarity by breaking unique ground. "I
think the reason why it tends to
be popular is that there are people from all different realms,"
Nowicki concedes, "comedy people, people coming to see the
stand up acts, the writers, the
bands that play ... That's what
helps with having a diverse group
of performers: they're gonna invite their friends, their friends
are gonna invite their friends."
Beyond the charm of fine.'s
always-eclectic lineup, it's
Nowicki's allowance for spontaneity that imbues the show with
palpable authenticity and ease;
there's never a sense of urgency,
nothing formulaic or prescribed.
At fine.'s January event, Nowicki
and writer Ben Stephenson both
shared stories which pivoted
thematically on the taboos of
gay skate culture. When asked
whether it was by design or sheer
coincidence, Nowicki recounts
that the correspondence was totally unplanned, explaining that
the two pieces just "dovetailed
into each other." He insists, "One
of the things I really like about
doing a show, is that when I get
to do my piece, I'm doing whatever the hell I want, so I like to
give everyone on the show the
same opportunity ... to branch
out and try something different."
Nowicki kicks off each show
with a piece of his own, setting the bar for anything goes. "I
had this story ... where I found
out a couple years ago that my
dad's cousin is a New York Times
best-selling romance novelist."
At my confusion, Nowicki clarifies, "She writes erotic novels. [She's] sold like, millions of
books ... I was inspired, because
I wasn't really getting anywhere
with my personal writing, so I
thought, 'I'm gonna try to get
into the erotic novel realm, and
I wanna write what I know, and
what I know is skateboarding,'
so I read a piece of skateboard
erotica."
mhile charming and
casual in his role
as host, Nowicki is
nonetheless staunchly committed
to cultivating a sense of community: "I have a bit of a particular
vision, but storytelling is pretty
universal in its appeal. People like
to share in others' shared experiences, people like to laugh. And
I'm pretty happy that people are
coming to the show ... and enjoying it." fine., it would seem, is on
its way to big things: "I bought a
standing lamp, so it's not gonna
be that weird stacked light anymore. Three shows in — proper
lamp. Yeah, we're getting legit,"
he laughs.
When he's not skating, writing, or picking out light fixtures,
Nowicki dips his toes in other
creative realms, like designing
an illustrated short story project,
Portraits of Brief Encounters, and
working on short story submissions. Reminiscing on his first
brushes with the Canadian literary community, Nowicki shares,
"I would write poems and submit
them to little journals that I'd
find online, magazines I would
get in the mail. I was probably 17
or 18 when I first got published
... I had to get rejected [a lot, but]
I've been skateboarding since I
was 11 or 10, so I'm used to not
getting things very quickly. You
know, you fall down and eat shit,
and then just keep trying until
you get it."
Looking forward to fine.'s next
events, Nowicki raves that "everyone has killed it so far. I'm
just grateful that most of the
people who've been on the show
and performed do not know me.
I just out of the blue ask them
to take a chance and be on the
show, and they do, and I appreciate that. I'm grateful to be able
to do something that I wanna do,
and that other people seem into
it."
fine.'s next installment takes place
April 24 at the Lido, and won't be one
to miss. For more information, visit
afineshow.com or follow
@afineshow on Instagram.
BC MUSIC FUND (cont'd)// TEXTUALLY ACTIVE: fine. G
entricide." There it is, written in fading
red ink in an alley alcove in Vancouver's
Downtown Eastside, a combination of the
words 'gentrification' and 'genocide.'
No one has felt the mounting tide of housing insecurity more than the folks living at and around the
intersection of Main and Hastings. It is the intersection where poverty disproportionately impacts displaced
Indigenous communities, first-generation immigrants,
former Riverview Hospital residents, and many people
differently abled bodies.
While the neighbourhood demographics have
changed, it was reported in a City of Vancouver area
profile in 2013 that people living in the DTES had the
lowest income in all of Canada, outside the Reservation
System. The DTES community, as a whole, has faced
an epidemic of opioid-related deaths, cuts to community resources, shifts from trusted community-based
services to paternalistic and high-barrier agencies, and
housing loss. Over the last few years in particular, the
neighbourhood has been encroached by boutique condo
developments and high-end-niche businesses aimed, in
part, to change the demographic of the DTES and take
advantage of its desirable real estate. Within this context of commodification and commercial interests, it is
difficult not to jump to paranoid conclusions about how
the ever-accelerating gentrification of the DTES has been
made possible. Are there political or corporate forces that
have deliberately calculated the vulnerability of people living in the DTES, and are allowing it to continue
unnecessarily?
There is no evidence of inactive and ineffective government more damning than as demonstrated through Paige's Story, a report released in May 2015 by
independent watchdog and former Representative for Children & Youth, Mary
Ellen Turpel-Lafond. Paige, a young, legally blind Indigenous woman, grew up in the
Downtown Eastside, where she experienced violence and neglect. Though she had been in
the foster system, after 16 detox attempts, a drug overdose in April 2013 resulted in her
death. Turpel-Lafond pointed out that Paige's death was not due to a single moment, but
a lifetime of abuse, persistent inaction from front-line professionals, and an indifferent
social care system. Turpel-Lafond argued that Paige's death was preventable, having occurred only two months after she 'aged out' of care.
In the report, Turpel-Lafond admonished every professional in British Columbia who
worked with vulnerable children leading up to this tragedy — people in services such as
child welfare, education, health care and justice — who were sworn public servants, but
did not act to their fullest. As reported, one of Paige's safe places was Young Bears Lodge,
a youth treatment house that incorporates Indigenous wellness practices, natural medicines, cultural connection, mentorship and love. If it wasn't so serious, it would almost
be laughable how little it was funded at the time of Paige's visits.
hen we look at main systems of inequality, poverty and homelessness are
the two with the highest morbidity. With income often determining access
to adequate healthcare, it is not surprising that poverty results in high death
rates. It can be argued that poverty requires intervention, just like other well-known and
diagnosed health risks.
Reports by Diabetes Canada and the Canadian Institute of Health Information show
that Health Canada spends billions of dollars addressing medical issues like diabetes and
cancer, and even smoking prevention programs. Research from the Cumming School of
Medicine state that in 2010 alone, the federal government spent $13.9 billion treating the
symptoms and consequences of hypertension.
If being in a state of poverty causes and accelerates life-threatening conditions, why
is it not treated like a health condition, and given the same funding for prevention and
treatment? Simple: It is because society is a system that values the social situation and
location of one person over another. In other words, we are stalled by stigma.
spoke with Patrick Smith, one of the founders of Culture Saves Lives, a community-based initiative that connects DTES Indigenous residents to traditional medicine and community. He told me that the impetus for CSL was Paige's Story.
"She had been living down here since she was 12. Legally blind. All kinds of very risky
situations for a young girl, and nobody seemed to save her from that," Patrick recalled as
we sat on the overstuffed couches of a DTES social enterprise on Hastings Street.
I said that I had read that social workers wouldn't step foot in the DTES to find her
because they thought it was too dangerous. His face darkened, "I had to live with that
[death]. I know our cultures are really beneficial and powerful in helping facilitate
change in people individually and collectively. I've seen it happen time and time again."
Paige's Story didn't just resonate with Patrick, it propelled him into action.
Situated on the corner of Carrall and Hastings, the land that CSL occupies has a history
that Patrick acknowledges. "From what little I know of it, this used to traditionally be
called K'emk'emlay' or Q'umq'umal'ay, meaning Place Where The Maples Grow, because
"GENTRICIDE"
WORDS BY OONA KRIEG / ILLUSTRATION BY KATIE LAPI
the Squamish Nation, they'd come get their canoe
paddles in this area where the maples were. Maples
make great canoe paddles."
I asked Patrick to tell me more, and he sighed before answering. "The area was called sqax-xin, that's
named after the bog that used to be False Creek, and
there was lots of cranberries and things like that. It
was a place of harvesting." And just as important as
knowing the history of the land is sharing it with others. Patrick continued, "I always try to include the
a deep, rich history. It wasn't always this stigma of
Downtown Eastside ... It had a deeper purpose and a
deeper meaning. I say the same is true for all the people who are here today; they have a deeper purpose."
Throughout our conversation, Patrick emphasized how the colonial system replicates itself through
the bodies of the people downtown. "Because First
Nations people are one of the lower groups in the hierarchy of power, of course they're going to be one of
the first ones who are ground down by that system.
We have to look at the [poverty] stats. Same with incarceration. We always have the highest population
incarcerated. I haven't seen the [overdose] stats because nobody's found them or matched them together,
but I know just by experience that going to these First
Nation's funerals that this fentanyl — for lack of a
better term — epidemic, that we're vastly overrepre-
sented in that, too."
T
here are visible linkages between the hou-
ing economy and growing disparity between
classes. What is a squeeze for some, has deadly
health outcomes for others. Some identify gentrification as a top-down
governmental strategy to 'redevelop' cities in order to increase a city's tax base.
Vancouver is one of many cities —Toronto, San Francisco, New York, Sydney — where
the cost of housing has risen to the point where even the middle class cannot afford to
live in the cities they serve. This globalized neo-gentrification is a blood relative of imperialism, which brought us colonization in the first place.
In Vancouver, there are constant examples of the undeserving-versus-deserving colonial narratives. The Georgia Straight filed a freedom-of-information request for public
feedback letters to the City of Vancouver about the opioid crisis, culminating in an article published in March 2017. After the municipal tax hike of 0.5% to help deal with the
opioid crisis, letters to City Hall were overwhelmingly negative, showing that Vancouver
landowners did not want to pay for preventable deaths.
This outcry reinforced the stigmas impacting people who live with substance use in
their lives. Unfortunately, the bulk of the funds raised from the tax increase were put towards enforcement and a new policing station in Strathcona, once again reinforcing the
narrative that impoverished inner city dwellers are 'bad,' and just require supervision
and control. The City of Vancouver missed an opportunity to allocate funds to address
housing insecurity and poverty, two of the factors at the root of systemic health injustices and the conditions contributing to the crisis in the DTES.
he term gentricide is impossible to tether to a single definition, a single cause, or
a single consequence, as this article demonstrates. There are so many interwoven
factors contributing to the poverty of the Downtown Eastside: the perpetuation of
colonial narratives through gentrification and commercial development, cuts and inadequate funding to community-driven resources, and inaction on all levels of government.
Patrick closed our conversation with a bittersweet reminder: "Everything is always interconnected. In all our relations, we always believe everything is related. As soon as you
shift one thing in the puzzle, things can shift for better or worse."
References:
"Canada's health care spending growth slows." Canadian Institute for Health Information. October 30 2012. https://www.cihi.ca/en/
spending-and-health-workforce/spending/canadas-health-care-spending-growth-slows
"Downtown Eastside Local Area Profile 2013." City of Vancouver Community Services and City of Vancouver Planning and Development
Services. November 2013. http://vancouver.ca/files/cov/profik-dtes-local-area-2013.pdf
"Economic Tsunami- The Cost of Diabetes in Canada" Diabetes Canada. December 2009. http://www.diabetes.ca/publicatwns-newslelters/
advocacy-reports/economic-tsunami-the-cosl-ofdiabetes-in-canada
Lupick, Travis. "Many taxpayers don't want to foot the fill for programs supporting drug users, emails to city reveal" The Georgia Straight.
March 27 2017. httpy/wvuw.slraight.com/news/886726/many-taxpayers-donl-wanlfoot-bill-programs-suppoHing-drug-users-emails-city-reveal
Maclean, Rachel "High blood pressure draining Canada's health-care system, study suggests " CBCNews. August 12 2015. http://www.cbc.
ca/news/canada/calgary/high-blc/od-pressure-draining-canada-s-health-care-system-suggests-study-1.3188881
Turpel-Lafond, Mary Ellen. Paige's Story: Abuse, Indifference and a Young Life Discarded. Representative for Children and Youth. May 14
2015. https://www.rcybc.ca/sues/default/files/documents/pdJ/reports_publications/rcy-pg-report-final.pdf
Wong, Craig. "Owning home becoming pipedream for many house-hunters in Toronto, Vancouver." Global News / The Canadian Press. June 9
2016. http://globalnews.ca/news/2751178/owning-a-home-becoming-pipedreamfor-many-house-hunlers-in-loronto-vancouver/
"GENTRICIDE" 7
think a lot about images. I
think about how images are
consumed, how Indigenous
bodies are consumed by different public."
