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 I
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"that salty magazine from GTR101.9FM'
. JForeuer JLocal, Jroreuer irree.
Wloh 34 I j|io» 2 I 3^ue, 387
%
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4
¥
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M 254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
ADVERTISE
annual Subscription
(That's $2.0 for Canada,
325  for U.S.A.)
would like to support
Discorder Magazine with
>nation!(Hey,   thanks!)
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ITAL:
>end th:
cash or
and
le  to:
Discorder Magazine
ity
LL500
Boulevard.
Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z
SIIRWT
iq mm MAR 2017
COVER I RHI BLOSSOM OF INTERSESSIONS VANCOUVER BY PAT VALADE.
jFeaturea
04  -  FAKE NEWS
but actually, what the fuck?
06 -   SAM  TUDOR
they're got a new album, but it doesn't hare a name yet.
07 -  QUIET CITY
the experimental sound series anything but quiet.
08 -   INTERSESSIONS
inclusire DJ workshops here and beyond
16   -   IN  CONVERSATION:   ANDREW YONG
HOON  LEE & ANGELA  SEO
Holy Hum and Angela of Xiu Xiu.
18   -   CAN'T LIT
an afternoon on Dina Del Bucchia and Daniel Zomparelli's couch
Column* + spore
04
05
10
12
13
14
17
19 -
20 -
21 -
22 -
23 -
- Hot  Head
- Venews:
Rickshaw Theatre
- Real Live Action
Art Project
Aimee Henny Brown
Calendar
Under Review
In Response:
Pitchfork's "Does College
Radio Eeven Matter Anymore?"
No  Fun Fiction:
The Sun & the Moon by Amy
Stewart
The  Air:
White Noise
Program Schedule
Program Descriptions
Charts
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues can be
booked by calling (604) 822-4342 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please
contact: editor.discorder@citr.ca. To submit images:
contact: artdirector.discorder@citr.ca.
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to LL500
- 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1, Vancouver, BC with
your address, and we will mail each issue of Discorder
right to your doorstep for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your business, email advertising@citr.ca. We are always looking
for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered non-profit, and accept donations so we can provide you with the
content you love. To donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
!!!
To inform
Disc
order of an upcom
ng album
release, art sh
please email al
advance to Brit
edito
You may also dir
ow or significant h
relevant details 4-
Bachmann, Editor
r.discorder@ citr.ca
ect comments, con
appening,
6 weeks in
In-Chief at
nplaints and
corrections via email.
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station Manager: Hugo Noriega // Advertising Coordinator:
Sydney Thome // Discorder Student Liaison: Claire Bailey // Editor-in-Chief: Brit Bachmann // Under Review
Editor: Maximilian Anderson-Baier// Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch //Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-
Laredo // Production Assistant: Jules Galbraith // Web Content Coordinator: Katrina Wong // Accounts
Manager: Shea McConkey// Charts: Andy Resto // Discorder On Air Coordinators: Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse,
Jordan Wade // Online Communications Coordinator: Keagan Perlette // Writers: Maximilian Anderson-Baier,
Aidan Danaher, Joey Doyle, Dora Dubber, Sophie Gray, Blake Haarstad, Esteban Heavy, Evangeline Hogg, Tom
Ireland, Sarah Jickling, Dylan Joyce, Kat Kott, Andrew Yoon Hoon Lee, Maddy Rafter, Angela Seo, Lary Shelmal,
Amy Stewart, Faur Tuuenty, Lili Watson, Tintin Yang, Anya Zoledziowski // Photographers & Illustrators: Janee
Auger, Sara Baar, Simone Badanic, Amy Brereton, Evan Buggle, Neetu Dha, Olivia Di Liberto, Emmanuel Etti,
Jules Galbraith, Laura Harvey, Dana Kearley, Marita Michaelis, Pat Valade, Sydney Thorne // Proofreaders:
Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Brit Bachmann, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Jules Galbraith, Sydney Thorne, Kat
Wong, Jasper D. Wrinch
©Discorder 2017 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, located on
the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqamiharh speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as
well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822 1242, email CiTR at
stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500-6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
THE SHAPING OF
YOUR MEDIA
EDITOR'S NOTE
J write this note surrounded by my junk, piled on the floor outside cupboards and drawers, and wedged into moving boxes — delicates and glassware wrapped in back-issues of Discorder. So much stuff. So much baggage. It's difficult not to slip into comparisons about how backwards society is, or
to use chaos to justify hiding in Netflix. Discorder always drags me back to reality.
Deadlines that I set for myself and writers are as relentless as the press emails I
filter through every day. I know that across town, Ricky, Discorder's Art Director,
is meticulously laying out the magazine, combing through a dozen photo shoots
and illustrations, adjusting ads and reformatting text. It's sunny outside, but he's
indoors at his computer to make the beautiful magazine you hold in your hands.
It has been 34 years of editors and art directors, writers and artists giving their
weekends to Discorder — to you — with intention and adoration.
You see, Discorder isn't just a promotional tool for the content we cover, and it
doesn't just exist for your enjoyment, either. The act of contributing to Discorder,
of seeing one's work in print, is just as important.
CiTR 101.9FM and Discorder are launching our annual Fundrive fundraiser this
month, themed "Shape Your Media." This year's fundraising goals are focused on
providing access to media, and enhancing the experience for people wanting to
make radio and publish content. We are a campus community media organization
and as such, we are community-driven. The Fundrive telethon dates are March
9-17, but we are accepting donations all month. Flip to page 19 for more information about how to donate, and visit citr.ca to see what your money gets you.
Puppyteeth designed us a pin, and the Spoken Word department has collected some
of CiTR's most memorable and relevant on-air moments for a new compilation.
Abstractly, the March issue of Discorder explores what independent media
means to us. Can't Lit is a podcast that gives a platform for the new wave of Can
Lit; Anya Zoledziowski dissects 'fake news' from the perspective of a journalism student; Holy Hum and Angela of Xiu Xiu question their roles in resistance;
Pitchfork's "Does College Radio Even Matter Anymore?" gets called out; and Hot
Head submissions tackle covert sexism and overt fascism. Our sections are also
expanding, with Real Live Action now reviewing comedy, and Under Review reviewing its first podcast.
Please keep reading.
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EDITOR'S NOTE HOT HEAD
RANT IN RESPONSE TO FEBRUARY'S "REPORTED AS SPAM"
HOT HEAD
here's nothing radical about being overly-critical of women, women in music are still a lightening rod for condemnation, people notice stuff that they don't like on women way quicker than
they notice anything on men. and with women still being the minority in the Vancouver music scene,
i don't see how focusing on criticizing them is making it any more of an inclusive environment, it
makes it a shitty environment, i'm a woman musician, and it's fucking scary out there, you know
that no matter what you wear or what kind of photos you take or what your stage presence is that
people are gonna have harsh, unfair, and often overly-personal criticisms of you. yeah they'll trash
your music, but they'll also project a ton of shit onto you and discredit you for any number of reasons that their brain can scramble towards.
as well, there's no epidemic in the Vancouver music scene of overly-sexualized women musicians, i don't think being a sexy band is the norm, nor do i think it's an easy ploy to get popular or
anything, if anything, it clearly hurts your cause because people just use it to detract from you. in
general, i'm not a big proponent of sexiness, but even so, this band's sexualization doesn't bother
me. i don't think it puts any more pressure on me to be sexy, i think they're just expressing themselves, and the baseless criticism for it is going to stifle creativity and make a culture of fear down
the road, like the common style in Vancouver is to be sludgey and unpolished (sick), so a band
being sexy is actually them going against the grain, and like all women who go against the grain,
they get trashed for it.
in fact, the ease with which i've heard people think it's okay to trash women musicians for being
sexy is alarming, like, slut-shaming is back in a big way, and good news guys, it's socially acceptable again, great progress!
furthermore, a local band writing all their own songs and organizing and designing all their own
photoshoots is entirely different from the mainstream sexualization of women, there's no male-run
labels or producers making money off their self-sexualization. and i get it, we don't want leagues of
women thinking that they need to sexualize themselves in order to be involved with music, but really what we're teaching them is the same thing in the inverse: that they must fit this exact mold of
what an acceptable woman musician presents herself as or prepare for a world of shit.
basically, i think the music community is hostile enough towards women, ever notice that men
are quick to call women great "songwriters" but way less likely to comment on their actual musicianship? ever notice that women get crap for playing simple parts (or that people even pay attention to the difficulty-level of their parts) when a ton of men musicians play those
same parts and no one notices shit? it's because both men and women are intimidated by women musicians, in a way that neither gender is intimidated by male
musicians, and it isn't progressive at all to disparage women who are actually trying to do stuff on their own volition. — meta-ranter
PAMPHLET #8 OF THE WHITE ROSE
dear discorder & hothead column editors,
today is feb. 18. a flower will be present this morning outside of a buil
on granville street which is displaying an ss flag (inside out), in light of the
"alternate reality" we presently occupy this text will be released, sometimes
what we say sounds ridiculous, but too often, we remain silent for too long,
this is also a submission to your column.
P.S. this email will not accept a reply.
sincerely,
melusina.
II
We have permitted the highest atrocity of willful ignorance towards the
hatred that lives among us. It is not separate from us. It is not Other. Look
up on our streets! We house fascists among us, ignoring their insignias of
hatred. We tolerate their perversities as exercises in alternative logics, and
remain comfortable in disagreement. We infantilize demonstrations of socio-
pathic symptoms. Cruelty is the silence that waits for violence to reveal itself
at its most intolerable.
Fascism lives comfortably in the tepid pools of our passivity, steaming in
its banality. It is permitted by an attitude that says, "maybe this time it will go
away on its own". It is the acceptance of an SS flag to fly in an apartment
window on Granville, or so quickly forgetting the fascist propaganda and
paraphernalia distributed through New Westminster - while instilling daily
shame in our fellow people for the languages they speak, the clothing they
wear, the prayers they whisper. Fascism is made possible by our systems
consumption and our muted ignorance of its survival through representation. By ignoring the blatant presence and self-satisfaction of neo-Nazi
paraphernalia and the permutation of its ideology - in the Vancouver metropolitan area, in the Prairies, and in its visible manifestations in Quebec
we allow that hatred to grow and replicate once more, its magnitudes
surpassing the small frames of these windows that glimpse inwards to a
half-concealed rot.
Do we really continue with business as usual?
It is ourselves we must now place on the tribunal: what is it that we have permitted? Whose
hatred do we continue to house?
"Ride the air of those abject clouds of locusts," wrote Andre Breton in 1943, in Arcanum 17, "set
free the most fundamental right to live from the extreme limitations that a manifestly parasitic interference imposes on it, cleanse the sites exposed to the contamination of repression by all those
who accommodated themselves to the claw on the nape, we can imagine, once again, nothing
more essential, and still that does not yet constitute a decisive step towards a world forever sheltered from what just infested it."
On February 18, 1943, Sophie and Hans Scholl of the White Rose antifa group were arrested by the Gestapo while pamphleting a university in Munich. They were executed by the Nazis on
February 22, and the remaining White Rose antifa group faced trials. Today, February 18, 2017, the
White Rose symbolizes the recurrence of history, the corruption of our historic memory, the shame
for the complacency with which we have permitted the poison of fascism despite the cry, Never
Again. But the White Rose is also the irrepressible beauty of persistence and resolution despite this
cruel time, of the heart that demands to speak against the irrational hatred of our fellow people.
("love, poetry, art, it's only through their resilience that confidence will return")
CAUGHT IN
words by Anya Zoledziowski // illustration by Simone Badanic
f}
00      ^ illary Clinton ran a child sex ring," read a
headline during the latest presidential race.
The headline was absurd, yet my curiosity pushed me to glance over the article. During the
two minutes I spent reading sensational falsities about
Clinton, I didn't once consider the negative impacts that
such an article could have. Sure, the piece had garnered
enough traction to end up on my Facebook feed, but articles detailing Drake's dating history and listicles proving
the presence of UFOs also show up on my feed.
But not all lies are as easily discernable.
Shortly after I engaged with the article about Clinton's
criminal escapades, I started to pay attention to the term
"fake news." Though it's hard to determine what exactly constitutes fake news, Buzzfeed's Craig Silverman
— one of the leading journalists specializing in fake
news — defines it as false stories that are generated by
hoax-trafficking sites. The aim for such sites is to gain
clicks, and ultimately profit. However, most fake news
headlines seem less outlandish than one about Clinton's
alleged sexual exploitation of children, making it difficult for the public to avoid conflating fake news with
real news. For example, false headlines range from "Playboy founder Hugh Hefner dead"
to a claim that Iraqi forces shot down British planes en route to aid ISIS. Unless you have
plenty of free time, sifting through all of the stories in order to determine which ones are
credible and which aren't isn't feasible.
As fake news permeates through the media ecosystem, questions surrounding its impact arise: What information are audiences consuming? How does this information influence understandings about the workings of the world?