Jeneen Frei Njootli is an artist and member of the Gwich'in nation. This statement,
borderline stream of consciousness, seems
to connect the various projects and passions she has been involved in lately.
Frei Njootli has just recently come back
from Washington, D.C., where she was
advocating for the protection of an area
occupied by the Bering Ground Caribou
herd. The land is called Iizhik Gwats'an
Gwandaii Goodlit, or The Sacred Place
Where Life Begins, named because it
is where many caribou give birth. Frei
Njootli explains that Gwich'in nation has
had an interdependent relationship with
caribou that spans 20 thousand years (according to scientists, though the nations
themselves see time as immemorial).
Unfortunately, this same area is also
rich in fossil fuels and currently under threat of industry development.
As Frei Njootli describes it: "If [the
caribou's] cabin ground gets disrupted, that means their migration
routes get disrupted, which means
that means they die, and we die."
The Gwich'in nation is one of the
few nations that spans the U.S.Canada border that still depends on
hunting as a primary food source.
Caribou is crucial to their diet, as much
culturally as physically. Old Crow, a northern community just 130 kilometres north of
the Arctic Circle, is a boat or fly-in area. This
makes transportation of all goods and supplies exorbitantly expensive. However, the Gwich'in nation operates a food co-op, which centres much around caribou.
If governments and industry develop the Bering Ground
Caribou's migration locations near the border, the herd
thins. This thinning would result in less caribou migrating
JENEEN FREI
NJOOTLI
WORDS BY KAT KOTT
PHOTOS BY EMMANUEL ETTI
ILLUSTRATION BY AMY BRERETON
SUBVERTING,
RECLAIMING
AND REDEFINING
north, directly cutting off the
Gwich'in caribou. Not protecting these lands won't just impact
Gwich'in culture, it will lead to
starvation.
Caribou, being such an integral
part of her culture and sustenance, is often a theme in Frei
Njootli's art. Her most recent
performance piece Through
the Body. Where is the work?
g'ashondai'kwa is part of the
Ambivalent Pleasures exhibition
at the Vancouver Art Gallery.
'G'ashondai'kwa' translates to
'I don't know,' described by a
footnote next to the display. The
intention of the note is to lead the
curious viewer to see their response
reflected back at them. Playing with
the perceptions and assumptions of
the audience is not uncharacteristic of
Frei Njootli's art practice.
In Through the Body. Where is the work? g'ashondai'kwa, Frei Njootli turns a caribou antler into a microphone, into which she sings. It is also dragged across the
floor, activating the microphone with sound. The audio
feeds into a distortion pedal and a loop pedal, which are
then fed through a subwoofer and guitar amp. Frei Njootli
attempts to harmonize her voice with the other sounds
generated by the pedals, creating a weave a complex sonic
landscape.
During the performance, Frei Njootli wears an industry
grade respirator and black parka she has made herself; the
audience is also provided ear plugs and respiratory masks.
Of this she says, "I want people to wonder why their protection looks different than my own." Frei Njootli then
uses an angle grinder on the antler, filling the space with
dust and the smell of burning antler. The only form of
documentation of this performance is the dust that falls to
the floor by the end of it.
n addition to her performance practice, Frei
Njootli is also a founding member of ReMatriate.
ReMatriate aims to disrupt the narrative often assigned to Indigenous people from the media and, as Frei
Njootli puts it, "assert a positive Indigenous presence."
The collective presents content that show the strength
and vitality of women and female-identified artists in
Indigenous communities, and share the true experiences
of entrepreneurs and creatives.
The name, ReMatriate is based on repatriation, a term
used to describe a restoration of a culture with their
homeland. However, repatriation, with the latin root
'pater' meaning father, is still a perpetuation of patriarchal colonialism. The term continues the idea of the
'fatherland,' as if the home is necessarily 'of the father.'
Frei Njootli suggested the more fitting term 'ReMatriate'
to subvert traditional colonial language. She thought of
it as she pondered what exactly was being taken from
Indigenous folk.
"A lot of the things being profited from illegitimately by
companies and designers is Indigenous women's labor,"
she explains. "Who tanned those skins? It was women
who tanned those skins. Who sewed that together? It
was women who sewed that together? Who carried that
knowledge?"
hen companies steal designs and patterns
from Indigenous artists, it strips them of their
voice and culture. It's as if to imply that the
companies were inspired by a relic, or else came up with
the designs on their own. Frei Njootli explains, "When
[companies reproduce designs], it erases us, because it
gives the statement that we're not here."
Frei Njootli and the rest of ReMatriate are working to
change that narrative. They use social media platforms
such as Facebook and Instagram to show that their cultures are very much alive and active. ReMatriate makes
an effort to post photographs, biographies and updates
from Indigenous artists of various descents. In so doing, ReMatriate seeks to visually interrupt the colonialist narrative to reclaim their own images. The posts allow
Indigenous women to tell their own, actual stories.
This movement also disrupts the misleading and ultimately violent depiction of Indigenous people in the
media. Frei Njootli says, "We want to advocate for lateral
kidness, lateral love, and the sovereignty over our image and culture." ReMatriate shifts the focus away from
harmful portrayals of Indigenous peoples to more accurate
representations of their individual realities, accomplishments and creative expressions.
Frei Njootli's own art, activism, and involvement with
ReMatriate centre around (mis)representation and power:
questioning who controls the representation of individuals
and groups, the harmful power of those representations,
and what can be done to change it. Through her work, Frei
Njootli considers the potency of the images we see, and
how they come to define society's understanding of culture and heritage. In so doing, Frei Njootli challenges the
complexity of contemporary colonial narratives, and compels her audiences to do the same.
'it
Ambivalent Pleasures featuring the remnants of Jeneen Frei
Njootli's performance is on display at the Vancouver Art Gallery
until April 17. To learn more about ReMatriate, follow them on
Facebook or on Instagram @rematriate_.
JENEEN FREI NJOOTLI Heal tine
fiction
MARCH 2017
GENTLE PARTY / MOONDLE
MARCH 4 / ACADEMIE DUELLO
hen I arrived at the show, I was met by a wall of swords. While it was
far from a conventional venue, Academie Duello — Vancouver's
School of Modern Swordplay — perfectly set the atmosphere for Gentle
Party's album release. The spacious studio, normally reserved for various
styles of medieval combat instruction, was instead filled with small groups of
people softly chatting in groups among the racks of blades that surrounded the
dimly lit room.
As I studied the assortment of crests adorning the brick walls of the space,
and the conversations continued humming behind me, Gentle Party quietly
slipped onto the stage, readied their instruments, and let loose a single, powerful chord. It swept across the room and snapped the crowd to attention.
Almost instantly the audience sank to the wooden floor, sitting enraptured by
the quartet. Despite it being their own release show, Gentle Party showed no
hesitation in performing first.
Harpist Elisa Thorn, violinist Meredith Bates, cellist Shanto Acharia, and
vocalist Jessicka serenely moved through selections of their debut album,
Jouska, mixing elements of chamber music, jazz and musique concrete,
among other styles. Between the staccato pop of "Trophies" and the impressionistic instrumental "Boy Children," the intricacy and subtlety of their music
united their performance and demanded close attention.
As the set went on, I found myself drawn to the oxymoronic phrase "modern swordplay" as an apt metaphor for the music Gentle Party created. By
incorporating recorded soundscapes and slight electronic manipulations into
their seemingly antiquated instrumentation, they blended the old with the new.
Both the band and the space were suspended in time, pinned down to no singular era.
Moondle — the would-be opener for the night — took to the stage after a
brief intermission. With a slightly more conventional set up (vocals, two guitars,
bass, and drums), Moondle continued where Gentle Party left off in combining
disparate genres with incredible technique and subtlety. Emma Postl's voice
effortlessly spread across jazz-influenced melodies, as Eli Davidovici's bass
lines grounded the quintet; Thomas Hoeller and Cary Campbell's guitar parts
were passed back and forth, both defining the atmosphere of each song, and
elaborating upon it; Mili Hong's drumming was near virtuosic.
Unfortunately, Moondle suffered from the all-too-common problem of having the guitars far too loud. As is the case with many guitar based bands, the
two guitars overpowered the other instruments and muddied the overall mix.
Especially in the swordplay studio, with an impressively attentive crowd, there
was no need to have the guitars at such an attention grabbing volume.
As I stepped out onto the street after the show, it felt like I had stepped out
of a time machine back into the present. I'm not sure where or when I had just
come from, but it sure had sounded good. —Lucas Lund
RAE SPOON/CAROLE POPE
MARCH 11 /WISE HALL
f you're anything like me, in simplest terms, you go to a concert to experience your favourite mildly loud music from your favourite artists as loud
as physically possible without rupturing an eardrum. Thankfully, my trip to the
WISE Hall to see Rae Spoon and Carole Pope was to be no danger to my
hearing.
Dubbed by Rae Spoon as "The Rae and Carole Variety Hour," the concert
saw the two split their set lists in half and alternate every six songs. Spoon
gently swept into "Lighthouse," which slowly broke through the chatter and
gave a lovely kickstart to the night. Another song later and Spoon invited us
into "a little sing-along," which, long story short, created a room full of people singing "Do whatever the fuck you want," — an experience that was easily worth the price of admission alone. "Any metal bands who want to use this
song can just have it," Spoon says, referencing "The Beast Is Me," the penultimate song of the first half of their set-list. This light jab, while at their own
expense, highlighted the charm that Rae exudes on-stage, making quickwitted remarks about gender politics, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and their
own experiences with fellow musicians across the country.
Without much delay, Carole Pope and her accompanying guitar player,
David Taylor took the stage, and it became clear that most of the audience
was there to see Pope. Taylor cranked up the gain and filled the hall with noise
and applause from a ready-to-rock crowd.
I must say in advance that I listen to several albums of any musical artist before I go to their concert to get an idea of what type of music to expect.
While it was fun to recognize some of my favourites such as "Francis Bacon,"
"Lesbians in the Forest," and "My Flame," Carole Pope's live performance
didn't make me feel like I gained anything from coming to a live performance
of the album material I grew to really enjoy over the weeks prior. The material
performed during both halves of Pope's set demanded a drummer above all
else — without a driving force behind the songs, her performance unfortunately felt more like karaoke night at the bar more than a paid concert.
How delightful it was for me then that Rae Spoon's performance exceeded and built upon the original studio-recorded material, especially during the
second half of the performance. The second half of their set drove head first
into bellowing electronica that got the concert hall shaking, a strong increase
in tempo from the more soft-rock inspired first half. Their performance made
me see the value in coming to see a live performance of the album material
that I had grown to enjoy in the weeks prior to the concert. Rae's voice enveloped the audience in a dreamlike defiance of the sexual constraints that I feel
comfortable in saying that many people in the room had experienced at least
once in their lives before. It was the type of subtle rebellion that is refreshing in
the vast ocean of name-calling and shouting matches that populates much of
social politics today.
While rather disappointing on Pope's part, Rae Spoon stole the show. Their
duet together at the end of the show was a pleasant surprise, however— their
voices work impressively well together. But don't let a few paragraphs written
by somebody you don't know influence your ticket-purchasing habits. In the
words of Rae Spoon: "Do whatever the fuck you want."—Andrew Smith
JOKES PLEASE!
MARCH 16 / LITTLE MOUNTAIN GALLERY
know some people who feel iffy about going to stand-up shows. They
might've seen one too many comics bomb for comfort — or maybe once
they were awkwardly singled out by a comedian doing some crowd work.