The first question is easier to answer, but only slightly. According to a news analysis led
by Silverman, the final three months of the presidential election saw fake news dominate
HOT HEAD / FAKE NEWS flttending a show at the
Rickshaw Theatre is
a very unique experience. Right from the entrance,
the venue feels comfortable. The
staff out front seem happy to be
where they are. The ground facing the stage is angled down very
slightly, so that those who are
in front are lowest, and those in
the back of the audience area are
higher. There are spiral staircases
leading from the carpeted main
lobby to the washrooms, and
there are movie theatre seats just
behind the main standing area.
Most unique of all, with regards
to the Rickshaw, are the meticulous yet genre-defying lineups.
I spoke with Mo Tarmohamed,
owner of the Rickshaw, about the
venue and the experience that
the place aims to provide. He had
previously been an accountant,
but decided to change careers for
something a bit more close to his
interests. The previous owner had
converted the Rickshaw into a
music venue and, upon Mo's asking around about buying a music
venue, offered up the theatre for
could have Sharon Van Etten, the
next night, Mayhem." Whoever's
set to play, you can be sure that
Mo supports them.
Most features of the Rickshaw
can be attributed to two things:
firstly, it was started as a
kung-fu movie theater in 1971,
and in 2009, was renovated into
purchase.
"I am e
up trie tn
a live music venue. The stair-
always looking for new       case, the marquee out front —
music." Mo said, when asked
about the shows he enjoyed going
to, " I never got particularly stuck
in one era." This ideology can
be seen in the shows hosted at
the Rickshaw. Bands range from
hardcore punk and death metal
to indie singer-songwriters and
shoegaze artists. "I just wanted
to diversify as much as possible. I
wanted to make sure one night you
these are all relics of the time
the Rickshaw was a theater.
Second, the space is meant to
be fully focused on the performance. Aspects such as the
friendly bouncers and staff, the
minimalistic bar, and the slanted
standing area (a relic from when
the ground was covered in theatre seats), all have the simple
goal of keeping the audience's
attention on what's happening on
the stage. "Everything's pointed
towards the stage." Mo says that
he wants all aspects of interacting with the space, from bouncers to coat check to bartenders,
focused on the performer and act
accordingly. "Our bartenders will
dim their lights during the show.
Even they don't become a dis-
raction to what's going on."
"I was approached by someone
who wanted to put a photo booth
in the main room," Mo recalls,
"and I was really resistant to the
idea. I don't want distractions.
The main distraction should be
what's on stage." Such focus from
a venue to the stage is rare. Mo
runs a tight ship in regards to the
Rickshaw — it's clear that there's
little wiggle room for anything
that doesn't elevate the audience
experience. This focus is often
noticed by performers, especially
by those unaccustomed to much
attention at all. "I've had local
artists tell me that just being on
the stage and getting the lighting treatment and the great sound
upped their game a little bit... it
feels like a stepping stone."
Located just east of Main and
Hastings, attendees and performers alike walk through the
stigmatized neighbourhood of the
Downtown Eastside to get to the
venue, and Mo is well aware of
this. He is sympathetic to patron's potential unease, but finds
that the unease wanes with each
show attended: "I can understand being uncomfortable initially coming to this area, but once
[concert-goers] have been to the
venue once or twice, that level
of uncomfort simply dissipates."
On behalf of the Rickshaw's role
within the immediate community,
Mo said, "The level of stigma is
slowly evaporating and I think the
Rickshaw is partially responsible
for getting people out to this area.
I think collectively, we need to do
something about this area, but it's
not a scary area."
■i'i
11 in all, the Rickshaw
is both a music lover
and musician's greatest dream. The Rickshaw is a
physical embodiment of devotion
to the experience of musicians,
dancers, artists, and audience
alike. There are no guarantees on
what type of performance will be
happening on any given night,
but you can be sure the night will
be authentic.
'it
For upcoming Rickshaw Theatre
listings, turn to their program
schedule on the front inside cover of
Discorder, across from the Editor's
Note.
A
mainstream news outlets. Whereas the best performing election news stories published by
sites like the New York Times or the Washington Post enjoyed approximately 7,367,000 likes,
shares, and comments on Facebook, false stories about the election generated a whopping
8,711,000 reactions. Although I can't provide a reason as to why fake news was consumed
at higher volumes, it's clear that false information is unnervingly popular.
Whether or not false information influences public opinion is a question I can only
answer speculatively. Citizens trust news media to be informative and accurate. I can't
stress how much power this places in the hands of journalists. Entrusted by the public to
relay information about politics, science, arts and culture, celebrity gossip, international
news, and more, us journalists get to determine what news deserves public attention.
This can in turn shape what issues society cares most about.
Journalists, however, follow ethical codes that fake news distributors do not. During
one of my first days at the UBC School of Journalism, my classmates and I were provided
with a sheet that outlines our code of ethics from the Society of Professional Journalists.
Minimizing the harm that stories can inflict on sources, sharing accurate information,
never distorting facts deliberately, and admitting mistakes, among other declarations,
make up the main tenets of journalism. In spite of strict adherence to ethical guidelines,
maintaining the public's trust in an era of fake news isn't easy for journalists. When
honest headlines intersect with farces masquerading as news, it comes as no surprise
that a disgruntled public loses trust in news media, including reporting from honest, independent journalists.
^^M   n addition to misleading the public, fake news provides politicians with a cop-out
I  argument when news coverage is critical of their administrations. Recall the now
•^^  infamous press conference where President Trump berated CNN's Jim Acosta for
being "fake news." Trump delegitimized a journalist whose role is to hold the president
accountable. The president has since expressed his belief that CNN and the rest of the
mainstream media belong to the fake news machine.
The assertion that mainstream media organizations push fake news further blurs
the line between credible reporting and the financial opportunism of fake news. When
the term fake news becomes a colloquial phrase used to refute any story in ideological
opposition to a person's beliefs, it detracts from the severity of fake news. This further
erodes the trust relationship between journalists and the public, and safeguards President
Trump from headlines that question his presidency.
Canadians are fortunate because fake news hasn't pervaded our society to the same
extent as it has in the United States. As a result, it's difficult to isolate false headlines or
dictatorial uses of the term "fake news" in a Canadian context. Nonetheless, our news
feeds seep with American content. Canadians must be vigilant when consuming news in
order to avoid falling victim to the fake news epidemic. Plus, because the provincial election is coming up, it's imperative that we get in the habit of ensuring the information we
rely on is credible so that we can make informed decisions when casting our ballots.
The current media landscape isn't as grim as I've made it out to be, however.
Audiences have insurmountable agency to seek out factual information. So to the readers of Discorder, I say this: always be skeptical. When you read a news story, first identify where the article was published. Did a media organization you trust share the article?
By turning to local publications like The Tyee or The National Observer, you're placing your
faith in journalists who work tirelessly to ensure their articles are fact-checked, and admit mistakes when their reporting goes awry. You can also verify information by looking for similar news stories published by multiple media organizations — it doesn't take
long to ensure you are consuming trustworthy content.
My final plea is that you don't lose trust in news media and independent journalists. As discussed earlier, journalists have ethical codes that shape their reporting. When
you're too busy at work to attend a political press conference, or you have a midterm that
is preventing you from discovering innovative scientific research, journalists work to fill
the void. Legitimate reporters attend press conferences, dig for new information, and
fact-check meticulously in order to hold powerful people accountable and make pertinent
information readily available. It can be disorientating to wade through the hoax-plagued
media landscape, but we're all capable of immunizing ourselves against false information. So the next time you scroll mindlessly through your feed, toss fake news aside and
turn to those organizations that work tirelessly to share factual information.
$
FAKE NEWS / VENEWS: RICKSHAW THEATRE EYS5 WIDE SHUT
words by Vora 1 \bber // photo by Pat \falade
illustrations by Janee Auger
ft
we don't really arrange parts. I don't orchestrate, because I don't feel like I have
to. We just sit down, and every band
member brings their separate influences
to whatever the melody is, and that's the
song." The new album also features contributions by Craig Aalders and Brandon
Hoffman.
The releases of Sam Tudor's two separate albums bookend Sam's university career, where he had studied
film at UBC. He used the opening scene of
David Lynch's Blue Velvet to describe the
major theme of the new album:
"It begins with the picture perfect, fairly
sanitary town, and the picturesque firefighters drive by, and everything seems
nice if not a little strange, and then the
camera slowly moves towards the ground
and actually goes into the earth and
through the blades of grass until they find
that severed ear. Ear aside, it kind of proposes
that under all the nuclear lifestyles and well
manicured neighbourhoods,
make music that was deliberately 'apart'
from that. But that's a problem too, because then you end up making music that
is reactionary."
The new album isn't just anti-folk, it
strives to resist all genre labelling, due in
large part to Sam's personal experiences.
"I've got to a point of like 'fuck thinking about genre in the first place'. The bus
I rode to high school only played Kenny
Chesney and Tim McGraw and that led
me to believe I hated country music. But
later I discovered like, Linda Ronstadt or
Emmylou Harris and when I listened to
some of those gorgeous songs, I'm not
thinking about what genre it is. I am just
crying in the car because it's beautiful."
Sam's love of cult cinema is perhaps
the most striking influence on the new
Sam Tudor release. Sam's songwriting
plays with the real and unreal, surreal
and grounded. The songs are dreamy but
intimate, as any classic cult film is, and
lovingly integrates the mundane and the
spectacular. "I like to think of it as that
state where you're lying in bed and staring
at the screen and you're kind of asleep, but
also hyper aware that you're awake."
Sam Tudor's new album will be released
at the beginning of April. Keep in touch at
samtudormusic.com or follow on social media
for details on the release show.
proposes that under all the nuclear lifestyles and
well manicured neighbourhoods, there can be something ominous and dark."
Sam Tudor lives nestled in Kitsilano
between sky high hedges and huge
homes. Something I find funny
about those neighborhoods right near the
UBC campus is that the residents are a
very obvious mix of wealthy families and
university students. It is a quiet area, and I
catch up with Sam in the late afternoon: "I
always want to drink tea when I'm about
to go to bed so I saw this and it seemed
like an obvious choice. SleepyTime for a
sleepy time."
Sam Tudor and his band are primed to
release a new album, still untitled at the
time of our interview. It has been dormant
since their last release, Modern New Year
in 2014. With Tegan Wahlgren on violin,
Jasper Wrinch on bass, and Harry Tudor
on drums, Sam headlines the project as
the lead singer, guitarist and songwriter.
But as he expresses, he's not totally comfortable in that role: "If I could go back in
time I would've had a cool stage name, but
I guess we're too 'in it' now."
Jasper, Tegan and Sam met just a year
and a half ago, and formed the band after
SAM TUDOR
a jam session where "it all just clicked."
Harry, Sam's brother, joined after moving
to Vancouver for school. Speaking to their
dynamic, Sam provides the space and music, and the band members bring their own
talents. They have projects outside of Sam
Tudor that have influenced the sound of
their new album.
"Jasper is really good at creating a general atmosphere of weirdness. Before, I
thought of music as just a vessel for melody and words, like, I didn't focus as much
on the layers and the 'world' of the song,"
explains Sam.
This new-found awareness, due in large
part to the band's influence, is evident on
the new album. Sam plays with production
techniques to create a dreamy and intimate
ambiance in a way that deviates from his
earlier releases, both with instruments and
vocals. The addition of Tegan's violin elevates the ethereality of Sam's vocals on the
album and during live sets.
"I think [Tegan] gets a really human
sound from her violin," elaborates Sam.
"I've had moments during a heavy part of
the set where I think it could be a person
screaming in anguish or something, and
that fucking tears me apart."
Modern New Year was mostly produced by
Sam, alone in his room, as simple as possible. Over the last three years, the further
integration of band members has expanded
Sam's sound from the intimate hominess
of his first release, to the stronger and
more experimental work of Sam Tudor, as
reflected on the new album. Sam, Tegan,
Jasper and Harry seem to collaborate in
fluidity. Sam explains, "We rehearse, but
there can be something ominous and dark.
Slightly askew. I love the idea of taking
an idyllic seeming situation and pulling it
apart slightly, like, showing a sort of unspoken pool underneath."
(Fittingly, one of my favourite songs on
the album is called, "Chlorine.")
Sam Tudor has rejected the idea of
performing a distinct genre, their album recounting a fresh spin on the familiar narrative of transitioning from
small-town rural life to the big city. Sam
explains, "There was this huge folk Zeitgeist that I came to hate, and I wanted to UIET
UIET CITY,
UNDERGROUND
SOCIETY
words byAidan Danaher
illustrations by Jules Galbraith
hotos by Evan Buggle
The atmosphere that Katsiris
has laboriously crafted and refined over the years, "is one of
inclusiveness, focused attention
during performances, introspective listening encouraged,
friendly and safe atmosphere
in which to enjoy the sometimes bizarre music that we're
presenting," as well as, "a
platform for experimentation."
Because the event has acquired
so much attention since it began, Quiet City has bloomed
into its own sort of social
phenomenon.