Either way, they shouldn't let some rough experiences in the stand-up universe
ruin the fun for all stand-up shows — especially when there are rooms like
Jokes Please! around.
Jokes Please! was no average stand-up comedy night. The poorly insulated (you will keep your coat on) but still charming and beloved Little Mountain
Gallery offered a cozy seating arrangement that guaranteed a fun and casual
show. No audience member was safe from some gentle, yet personal "zings"
from chipper host Ross Dauk. The venue was so small that even late audience
members walking through the front door were still in Dauk's zinger splash-
zone. That's just one way that the crowd was drawn into the comedy. Another
was that Dauk sent cat videos to everyone in the venue who activated Air-Drop
on their iPhones. Weird, but very fun.
If you're looking for variety, this room has everything from comics working out new material, to others running sets they've prepped for TV specials.
If you're skeptical about watching comics work out new jokes, rest assured
that even the few punchlines that fall flat end in laughs, like when comic Ryan
Williams (my personal favourite of the night) screamed into the mic after a
silent pause: "They're not all good jokes!"
Kelsey Hamilton entertained the audience with some delightfully quirky
anecdotes, and Alain Williams weaved some personal material into his set, as
well as some deserving jabs at the final two Harry Potter movies. MVP Jacob
Samuel ran his set for the Winnipeg Comedy Festival — people pay top dollar (as in, more than five dollars) to see sets like these. Samuel spent his time
telling us tales about his long-term girlfriend — but his wholesome, light-hearted bits about relationships ended with the ultimate reveal: that his relationship
had ended since he'd "submitted [his jokes] to the festival," and been accepted. While the audience roared with laughter at the sick irony of it all, there was
beauty in such an honest moment of vulnerability on stage. The making-funny of things that are supposed to be sad: that is a special phenomenon largely
unique to the art of stand-up comedy.
Between every comic, Dauk would pop back on stage and riff on a tangent
while audience members had the chance to get a quick drink. For one of these
instances, someone in the crowd abruptly stood up and announced "I'm gonna
go vape," which was met by a world of berating quips. It was a special time.
Headliner Jane Stanton, a seasoned vet in the Vancouver stand-up scene,
closed the show with 15 minutes of hilarity through telling-it-like-it-is comedy.
Her narrative meandered from topics on chocolate bars, dating, Vancouver,
Uggs, and more. She told her jokes in a totally unique style that had her putting on crazy voices and doing act-outs that left the audience in stitches.
If you're looking for a fun night out, Jokes Please! is a great room to get a
taste of all that Vancouver's stand-up scene has to offer. If you're unsure of
whether or not stand-up is for you, give this lovable show a try — worst case
scenario, you'll leave with a new cat video.—Maddy Ratter
PRINCESS NOKIA / HORSEPOWAR
MARCH 23 / BILTMORE CABARET
he show began with Horsepowar and Homeboy Jules. Although I hadn't
heard of them before, I instantly knew they were going to bring something
special with an air of vigour and vitality to their presence. The two had great
chemistry. Behind Homeboy Jules, clips of Bollywood movies kaleidoscoped
on a projection screen. As the images twirled about in the background, Jules'
mixed Bollywood samples with slippery techno beats. Horsepowar, with a style
slightly reminiscent of M.I.A., had empowering lyrics like, "What good is a king
without a queen." The nuanced blending of traditional Bollywood music and
electronic elements was new to me, but it didn't stop me from absolutely loving it.
As the clock struck 11 pm (more than two hours after Princess Nokia was
supposed to appear), I was entranced by two talented dancers alongside the
badass DJ Kookum. Clusters of predominantly women pushed to the front for
Princess Nokia, creating an almost faux-mosh pit as elbows were thrown and
words exchanged, every fan trying to secure a spot near the front to see the
Princess.
I knew the moment I would first see the notorious Princess Nokia had finally arrived when I heard the revving engine of "Tomboy." As she walked on
stage, her presence was so powerful and positively radiant that her energy
was infectious. There seemed to be a physical elevation of the mood in the
room as the entire Biltmore exploded at the sight of her.
She played music from all throughout her career, ranging from tracks on
her new album 1992 to her old songs on Metallic Butterfly such as "Dragons"
and "Apple Pie." When she was playing "Kitana," the crowd's energy was
bouncing off the velvet walls. Then it slowed down for "Soul Train," one of my
favourite songs of the night. The song itself is an obvious throwback to the
sensuality and coolness of 70s soul and funk, complete with a chant-along
refrain — albeit with a few tricks picked up from modern deep house and r&b.
This diversity in music genres added depth to the performance, as the intensity
ebbed and flowed between fast trappy tracks to slow soulful ballads.
What made this show especially extraordinary was her closing remarks.
She spoke about taking time each day away from technology and the importance of self-love for young adults, especially young women. It was such an
important topic to address, considering the diverse and mostly female crowd.
Princess Nokia has a strong feminist following, and she demonstrated why.
From the beginning of the night, when Horsepowar and Homeboy Jules
appeared on stage, to the moment Princess Nokia walked off, it was a truly
magical evening. Never have I experienced a set with a lineup of such engaging, badass, socially aware performers. That was an unforgettable concert.
—Inca Gunter
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine
and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA is also expanding to include comedy and theatre, among other
live experiences. Feel free to submit those event details to the
e-mail above.
REAL LIVE ACTION RIDLEY BISHOP/ONLY A VISITOR/
HUNTER GATHER/TOGETHERNESS
MARCH 25 / TOAST COLLECTIVE
elcome to my humble abode," uttered Ridley Bishop, taking to the
stage as the first act of the evening — the venue did at times feel like
being in somebody's living room.
Toast Collective occupies a converted storefront among a collection of
independent shops at Kingsway and Fraser, and the entrance is through the
back, as I was informed by scribbled note on the front door. Walking through
the dark alley, I found a canopy of fairy lights leading to the door, which certainly added an air of mystique before the evening had even begun. The room
itself was small and scattered with a few chairs — the high ceiling and the lazy
sofas kept the space from seeming cramped, despite the growing crowd outnumbering the seats available.
Natasha Zrno (clarinet) and Johanna Hauser (bass clarinet) joined Bishop
and his guitar on stage. The combination of timbres created intriguing layers of sound, with the clarinets almost filling the role of percussion, creating a
beat for Bishop to play over. The talent on stage was clear to see, with sounds
coming from the stage — albeit sometimes abrasive (particularly towards the
WHY?/OPEN MIKE EAGLE
MARCH 25 / VENUE
rriving at VENUE at 7:30pm, I was surprised to see a nearly empty
room. It was Saturday night, and it was to be an early show — get the
concert out of the way so there's still time to go clubbing later. The opener, Los
Angeles rapper Open Mike Eagle, was supposed to be starting his set, but the
stage was empty, except for four piles of equipment draped in canvas. The rest
of the room was sparsely populated by the few who actually pay attention to
door times.
Wandering around the near empty nightclub, I overheard a few fragmented conversations about the sorry state of the show thus far: "Didn't make it
into Canada ... No opener tonight, I guess ... I heard he forgot his passport... I
wonder when they'll start..."
Over the course of the next hour, the stage remained devoid of Open Mike
Eagle, but the crowd slowly accumulated, and the room filled with artificial
fog. By the time 8:30pm rolled around, a surge of bodies pushed to the front,
shoulders bumping to get that special spot at centre stage.
A few stage hands pulled the canvas sheets off the stage, revealing a drum
kit and three towers of keyboards, drum pads, and synths, all adorned with
»•
end of "Breathing Machine") — that really gave the impression that these were
artists who knew exactly how to manipulate their instruments with impressive
outcomes.
Next came Only a Visitor, made up of three vocals, a keyboard, bass
and drums. The band provided the warmest notes of the evening, and
their performance certainly garnered the best response from the audience.
Vocalists Emma Post! and Celina Kurz weaved harmonies together — finding
the perfect balance between experimentalism and traditional vocals — over
which Robyn Jacob provided groovy keyboard playing and great lyricism. The
harmonized vocal line on "Feigning Innocence" — "We went outside / We were
children again / Ignoring time" — was the most memorable moment of the set,
providing the ideal backing for Jacob to work with and creating a welcoming
atmosphere in the room. A cymbal heavy crescendo provided an end to an
impressively powerful and well received set from the band.
Following the first two bands that experimented in sounds, the night made
an unexpected turn with the next artists experimenting with the concept of
performance itself. Seattle-based Hunter Gather had their tour to promote
their new cassette cut short earlier that day having been turned away at the
Canadian border. The audience was instead treated to a set via Skype —
credit going to the organisers of the event, as well as Hunter Gather themselves for setting this up so efficiently. The band's music centred around
melodic saxophone, with texture added in the form drums, guitar and bass.
The second (and final) song, "Sing" showed what Hunter Gather was capable of, even with the limitations of Skype, in filling the room with atmospheric
sound. The short and impressive set certainly left the crowd wanting more.
Togetherness, the final band of the night, were waiting to satisfy the room's
craving. "We're going to be a bit louder than the other bands," the audience
was warned. And they certainly weren't lying, as Togetherness launched into
a set of explosive rock songs. They clearly didn't lack talent, but perhaps the
music would have been better suited to a different night. Glimmers of mellow
pop were short-lived as the distorted guitar screeched into action again. The
performance provided a resounding end to a varied and experimental night of
music. The variety of talent on display is testament to the welcoming nature of
Toast Collective, and long may it continue. —Harry Varley
a few incandescent light bulbs. The lights dropped and Why? strode out on
stage, each of the four members planting themselves behind their respective
stations on stage.
Without a word, they jumped into "This Ole King," the first track on their
latest record Moh Lhean. The lights exploded through the dense fog that surrounded them, creating vast swathes of vibrant and ever-shifting colour, with
the light bulbs intermittently flicking on as bright spots across the stage. After
ploughing through a few songs without pause, frontman Yoni Wolf addressed
the crowd for the first time. "Thanks for coming out Vancouver. And sorry about
Mike Eagle — he didn't make it into the country. He's in Bellingham in a Motel
6 with all our drugs. We'll go collect him later on tonight."
Being someone who has never really delved any deeper into Why?'s music
than their masterful second album, Alopecia, I was surprised to see so many
people around me sing along to every song they played, old and new. Of
course, the ones that garnered the most enthusiastic response from the crowd
were the tracks from Alopecia, like "Song Of The Sad Assassin," and "The
Vowels Pt. 2." But the rest of the set, drawn from every corner of their extensive catalogue, matched those classic tracks in energy and style.
Doug McDiarmid and Matt Meldon somehow managed to fill out each of
the songs' instrumentals, despite the incredible vastness of sounds and samples crammed into each. Josiah Wolf, drummer and Yoni's younger brother,
held down Why?'s signature complex and hard-hitting beats with an impressive display of technical drumming. Yoni Wolf completed the sound with his
impressionistic and imagistic lyrics delivered in the unique speak-sing style of
rapping that the band is known for.
Despite hours of waiting beforehand, Why? truly exceeded any expectations I might have had. Their performance, and the crowd's unrelenting excitement made me want to go home and explore even deeper into their discogra-
phy — or I could just stick to Alopecia.—Lucas Lund
•••••■•••_
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ffl&e're ooing it a little bit more effortlessly
thance Lovett got her start
in soul as a backup singer
when a classmate approached her in the hallway of
the Conservatory of Music in
Victoria.
"This girl just kind of stopped
me and was like, 'Hey, what do
you think about soul music?'" recounted Chance. "We were studying jazz, so it was totally out of
the blue. I told her I was in love
with it, and she was like, 'Well do
you want to be a backup singer in
a band?'"
Since this fateful day in 2010,
Chance has been hooked on singing soul.
Lovett had always been obsessed with soul music. Starting
out singing backup for the
Victoria band The Chanterelles,
she eventually moved up to lead
vocals. Now she fronts her own
band, Chance Lovett and The
Broken Hearted. But the legacy of
The Chanterelles remains.
Chance Lovett and
The Broken Hearted is
made up of ten members, most
of who played together in The
Chanterelles. They include Liz
Hagiepetros on backup vocals;
Andrew Bishop on saxophone;
Louis Grove on guitar; Scott
Raddysh on guitar and keys; Amy
Smith on bass; Adam Martin on
drums; Paul Oppers on harmonica and percussion; and Emily
Kells on trumpet. Also a previous member of The Chanterelles,
Emily recalled how The Broken
Hearted got their start as a band:
"I feel like it was just a cascade
of people asking us to do shows
or specific things, and we're like,
'Yeah, okay, we'll do that.' And
then two months [would] go by
and another show would come up
and we'd be like, 'Yeah, let's do
that too!' And then we just realized we were a band again."
Just like how Lovett wound up
getting her start singing soul, the
formation of The Broken Hearted
"Album of spacious acoustic roots
that places Alex's smooth, soulful
Cuban espresso vocals front and
centre, evoking a carefree clay in
the sunny streets of Havana."
On Tour Fall 2017
Available April 7  v
was "kind of a fluke." Now in
their third year together, the ten-
piece band has found their grove.
They are constantly fielding requests to play around Victoria.
"We're really fortunate in that
we get great opportunities," said
Chance, referring to their show
at Rifflandia Music Festival last
September. "I think it's because
we're a soul band and soul fits
into anything, really."
But when your title band
member lives in another city,
taking those opportunities can
be a little difficult. Lovett now
lives in Vancouver, and has for
the whole time the band has been
together, which can make coordinating shows and scheduling
practices difficult.
"Sometimes we'll do a full
month of practices and there
won't be the full band at any of
the practices," said Kells, noting
that February was one of these
months.
Sometimes the group will even
play shows without holding a full
band practice beforehand.
"We got the opportunity to
open for Frazey Ford and they
asked us on a Saturday and the
show was on Wednesday," said
Lovett. "We somehow managed
to get in some practices. So we
can do it, it's possible. It just
can be a bit tricky. It's pretty
crazy, but we always seem to
make it work somehow."
Lovett believes they manage
to make it work because they've
been playing together for so
long. The Broken Hearted are
able to rely on their years of experience together when distance
is an obstacle. Although not
ideal, they make do with whoever can make it to practice, and
always manage to put on a good
show in the end.
Dne of the major evolutions Lovett and Kells
have seen in the break-up
of The Chanterelles and formation of The Broken Hearted is an
increase in collaboration. Chance
Lovett and The Broken Hearted
are much more democratic than
The Chanterelles were, with no
band drama around administrative issues getting in the way of
creative expression.
"Before, there was too much
other stuff besides the music
going on that was taking away
from what we we're doing. We
all mentally were in different
places. But it feels like with this
we're working together more
[now], and we're really proud of
the stuff we're producing," said
Chance.
The music is more cohesive.
To Kells, it just feels more natural and less forced. There is an
innate trust in the ideas and capabilities of the bandmates. In
The Chanterelles, songs would be
written individually and brought
to the band. This is not the case
with The Broken Hearted, who
write songs together, and are
less concerned about a singular
sound.
"We're doing it a little bit more
effortlessly," said Kells. "[In The
Chanterelles] we were putting a
bit more pressure on getting a
polished sound, and sometimes if
you think too hard about it, you
lose that fun vibe. Now, it sort of
just sounds like a bunch of people
hanging out, having a good time,
which is what soul music should
sound like."
Lovett seconded this in saying that the group's sound has
changed for the better because of
the movement away from a polished product.
"Before, there was more of like
a poppy-er soul sound whereas a
lot of the stuff we're playing now
is grittier, which is my favourite
kind of soul," she said.
With a new edgy sound and a
focus on the "fun vibe," Chance
Lovett and The Broken Hearted
have set themselves apart from
The Chanterelles, carving out
their own spot in the soul music
community.
Chance Lovett and The Broken
Hearted recently performed at the
Fox Cabaret March 31, though more
show dates will be announced soon.
They have wrapped up recording their debut EP, which will be
pressed to vinyl and released later
this Spring. Visit chancelovett.com
for more.
CHANCE LOVETT AND THE BROKEN HEARTED Unfctt
KeoietD
BOOK REVIEWS
A PLACE CALLED NO
HOMELAND
Kai Cheng Thorn
(Arsenal Pulp Press)
01/04/2017
experience and a growing sense of isolation and cynicism, reflecting the myriad of ways in which we defend ourselves against pain.
At some points, I felt frustration over the callousness these characters
displayed towards one another. My impression was that they were mostly jerks with a couple of diamonds in the rough. But, in many ways, these
flaws were also refreshingly realistic. Zomparelli paints a vivid picture of his
characters, weaving his words with sardonic wit, allowing the reader enough
space to wiggle into situations from a bird's eye view. I routinely found myself
rooting for some characters, while wishing others would just grow the hell up.
But the sense that they could be that person sitting next to me on the bus, or
a loved one who is intimately connected to my own life never left me.
Everything is Awful is a unique slice of reality that challenges and gives
pause for thought. Daniel Zomparelli writes from an experience that is autobiographical yet touches upon us all in our search for meaning. While stepping into Ryan, Derek, or even Daniel's shoes we soon realize that the monsters are ourselves, and the ghosts are guilt that haunt us. This cast of characters, while sometimes careless are just like you and me: hurt individuals
wanting only for a warm pair of wings to wrap us up in safety.—Nathan Pike
place called No Homeland by Kai Cheng Thorn is a powerfully written
anthology of poems depicting her interconnected mental and physical
experiences as a queer Chinese immigrant in Canada. The rhythmic and lyrical nature of her art moves the reader into a space of comfort and inclusion.
As Thorn explores the geographies of body, mind, movement, and settlement,
she traces the ways in which violence scars, but also collides with the growth
of individuals. Her writing situates itself as both a place of refuge and a space
of learning for people who may or may not share similar experiences.
The beat of Thorn's poetry leaves you with a craving to hear it out loud.
Poems such as "Diaspora Babies" and "Between Friends" are among many
of her rhythmic gems. While reading "Diaspora Babies," for instance, I
couldn't help but add my own pace to each verse, and then wonder what
the true intent was. As a reader, it is interesting to interact so strongly with a
piece, because it begs for an understanding beyond one's self. Thorn's passion is heard in each word and paints a vivid set of images. This interaction
between experience and language intimately drags the reader to a place of
understanding.
Storytelling is another key element of Thorn's poetry. Through dynamic and compelling coming-of-age tales, Thorn illustrates the battles many
face against societal institutions, "its name was the Boy Without a Penis,"
for example, begins with a child's innocent self discovery. As the poem progresses, so does the child's life. Thorn details the child's loss of personal
and cultural identity. A cohesive and poetic narrative, this story depicts how it
would feel to be forced into the margins of society.
What a place called No Homeland presents beyond waves of intense
emotion, is questioning of the things Canadians choose not to consider. It
prompts you to stare, and think about the imperfections of our sugar-coated
nation. One thing becomes clear: it is only easy to be complacent within the
structures of society when you fit in neatly. Thorn's anthology highlights the
reasons structural violence needs recognition and deconstruction.
—Emily Valente
EVERYTHING IS AWFUL
AND YOU'RE A TERRIBLE
PERSON
Daniel Zomparelli
(Arsenal Pulp Press)
01/04/2017
ALBUM REVIEWS
GENTLE PARTY
Jouska
Phonometrograph
04/03/2017
ping about his daughter over a droning trap beat. Suddenly, Leon transitions
into a rawer, softer verse concerning his own tumultuous past.
Though compelling, "Daughter (Hailey-Nirvana)" is far from the only
standout track. A diverse energy runs throughout / Think You've Gone Mad
(or the Sins of the Father). "Matthew in the Middle," for example, appears
towards the midpoint of the album. With a rich and dreamy electric guitar juxtaposed against a jazzy drum beat, Leon's flow elevates to something which
seems absolutely effortless. "Kill My Mind," on the other hand, is a confessional slow-burner, while "81" finds Leon at his most gleefully braggadocios. On this album, when the energy peaks, it does so with a club-crushing,
soul-striking power.
This release, however, can still feel indulgent in its length. Clocking in at
75 minutes, / Think You've Gone Mad doesn't necessarily overstay its welcome but does lose steam. The best tracks appear in the first half, while
the later songs suffer from a noticeable lack of lyrical and rhythmic intensity.
Despite this relative lack of energy, some songs in the album's second half,
such as the soft, piano-driven "Salt Lake City" and the lyrically aggressive
"Sins of the Father (100 Bitches)," continue to showcase Leon's talents for
blending tight-knit production with a strong sense of rhythmic and emotional lyricism.
On "Black Sheep Nirvana," Leon compares himself to one of America's
most powerful musical families, remarking, "Make enough money we'll look
like the Carters." Though he may never reach the heights of Jay Z and
Queen Bey, if he keeps course, we may soon be hearing about another artist
from Toronto whose name isn't Drake.—Leo Yamanaka-Leclerc
DAD THIGHS
The Ghosts that I Fear
(Old Press Records)
14/02/2017
u
n
t feels like all we ever do in this world is break each others
hearts." These simple yet troubling words sum up my experience of reading Everything is Awful and You're a Terrible
Person, the debut work of fiction from Poetry is Dead editor-in-chief, Daniel
Zomparelli.
This collection of short stories is not all heartbreak, but there is an undercurrent of yearning, pain, and loneliness that ebbs and flows from tale to tale.
These are stories about hooking up, breaking up, and the stories we make
up. With recurring characters and themes, these interconnected tales follow
several men on their life journeys and love's follies.
There is the story of Steve, a monster in human skin who just wants to be
loved. And there is Derek with his newly moved in boyfriend, whose relationship already appears to be on the rocks. And then there is Ryan who shows
up at various points of Everything is Awful and You're a Terrible Person to
share his many dating experiences. Both humorous and frustrating, Ryan
is almost a protagonist, speaking for everyone else in his sometimes crass
words and actions. Cycling through a number of one night stands, he drifts
from guy to guy, never coming up with much more than a shallow sexual
UNDER REVIEW
ou have just laid down in bed. The light of your phone screen is still
burning your eyes. Like most nights, your mind is racing. Thoughts
and anxieties, successes and failures. Conversations. Maybe you remember
a frustrating moment- someone cut in line at the coffee shop, and you stood
by without saying anything. Maybe you are preparing to quit your job. These
scenarios battle inside your head, you search for words, you find them. A
retort which sends the line-cutter snivelling away. Or you imagine the sweet
confrontation with your controlling boss, and walk away proud. These imaginary moments are familiar to all of us.
This is Jouska, the title of Gentle Party's debut LP - a word the band
defines as "a hypothetical conversation that you compulsively play out in
your head, which serves as a kind of psychological batting cage." Indeed,
this is an album in conversation with itself. The sounds of cello, violin, harp,
and voice swirl throughout each song, playing off each other to intrigue the
listener into the album's imagination and take them down unexpected paths.
This ensnaring quality is perhaps demonstrated no better than in "The Door
There Is Devastation," a song without vocals in which the strings brilliantly
invoke the ominous feeling hinted at in the song's title.
It is rare to find an album that has such masterful control over the emotional response it provokes in the listener. On Jouska, each song feels crafted to tell a particular story, whether it is a short track like "Wound of Fate" or
the seven-plus minute tracks like "Boy Children." Even after multiple listens,
Gentle Party manages to keep you wondering what will come next. Just as
you settle into a peaceful place, another errant mood arises. Jouska indeed.