Jn discussing the event's
ever growing popularity, Katsiris admits, "In
some ways I prefer Quiet City to
be an underground entity, something that one might have to seek
out in order to find. I also find it
interesting to talk to people who
were simply drawn to the poster
art and decided to check out the
event on a whim." Elaborating
on his motivation for continuing
Quiet City, he explains it plainly:
"For the uninitiated, stumbling
upon something such as drone,
harsh noise, soundscape composition, or free improvisation
for the first time can be a truly
"Just because the name of the series
is 'Quiet City' doesn't necessarily mean
that the music won't be loud."
— Constantine Katsiris, Founder, Quiet City
W   or over a decade,
^^T Constantine Katsiris has
^^  been a curator of all kinds
of concerts and events. His longest running series has been Quiet
City, presenting its 32nd instalment on March 17. Constantine
shows no signs of slowing
down anytime soon. As he says,
"Hosting concerts is definitely in
my blood ... it's part of my lifestyle." Over the years, Katsiris
has poured his heart and soul into
promoting local and lesser known
artists from all kinds of left-field
genres — from drone, to avant-
garde, to electronic — by giving
them a unique opportunity for
gaining exposure.
It is very obvious that his passion for experimental music is as
strong now as it was during his
salad days: "Wherever I live, I try
to buy music by local artists from
the record shops, and attend as
many shows as I can to hear new
music ... I'm still researching,
collecting records, and listening
to what's current in other cities around the globe, although I
don't devote as much time to that
as I used to when I was younger."
Katsiris reminisces, "When I discovered ambient music back in
the mid-1990s, I felt like I had
stumbled across something that
really resonated with me, namely
Brian Eno, Aphex Twin, Future
Sound of London, Autechre ... It
was like a new world of music
that I didn't know existed had
presented itself." But much has
changed since then, now with
esoteric art forms being more accessible and easier to come across
than ever.
This month's Quiet City especially is nothing short of revolutionary. This instalment intends
on literally challenging and overcoming the confines of city limits,
with the feature of "a live telem-
atic performance piece between
Sydney and Vancouver." If that
doesn't sound cool enough, other
performances include "a chamber doom trio, free improvisation,
modular synth wizardry, ambient
music and more."
Quiet City's audience grows
year by year, mostly through
word of mouth. More specifically
through "the testimonials of the
artists who've previously attended
or been involved."
thrilling discovery ... Seeing the
amazement in the wide eyes of
someone who just experienced
something new is pretty incredible." The community has
grown in the event's immediate
presence, all thanks to Katsiris.
"What once was disparate is now
cohesive ... Hopefully we've been
a bit of that glue that has held
this weirdo music community together," he says.
Quiet City has been cited as a
widespread inspiration for young
artists and promoters alike, and
Constantine is a beacon of encouragement: "We are small groups
of people forging our own paths,
creating the types of spaces that
we want to exist in... It all becomes part of the local history and
eventually the underground gets
the recognition it deserves."
^H^^   hile Quiet City may be
I   Katsiris' brainchild,
^^^^F  he- is adamant that
the series could not have gotten
to where it is today without the
support, inspiration, and encouragement of many others. At the
beginning of Constantine's career
in promotions here in Vancouver,
he co-hosted Soundscape on
Vancouver Co-Op Radio, CFRO.
Since leaving CFRO, Katsiris says,
"Soundscape is [still] considered to
be a co-presentation partner [of
Quiet City], as their involvement is
crucial as a broadcasting platform
featuring the same types of music
we feature in our series."
It should be mentioned that
a very notable characteristic of
Katsiris' is his ability to maintain his professional relationships and friendships within the
arts community from all over
the globe. He mentions his long
standing partnership with artist Jack Duckworth, who designs
each Quiet City poster. Katsiris
praises Duckworth's talents, "His
incredible designs are works of
art in themselves, and I couldn't
have asked for a better partner
to provide the visual representation of Quiet City to the public."
Duckworth has since moved to
London, but his artwork is still
very prominent and integral to
Quiet City's impact within our
music and arts community.
Before Katsiris concludes the interview, he proposes the possibility
of an eventual Quiet City festival,
but I guess we'll just have to wait
and see. For anybody who may be
interested in contributing to the
series in the future, Constantine
offers an open invitation, "Come
with an open mind. If you think on
the same wavelength, get in touch
to be involved."
ft
The next instalment, the 32nd in
the series, is a co-presentation with
VIVO Media Arts Centre on Friday,
March 17. It will feature performances
by Crawling Human, John Chantler,
Loscil, Rosen and Smalltime Magic.
Advance tickets $12 on Eventbrite, or
$15 at the door. If you are interested
in being involved in Quiet City or want
more information, email Constantine
at quietcity@panospria.ca.
IN SOME WAYS
QUIET CITY TO BE AN
UNDERGROUNDENTIT
SOMETHING THAT ONE
MIGHT HAVE TO SE
OUT IN ORDER TO FIND."
QUIET CITY INTER
SESIONS
CROSS
SECTION
WORDS BY
EVANGELINE HOGG
ILLUSTRATIONS BY
AMYBRERETON
PHOTOS BY
PATVALADE
*^S^H espite Vancouver having a well established arts scene,
I it has its discrepancies. With the lack of safer spaces
4^J^ available to emerging artists and marginalized groups,
there is an undertone of inequality. There are a lot ofDJs on the
West Coast, but few opportunities for recognition and sharing.
That's where Intersessions comes in.
Intersessions is a DIY, Inclusive Sound Initiative that supports
women, POC, and the LGBTQ+ community. Through programming, Intersessions offer individuals keen on the art ofDJing,
the opportunity to surround themselves with like-minded people and learn from peers. During three-hour sessions, bonds are
created in a secure, passionate environment.
As Intersessions approaches their one-year anniversary in
March, it is already expanding internationally. Rhi Blossom is
Intersessions' Vancouver ambassador, Chippy Nonstop manages Toronto, Montreal, Europe and Mexico, Ainsley Willow is
in New York City, and Kathy Suarez is in Los Angeles. Discorder
sat down with Intersessions co-founder Rhi Blossom to chat
about their experiences, and to learn what makes Intersessions
so strong.
Discorder Magazine: i'm admittedly a little
unfamiliar with the origins of Intersessions, can
you please explain how it was created?
RHI BLOSSOM: Yeah, absolutely. Around this
time last year, I met Chippy Nonstop [Co-
Founder of Intersessions] at a club, and we
connected immediately. I really looked up
to her. She was the only visible, confident,
non-dude I saw dominating the scene
[in Vancouver]. She taught me how to DJ
through Traktor, and it was a really powerful and positive experience for me. I like
to say that the very first session began with
Chippy teaching me and it just snowballed af
ter that into what it is now. We'd been yearning
for a platform and an opportunity to help people
like us create music without so many hurdles, so
we decided to create something together.
DM: SO| what was the prompt that really pushed you
to want to create this initiative?
Pg: I had guys offer to teach me, but it's just a different energy. I don't feel comfortable around most men,
and it's not always their fault, but I feel that way from my
own past experiences. Having met someone like Chippy,
who was able to teach me, created the ability for me to go
forward and create the same experience for other people
on a much wider scale.
DM: Why do art scenes need initiatives like
Intersessions?
R[J; There just isn't a lot out there like it! There are a
lot of clubs and collectives founded and run by men and
those, in themselves, are their own dude-producer breeding initiatives. We're trying to create something that
doesn't exist for underrepresented, marginalized people.
That's why [Intersessions] is continuing to be sought after, and have success: because it's just not something that
is readily available. Access to equipment is also a really
INTERSESSIONS
big hurdle as it's so expensive
and inaccessible, so that makes
Intersessions kind of a rare thing,
as well, because we try to provide hands on experience with gear
without it being mad expensive.
DM: S°> Intersessions isn't just
a place for women, it's also inclusive. How do you navigate the
politics surrounding that?
Pg; We try to take an intersec-
tional approach with it, while also
trying to be chill about it, because
that sort of dialogue isn't always
accessible to people. When it's something that's supporting women, that's great, but there are other things
to consider, such people who are trans, people of colour,
poor — these groups of people aren't put on a pedestal,
but deserve the same access opportunities 100 percent. In
the past, we were very 'for women,' and that's why there
is confusion behind why there are not just strictly women
who attend Intersessions.
We really try to be inclusive and we are also always
learning about how to be better at this. When people ask
questions about why we let men in, I respond with "How
do you know they're men?" Not only that, but we trust
that people with more privilege will know when not to
take up space, and so far it has been fairly smooth sailing
in that way.
DM: What is it about other parts of the scene that are
considered unsafe?
RB: Rlght off the bat, clubs and promoters continuing
to book abusers, and not having properly trained security who actually care about guests' well-being. People
pick up on this, and crowds will go to certain spaces
.ecause they know they can get away with being
shitty because the hosts get away with it,
too. Intersessions is safer because we as organizers try to lead by example in our bookings and everyday action and words, so the
people who support us tend to follow suit. We
aren't here to be complacent.
DM: What makes Intersessions
workshops so unique?
R[J; I feel like whenever people come, they
learn about so much more than just DJing, they
also learn about the complexity of the issues
people face within this world, in relation to gender, sexuality, race, class, etc. If teaching DJing
can be a vessel for communicating these things,
then that's sick.
Another thing is the amount of people that come simply to make friends. There is such a lack of spaces to be
around diverse people, and also feel comfortable.
DM: What can you tell newcomers to expect from their
first experience with Intersessions?
RB: Expect to be surrounded by passionate, accepting
people. There is an eagerness to learn, and a wide variety
of material thrown at you. It's a lot, but it's also exhilarating. Learning how to DJ is going to take more than
three hours, so everyone fucks up or makes a bad mix, but
it's a good stepping stone to overcome, and Intersessions
offers a safer space to do so.
Upcoming Vancouver events include the all-ages RECESS x
Intersessions l-y ear Anniversary Party March 15, and Pep Talk:
New Party by Intersessions Vancouver team on March 17. Follow
Intersessions on social media for more event details:
/intersessionsinfo on Facebook, @intersessions on Instagram,
and @inter_sessions on Twitter.
jy .^m ^^CVIDEOMAKe^^
** *3» W» 03QIA OX****
IS APRIL, ARTIST CASEY WEI &
UNIT/PITT PROJECTS PRESENT:
KARAOKE MUSIC VIDEO MAKER
FREE STORE
EVERY FRI & SAT 12-6PM
236 E PENDER
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY
FOR THE MONTH OF APRIL, UNIT/PITT PROJECTS
WILL BE TRANSFORMED INTO A VIDEO STUDIO
WHERE YOU CAN MAKE YOUR OWN FABULOUS
MUSIC VIDEO OF A KARAOKE SONG
(OR YOUR OWN MATERIAL) IN FRONT
OF A GREEN SCREEN.
ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE!
BOOK YOUR FREE HOUR LONG SESSION, CONTACT CASEY AT:
FREEKARAOKEMUSICVIDEO@GMAIL.COM
UNIT/PITT Projects 1236 East Pender Street, Vancouver BC Canada V6A1T71 +1 604 68167401 www.unitpitt.ca
UNIT/PITT is grateful for the assistance of the Canada Council, the British Columbia Arts Council, the Province of British Columbia through the BC
Gaming Commission, and the City of Vancouver; we are particularly grateful to individual donors, volunteers, artists, and cultural workers, without
whom we would be unable to continue.
i
DISCORDER Heal tine
fiction
FEBRUARY 2017
SHINDIG FINALS W/ CAROUSEL SCENE /
LITTLE SPROUT / MARK MILLS
FEBRUARY 3 / PAT'S PUB
On February 3, CITR 101.9FM and Discorder celebrated the end of the
long and hard battle at Pat's Pub. It was Shindig 33, and it was the
finals. The theme of the night was BOLD and both the performers and the
audience exceeded all expectation. It goes without saying that everyone was
excited to see which of the three finalists — Carousel Scene, Little Sprout, or
Mark Mills — would take home the Shindig crown and end the madness.
Having attended almost every night of Shindig this year, it was a cruel turn of events that I was running late that night. I ran into Pat's and was
greeted by Sally at the door who immediately recognized me and said something sweet about it being the end of an era. It was decently crowded and I
dropped my things at the usual table at the back with this year's ever affable
host, Andy Resto. Making the whole things happen this year, Andy was the
best host a battle of the bands could ask for: a little nervous, a little awkward,
and very sassy.
Carousel Scene was playing as I settled in and everyone was crowded
around the small stage. The lead singer, Ashley Weis, serenaded everyone
over the perfectly synchronized band. She danced around the stage, totally
intoxicating the audience with her honeyed voice. I figuratively melted when
the band performed their most recent, and sexiest, single "Red Lipstick."
After a far too brief interlude set courtesy of DJ autonomy, Little Sprout
took the stage. Of all the bands, Little Sprout took the night's theme most
seriously. The orchestrater and lead singer Amie Gislason swayed on stage
in a black and white checkered dress and tiara, next to an electric-blue toga-
ed bassist, and in front of a butterfly mini-dressed drummer. Their outfits
seemed to embolden their set and they brought it like they'd never brought it
before. Mixing their soft pop and garage rock sounds seamlessly, they managed to play with an intensity that may have been lacking in their earlier sets.