Truly, it is easy to feel a deep connection with the world portrayed in this
album.—Joey Doyle
SEAN LEON
/ Think You've Gone Mad (Or the Sins of
Our Father)
(Self-Released)
05/02/2017
he hook of "Matthew in the Middle" finds featured singer Daniel Caesar
musing over the pains of class struggle, asking himself, "Is this Heaven
or suburbia?" These simple lines best encapsulate the concepts behind
Toronto-based rapper and producer Sean Leon's / Think You've Gone Mad
(Or the Sins of the Father), the highly-anticipated first installment of his
Black Sheep Nirvana trilogy. On this album Leon mixes the personal with the
social, weaving together motifs of family, economic tension and racial struggle atop spacey and trap-influenced production. As a result, it is a release
both uniquely off-centre and powerfully inviting.
Leon achieves these results through rapping with intensity. In several
songs he layers his naturally passionate flow with unique effects, which provides a strong catalogue of vocal highlights. The album's opener, "Daughter
(Hailey-Nirvana)," for instance, begins with a heavily-synthesized Leon rap-
on't judge a book by its cover. Dad Thighs might have a goofy-chic
moniker, but The Ghosts that I Fear is a far cry from a light-hearted gag. This album is a dedicated elucidation of heartbreak, tragedy, and
self-loathing.
From delicate and soft to incredibly loud and abrasive, Dad Thighs' compositions involve clean melodic guitars and thundering self-destruction.
"Going to the Dump to Watch the Bears Part One," for instance, serves as
a fitting introduction to this type of songwriting. Beginning slowly, the song
picks up into a hard hitting overdriven chorus, ending with a lasting impression that sets the tone for the rest of the album, "If this is love then where is
life meant to lead us except in circles?"
"Part Two," on the other hand, brings with it bright guitars, a melancholy
bassline, waltzed drumming, and vocals of harmonized yelling and whispers
which juxtapose heartbreak with fury. This song is as devastating as it is ten
der, with the last two choruses coming from both perspectives of post-breakup depression, down to the details of the ensuing dampened cognitive functions. A point driven home when vocalist Victoria confesses, "I can't say that
I've never fantasized about my own funeral and who would be there," a line
which is later repeated by co-songwriter Felix on the dreamscape spoken
word interlude, "Every Day."
These lyrics combine the delicacy of spoken word poetry with frustrated, rage-fueled cries of desperation. At times, however, Dad Thighs' commitment to raw emotion acts as a double-edged sword, as certain moments
come across as overtly self-indulgent. On "The Rain it Raineth," for example
Victoria yells, "I'll stand on my rock / Wishing to scream / (Leave me alone) /
But I'm too fucking pathetic." The Ghosts that I Fear suffers from an obsession with heartbreak. It is one thing to write a cathartic song about lost love,
but half an album's worth of lamenting the same subject is overbearing to
say the least, ultimately detracting from its lasting impression and meaning-
fulness. With that said, this 'woe-is-me' self-absorption is not always present. Some lyrics are as simple and general as can be, such as on the ballad
to self-deprecation, "My Favourite Valentine," which is carried by the chant,
"We're all in this together /But we all hate ourselves."
The final track "Sometimes," is where everything comes together perfectly. With its catchy chord progressions, bright riffs and pounding drums,
the band shouts, "SOMETIMES!" As they scream, you can hear the microphones capturing the air being torn out of their lungs by their (possibly damaged) vocal chords. And as it is with the rest of The Ghosts that I Fear, sensitivity is hidden amongst brutality: "Sometimes / A laugh is all we'll ever
need / And at times I still forget to smile."—Aldan Danaher
!!!
To submit music for review consideration in Discorder Magazineand online, please
send a physical copy to the station addressed to Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Under Review Editor at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver BC,
V6T1Z1. Though our contributors prioritize physical copies, you may email download codes to underreview.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums sent prior to their
official release dates.
Under Review is also expanding to include independent films, books and podcasts.
Feel free to submit those, too. LIZA
February 29
(Self-Released)
07/02/2017
new age-y corner.—Victoria Canning
MAXIME MICHAUD
Essais
(Jeuness Cosmique)
12/04/2016
he debut EP from Toronto-based R&B singer Liza is decidedly without winter's chill. Clocking in at 13 minutes, February 29 is an effective presentation of Liza's warm vocals and her ability to move effortlessly
through pitch perfect melodies. February 29 showcases her technical precision rather than her range, favouring simple arrangements sung with mastery. As a result, the production emphasizes her voice. Absent are heavy
synths and bass drops, as there is no need to compensate for vocal shortcomings. Instead, the listener is left in intimate reach of Liza.
Album opener "Let You Know What" is a mellow piano and synth track
about desire. Liza's mellow vocals are at odds with the intensity of the language she uses to express this lust. "I've been fiending for you," she sings
smoothly, quite unlike a woman who is actually fiending for her lover. On
"You," she sounds her longing in scales, articulating desire through both her
words and a mounting crescendo.
In contrast with the EP's first two tracks, which focus on Liza's feelings
in relation to her would-be lover, "All Alone" is introspective. Synth-forward
"All Alone" is the EP's lyrical standout. On this track, Liza describes feeling
alone in a crowded room by using the month of February as a metaphor for
her loneliness. Though this moment is the only explicit reference to the EP's
title, Liza does not extend the metaphor. In the second half of the song, she
relates this alienation to the pressures felt in school and at home: to do better
and to meet the demands of others. Despite the song title, Liza is not alone
in her feelings of isolation; "All Alone" is equally relatable and personal.
On album outro "Ride," Liza returns to the theme of desire from the EP's
opening tracks. But this time, she no longer seeks the lustful relationship
she describes on "You;" instead, she seeks a relationship built upon the slow
bloom of love. "Ride" is the most instrumentally complex track on the album.
Its style differs from the other three tracks and their predominantly electronic
production. Quiet guitars and layers of percussion float through the song. As
the best showcase of Liza's vocal range, "Ride" is a fitting outro to the EP.
With one EP under her belt, Liza is on her way to establishing herself as a highly regarded singer-songwriter. She writes with commendable
frankness and honesty. However, her style is overly simplistically at times,
which lessens the intimacy of her expression. Creative production and further development of her writing style will push her vocals even further and
encourage a deeper connection between the artist and her listeners.
—Courtney Heffernan
MAN MEETS BEAR
/ Want to Be a Ga//ant Rider Like My
Father Was Before Me
(uur audiovisual recordings)
01/09/2016
maxime Michaud's experimental album, Essais, is a triumph of consciousness. The word 'essais' implies 'to try,' a theme woven flawlessly into the delicate fabric of Michaud's work. As an experimental artist
from Quebec, he tasked himself with the mission to put personal experience
into universal sound. From metallic wind chimes, to Johann Sebastian Bach,
to Britney Spears, the ubiquity of the album is all consuming.
The first song "Human Thought, Consciousness, and Word," begins with
a Bach-inspired call to the Christian Lord. Elements from classical music,
radio interference, and synthesizers are combined and distorted to encapsulate Michaud's sentiments. Together, these sounds send you on a journey
unhindered by the constraints of time and place. While listening, your mind
leaves the body. Rather than being a mere observe, your thoughts become a
part of the music. As a result, a beautiful narration of the universe's connective undertones emerges.
A sense of hope and wholeness is carried from the first song into "Essai
d'une musique pour essayer de faire dodo." The radio interference transitions into the scratching of an old vinyl record as Michaud explores the love
and presence of his friends and family. With crickets chirping at various intervals throughout, Michaud succeeds in making this fraternal and familial love
seem organic and eternal.
This simplistic ease, however, is short-lived. The third song, "those
who have hurt [him] and [he has] forgiven, the hard times, and the winter,"
takes on a much darker tone. While still creating a sense of calm, this song
explores the hesitation felt by Michaud when faced with a challenging situation. Ultimately, the juxtaposition of tranquility and reluctance suggests there
is always hidden depth to an experience.
The complexity of both consciousness and those trying to materialize it
resounds throughout the album. "Les autres aussi essaient," hosts the pinnacle moment where Michaud unquestionably succeeds in bringing a voice
to the vibrations of existence. Recorded from an inner-city balcony, the familiar sounds of cars rushing by, rain drops landing in the gutters, and delicate
wind chimes can be heard amongst an ethereal backdrop. You can feel the
harmony unmistakably conveyed through subtle chaos.
'This review has been excerpted, read the full review at discorder.ca*
The final song of Essais, however, shocks you out of this meditative state.
By titling the piece "the struggle of being considered human in a world of
Pokemon," Michaud calls to the inner child and creates a space to get lost in.
This theme of imagination is carried through abrupt playground sounds and
remnants of the video games we all know and love. A sense of endless possibility and innocent freedom pull the album to a satisfactory close.
Once you have experienced Maxime Michaud's album, Essais will no
longer feel like a fitting title. Rather, it would be better named Reussir, 'to
succeed.' In 63:38 minutes, one artist has managed to not only make sense
of the world, but to convey it in a universal, relatable way. Human nature has
never sounded so good.—7ay/or Benn
The hosts of Pop This! know that our cultural landscape does not exist in
a vacuum: the underlying themes in what we read and watch are a reflection
of societal values. Warner and Christiansen bring an essential feminist perspective to their discussions of media, hitting a perfect combination of sharp
• insight and genuine warmth.
Thanks to their multidisciplinary careers, Warner and Christiansen are
experts at discussing pop culture from a diverse range of perspectives. Take
a recent episode, for instance, which focuses on the 1992 female-centric
baseball film A League of Their Own. Christiansen and Warner compare
their past and present experiences watching the film, and discuss the movie's portrayal of political history, socioeconomic class, and gender roles.
This discussion is an extremely candid one. Rather than sticking to a
script, Christensen and Warner embrace tangents and build off of each other's' energy, letting their real-life chemistry shine. While listening, I found
myself both laughing, and gaining a new understanding of the film.
Each episode ends with a segment where the two hosts discuss recent
favourites from their own pop culture diets. Here, the experiences that
Warner and Christiansen's individual careers in media are clear: their top-
notch recommendations are full of seasoned insight.
Pop This! is a lively reminder that discussions around what stories are
being represented in our media, and what messages we're being fed, are
essential - especially in our age of news echo chambers and sensationalized clickbait. It's proof that turning an analytical eye to our cultural landscape can be fun when it's done in such good company.—Hailey Mah
SOMEONE KNOWS
SOMETHING
CBC Podcast
28/02/2016 to 13/02/2017
eviating from the indie folk dalliances of predecessor, Huronian
Cadence, Toronto-based Man meets Bear, explore a more spiritual
side in their largely instrumental fifth album, / Want to Be a Gallant Rider Like
My Father Was Before Me.
Released September 2016, the album flits between both world and
post rock genres, collating natural and synthetic melodies with 'pretty' guitar motifs to create droning soundscapes. At times, inspiration seems drawn
from traditional Indigenous music, invoking deep meditation and calm. This
theme is heavily felt in title track "Lake Ontario Seiche," as well as "Year of El
Nino" and "Garrison Creek."
The band however, pull back toward their indie roots on both "Niimi" and
"Sun's Back," whose flirtation with dreamy folk tones and lo-fi are warmer, more inviting and less foreboding than the aforementioned 'atmospheric' tracks. These songs are reminiscent of Man meets Bear's Dream BC,
whose perfect balance of whimsy, wit and folk-pop charm made it a strong
and intriguing debut, played like a meeting of minds between peers Belle &
Sebastian and The Polyphonic Spree.
But despite the efforts made in pursuing a more ethereal sound, / Want
to Be a Gallant Rider Like My Father Was Before Me fails to offer anything of
much interest. Instead, Soren Brothers (the artist behind Man meets Bear)
chooses to meander aimlessly through half baked ideas that would be better
served as interludes between more thought-out songs. Given the choice, I
recommend Brothers' second album, Buffalo Comets for its far more earnest
and flexible reaches as an experimental album. In comparison, / Want to Be
a Gallant Rider Like My Father Was Before Me paints itself into a rather dull,
PODCAST REVIEWS
POP THIS!
(Podcast Series, Pop This Collective)
Ongoing release since 7/10/2015
ress play and come hang out with your two new best friends." So
reads the online description for Pop This!, and it's a statement which
lives up to its promise. Recorded at the Vancouver Public Library, this local
podcast series provides a candid dose of pop-culture discussion each week.
It is hosted by two feminist veterans of Vancouver's music media: writer
Andrea Warner and broadcast journalist Lisa Christiansen, both affiliated
with the CBC.
Most episodes of Pop This! zero in on a buzzworthy piece of culture,
whether it be a movie, book or TV. show. Recent episodes feature topics
ranging from comedian Phoebe Robinson's book You Can't Touch My Hair,
to the power politics of this year's Academy Awards.
omeone Knows Something is CBC's first attempt at a Canadian version of A/PR's Serial. The first season was released in March of
last year, and follows documentarian David Ridgen as he returns to his
hometown to research the 40-year-old disappearance of a child, Adrien
McNaughten. You may be imagining a case similar to the one featured on
Serial, with botched investigations, shoddy police work, and suspects lying
through their teeth. Unfortunately, this podcast should be called No-one
Knows Anything. For, regardless of how hard Ridgen tries, nothing turns
up. Painstakingly, it becomes obvious that the disappearance of Adrien was
an accident. As a result, the episodes drag on. Soon, the wide variety of
Ontarian accents become more fascinating than the case itself.
Though the first season of Someone Knows Something is monotonous,
the second promises drama. Ridgen investigates the 1998 disappearance of
Sheryl Sheppard, a woman who went missing just hours after she was proposed to on live television. This story is filled with shady characters and the
inherent heartbreak of a "pretty blonde" whose life is cut short.
But along with this second season of SKS, CBC took another stab at
recreating Serial, and wound up with something better. Journalist Connie
Walker's podcast Missing and Murdered: Who Killed Alberta Williams has
the all the suspense of Serial and enough educational and historical content to make for a fascinating, if not depressing, episode of Stuff You Missed
in History Class. Focusing on the disappearance of a young an Indigenous
woman (Alberta Williams), Walker explores the horrific trend of missing and
murdered indigenous women in Canada. A tragically ignored subject, Connie
Walker brings attention to the forgotten.
Next to this significant podcast, Someone Knows Something seems like a
white guy holding up an "All Lives Matter" sign. Of course, the story of Adrien
McNaughten is tragic and horrible. And, of course, violence against women
like Sheryl Sheppard is devastatingly important. But when Ridgen notes that
Sheryl Sheppard's disappearance was met with media frenzy, my mind went
to women like Alberta Williams. I couldn't help but think: they didn't bring the
army to search the woods for Alberta, and they certainly didn't plaster her
face all over national television. Instead of giving a voice to the voiceless,
Ridgen concentrates on the already sensational through SKS.
If you are a true crime junkie and need your next fix, then give SKS a listen. Be lulled by David Ridgen's smooth voice, and appreciate his ability to
create the illusion of suspense without any suspenseful material. But CBC
has its own version of Serial, and it's not Someone Knows Something. Not
even close.—Sarah Jickling
UNDER REVIEW ian.william
craig
on the brink
//words by Claire Bailey
//illustrations by Maxwell Babiuk
//photos by Pat Valade
hen I sit down with
Vancouver-based
experimental sound
artist Ian William Craig, I've
caught him at a threshold. "The
last record was a culmination of
a lot of years of work and it was
pretty intense," he says. "I think
with that intensity has come kind
of a re-stocking time - trying
to figure out what relationship I
want to have with music now or
However, with his upcoming EP, Slow Vessels - which
features re-renderings of six
songs off Centres - Craig is pulling away from tape manipulation, and focusing on the bare
bones of the songs underneath.
When he first started making
music, Craig found his songs
had "a real singer-songwriter
bent" which "didn't really quite
sit right." Another aspect that
drew him to tape was its ability
to break those older songs apart
and make them new. "The songs
that I had written way back then
got passed through this gauntlet and got reworked and recom-
posed, and sucked back together,
and became unrecognizable from
their original iterations." Craig
returned to that source material
for Slow Vessels out of an interest in exploring the songs "in a
more deconstructed kind of way."
For Craig, Slow Vessels seems to be
more of a study than a permanent direction - a way of "trying
to tinker around with the process
itself."
"I'VE ALWAYS FE
BE ABLE/TO WAL
MUSICllKEir
CAN EXIST."
rraig is still getting comfortable with the success of
his music. "Ostensibly, I've
made it, right? Like, I make ridiculous choral tape-loop decay music. ... This is as good as it gets,
and I don't mean that in a bad
way - it's humbling and awesome and a privilege. But also,
this is what 'making it' looks like
- there's no secret community,
there's no point at which you feel
like you've culminated, there's no
other-worldly body that comes
down and says 'You are a musician now.'"
While Craig is also a print studio technician at the University of
British Columbia Vancouver campus, he has found himself struggling with the decision to devote
his full-time to music after a
successful tour last summer. He
went so far as making plans with
booking agents and management
companies before reneging on
it all. Craig "couldn't figure out
why [he] was getting so anxious," but the decision not to quit
came as relief: "I realized that
QU SHOULD
URFAVOURITE
E IN WHICH YOU
/M
maybe what that relationship is,
or maybe enjoying a little bit of
silence."
Craig's last album, Centres, released on 130701 label, came out
to widespread critical acclaim,
garnering attention from numerous music media, including
Pitchfork and Rolling Stone.
Craig is best known for his experimentation with analog tape
- his technique of running tracks
repeatedly through manipulated
cassette decks results in compositions that feel like vast environments of decaying beauty. At
the time he got into this sort of
experimentation, Craig was interested in exploring the relation
between space and sound, and
the haptic nature of tape is what
drew him to it.
"It's really about the surface,"
he explains. "One of the interesting things about surfaces is that
they cause you to think about
space in a different way. Like
how snow is kind of an interference, but because it fills the space
in a really interesting sort of
way, it makes you more aware of
it.The analog tape [is] like a veil
for me... I've always felt like you
should be able to walk into your
favourite music, like it's a place
in which you can exist."
Repeating songs doesn't come
naturally to Craig. He sees his live
show as "more about creating a
space or creating a feeling. I like
being a bit more of a radio antenna than a loudspeaker."
Slow Vessels will be released
on FatCat's 130701 imprint. The
pioneering post-classical label
meant a lot to Craig in the formative years of his musicianship, so being signed to it was a
dream come true. "If you told my
younger self that that's what was
going to happen - he would just
die, he would just explode," Craig
says.
At the same time, seeing the
label's day-to-day operations and
talking with Dave Howell, 130701
founder and manager, has had
the same effect as pulling back
the curtain on the Wizard of Oz:
"Prying open the dream and seeing that there's just a bunch of
life underneath it is really weird.
I mean it's beautiful and great
but it's kind of like 'Oh, that's
not like this magic world, I didn't
become a perfect ball of energy and ascend to this creative
Shangri-La'... Like, Dave Howell
puts on pants. I thought he put
on - I don't know - magic. Just
dressed in magic. But, nope, he
dresses in pants."
the thing that UBC gives me is
this interesting stability, and the
ritual of it is really interesting,
and even the ritual of being disparaging about it, or the ritual of
disparaging not being a full-time
musician, that's actually kind of
really interesting fuel."
While Craig doesn't know exactly which direction he'll be taking in the long run, he is moving
towards something new. "It's an
interesting time because I think
I'm recalibrating a lot of these
things. I feel like I've come to the
end of a big body of work, and for
the first time I don't really have
anything in the coffers anymore."
'it
Slow Vessels is due out May 9.
Ian William Craig will be playing
the Donau Festival in Krems an der
Donau, Austria May 1, and Oslo in
London May 8.
IAN WILLIAM CRAIG a wit
uiorbs bji ffintin |}ang | illustrations bij^opbia Capres | photo bjj Cbristine pbanfl
s one of Shindig 2015 / 16 semi-finalists, The Psychic Alliance can
be aptly described by their off-kilter show featuring lead singer being led
on stage in a carrying chair with a face-
painted choir at the front of the procession. The Shindig performance itself was
bombastic, a pure rush of adrenaline, and
pure punk euphoria. The Psychic Alliance
is Shaun Lee on guitar and vocals; Marc
Guenette on lead guitar; Dani Fournier on
keys; Kyle Cheadle on bass; and Mareike
Hanke on drums. I meet with three of
band members, Marc, Dani and Shaun in
Shaun's house in East Vancouver. The living room is decorated with knick knacks
and paintings, and records line the room. A
tall bottle of snake wine is the centrepiece
of the coffee table between us. Shaun immediately takes control of the conversation
and we quickly dive into the interview,
discussing religion, curses and witches.
The Psychic Alliance formed in Calgary
in 2010, and has had over 13 members
since its inception. Unsurprisingly, the
large number of past collaborators reflects
the nature of the ever-changing styles and
influences of the band. "But the band feels
sort of anonymous anyway, that's kind
of the appeal of it," remarks Shaun. The
music is at the crux between the experimental and unconventional elements of
psychedelic music, and the spry and unhinged nature of punk rock. It's music that
can change from having a funky bassline
and quirky lyrics to fast-paced drums and
guitar-driven rhythms with existential
undertones.
With their third studio album Evil
Against Evil dropping on April 29, the process of finishing this particular album has
been a hectic experience, to say the least.
After having a bandmate leave during
the recording process, the existing band
scrapped their initial synth-heavy experimental album in favour of a "gnarly, dirty
rock album."
"At that point it was like, I never want
to hear a synthesizer ever again," states
Shaun in regards to the initial recordings. "We had about 48 hours to rewrite
the whole album ... It was definitely a lot
more terrifying and nerve-wracking than
our other [releases]." When I ask the band
about what fueled their writing process,
they reflect on two events - a past drummer going awol, and a curse placed on The
Psychic Alliance by an old band member.
Both instances have inspired the motifs of
witchcraft and spirituality on the album.
When thinking back on the curse specifically, Shaun remarks, "She wrote this
long rambling letter about the curse placed
on our band, and sent us a little bible, a
piece of a dreadlock, among other things...
but I loved it, it was very evocative to me."
He continues, "The band has always been
about the imagination of the occult and the
darker and more sinister side of things."
hs a band notorious for their dramatic, show-stopping live performances, The Psychic Alliance takes
pride in creating a unique space that separate themselves from other acts. "What we
having going for our live shows is an ability to connect with audiences not everyone
does, or not every band does. I think ritual
is a big concept for the band, where
people can achieve a catharsis," explains Shaun. "It's an event where
you aren't just a casual observer,
but that you're actually involved in a
completely experiential process."
The band strives to make both
art and music a much more involved and emotional experience;
something akin to religion ritual by
demonstrating an all-encompassing
and engaging artistic practice during
their live performances. By undertaking the daunting task of turning music into a sweeping art form,
the band challenges their audience
to see music in an entirely different,
visceral way. "Art should be spiritual. Art is what church should be.
What religion fails to give people, art
can supply," states Shaun. "No matter how much you beat their spirit
down, through art people still have
the chance to connect with others who are full of things that make
people feel alive."
After moving to the coast from
Calgary, it was evident that although
Vancouver's music scene is more
vast, both cities face the same challenge of
fewer and fewer venues for live music. The
Psychic Alliance has hosted house shows as
a solution, which also creates a much more
intimate and safer environment compared
to the bar scene. Despite difficulties with
venues in Vancouver, Shaun praises the
creativity of younger, underground bands
combatting these issues. "At some of these
all ages shows I just think: how are there
this many people here to see a band playing teenage yacht rock? It's mind-blowing,"
comments Shaun, "I don't understand
what the bars aren't getting that 19 year-
old kids [putting on shows from] the suburbs seem to be figuring out."
With a follow up album to Evil Against
Evil already finished, The Psychic Alliance
is planning on touring outside of Canada
soon. The band concludes that this is with
the exception of the United States, given
that recent political and social climate
of our Southern neighbours. "I'd like to
represent what we're doing in Canada internationally, because I think there's a
Canadian aesthetic in music that's valuable and cool, and it's not always what we
choose to put out into the world as a nation," remarks Shaun.