After Little Sprout rocked Shindig's world, Andy got up on stage and
hosted my favourite part of the night: Jokes & Fun Facts for Beers. It was
definitely the most competitive night all year, with several people, including
myself, not making the cut. Most nights have been very Fun Fact heavy but
the crowd let loose with some quality comedy. Highlight: "Why can't you tell if
you're in the bathroom with a pterodactyl? Because the P is silent!" While the
competition was fierce, the real heat came from Andy who let his sass flag
fly, a fitting premonition for the rest of the night.
The final act, Mark Mills, switched it up from his usual act by adding a
guitar to his performance. He ditched it after the first couple songs and went
back to his classic method of shimmying around the stage to beats playing
from his iPod and, as per usual, I loved every second of it.
When the time came to announce the winner, Andy was brutally evasive. He purposefully rambled, touching on several topics: why he would
announce the winners in the order he did, the boldness of the audience, a
quote from the letter he wrote in the event's program, where the trophy had
sat in his apartment, and anything other than the results. In the end, Little
Sprout won the gold, with Carousel Scene coming in second, and Mark Mills
taking home the third place hammer.
I stayed at Pat's long after the winners had been announced and the
music had stopped playing. While it was definitely motivated by entertainment and his desire to rile up the crowd, I think Andy's stalling was also an
attempt to make the night move a little more slowly. We had been going to
Pat's every Tuesday night since October, and while we were both excited for
Shindig to end, we wanted to hold on, if only because now we can't go to
Pat's to hang out and hear Vancouver's boldest music. —Dora Dubber
CORY HANSON / JODY GLENHAM 8 THE
DREAMERS /MALCOLM JACK
FEBRUARY 9 / COBALT
Thursday night at the Cobalt featured Los Angeles headliner Cory
Hanson touring his new album The Unborn Capitalist from Limbo,
where he trades in the heady psych rock of his band Wand for autumnal folk
lamentations. He was joined by two locals, psych-folk disciple Malcolm Jack,
and the dreamy Jody Glenham and the Dreamers.
The night began with Malcolm Jack performing an all new solo acoustic set. Straying from traditional song structure, the songs were propelled by
rhythmic strumming and riffs in open tuning. He's concerned about death,
he's concerned about his friends, and the songs were full of insightful reflections. Whether solo or with his band Dada Plan, I've never seen him do the
same thing twice, and yet he always sounds like himself.
Between songs he consulted a book of lyrics perched atop a television /
VCR combo. He quipped something to a crowd member about the llliad —
maybe he has another folk epic in the works. Malcolm's set felt like words of
wisdom shared around a campfire, albeit a virtual one: a flickering splotch of
red, blue and green VHS distortion. Still, it's a circle of warmth surrounded by
a foreboding wilderness. Better get a bit closer.
Next, a set of lamplit soft rock from Jody Glenham & the Dreamers
proved the biggest draw of the night. With a six piece band and three part
harmonies, tliu sound was full and lush, They played new Lracks from an
upcoming release including Jody's version of a protest song. There were
political themes throughout the night — it seems people are uneasy about
something or other. Highlights came from performances of "RSVP" and "III
Wind" which wonderfully showcased the character and range of her voice as
well as some lovely reverb and crunch on the guitar. Also, apparently they
have mood rings as merch. Too cool.
Taped to Cory Hanson's guitar and encircled with a line through it was
the fasces symbol — an axe and bundled sticks that symbolizes strength
through unity and from which fascism derived its name. Opening
with his record's ominous title track,
Hanson gently plucked his classical
guitar while wilting violin washed
over the crowd. The otherworldly aesthetic of the album was simplified in the live environment but
no less powerful. For "Replica,"
which featured the most prominent
drums and bass, he picked up a
steel string. Then, the classical was
back for the stunning "Garden of
Delight," which was surely planted
with the help of John Lennon.
Throughout the show the noise
coming from the crowd at the back
was pretty out of hand, and the
band had to ask for quiet more
than once. Cory dedicated a track
to political theorist Hannah Arendt
and mentioned her famous "banality of evil," which I believe was written about people who talk loudly during
acoustic sets. Nevertheless, using her skills as a teacher, violinist Heather
Lockie managed to get complete silence for the pastoral fingerpicking of
"Evening Glass." The silence remained for the finale, and those who listened
were not disappointed. —Dylan Joyce
THE SUNDAY SERVICE
FEBRUARY 12 / THE FOX CABARET
By 8:30pm on February 12, the Fox was completely at-capacity. The
Sunday Service, the long-running weekly improv show, didn't start
until nine, but the dimly lit room was already buzzing with anticipation. At
show time the six members of the troupe took to the stage; improviser Aaron
Read introduced the players, and kicked off the first half.
The night started with a series of short-form improv scenes, inspired by
audience suggestions. These rapid-fire scenarios jolted the crowd
to attention with their absurdity.
For an audience member at the
Sunday Service, focus is key. If you
find yourself distracted for a second, you might miss a crucial piece
of information in a scene, like why
Caitlin Howden was helping Ryan
Beil, a murderous daisy that wished
to become human. The Sunday
Service definitely does not shy away
from getting weird; instead, absurdity
is weaved into every scene and consistently pumps out comedic scenarios and predicaments.
Despite the often silly, slapstick situations that cropped up in
these moments, Taz VanRassel
and Kevin Lee were showcasing
impressive skills while starring in
the game "Forward and Reverse."
In this game, a scene is improvised, and at the will of the moderator (Read),
players perform the scene line-by-line in reverse — and then forward, and
then reverse, again. The possibility of their failure was a thrilling prospect for
the audience, and the room was left in excited amazement when the players
completed the scene successfully.
The intermission was preceded by a short character performance. Sketch
comedian Colin Edward Cowan played a big-band crooner in his eighties,
recently dumped by his partner of 65 years. Cowan amused the audience
with his anti-Valentine's day shtick, and offered a refreshing break from the
fast-paced stylings of the rest of the evening.
As the intermission came to an end, the improv troupe introduced their
long-form set. In the second half of the show, they weaved a continuous
narrative consisting of multiple storylines, lasting about 30 minutes. Piano
accompaniment provided by The Sunday Service's musical director Emmett
Hall, added extra feeling to the scenes, and added that much more depth to
the stories.
Scenes took place anywhere — from an abandoned barn, to an elementary school principal's office, to a bank in England, and to a music studio
recording the hit song "Dorito Poppin' Daddy" — as they constructed worlds
by expanding on tangents, and developed them into full stories. At times I
found myself lost in the abyss of crazy characters and absurd situations, but
the players always made sure to ground their scenes in enough emotional
sincerity for the audience to truly care about what happens to them.
What is most impressive about The Sunday Service, is how they make
their performance look so effortless — the troupe clearly knows how to work
together. These seasoned professionals, masters of their artform, are truly a
pleasure to watch. —Maddy Rafter
CLOUD NOTHINGS/ITASCA
FEBRI
X
FEBRUARY 16 / BILTMORE CABARET
he Biltmore Cabaret's stage is no more than two feet tall, and at first I
thought the venue would be too small for such a class act like Cloud
Nothings to play. But I was to be proven wrong. On February 16, suffice to
say, Cloud Nothings conquered Vancouver for the evening as they filled the
ITW^^^^^^^PP^
YOUR
@ 333 CLARK
DAY 1
TEMPEST - WORLD VIEW
OPEN LETTERS - SHIT BOYS
POLICY OF TRUTH - WANT
ALL AGES
$10 AT THE DOOR | DOORS AT 8
SAT. MARCH 4TH | BANDS AT 8:30
I.        3AI. iviHnwn tin |  dhhus mi
{DAY 2
■   ■„;('
@ THE ASTORIA
BENEFIT SHOW FOR THE
CITR ANNUAL FUNDRAISER
PRESENTED BY SOUND & SALT IDPKI CiTR
lilsS&ifcSfri     .. /A^l-*^=fc&(&&EA-.>
9
6
SIGHTLINES - SORE POINTS
YOUR PROBLEM - BRUTAL POODLE
19+
$10 AT THE DOOR | DOORS AT 9
SUN. MARCH 5TH | BANDS AT 9:30
:3
PUNK ROCK AND HARDCORE
SINCE 1989
jgHH jggi .-,,^^,^.^,..,, ym jgn,....:
REAL LIVE ACTION Biltmore Cabaret to the brim, on their tour supporting their brand new album
Life Without Sound.
However, for the Los Angeles-based opening act, ITASCA, the venue and
audience were much too big for their colour of mellow, soft spoken folk rock.
But that didn't stop singer-songwriter Kayla Cohen as she sang while her
hands effortlessly played her sunburst Guild acoustic guitar or her 12-string,
which further highlighted the sweet sounds of her intricate finger-picking
patterns. She was accompanied by the beautifully swelling sounds of the
lap steel guitarist beside her, which mostly overshadowed her vocals — but
I won't deny that it sounded pretty cool regardless. Whether or not it was
intentional, the slide guitar's high-pitched hum while paired with Cohen's
acoustic guitar sounded eerily similar to Jimmy Page's slide guitar solo on
Led Zeppelin's acoustic song, "Tangerine." If that alone doesn't pique your
interest in this band, I'm afraid there must be something terribly wrong with
you (jokingly, of course).
With all that said, playing to an audience expecting something similar to Cloud Nothings' noise pop, the band was doomed to fail at the start.
The crowd talked nearly the entire set and ITASCA well-deserve a second
chance.
The second Cloud Nothings started playing, I abandoned any sense of
professionalism I had about my duty as a critic and spent the entirety of their
set and encore inside the hellish frenzy of fun that was the mosh pit — it was
the most fun I've had at a show in a very long time. For the most part, I was
squished against two headbangers who themselves were squished against
the stage monitors, holding the line between the band and the crowd.
Singer, guitarist and bandleader Dylan Baldi damn near yelled his lungs
out. But the most impressive part of the entire show was watching Jayson
Gerycz, in some circles known as "The Unknown Drummer," absolutely
going to town on his drumset, with his awe inspiring drum fills. For years now
he's been labelled as one of the most underrated drummers of this decade,
and anybody who's seen him live can attest to that. Everybody I had talked
to after the show each said the same thing: "That drummer..." followed by a
long, amazed pause.
They ended their main set, which
spanned their last three albums since
their breakthrough, Attack On Memory,
with a full length rendition of their famous
nine minute song, "Wasted Days," —
most of which is the mid-song breakdown with each band member making
as much noise as possible while Baldi
continuously yells, "I thought /1 would /
Be more / Than this!" Baldi wasn't one
for banter, as he admitted to the crowd
with a smirk, "I don't really say much, but
I appreciate you being here!"
I can't wrap this up any other way
than by saying this: it was one of those
bands that was so good, you just had to
be there to really know how good it really
was. —Aidan Danaher
ART D'ECCO / MU /
SEX WITH STRANGERS
FEBRUARY 16 / FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
The idea of costume as a means to shed one skin and don another in
order to connect with another person is no new thing to art, but its
presence was nevertheless heartwarming at Fortune Sound Club with the triple threat bill of Art D'Ecco, Mu and Sex With Strangers.
The Vancouver five-piece Sex With Strangers brushed off the late start
by barreling into their set, with frontman Hatch Benedict's theatricality a satisfying blend between Jack Black's antics and Samuel T. Herring of Future
Islands' sincerity. This energy was most strong in their song "Momento,"
off their 2016 EP Space In Time, produced by Vancouver's prolific Jason
Corbett — who was also the guest DJ for the evening. Fast-paced, maniacal
and with fits lying between rage and pleasure, Sex With Strangers wrapped
up their half hour with a cover of INXS's dance-inducing "Don't Change."
After a quick mood change, courtesy of fog machines and some pink
plastic draping, Francesca Belcourt and Brittney Rand of Mu took to the
stage dressed like rhinestone cowgirls, jokingly stating, "new wig, who dis."
Dream pop to the core, the two provided a set with all the right vocal layers
as two sparkly, dewy-faced backup dancers sat at the edge of the stage,
seemingly taking in the audience as if they were universe. After announcing
that the duo would be taking a hiatus and the evening would likely be the last
time to see them for a while, they stated, "let's all dance and die together,"
ending their time on a bittersweet but nonetheless delivering note.
By the time Art D'Ecco hit the stage, the venue felt fuller, darker and
more apt for the heady and driving ballad that Art and his band launched
into immediately. Building anticipation with Spoon-like synths, they broke into
"Let's Go Home Together," one of the tracks off his 2016 full length debut
Day Fevers. Lying somewhere between Marc Bolan and Bradford Cox, Art's
stage presence delivers a kind of slinky serenade that wouldn't be out of
place at a haunted high school prom, laden with glamour and seedy insinuations. Towards the end of the evening, Art spoke to the camaraderie in the
room of local talent. Offering up a sentiment of how close he felt to everyone,
he quipped, "alright, let's fucking dance," as his band sprang into the synth
anthem "I'll Never Give You Up."
Whether it's a pageboy wig, a cowboy hat fringe or a snarling on-stage
personality, a costume can allow for an anonymity that is liberating to the
connection between performer and audience. Where a outstretched hand
may have not been before, the costume gives way to a sense of "we're all
weird here," a sentiment that was definitely embraced with vigor and affection on that Friday night at Fortune. —Lili Watson
THUNDERCAT/V.VECKER
FEBRUARY 17 / RICKSHAW THEATRE
Pfter dropping the single "Show You the Way" — a track that somehow remains cool while featuring both Kenny Loggins and Michael
McDonald — from his forthcoming record Drunk, Thundercat took to the
Rickshaw to play the fourth show of a lengthy world tour. Vancouver seems
to have treated Thundercat well over the years, as he was very vocal about
how much he enjoys it up here. It must be a West Coast thing.
Opener and Vancouver native V. Vecker set the tone early with a collection of ethereal saxophone drones and ambient jazz pieces. A stark contrast
to the headliner, it was the perfect way to start the night. Mysterious modal
sax melodies echoed around the cavernous theatre and slowly built anticipation. Triggered drums and synths joined in occasionally, complementing
the delay and reverb saturated horns. It was easy to close your eyes and get
lost in the layers and textures, noticing each new addition as it became less
transparent.
The Rickshaw was sold out, and it was filled to the brim when Thundercat
took the stage. Stephen Bruner, the supernatural bass player, was joined
by his usual line-up of Justin Brown on drums and Dennis Hamm on keys.
These guys absolutely destroyed for an hour and a half, non-stop. The skill
and stamina apparent here was not lost on the crowd, as I overheard at least
half a dozen people mention Justin Brown's drumming alone — and it was
truly something to behold. Dennis Hamm provided all the necessary lead
synth lines and some impressive solos of his own. Of course, Thundercat's
now legendary style of six-string bass playing combined with his pop sensibility is what everyone was there to see, but they were a trio of elite players
together and they all deserve credit.
They relentlessly pushed out Thundercat's unique brand of jazz fusion
with only a few quips to the audience here and there. The set was definitely full of crowd pleasers, hitting all the big tracks from 2013's Apocalypse
and 2015's The Beyond/ Where the Giants Roam, then filling it out with new
material. A slammin' rendition of "Them Changes" was one of the night's
highlights, as well as "Heartbreaks + Setbacks," both among the numerous
extended jams and solos.
"This song's called Friend Zone, anyone been there?" Thundercat asked,
before crying out "Fuck the friend zone!" and launching into a cut from the
new record.
After leaving most of the venue devastated from the onslaught of auditory bliss and the clinic in immaculate musicianship on display by this band,
they returned for one last song: a clean and shiny performance of "Oh Sheit
It's X" which served as an apt farewell to the diverse crowd present at the
Rickshaw. "I just wanna party / You should be here with me" are lyrics both
the music nerds and the party crowd could get behind.
To be honest, this review could have simply read: "Thundercat: the infallible jazz cat." —Lary Shelmal
C. DIAB / MEDINA/WALSH / V. VECKER
FEBRUARY 18 / SELECTORS' RECORDS
On February 18, at Selectors' Records, Vancouver based C. Diaband
V Vecker, and Seattle based Medina/Walsh filled the store with their
ambient, textural, and droning soundscapes.
The crowd slowly gathered into Selectors' Records, located on the corner of Pender and Carrall Street, with ceiling to floor windows on the north
and west corners of the store, letting in the colourful neon glow of the two
Jack Chow Insurance buildings across the street. There were some chairs
to sit on, but most of the crowd huddled together on the floor, clutching their
knees, or sitting cross-legged with a beer in hand.
C. Diab nonchalantly approached his chair and prepared his bow with a
shiny black cake of rosin. As the crowd began to notice C. Diab's pre-perfor-
mance ritual, the room started to get quiet. As he began tuning his guitar, C.
Diab said,"Anyone know a good joke?" This was met with silence, followed
by some (uncomfortable) laughter.
The set began with some gentle harmonics on the guitar that were then
made into a looped bed. The most striking moment of this performance,
was when C. Diab picked up his guitar and placed it in between his legs
like a cellist, and with majestic proficiency, he began to play with a massive,
distorted, delayed, and reverberant sound. He created melodic loops then
improvised a melody over top. Diab executed this compositional formula for
most of the set, even when he picked up a beat-up old trumpet with a thoroughly dented bell. What I craved from C. Diab, sonically, was some more
textural and non-melodic sound, perhaps some more sul ponticello bowing for some added sonic dirt. My favourite moment was when he droned a
very low open string on his bowed guitar, and played a pseudo raga. This
moment felt liberating, getting lost in the wonderful drone. He even made a
nice breath sound in the trumpet, but not to add to the music, only to clean
the trumpet. I thought that breath could have added another dynamic layer to
C. Diab's sound.
Medina/Walsh were up next. The duo had a guitarist with a well-equipped
pedal board, complete with lights flashing on and off; and there was another
performer processing sounds on a laptop covered up with a blanket. The set
was spectrally balanced in a very nice way — low sub frequencies to piercingly high frequencies. The duo beautifully took clear and melodic notes from
the guitar, and gently blurred their sharp sonic image. Creating wonderfully
grainy, and textural, aural images, Medina/Walsh left enough space for one
to become lost in.
To cap off the night, V Vecker hit up the stage with a keyboard, alto-saxophone, and a string of pedals attached to both instruments to sculpt his sonic
landscape. It was a solid set that once again had some melodic and harmonic loops, and almost soul-like saxophone over massive frequency drones. I
also craved a little more textural focus from the saxophone instead of getting
an abundance of melodic material, but the constant looping of these melodies eventually fell onto themselves and created a sound that was simultaneously lovely and ominous.
When the performance finished, the night felt quite silent after being
immersed in dense, complicated, sonic textures. If I listen carefully, I can still
recall some of the vibrations in my body. —Faur Tuuenty
' considered for revie»
gazine and online, please email event details ■
weeks in advance to Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Liv
Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA is also expanding to include comedy and the
among other live experiences. Feel free to subi.
those event details to the e-mail above.
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WITCHSTONE
WITCHSTONE
A Mortal Fear of Infinity
(Self-Released)
03/01 /2017
misery is a dread that pulses like a second heart. Excruciating, it is
the slow twisting of a screw. In order to craft unremittingly heavy
music, Black Sabbath tapped into this distress. On their 1970 self-titled
debut, they elongated notes, distorting bluesy riffs into something strange
and evil. Ozzy, fucked up on vodka and cocaine, wails like an animal falling
into a pit, "Oh no, no, please god help me." Desperate, dire and painful, this
is the birth of metal.
On A Mortal Fear of Infinity, Calgary's Witchstone embraces the traditions laid before them by those like Black Sabbath. Lingering notes and tortured vocals build an atmosphere both thick and daunting. The album cover, a moon swallowed by a black hole, serves as a warning: no light shall
escape here.
Avoiding the urge to deafen the listener, all four tracks build with crafted grace — few things appear out of place. On "Estuaries," for instance, a
lone distorted guitar gives way to the thudding shudder of a full band. The
lead guitar twangs with a submerged murkiness. Syrupy and sludge like, this
is the sound of a spiraling descent. As the vocalist releases a fading yelp,
an organ adds to the whirling confusion. This instrumentation is a touch of
pure psychedelia. Reminiscent of Electric Wizard, it propels the song into an
assemblage of solos and ominous samples. Though lengthy, "Estuaries" is
far from monotonous.
At other moments, however, Witchstone find themselves listless. Without
deviation, "Chronoshift" flails about. Altering between spacey reverb and
heavy riffs, the song's eight-minute length does not feel justified. Lacking are
the mounting crescendos of superior tracks — "Maniac of the Dane Hills," for
example, finds room for a bass solo and muted chants before the return of a
punishing swell of distortion. Similarly, a somber set of sharp sounding notes
drive "The Voidmouth" forward. Where these songs build pressure and ambience through sonic diversity, "Chronoshift" seems lodged in a rut.
Yet, this misstep fails to derail the momentum of A Mortal Fear of Infinity.
A tight conceptual unit, this album operates under the assumption that heaviness is based on more than just aggression and sheer volume. Like Sabbath
before them, Witchstone understands that human dread is the weightiest
substance on earth. —Esteban Heavy
NO JOY
Creep
(Grey Market)
02/24/2017
^T or a good while now, the Montreal alternative duo Jasamine White-
^M  Gluz and Laura Lloyd have planned on releasing a string of EPs. And
with no disappointment, No Joy return with their latest release, Creep. Simply
by looking at the track listing, it's noticeable that their intentions are to fully
immerse their listeners into a thematically twisted musical world. Oscillating
between dark and light, each song shifts (with ease) from soft, eerie dream
pop into very memorable progressive drum & bass. No Joy create their own
unconventional, yet entirely intriguing and accessible niche by fusing synth-
led electro beats with beautiful guitars and vocal melodies.
Opening track, "Califone" is characterized by both its catchiness and the
liberty taken by switching between cleanly reverberated guitars and a synth
bassline. Both of these instruments are set under pretty, soft-spoken melodies. The track is strongest within its last moments, when the chorus breaks
into a miniature (but no less impressive) guitar solo.
The poppiness of Creep's introduction slowly fades into darkness with
"Hellhole," which is a song that fits its name. It sounds like a dream that suddenly turns into a nightmare. In essence, this track is similar to the song
"Hare Tarot Lies" off of their 2013 album, Wait To Pleasure, with a chorus
driven by a simple, fuzz-laden bass progression under their signature soft,
melodic vocals.
While "Hellhole" is arguably the best song on the EP, the others can hold
their weight. Even more foreboding than its predecessors, "Tearing Apart the
Dark," is a bit of a departure from their typical accessibility. With its distorted
ominous guitar riff and spine-shivering, whispered verses, this song sounds
more like an industrial punk song rather than No Joy's typical dream pop.
Its chorus is led by a thrashing bass drum and some seriously dirty guitars.
Taking an unexpected turn, the bridge is a shimmering plateau of melodic
relief, which is promptly cast back into the abyss from which the song rose.
Given No Joy's tonal pendulum between malevolence and benevolence,
Creep suitably ends with a light at the end of the tunnel. The final track,
"Fluorescent Dread," is an entirely electro dance-pop song, heralded by
many different synthesizers on top of fast-paced, upbeat drums that sound
straight out of the '80s.
If anything is to be taken away from listening to Creep, it's that No Joy can
create a unique diversity of songs, all of which sound radically different from
one another, yet, somehow retain their unified, overarching themes. Though
above all else, it's abundantly clear that No Joy makes music that sounds
really f-king cool! —Aidan Danaher
JAPANDROIDS
Near To the Wild Heart of Life
(Arts & Crafts)
01 / 27/2017
Japandroids, often hailed as Vancouver's hottest rock' n'roll duo, have
returned from yet another victory lap since their triumphant, make-
or-break debut Post-Nothing. Near to the Wild Heart of Life [Wild Heart] is
Japandroids third full-length album and rips with the same intensity Brian
King (guitar / vocals) and David Prowse (drums / vocals) are known for. Not
much has changed; from day one Japandroids have been about capturing
the feeling of being born to run in a city that's bound to rain, plummeting from
apex to nadir and back again.
While Japandroids music used to create fireworks with next to nothing,
Wild Heart brings a wider array of production tools and arrangements. The
same colourful guitar lines exist as before but are now punctuated by synths
("True Love and a Free Life of Free Will"), samples ("Arc of Bar"), and acoustic guitars ("North East South West"). Bells and whistles adorn songs but
without the addition of instrumental staples, such as bass, to even it out. The
new additions tip the mix away from the warm midrange of their previous
sound and towards a sunlit, trebly glare. While these sounds don't enable the
band to reach previous peaks as high as "Young Hearts Spark Fire" or "Evil's
Sway," they nonetheless feel like suitable embroidery for the altitude.
Like Celebration Rock, Wild Heart drives through the heartland of rock.
But now, jocular punchlines have given way to tragically heroic narratives.
Life, love, and free will are barely within reach as King and Prowse rage
against the dying of the light. Throughout the album, bars become biblical in
proportion, and bodies seem like graves when confronted with age. Despite
the success of this lyrical maturity, these familiar narratives veer dangerously
close to melodrama.
This revamped, heavy-handed lyricism has a tendency to blunt the listening
experience. Lacking a sharp Replacements-esque wit, Japandroids neglect to
cut through a layer of Bruce Springsteen like pomp. With lines like "Under starless skies of fire, into great unknown / Living on the lam and the frontier of / A
free life of freewill for the thrill of your love," Wild Heart is ripe with spectacular
operatics and the imagery is flush with purple hue of nostalgia, "Work will sap
the soul / Hometown haunts what's left / Love will scar the heart." But with all
these rock cliches about drinking, growing up, and falling in love abound, it can
be hard to take such a self-serious album ... well, seriously.