The Psychic Alliance strives to celebrate
the unusual and the underappreciated in
contemporary music. As a band with so
much personality and bravado, coupled
with their spiritual approach towards musical experimentation, The Psychic Alliance
truly sits somewhere between the divine
and the absurd.
a
The Psychic Alliance will be playing an album release party for Evil Against Evil at the
Fox Cabaret April 29.
The PSYCHIC ALLIANCE ON THE AIR
interview by Fatemeh Ghayedi //  illustrations  by
Emily Valente  //  photo  by Alisha Weng
Jade Pauk is the founder and host of Little Bit of Soul, a show
concentrated on playing jazz, swing, and more for three years now.
Discorder recently had the opportunity to sit down with Jade to talk
about her show.
\Mmsm \XkmsmLittle Bit °fSoul is one of the lonser
running shows on CiTR that plays a mix of jazz tunes and
oldies. I was just interested in knowing how you started out?
JMm PMC? Well, growing up I was exposed to a lot of different forms of music — thank you to my parents for that —
and I remember going around my grandmother's living room
dancing with my sister to big band music. So, that music always has a place in my heart. Throughout my childhood, I was
involved with these different forms of music: classical piano,
cello, all those other art forms. Then, when I got to university it was hard for me to maintain a focus on studying those
instruments, and [I] wanted to find a different creative outlet
and a way of maintaining my connection to music. So, that's
how it started.
I guess I was hoping that I could find the interconnections
between the different genres that I was focusing on. If you
listen to the playlists, you'll hear similarities or contrasts between the music. I don't necessarily always want to be overt in
telling the listener "Listen for this" or "Listen for that," but
if they can make those connections appear for themselves, I
would really be happy.
UJy}; You do play a mix of old and new on
your show. What's your process of putting *    \\
content together for each episode?
JJpn I really like to focus on the historical elements of the music, and a lot of the
times when I'm listening to music, I try and
find similarities between songs, or pieces.
What's really amazing with jazz, soul, and
R&B is that you have these sort of condensed audio files. I really like to put them
into context or try and see the trends within
the music.
UJyJn How relevant do you think the genres you
play are nowadays?
JJpn Extremely. Mainstream music is, I'd say,
primarily made up of these genres, and everything
links back to them. And with that comes a lot of
cultural appropriation of African American culture.
I think it's really important to look at the music that we listen to today, and see where it came
from; we have to go back to the roots and hear for
ourselves how that came into being, and how it
has influenced the way we listen to it today. A lot
of artists draw directly from those in the '60s and
'70s. Justin Timberlake is directly connected to
Michael Jackson; he has his falsetto voice, his entertainment style. That being said, Michael Jackson
did also steal moves from James Brown, so, it kind
of goes back a long way.
[U^d It's just like a chain.
pjjpn Yeah, exactly. It just goes to show how influential that
time period was for music. The other thing is, a lot of musicians — jazz especially — had a really wonderful understanding of musical history. So, when they started bebop and the
other jazz forms, they were breaking away from convention.
Miles Davis, for example, had played in more conventional jazz
ensembles, and had wanted a way out of that to break convention. It's very much like visual arts, in that sense, where the
[contemporary] artists were breaking away from the standard.
[U^n You've already accomplished so much on Little Bit of
Soul, but I was just wondering where else you'd like to see it
go-
)• When I first started out, it was very much focused on
big band and older styles of jazz and things of the
sort. Now, it's starting to incorporate a bit more
modern r&b and hip-hop, and finding that line of
contrast and comparisons between the music. It's
been a journey and it's kind of been chronological? Like, I'd like to say that there's been a bit of a
stream there. I hope that at least some people have
stuck with me throughout the process, and have
learnt about these genres from the beginning to the
current state of those genres, really.
Little Bit of Soul airs on CiTR 101.9FMMondays
4.-5pm. For more show information or archived episodes and podcasts, visit citr.ca/radio/little-bit-of-soul.
Summer is coming!
(and so is the NEW at the Gallery)
Level 4 in the Nest
*? iv\,v
llfflW&SB
CHECK OUTCHRCA/FRIENDS RSH?/WSH£l MRS)
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ON THE AIR: LITTLE BIT OF SOUL (§m$
0
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6AM
TRANCENDANCE
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
6AM
7AM
GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICKIN"
CITR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
7AM
8AM
QUEER FM VANCOUVER:
CANADALAND
(SYNDICATED)
CITED!
8AM
9AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
RELOADED
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
WIZE MEN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
9AM
10 AM
FEM
CONCEPT
STUDENT
FILL-IN
STUDENT FILL-IN
MIXTAPES WITH MC
& MAC
10 AM
11AM
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
STUDENT FILL-IN
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM
12 PM
SYNCHRONICITY
MORNING AFTER SHOW
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
THE ROCKERS SHOW
12 PM
1PM
STUDENT
FILL-IN
PERMANENT
RAIN
KOREAN WAVE:
ARIRANG HALLYU
K-POP CAFE
FRESH SLICE
1PM
2 PM
PARTICLES &  WAVES
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
ALL ACCESS PASS
RADIO ZERO
2 PM
3 PM
THE BURROW
STUDENT FILL-IN
KEW IT UP
ASTROTALK
BLOOD
3 PM
THUNDERBIRD EYE
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
4 PM
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
TEXTBOOK
STUDENT FILL-IN
SIMORGH
SADDLE
4 PM
SPM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
DISCORDER RADIO
ARTS REPORT
BABE WAVES
NEWS 101
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
SPM
6 PM
FINDING
THE FUNNY
STUDENT
FILL-IN
STUDENT FILL-IN
ARE YOU
AWARE
STUDENT
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
UBO ARTS
ON AIR
7 PM
EXPLODING HEAD
INNER
SPACE
SAMS
QUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
FILL-IN
QUESTION EVERYTHING
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
8 PM
MOVIES
INSIDE OUT
MIX CASETTE
SOUL
SANDWICH
RIP
RADIO
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
WHITE NOISE
LIVE FROM
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
NINTH WAVE
HELL
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER
ROOM
COPY / PASTE
THE MEDICINE SHOW
THE AFTN SOCCER
11PM
12 AM
THE SCREEN GIRLS
SHOW
12 AM
1AM
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE
1AM
2AM
CITR GHOST MIX
OF INSOMNIA
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
"DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERYDAY" TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM, ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththe-
browns@hotmail.com
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
11AM-12PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
second season! The team
of Indigenous and non-
Indigenous peeps produce the
show weekly. We talk about
Indigenous issues, current
events, and entertainment
centering Native voices through
interviews and the arts. Come
make Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Follow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves/
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE BURROW
3PM-4PM, rock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
department manager Andy
Resto, the Burrow is Noise
Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock,
with a nice blend of old
'classics' and new releases.
Interviews & Live performances.
Contact: music@citr.ca
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
4PM-5PM,JAZZ
Host Jade spins old recordings
of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies and motown.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
UBC ARTS ON AIR
ALTERNATING MON. 6:30-7PM, TALK/
ACADEMIA
Provocative interviews expert
commentary and the latest
updates from Faculty of Arts
make for engaging segments
with UBC's top writers,
philosophers, researchers,
singers, and actors in the
Humanities & Social Sciences,
Creative S Performing Arts.
Contact: artsonair.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television, along
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks,
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FINDING THE FUNNY
6pm - 7PM, talk/comedy
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
PhdlfilV
THE SCREEN GIRLS
12AM-1AM, HIP HOP/R&B/ SOUL
The Screen Girls merge music
and art with discussions of
trends and pop culture, and
interviews with artists in
contemporary art, fashion and
music. We play a variety of
music, focusing on promoting
Canadian hip hop and RSB.
Contact: info@thescreengirls.com
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver,
Queer FM features music,
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact: queerfmvancouver@
gmail.com
FEMCONCEPT
A show comprised entirely
of Femcon* music and
discussions of women's
rights and social justice
issues. Featuring all genres
of music, with an emphasis
on local and Canadian artists
and events in Vancouver.
'"Femcon" is defined as
music with someone who
self-identifies as female in 2/4
categories: music composition
lyric composition, performance,
or recording engineering.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
12PM-1PM, ROCK/ POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music,
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE PERMANENT RAIN RADIO
1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join co-hosts Chloe and
Natalie lighthearted twin talk
and rad tunes from a variety
of artists. For more info, go to
thepermanentrainpress.com
Contact: theprpress@hotmail.com
PARTICLES & WAVES
2PM-3PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Like the quantum theory it
is named for, Particles and
Waves defies definition. Join
Mia for local indie, sci-fi prog
rock, classic soul, obscure
soundtracks, Toto's deep
cuts, and much more.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TEXTBOOK
4PM-5PM, talk/storytelling
Textbook (FKA The Student
Special Hour) is a show
about students by students
hosted by Josh Gabert-Doyon,
CiTR's student programming
coordinator. There are three
segments: Feature interview,
student storytelling, S "Tell
Me About Your Paper".
Contact: outreach@citr.ca
DISCORDER RADIO
5PM-6PM, ECLECTIC, TALK
Produced by the Discorder
On Air collective, this show
covers content in the magazine
and beyond. Coordinated by
Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse,
and Jordan Wade. Get in
touch to get involved!
Contact: discorder.radio@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
INSIDE OUT
8PM-9PM, dance/electronic
Tune in weekly for dance music!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
9PM-11PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles,
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels,
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.
com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
2PM-3PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
The CiTR Music department
program, highlighting the
newest/freshest cuts from the
station's bowels. Featuring live
interviews and performances
from local artists.
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica,
Post-Punk, Industrial,
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The one and only student run
arts and culture radio show in
Vancouver, Arts Report brings
you the latest in local arts!
Your show hosts Ashley and
Christine provide a weekly
dose of reviews, interviews,
and special segments.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
INNER SPACE
6:30pm-8pm, electronic/dance
Dedicated to underground
electronic music, both
experimental and dance-
oriented. Live DJ sets and
guests throughout.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
6:30pm-8pm, rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins,
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, HIP HOP/R&B/SOUL
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
WHITE NOISE
9PM-10PM, talk/sketch comedy
Join Richard Blackmore for half
an hour of weird and wonderful
sketch comedy, as he delves
into the most eccentric corners
of radio. Then stay tuned for
the after show featuring Simon
and Connor who make sense
of it all, with the occasional
interjection of quality music.
Contact: whitenoiseUBC@
gmail.com
NINTH WAVE
10PM-11PM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK/SPORTS
Chase takes you into the
locker rooms of UBC for talk
with varsity athletes, coaches,
and UBC staff on everything
but sports. The Thunderbird
Locker Room gives you a
backroom perspective.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SPICY BOYS
12AM-1AM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
Playing music and stuff.
You can listen.
Or don't.
It's up to you.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture,
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
8AM-9AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news,
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse@canadaland-
show.com
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
9AM-10AM, talk/accessibility
This show is produced
by and for the disabled
community. We showcase
BC Self Advocates and
feature interviews with people
with special needs. Hosted
by Kelly Raeburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and friends.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
11AM-12PM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new,
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com,
@tima_tzar,
facebook.com/RocketFromRussia
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.word-
press.com
K-CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
J ay den gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean,
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
2PM-3PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
The Accessibility Collective
radio show! They talk equity,
news, events, & dialogue.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
3-3:30pm, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
3:30-4pm, talk/sports
Your weekly roundup of
UBC Thunderbird sports
action from on campus and
off with your hosts Jason
Wang and Timothy Winter.
Contact: sports@citr.ca
SIMORGH
4PM-5PM, talk/storytelling
Simorgh Radio is devoted
to education and literacy for
Persian speaking communities.
Simorgh the mythological
multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-
in as your mythological narrator
in the storyland; the contingent
space of beings, connecting
Persian peoples within and
to Indigenous peoples.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BABE WAVES
5PM-6PM, talk/cultural criticism
Babe Waves is CiTR's Gender
Empowerment Collective show.