And yet, like The Boss, to level a criticism of melodrama at Japandroids'
high concept rock n' roll misses the point. Grandiosity of poetic device and
image is part of ride, and that sure as hell doesn't make it any less true. If
you're cruising anywhere near to the Wild Heart of Life "amid a waste of wild
air and brackish waters," irony and triviality fly out the window. So go ahead,
dime the amplifiers and, to quote from the same titular Joycean text, "forge in
the smithy of the soul."—Blake Haarstad
LITTLE SPROUT
Little Sprout
(Self-Released)
01 /14/2017
The members of Little Sprout seem shy. Other than the fact that they
just won Shindig (amazing) and that two of the members met on
Tinder (AMAZING), this coyness is one of the few things I could find out
about the band. Little Sprout seem to shun the spotlight. I scoured the internet for something tangible behind their cool exterior. But short of Facebook
stalking, there were few clues as to the personalities and potentially relatable
flaws of the band members. Their twee EP cover features a Cherry Blossom
candy, oozing green slime from its chocolate's cavity. The band mentions in
their short bio that they drew the album art themselves. So clearly, this drawing of a classic Canadian candy that your grandma probably loves, along
with the five songs on their freshly released EP, provide the best clues as to
who Amie, Sean and Reese really are.
A few things stand out as soon as you visit their Bandcamp page and
press play. Amie's jangly guitar and coy vocals propel most of the EP. On
tracks like "Amie You're," for instance, her voice and melodies are maraschino
cherry-sweet, but detached in a style similar to Rilo Kiley's Jenny Lewis. Just
like the front woman every teenage girl wants to be, Amie is ironically upbeat
and unimpressed. When she sings "I am underwhelmed," she sounds it. But
unlike Jenny Lewis, whose song lyrics pander to male fantasy, Amie' sings
about anxiety, binge eating, and occasionally, aliens. Is the green slime inside
the Cherry Blossom really extraterrestial goo? Or does it represent alienation? Her lyrics are neurotic and blunt. She perfectly sums up the experience
of being a millennial with social anxiety on track "No Twins Spirits" when she
sings "I am so jaded but embarrassed by everything."
As a result of this honesty, Little Sprout's self-titled release is reminiscent
of one of my favourite headlines by humour writer Whitney Ralls: "How to
Pass Off Your Crippling Anxiety as Cooler-Than-You Detachment." As someone with debilitating anxiety and a nose ring, it's important to note that I am
not condemning the album, but instead recognizing its honesty and accessibility. Little Sprout is cool on the outside, but weird and shy on the inside.
This album is a peek into their oozing Cherry Blossom centre.
—Sarah Jickling
DOPEY'S ROBE
Dopey's Robe
(Sweety Pie Records)
01 / 09/2017
Since its release in January, I've been really enjoying the self-titled album
from Dopey's Robe. In fact, it's probably my favourite release so far this
year. An enjoyably trippy mixture of surf and psychedelic rock sounds, these
Vancouverites will have you bopping along wherever you listen.
Dopey's Robe has been playing quite a few gigs recently, including cracking performances at Art Signified's 4th anniversary bash and at the Cobalt with
Highland Eyeway. If you spot an upcoming show with these guys on the bill:
go. Since releasing a demo in the summer of 2016, the band is rising quickly.
Dopey's Robe opens strongly with "Psycho." It's clear from the very first
notes what the song is going to be: surf rock. In the very best of this tradition,
there's a lot of energy on the track. With its uptempo, "Psycho" is ideal both
as an album opener and as an introduction to the band.
Though excelling at this surf sound, Dopey's Robe knows better than to
maintain this frenetic tempo throughout. Even acknowledged greats of the
genre, such as the Allah-Lahs or the Mystic Braves, suffer from a lack of variety in their songs. Instead, Dopey's Robe continually switch things up, effectively keeping the listener's interest. Over the course of nine songs, we journey through surf, psych and garage at speeds ranging from the manic to the
syrupy. "Under the Robe" and "One Toke China," for instance, are among the
slower songs, taking the listener into a super-mellow, contemplative daze —
which is quite a striking contrast after some of the speedier tracks.
Discontent with simply switching genres and tempos, Dopey's Robe
also changes vocalists from track to track — an especially effective element during their live performances. This allows the band to explore an even
greater range of sounds and moods on the album.
As is often the case with the genres explored on this record, the listening
experience is trippy and addled. Like some of the best psychedelic rock out
there, the album is a meandering inwards journey. In addition to changes in
UNDER REVIEW speed and style, hazy guitar riffs like those on 'Love Ain't Evil' give the feeling of being in a room heavy with incense. The overall feeling is that there is
some deep truth on offer, but that the listener (or the band) is just too damn
high to define it sharply. My one criticism of this album is that it's not necessarily innovative. Despite that, it is very well put together. The band members know their craft. There's not a bad track on here, and the whole thing
rewards repeated listening. —Tom Ireland
SHH
Be Quite
(Self-Released)
11/06/2016
I hat do I do next?" asks Megan Arnold, the London, Ontario-based
^V%T  artist behind Shhh. on the third track of her latest EP, Be Quite.
This is among the questions which occupy the space of this album. Against
a blurry backdrop, Arnold's vocals rise up to question the indecision and
anxiety that defines modern life. Filled with images of youthful decay, Be
Quite's explores the tension between the complacency of youth and the busy
demands of adult life with subtlety and honesty.
Arnold, like most of us in this day and age, glimpses the uncertainty in the
world. What will happen to us? How can we have control over our own lives?
Do we remember to spend enough time doing things we love with people we
love? It is easy, in the face of this anxiety, to fall into complacency, and let
the world go by.
But Arnold refuses to do so. Where the album begins in a quiet place,
Arnold's vocals ride the music into a passionate crescendo before occupying
the middle space between sleepy mornings and fervid nights. In this, we recognize that extremes are unsustainable, that life is a balance, that we all live
with our regrets and grow from them. Be Quite is a process of maturity.
None of this is to ignore the singular power of each of the songs on this
album. Part of the reason Arnold's work is so successful at eliciting powerful emotional responses is that each song gives a unique insight into these
tensions of modern existence. Life is not a series of vague emotions, but
rather the stories of lived experiences. Arnold's effectiveness at telling these
stories is what enables Be Quite to connect with the listener. We recognize
the desire to lie in bed all day, or eat hot dogs for breakfast, or the regret we
feel at not calling an old friend back. This album does not hide behind vague
proclamations. It takes self-loathing and anxiety head on. This is refreshing.
The world could use a little more honesty. —Joey Doyle
TASHA THE AMAZON
Die Every Day
(The Truth Music Group / Hot Steam
Entertainment)
11/11/2016
Pt the tail end of 2016, Toronto artist Tasha the Amazon, a.k.a Perp
Vonnegut, dropped her debut EP Die Every Day. Although Tasha
has been releasing mixtapes for years, Die Every Day is her first fully-developed project, providing the most pronounced introduction to the emcee's
sound. Tasha's menacing beats and confident lyrics are perfect aggressive
pre-drinking or crushing it at the gym on leg day.
Tasha oozes cool. She co-produced each of the eight tracks in her EP
and effortlessly switches up her vocal cadence within songs. The standout
cut "Picasso Leaning" features a booming bass and snickering hi-hats while
Tasha raps melodically over the beat — a sound characteristic of the Toronto
hip-hop scene.
However, Tasha does not let her city define her music. The chaotic
"Nowhere" (featuring RetcH) strays away from this stereotypical 6ix sound.
This track is soaked in Hennessey and will make the hairs on your neck
stand upright. A dark piano melody and RetcH's gritty feature give the track
its unique flare. "They never should have let us in the building / Come riding
through these streets like some villains / They never should have let us in the
building / Outlaws, blowing holes into the ceiling," raps the emcee, asserting
her dominating presence.
Although the album is hype, the songs are difficult to differentiate. Except
for "Watch it Burn", every track has a BPM in the triple digits. Bold percussion
characterizes each song, and the melodies seem underdeveloped. In spite of
Tasha's undeniable talent, the album offers little outside of club bangers.
All flaws considered, Die Every Day should not be written off. By bulldozing
her way into the Canadian music scene with an arsenal of skills and unshake-
able resolve, Tasha secures herself a place on Canada's ever-growing roster
of young hip-hop artists. —Anya Zoledziowski
Missing and Murdered
(CBC Podcast Series)
Released between October 24, 2016
and December 19, 2016.
MISS NG
& MURDERED
I hat is the best way to discuss murder? Journalistic investigations
^V%T often border on the fetishistic. True-crime TV shows (ie. Cold Case
Files) and podcasts (ie. Serial, Sword and the Scale, Stranglers) painstakingly provide details of violent acts. Emphasis is placed on the murderer and
the corresponding police investigation. Why they killed, how they killed, and
when they killed are fodder for our grotesque curiosity. As a result, killers
are immortalized, while the murdered face one final indignity: they dissolve
further into invisibility.
Missing and Murdered: Who Killed Alberta Williams? works against this
neglect. In an eight part podcast, journalist Connie Walker investigates the
1989 murder of a young indigenous woman. A desire to unsilence the past
drives Walker. Like many other slain indigenous women, the death of Alberta
Williams was met with indifference. Found along the highway of tears in
Prince Rupert, the investigation floundered and eventually collapsed, remaining unsolved.
In the early episodes, Walker directs her energy towards memorializing
Alberta. Interviews with relatives and friends sketch an image of a vivacious
young woman. Her dreams of completing nursing school, her desire to live in
Vancouver, all her fears and anxieties are laid before the listener with a tender
frankness. Absent are descriptions of the violence she faced. Instead, Alberta's
death is framed by the heartbreak of loved-ones.
Yet for all of the focus on Alberta, we are still made to understand her
murder as emblematic. Other families have suffered in eerily similar ways.
From 1969 to 2011, twenty one women have been found along the same
stretch of British Columbia highway. Like a good historian, Walker explains
something vast and complex through a singular case. Through exploring
Alberta's death we see its basis. A legacy of Canadian institutionalized racism, a distrust of the RCMP and the disinterest of the public have cultivated
a culture of abuse.
Even when her investigation ramps up, Walker abstains from judgement.
She maintains the air of a proper historian. The prime suspect is met with
pity. Just like Alberta, the murderer exists within a web of historical trauma.
Though actions appear singular, nothing occurs in a bubble. Blood splatters,
soaking all. —Maximilian Anderson-Baier
/ consideration in Discorder Mag-
az/neand online, please send a physical copy to the station
addressed to Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Under Review
Editor at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd.,
Vancouver BC, V6T1Z1. Though our contributors prioritize
physical copies, you may email download codes to under-
review.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums sent prior to
their official release dates.
Under Review is also expanding to include independent
films, books and podcasts. Feel free to submit those, too.
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UNDER REVIEW Mon, Dec 19, 2016 at 8:28 AM
Andrew Lee
To: Angela Seo
IN CONVERSATION
ANDREW YONG HOON & ANGELA SEO
illustrations by Dana Kearley
Andrew is a Vancouver based artist who performs under the moniker Holy Hum.
Angela is a Los Angeles based artist who performs in the band Xiu Xiu.
What follows is an excerpt of a conversation that took place over the fall of 2016 into the winter of 2017.
Mon, Jan 30, 2017 at 9:15 PM
Angela Seo
To: Andrew Lee
I'm not sure what my purpose is at this exact moment. But what is meaningful and important in
my life has been made clear and that includes my family and friends and then after that I would
say my art. I like what Robert Filliou said: "Art is what makes life more interesting than art."
Maybe at one point when I was younger I thought that art was everything and that I was ready
to suffer for it. Now I'm like: give me life, give me food and then maybe I'll make some art.
You have a very strong sense of aesthetic. What type of role do you play in Xiu Xiu?
Tue, Dec 27, 2016 at 11:13 AM
Angela Seo
To: Andrew Lee
In many ways, the music and identity of Xiu Xiu is firmly entrenched within Jamie's identity. He
is the founding and only consistent member, and in fact, he is Xiu Xiu. It wouldn't exist without
him.
That being said, it's a very fluid working process with Jamie and I weave in and out
at all stages to tamper with the sounds, textures, and structures of the songs. I also help with
editing, mixing, designing the album art and layout, and making music videos. I play in some
shows, not all, because I have another job, and help review contracts / biz stuff for the band too
(I practiced law for a bit).
I have a different approach to and varying tastes in music / art than Jamie, so it's
an interesting dynamic. But I've worked with Jamie long enough to understand his goals,
strengths, tendencies, and aesthetic, which helps me to see what he's trying to achieve and
how to push certain things to get there.
Thu, Jan 26, 2017 at 11:15 AM
Andrew Lee
To: Angela Seo
My collaborators are almost always my friends. Or people that I want to be friends with. Ryan
Flowers, Rob Tornroos, and Ash Poon are all people that I met in high school and who I still
make music with today. Khan Lee, who is a jack of all trades, is someone who I work with a
lot of the time on art projects and installations. And my partner Jacq is is often the person I
am bouncing ideas off of and she is definitely the person that gets asked, "Which do you like
better? A or B?"
I wanted to ask you about how you were feeling and what you are thinking about
post inauguration. The Women's March in my opinion was a great first response and it helped
remind me that I am not in isolation feeling scared for the future and that there are good people
who do care about social and political justice. I marched in Vancouver with my partner and my
in-laws alongside over 15,000 other people and I felt for the first time in the last six months
that we weren't going to get swallowed up into a void of some Orwellian nightmare. The
march itself, I realized, was not perfect. But what was encouraging was that it was a peaceful
demonstration/protest and that it was multigenerational.
I've been struggling to find the right words that say everything I mean. All the fear, anger,
sadness, hope, despair, absurdity. Nothing really seems to have weight enough when the
scales are already so loaded.
I am also finding it hard to speak as words seem so easily manipulated and
truth often useless in this age of post-truths and alternative facts. There's so much talk of
revolutions, resistance, nazis, fascism and it is so difficult to feel so much, and not react and
speak emotionally. It pushes me to be mindful, if not vigilant, with my words and intentions.
I want a revolution. But I am not going to call mere reactions and sporadic acts of
protest a revolution. I want progress. But no matter how much we regress, a mere return to
status quo will not be progress.
I think this is why although I am lifted by the massive protests, and incredibly grateful of
continuous and active resistance, I am wary of exaggerating the significance of these actions into
a revolution. Instead, in these times, it seems to be a necessary and vital act of humanity.
That being said, shit's fucking crazy.
I hope we get a revolution.
What's it like looking in Canada — especially as such close neighbors?
Wed, Feb 1, 2017 at 8:31 PM
Andrew Lee
To: Angela Seo
I think that Canada's problems are much more acute and in a sense hiding out in plain site. At
least in Vancouver I don't think we are afraid to erode or erase any semblance of our ancestral
histories as long as we put up a plaque or a monument in its place. The city that I live in
currently is built upon unceded Coast Salish lands and while there have been small steps to
acknowledge this we still don't have a problem building pipelines on sacred land as long as we
are putting up totem poles at the same time. The hypocrisy is real and in plain site.
Can I ask what you're doing to get yourself through these dark and depressing
times? I haven't really felt that creative and it also feels a bit futile right now to drop a single
from my new record when everything else seems not as important at the moment and
somehow being an artist feels even more self indulgent than it already is. What should I do?
Do you think there is any merit in creating something that might potentially be an escape for
yourself and for someone else?
Tue, Feb 7, 2017 at 10:17 AM
Angela Seo
To: Andrew Lee
I definitely struggle with seeming irrelevant. When things are so grave, nothing can really seem
meaningful enough. However, making music or art at this time isn't meaningless or simply an
escape. It is a way of engaging. Even if it does not explicitly address the most salient political
events of our time, that doesn't mean art does not matter. This way of thinking is why arts
funding and programs are so often the first to be cut. Yet these are the mediums through which
we can learn and practice empathy, compassion, and love. It is also a way we can express
anger, fear, and despair while still adding to the beauty and joy of the world. Not much else can
be so ugly and yet so beautiful.
y
IN CONVERSATION: HOLY HUM & XIU XIU
^ < RESPONSE
PITCHFORK'S "DOES COLLEGE RADIO EVEN MATTER
ANYMORE?"
words  by  Cob  Wickers  and Troy  Coy
Editor's Note: In Response is a new Discorder column that directly responds to another piece
of writing or broadcasting. For this first one, the article is in response to "Does College Radio Even
Matter Anymore?" by Kevin Lozano, published to pitchfork.com February 8, 2017.
ams
ELECTIONS
^^M  '11 start by saying that the Pitchfork
I  article is written within the context
^^  of an American regulatory / broadcast landscape, and I am speaking within
the context of a Canadian regulatory landscape — there are differences between the
two, perhaps some of them so longstanding and systemic that they would actually
change the underlying purpose of Campus
and Community Media in the United
States versus Canada. Even with that said,
I know that American cultural imperialism and the impact of their cultural institutions is quite potent. I know that
while the Pitchfork article may be written in a U.S. context, it is quite possible
that its implications could move beyond
borders and seep into general consciousness elsewhere. In fact, at the time I am
writing this, the article has already been
shared on the Canadian National Campus
Radio Association email list-serv. In the
case of "Does College Radio Even Matter
Anymore?," the title alone is detrimental
to Campus / Community Media everywhere.
That part isn't great. So someone should
interject, and perhaps the new digital social
mechanisms will allow for this interjection
to be shared.
Plain and simple, to correlate the relevance of Campus / Community Media
with the ability of labels like Sub Pop to
use them as vehicles to sell their particular
brand of cultural product, is a bad call. This
is an unfortunate thought / consequence of
a time in the late '80s and early '90s when
the U.S. music industry leveraged Campus /
Community broadcasters to sell their brand
of cool. Not to say that it sucked that independent artists found success within the
campus radio environment in their "heyday," as defined by Conde Nast for this article, because that success propelled them
to more national and international recognition. I am also not saying it is bad that
independent labels benefitted immensely
by utilizing Campus / Community Media
networks. I will say that at the end of this
"heyday," the people who benefited the
most were the largest, most intensely capitalistic organizations, mostly through the
exploitation of Nirvana-style counterculture, like the article notes.
One could argue that in 2007, the role
of websites like Pitchfork in the music industry mirrored the role that Campus /
Community Media played in the late '80s
and early '90s, with the distinction that
Pitchfork is owned by Conde Nast. Campus
/ Community Media has never had to deal
with the undeniable pressure that exists
from being a subsidiary of a giant Media
conglomerate, and the profit motives associated with that. The reason I bring
that up is because it sheds light on why
the metrics of listeners and the music
industry's use of statistics is so strong
in Pitchfork's article — Pitchfork itself
derives relevance from analytics. They
probably base their business plan on it.
Circling back, it's fine that artists
found success through Campus /
Community broadcasters in the
'80s / '90s, but to tether their relevance and the relevance of community
access to media in 2017 to a point of
time 30+ years ago is a huge mistake.
The article definitely alludes to the idea
that Campus / Community Media is a
training ground and place of empowerment, but those mentions are sparse.
The majority of the article focuses on
how industry representatives interpret
the relevancy of Campus / Community
Media, statistics about listenership, and
qualitative experiences of people who
are established — are these the people
to talk to about community media?
Campus / Community Media does not
cede to the idea that success is defined
by the quantitative factors that corporate media is driven by. It does not
attempt to achieve those goals, hence
why it does not achieve those goals, and
also why it doesn't care about achieving
those goals. Most corporate media organizations (social media included) have
become glorified advertising agencies,
with their main motivations to collect and commodify listeners / readers
/ 'likers,' and sell them to the highest
corporate bidder. Campus / Community
Media rejects that model.
If Pitchfork actually wanted to write an
article about whether campus radio matters, it would ask Campus / Community
Media about how it envisions their roles
in a media environment that is increasingly corporate (through conglomerates
like Conde Nast) and democratic (through
sharing on corporate social media platforms), but decreasingly funded regionally
and nationally.
The empowerment of people through
providing open access to media,
media literacy, and the production
training that community media provides,
is the correct way of measuring its success.
Campus / Community Media provides a
framework for marginalized voices to gain
the skills to actively participate in media.
Those perspectives are not represented by
corporate media, and the Pitchfork article fails to acknowledge that. 'Success' for
community media has little to do with the
Conde Nast version of 'hip' or 'Best New
Music' label, and everything to do with
trying to provide a space for discussion,
whether that be on FM, web-streamed, or
in print. Campus / Community Media is
intentional space for learning, exploring
* I v
MARCH 6-10
AMS EXECUTIVES
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
SENATE
STUDENT LEGAL FUND SOCIETY
www.ams.ubc.ca/elections
and sharing. An unintentional consequence
is that Campus / Community Media can
be considered a vehicle for music industry
profit, but that is not why it exists.
This is also not a straight condemnation
of all of the content that Pitchfork puts out.
It is now 2017, mainstream media coverage
is becoming more diverse, and traditionally
marginalized voices are becoming more centred, for this we are grateful. I believe many
of the journalists that write for Pitchfork really do care for positive social change. That
said, an article on Pitchfork can be stopped,
changed, or removed if the article does not
align well enough with the profit motive of
Conde Nast — that subconscious organizational censorship is real.
It would be unnecessarily confrontational to negate something covered by
Pitchfork because it represents a cultural
product that feeds a particular group of
consumers. Independent artists, musicians, activists, journalist, DJs, etc., are the
cultural producers that Pitchfork sometimes
promotes — and their success is ours.
The higher levels of cultural / social capital afforded to people featured on Pitchfork
has material manifestations in the form
of money, and if that money goes to the
independent producers of content, that's
great. The music industry value chain may
siphon profits meant for cultural producers, but that also isn't totally a bad thing.
It can be positive if the money goes to
smaller press companies, booking agencies, venues, etc., that distribute these
profits to everyday people, as opposed to
hyper-wealthy CEOs.
I am trying not to demonize Pitchfork,
because it has helped a lot of people and
brought some important opinions to the
forefront in its history. However, I think
it is important that us as readers, and as
commodified cultural consumers, continue to critique and contextualize the
content that we are spoon-fed, especially
when it questions the value of Campus /
Community Media for clickbait.
IN RESPONSE: TO PITCHFORK saw em
"^B^B^B   hen I meet Daniel and
I  Dina of Can't Lit in
^Hj^Br    Daniel's apartment
in Mount Pleasant I am nervous,
given the stereotype I've been accustomed to concerning writers,
poets and the like. I'm worried
that I won't appear as intellectual
or well-spoken as two published
and praised authors. However,
this concern quickly fades as I
begin chatting with the duo. The
lighthearted and jovial atmosphere of Can't Lit definitely reflects the spirits of the two hosts.
I catch up with Daniel and Dina
before they record another episode
of their podcast in between shared
belly-laughs. Daniel drops a
phrase that captures the nature of
their recordings: "We're not like,
Canadian polite."
Daniel Zomparelli, editor and
chief of Poetry is Dead magazine
and Dina Del Bucchia, author of
Coping with Emotions and Otters'
collaborative podcast are bringing
accessibility and a more personable
CAN'T LIT
approach to Canadian literature. A monthly podcast started
in 2014 with a growing listener-
ship, Can't Lit aims to shed light
on conversations that haven't had
adequate exposure, and to showcase the goofy side of the literature sphere. Some of their previous
guests include Amber Dawn, Jillian
Christmas, Adele Barclay, and
Michael Christie.
Can't Lit serves to bridge the
gap between authors and their
audiences, and to initiate broader,
less insular conversations with
the featured authors. "Canadian
literature is like any other cultural phenomenon," explains
Daniel, "it has all of those faults
too, so without displaying these
conversations ... how white
Canadian literature can be, how
heteronormative it can be, a mask
is formed of what literature is."
Can't Lit is "a podcast about
books and stuff," with an emphasis on the "and stuff." "Writing's
not just about breaking down the
scan of a line or sentence structure or story structure, it's about
so much more ... and there's so
much more to the community,"
remarks Dina. Often, guests on
the show will discuss their own
work, but will also expand upon
their tastes and interests in and
outside literature, broadening
the scope of discussion beyond
literature alone. "It's important
because people are having these
conversations like the ones we're
having in the podcast, but they're
not recording them. We're able
to create some sort of a record of
what's going on in Canadian literature," adds Daniel.
By placing emphasis on the
more relatable, less academic
perspectives on literature, Can't
Lit follows a similar mandate to
Daniel's project, Poetry is Dead:
"If it's not fun, don't do it." Can't
Lit is one solution addressing the
problem of framing Canadian
literature in an inaccessible and
pedagogic way.
"^B^P^PJ   hen asked about the
I   importance of pod-
^■J^Br    casting, Dina responds, "It's about the type of
voice you can use on the podcast,
versus the voice you can use in
the page, versus the voice you can
use on a national radio broadcast." Daniel adds, "Canadian
literature can be very stuffy, and
part of that is self-seriousness...
we wanted a space for people to
be goofy and weird."
As far as what Dina and Daniel
want to see change in Canadian
literature, they arrive at a unanimous conclusion: more diversity
and less seriousness. "Everyone
wants to see the same version
of Canadian literature that's
so clean, I want to see messier
things," remarks Daniel.
From the "no fun city," Dina
and Daniel want to shift the literature landscape to reveal the
very unpretentious and cheerful side of what can be seen as an
affected art form. Speaking to the
seriousness of Canadian literature, Daniel confirms that often
"the books that don't make the
bestseller list or win awards don't
get exposure and are constantly
ignored."
Can't Lit is striving to make
it known that content creators
and authors aren't strictly limited the pages of a book. Authors
who use Twitter for daily doses of
poetic one-liners, or Instagram
to express hilarious takes on the
merging of fashion and book covers simply don't get coverage. As
a result, readers have a stale and
inaccurate image of what the literature community is all about.