Jazzed women-identifying and
non-binary folks sit around
and talk music, art, politics,
current events and much more.
Tune in, follow us on social
media, and get involved!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
facebook.com/citrbabewaves
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM-7:30,
ECLECTIC
Celebrating the message
behind the music. Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SOUL SANDWICH
7:30pm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/soul
A myriad of your favourite
genres all cooked into one
show. From Hip Hop to Indie
rock to African jams, Rohit
and Ola will play it all, in a
big soulful sandwich. This
perfect layering of yummy
goodness will blow your mind.
AND, it beats Subway.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
R.I.P. RADIO
alternating thurs, 8pm-9pm,
talk/hip hop/rSb/soul
R.I.P. Radio brings deceased
artists back into the spotlight
and to reveal the world of
budding artists standing
on the shoulders of these
musical giants. Each episode
is a half-hour journey back
from the musical grave.You'll
want to stay alive for it.
Contact: Instagram, @rip.radio
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ FRIDAY
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance,
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact: auraltentacles@hotmail.
com
CITED
8AM-9AM, talk/academia
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact: facebook.com/citedpod-
cast, Twitter | @citedpodcast
WIZE MEN
9AM-10AM, rock/pop/indie
Watch and wonder as Austin
begins to unravel the intricate
world of environmental
science right in front of your
earz. Austin's taste in music
has been praised among the
deities as the finest and most
refined in all the land. So trust
in Austin as you surrender your
ears every Friday morning.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
10AM-11AM, rock/pop/indie
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery, and a "III dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact: daveradiopodcast@
gmail.com
FRESH SLICE
1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Tunes are hot and fresh.
Talk is cheesey. Pop,
rock, DIY, pop-punk.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RADIO ZERO
2PM-3:30PM
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams
from New Wave to foreign
electro, baile, Bollywood,
and whatever else.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact: http://nardwuar.com/rad/
contact/
NEWS 101
5PM-6PM, talk/news
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and
community newscast. Fridays
tune in to hear an independent
perspective of what's going on
in the world. News 101 covers
current affairs ranging from
the local to the international.
Contact: news@citr.ca
RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6pm - 7PM, talk/comedy
6pm-7pm, Every week Jack,
Tristan and a special guest
randomly select a conversation
topic for the entire show;
ranging from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure .Also
theSre is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
QUESTION EVERYTHING
7pm-7:30pm, talk/interviews
Question Everything focuses
on providing inspiration and
advice to young leaders who
are in the early phases of their
careers. Each week, we bring
you inspiration and insights
from creative minds and
experts in entrepreneurship,
publishing, and design.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-gpM, r&b/soul/inter-
NATIONAL
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop,
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings,
poetry recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post-Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock,
drone, ambient, experimental,
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, eclectic/live
INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact: vancouvermedicine-
show@gmail.com
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, which progresses
to Industrial, Noise and
Alternative No Beat into the
early morning. We play TZM
broadcasts, starting at 6am.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31st year on CiTR,
The Saturday Edge is my
personal guide to world &
roots music, with African,
Latin and European music
in the first half, followed by
Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact: crashnburnradio@
yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll
like it. Sonic assault provided
by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, electronic/mantra/
NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary,
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats,
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmail.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, TALK/RUSSIAN
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7PM-8PM, experimental/ambient/
CHILLWAVE
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy,
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker,
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmail.com
SOCA STORM
8PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
Papayo!!#SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
8bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
7AM-9AM, experimental/difficult
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPAN© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @BEPICRE-
SPAN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
9AM-10AM, CLASSICAL
From the Ancient World to
the 21st century, join host
Marguerite in exploring and
celebrating classical music
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock,
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmail.com ,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM, ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds,
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmail.
com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver,
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
Contact: djsmileymike@trancen-
dance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS,
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points,
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LOST TOVS
STUDENT FILL IN
ECLECTIC
A place for experimentation
& learning!
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
frnm ?
lrlrl OTR101.9FM MARCH CHARTS
WE APPRECIATE APPRECIATION SOCIETIES
#rttet
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Century Palm*
Meet You
Deranged
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Austra*
Future Politics
Pink Fizz
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Louise Burns* +
Young Mopes
Light Organ
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Mi'ens*+
Challenger
Kingfisher Bluez
I
The Courtneys*+
II
Flying Nun
6
High Plains*+
Cinderland
Kranky
f
Little Sprout*+
Little Sprout
Self-Released
@
Pale Red*+
Soft Opening
Self-Released
%
Tim Darcy*
Saturday Night
Jagjaguwar
fl®
Tim The Mute*+
Take My Life...Please!
Kingfisher Bluez
1
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PC Worship
Buried Wish
Northern Spy
Cawama*+
Sea Sick
Self-Released
US
Japandroids*+
Near to the wild heart of life
Anti-
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Cuddle Magic
Ashes/Axis
Northern Spy
HI
Gun Control*+
Volume 1
Self-Released
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Julie Byrne
Not Even Happiness
Ba Da Bing!
©
Melisande*
Les millesimes
BOREALIS
11©
Rose Cousins*
Natural Conclusion
Outside Music
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Local Creature & Alien
Boy*+
The Viper Sessions
Self-Released
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Bored Decor*+
S/T
ROCKSALT
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Forager*
The Body Vow
Self-Released
23
Kele Fleming**
No Static
Self-Released
2S
Brasstronaut*+
Brasstronaut
Unfamiliar
$4
Fond of Tigers*+
Uninhabit
Offseason
2S
Amy Brandon*
Scavenger
Self-Released
2©
Bill & Joel Plaskett*
Solidarity
Pheromone
2P
Church of Trees*
Primitive Creatures
Self-Released
%
2®
Delia Derbyshire
Appreciation Society
Delia Derbyshire
Appreciation Society
Six Degrees
If
Doug Cox and Sam Hurrie*
Old Friends
Black Hen
SD
Sore Points*+
Demo
Self-Released
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The Luyas
Human Voicing
Paper Bag
S3
Cloud Nothings
Life Without Sound
Carpark
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Pye Corner Audio*
Half-Light: Prowler Remixed
More Than Human
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Asaka
East Van Digital
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Nothingness**
Being
Big Smoke
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Pissed Jeans
Why Love Now
Sub Pop
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Sacred Bones
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Danny Michel*
Khlebnikov
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Begonia*
Lady In Mind
Self-Released
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Elisa Thorn's Painting
Project**
Hue
Self-Released
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Homeshake*
Fresh Air
Royal Mountain
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Jens Lekman
Life Will See You Now
Secretly Canadian
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Here is Fine
Self-Released
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King Woman
Created In The Image Of
Suffering
Relapse
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Moth Mouth*+
Mirror Universe
Self-Released
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Leif Vollebekk*
Twin Solitude
Outside Music
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FRIDAY
MARCH 31
THURSDAY
APRIL 6
THURSDAY
APRIL 6
FRIDAY
APRIL 7
SATURDAY
APRIL 8
SUNDAY
APRIL 9
MONDAY
APRIL 10
THURSDAY
APRIL 13
FRIDAY
APRIL 14
SATURDAY
APRIL 15
WEDNESDAY
APRIL 19
THURSDAY
APRIL 20
FRIDAY
APRIL 21
SATURDAY
APRIL 22
SUNDAY
APRIL 23
MONDAY
APRIL 24
WEDNESDAY
APRIL 26
THURSDAY
APRIL 27
FRIDAY
APRIL 28
SATURDAY
APRIL 29
SATURDAY
APRIL 30
VERY MONDAY
N THE LOUNGE
LIVE AT THE WISE  HALL
APRIL EVENTS SCHEDULE 2017
Co-Op Radio Birthday Bash
DANICI tHAMPfUiNE
(AUSTRALIA) LIVE IN THE LOUNGE
ARTIST SHOWCASE LAUNCH
WITH MUSICAL GUESTS THE WASTED STRAYS LIVE IN THE LOUNGE
OLD TIME DANCE PARTY
MONTHLY SQUARE DANCE
WISE OPEN HOUSE & MEMBERSHIP DRIVE
12 N00N-4PM • THEN 8PM-MIDNIGHT • FREE EVENTS WITH MUSIC, SNACKS AND BEVVIES!
GOSPEL TRAIN THE LAST TRAIN
10:30AM GOSPEL BRUNCH • 11AM-1:00PM BROADCAST • $25 ADV ONLY
PETUNIA AND THE VIPERS
THEIR LAST MONDAY ENGAGEMENT • IN THE HALL • DOORS 7PM $15
JOIXNE joAYjLIS ALBUM RELEASE SHOW
WITH GUESTS THE CRACKLING and VI AN DIEP
BLUE LCDGE SOCIETY
A BURLESQUE THEATRE EXPERIENCE  •  HOSTED BY MELODY MANGLER
THi SI© SQUIB Yfl
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LIVE IN THE LOUNGE 8PM AND EVERY THIRD WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH
LINDA  MCRAE so
and GURF  MORLIX
CTOEY ONLY   Km Governs
MICHIGAN RATTLERS     DEMON SQUADRON
T3B00 ReVUe BunesQue variety show
VERSES FESTIVAL featuring 3f|UL NILLIRtlS
Hffl HcCLCLLP. DP PCtybWON. EUGENE Bf|C.
$25 ADV
$30 DOOR
VERSES FESTIVAL VHN SIM flNHLS » a vemfafeto
VERSES FESTIVAL WED POETICS more Mo wafaMa
VERSES FESTIVAL MJQJ1Y jE PEE m M D HIL50N
Bret Higgins ATLAS REVOLT
C3LAM SLAM Burlesque vs Wrestling
WISE HALL MARKET iianmpm
MISS QUINCY & THE 5 STAR STUDS
EVERY MONDAY 8PM-11PM  • $10 SUGGESTED DONATION
1882 ADANAC STREET (AT VICTORIA DRIVE)
WWW.WISEHALL.CA   (604) 254-5858 Homeshake
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
Apr 7
MITSKI
The Biltmore
Apr
WIRE
7    Apr 8     Apr 8
SOHN
FKJ
Imperial  Imperial Fox Cabaret
Apr 9
HINDS AND TWIN PEAKS
Rickshaw
Apr   9 Apr   10
REGGIE WATTS ■ SPATIAL   KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD
Vogue Theatre Vogue Theatre
Apr 10
WHITNEY
The Biltmore
NICOLAS JAAR
Vogue Theatre
Apr 25
the xx
Thunderbird
Sports Centre
Apr 10 Apr 11
A BOOGIE WIT DA HOODIE JAY SOM & THE COURTNEYS
Rio Theatre
The Cobalt
Apr 12       Apr 14 Apr 18 Apr 20
AB-SOUL     HOMESHAKE     REAL ESTATE      SAN FERMIN
Fortune     Rickshaw      Rickshaw     The Biltmore
Apr 27
BETTY WHO
Imperial
Apr 28
DUNE RATS
Rickshaw
May 1 May 4
KEHLANI       LEIF VOLLEBEKK
Vogue Theatre   The Biltmore
May 4 May 5 May 6
LYDIA AINSWORTH   COM TRUISE / CLARK   ALL THEM WITCHES
Fox Cabaret Imperial The Cobalt
May 8
NI6HTLANDS & THE BUILDING
Fox Cabaret
May 17
JMSN
Alexander
May 8 May 16
THURSTON MOORE GROUP K0NG0S
Imperial Imperial
May 22 May 23
MATTHEW LOGAN VASQUEZ   PAUL KELLY & CHARLIE OWEN
Fox Cabaret
Biltmore Cabaret
May 24
H09909
The Cobalt
May 24
SMINO
Alexander
May 24 May 25
THE JESUS AND MARY CHAIN    FOXYGEN
Vogue Theatre Rickshaw
Cgp| Tickets   & more  shows  at   t±mbreconCerts. com

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