Without a celebration of the fun
and the weird happenings in
Canadian literature, readers are
often left out of the discussions
that authors are actually having.
I leave Dina and Daniel after a
series of laughs and rants about
the insularity of Canadian literature. Our conversation felt like
speaking with friends, similar to
the atmosphere of their podcast.
Can't Lit is truly a behind-the-
scenes and "after the reading
drinks" approach to exploring
Canadian literature.
Visit cantlit.ca for archived episodes
0/Can't Lit and bonus features, and
follow @cantlit on Twitter for all the
instant witticisms. NO FUN FICTION
THE SUN & THE MOON
words  by Amy  Stewart  //   illustrations  by Dana Kearley
The one thing I never
counted on in my life was
that a memory could be
altered in retrospect. I always
thought that the recollection
was safe once its corresponding event had unraveled, ready
to be tucked away neatly in the
brain's warm and fleshy folds. I
was under the impression that
no matter what might happen to
a person next, whatever misfortunes might befall them, at least
their memories would be pristine
and untouched. It appears now
that I was wrong.
I stand alone at my father's
wake. I'm vaguely aware of distant relatives and forgotten friends
clutching at my elbows, but I can't
be bothered to think of words to
say, let alone give them breath.
I have stopped what I was doing to stare at my brother. He is
handsome and resplendent, even
in the face of our father's untimely death. All day he has been
the circulating sun in this gloomy
room. People's faces spark with
cheer when they see him - they
seem privileged to bask in his
warmth. And if he is the sun,
then I am surely the moon;
harping darkly in the background, any light I bring cold and
uncomfortable.
It has always been so. Growing
up, we trailed my father's career as
a translator around the world, the
stage dressing of my early years
changing every few seasons. First,
a crumbling apartment in Venice,
then a cold farmhouse in England,
and lastly, a tired condo in
Vancouver. Wherever we went, my
brother shone like a sunbeam, attracting giggling gaggles of friends
while I hovered on his periphery.
I would stare at my brother, trying to glean some reflected charm,
some measure of warmth.
However, I am staring at him
now because he is speaking
French. Some of my father's old
work colleagues are here, and my
brother has graciously engaged
them in conversation in their
native tongue. There would be
nothing wrong with this, nothing
unusual at all, if it weren't for a
memory that comes pricking at my
consciousness like a stomach ache.
me, my father and my
brother, sitting in
the living room of
that old English farmhouse one
particularly brutal winter. My
father had just returned from
a trip to Paris, and was experiencing a funny kind of language
hangover; French words just kept
spilling out of his mouth. They
were strange, exotic music to our
childish ears, and slippery as they
were, we tried to capture them in
our mouths. We tried to conquer
them, and my father tried to help.
Of course, my brother took to
this easily. The words came to
him fully formed and perfect,
mythical creatures made real,
while I remained stuttering and
awkward. My brother talked over
me, and I gave up; I remember
tears stinging my eyes as he perfectly pronounced "je m'appelle"
over and over again.
And so it surprised me when
my father said; "You haven't
quite got it, son. Listen to your
sister; her intonation is perfect." They shared a funny look,
my father's eyes all narrowed
and beady, and my brother's
wide and staring. Not the type
to not be good at something, my
brother got up and left the room,
pretending to be bored, while I
soared like a child pushed forward on a bicycle. The only reason I am still proficient in French
today is that somewhere, deep
down, I believed that it gave me
some edge over my brother in my
father's eyes.
I had always thought that, since
that day, my brother had left the
tangled French words alone. That
he'd relegated the language to being my thing,
not his. But there he
stands, speaking very, very
good French. He catches
my eye, and a smile plays
on his lips - not a smug
one, not even a happy one.
Just one that knows.
It makes the old memory spin once more in my
mind, and I understand it
anew. That look between
my father and my brother
- I understood its importance, but not its meaning. It did not say, "This
is your sister's thing." It said
"This could be your sister's thing.
You, who have everything, should
let her have something."
I can see the lie. Of course, I
can see the lie. But I also see the
kindness. I see the sun dimming
and stepping aside, so that the
moon might shine bright.
Amy Stewart is an aspiring author
and freelance copywriter on a round
the world trip. Originally from the
UK, she's currently living and working in Vancouver. You can read more
of her work and stories from her
travels at bambi-jane.co.uk.
C1TR101.9FM and Discorder Magazine
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March 9-17
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NO FUN FICTION: THE SUN & THE MOON ON THE AIR
WHITE NOISE
interview by Sophie Gray // illustration Neetu Dha
photo by Emmanuel Etti
T
his February marked two years on air at CiTR for White Noise,
the weekly comedy show written and produced by Simon
W^Welton. Hosted by the fictional Richard Blackmore, played by
Welton himself, the sketch comedy show features the voices of a team
of actors from the UBC community. Welton sat down with me to chat
about how it all began, and where he sees the show heading.
Discorder Magazine: how did white mise get started at
CiTR?
SlMON WELTON: I started out doing comedy and standup
about six years ago ... I decided to go to UBC and study philosophy. While doing this, I was writing scripts and looking
for ways to get [my writing] out there. I realized [radio sketch
comedy] was probably a good way to do it because it's cheap to
make, and doesn't require props. I heard about the radio station through a friend, and I was like, "yeah, this could be a really effective way to do what I want to do," so I made a pilot.
DM: Where did the name White Noise come from?
SW: Originally, the show was Richard Blackmore, the [fictional] host, gathering radio clips from around the world and
presenting them on his show. So, I, [playing Blackmore,]
would introduce each sketch like 'this is a radio piece from
Australia' and then host it. The idea was that [Blackmore] was
sorting out from the white noise these elements of radio and
bringing them to you. So that's where the name came from.
DM: Who is on the White Noise team?
SW: I've got a good team at the moment,
which is Connor Nechelput and Sierra Whylie,
who've been there since the start. Caitlin
Docking has been with us for about a year.
Last year I was looking for another girl so I
had open auditions. I didn't really get anyone I liked besides this guy Ken, who actually
plays girls really well! So, we've dressed him
in a lot of wigs. That's Kenneth Tynan, and
then Nick Rinke is the other guy.
DM: What are some of your favourite
shows that you've done with this team?
SW: I'm pretty proud of the special we
did [February 15], ...  It's a film noir play
about existentialist ideas. It's about two con
men who try to con an elderly lady, set in
1940s New York. What they don't realize is
she knows they're full of shit right away, but
rather than kicking them out, she's really
lonely, so she holds them there to try and have a conversation.
Obviously, they don't like that, so she pulls a gun on them and
literally holds them at gunpoint to have a chat with her! It becomes this whole thing about isolation, and are we bound by
our circumstances or can we rise above it? Stuff like that I'm
pretty happy with.
DM: Where do you see the show going from here? Would
you pass it on to one of the team members?
S W: It was originally my idea and my little project, so even
though it is a group project, it still feels like it's my baby, you
know? So, I'd like to take the name with me and maybe keep it
as a production company name or something like that for the
future. It's funny because we have built up a bit of a following
and a bit of a brand, so it'd be hard to walk away from it.
DM: Are you going to continue with broadcasting at CiTR
and writing radio comedy?
SW: I'm finished university at the end of the summer, so
definitely going until then. After that, my plan is to move to
Toronto to become a writer. This is something that [the team
has] been thinking about a lot lately. Part of me doesn't want
to just stop doing it because we've got a good team and we
have a lot of fun, but I don't know. At the moment, I'm pretty
keen to go somewhere fresh and see what happens.
5i>
White Noise broadcasts on CiTR 101.9FM
or live-streams at citr.ca every Wednesday
between g-iopm. You can also listen to archived episodes and subscribe to the podcast
by visiting citr.ca/radio/white-noise.
check cxncnKCMHmmm®imG£\mi§>
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ON THE AIR: WHITE NOISE cm* ioi.9fm imoGHTim gujdb
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8 PM
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11PM
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"DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERYDAY" ■ MONDAY
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM, ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththe-
browns@hotmail.com
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
11AM-12PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
second season! The team
of Indigenous and non-
Indigenous peeps produce the
show weekly. We talk about
Indigenous issues, current
events, and entertainment
centering Native voices through
interviews and the arts. Come
make Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Follow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves/
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE BURROW
3PM-4PM, rock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
department manager Andy
Resto, the Burrow is Noise
Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock,
with a nice blend of old
classics' and new releases.
Interviews & Live performances.
Contact: music@citr.ca
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
4PM-5PM,JAZZ
Host Jade spins old recordings
of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies and motown.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
UBC ARTS ON AIR
ALTERNATING MON. 6:30-7PM, TALK/
ACADEMIA
Provocative interviews expert
commentary and the latest
updates from Faculty of Arts
make for engaging segments
with UBC's top writers,
philosophers, researchers,
singers, and actors in the
Humanities & Social Sciences,
Creative & Performing Arts.
Contact: artsonair.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television, along
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks,
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FINDINGTHE FUNNY
6PM - 7PM, talk/comedy
Finding the Funny is a variety
show with host Nico McEown &
special guests who talk comedy.
What makes us laugh, and
why? What separates the best
of the best from all the rest?
Every episode you hear great
jokes and bits from both famous
and unknown comedians.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TUESDAY
THESCREEN GIRLS
12AM-1AM, HIP HOP/R&B/ SOUL
The Screen Girls merge music
and art with discussions of
trends and pop culture, and
interviews with artists in
contemporary art, fashion and
music. We play a variety of
music, focusing on promoting
Canadian hip hop and R&B.
Contact: info@thescreengirls.com
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6AM-8AM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
8am-io:30am, talk/politics
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver,
Queer FM features music,
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact: queerfmvancouver@
gmail.com
FEMCONCEPT
A show comprised entirely
of Femcon* music and
discussions of women's
rights and social justice
issues. Featuring all genres
of music, with an emphasis
on local and Canadian artists
and events in Vancouver.
•"Femcon" is defined as
music with someone who
self-identifies as female in 2/4
categories: music composition,
lyric composition, performance,
or recording engineering.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SOULIVERSE RADIO
11AM-12PM, HIP HOP /R&B / SOUL
R&B focused radio show
playing songs from the 90's
to today! New episodes
every Tuesday at 11AM.
Twitter | @Souliverse_604
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
12PM-1PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music,
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
THE PERMANENT RAIN RADIO
1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join co-hosts Chloe and
Natalie lighthearted twin talk
and rad tunes from a variety
of artists. For more info, go to
thepermanentrainpress.com
Contact: theprpress@hotmail.com
PARTICLES & WAVES
2PM-3PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Like the quantum theory it
is named for, Particles and
Waves defies definition. Join
Mia for local indie, sci-fi prog
rock, classic soul, obscure
soundtracks, Toto's deep
cuts, and much more.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RADIO FREETHINKER
3PM-4PM, talk/criticism
Promoting skepticism,critical
thinking and science, we
examine popular thought and
extraordinary claims, and
submit them to critical analysis.
Contact: info@radiofreethinker.
com
TEXTBOOK
4PM-5PM, TALK/STORYTELLING
Textbook (FKA The Student
Special Hour) is a show
about students by students
hosted by Josh Gabert-Doyon,
CiTR's student programming
coordinator. There are three
segments: Feature interview,
student storytelling, & "Tell
Me About Your Paper".
Contact: outreach@citr.ca
DISCORDER RADIO
5PM-6PM, ECLECTIC, TALK
Produced by the Discorder
On Air collective, this show
covers content in the magazine
and beyond. Coordinated by
Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse,
and Jordan Wade. Get in
touch to get involved!
Contact: discorder.radio@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6PM-8PM, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
INSIDE OUT
8PM-9PM, dance/electronic
Tune in weekly for dance music!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
9PM-11PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles,
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels,
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.
com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
2PM-3PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
The CiTR Music department
program, highlighting the
newest/fresh est cuts from the
station's bowels. Featuring live
interviews and performances
from local artists.
Contact: music@citr.ca
KEW IT UP
3PM-4PM, experimental/ talk
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica,
Post-Punk, Industrial,
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
VIBES AND STUFF
4PM-5PM, hip hop/ r&b/ soul
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and
Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to
contemporary hip-hop artists
all in one segment. DJ Bmatt
& Dak Genius will have you
reminiscing about the good
ol' times with Vibes and Stuff
every week! skrt skrt.
Contact: vibesandstuffhiphop@
gmail.com
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, talk/ arts & CULTURE
The one and only student run
arts and culture radio show in
Vancouver, Arts Report brings
you the latest in local arts!
Your show hosts Ashley and
Christine provide a weekly
dose of reviews, interviews,
and special segments.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
INNER SPACE
6:30PM-8pm, electronic/dance
Dedicated to underground
electronic music, both
experimental and dance-
oriented. Live DJ sets and
guests throughout.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
6:30PM-8pm, rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins,
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, HIP HOP/R&B/SOUL
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
WHITE NOISE
9PM-10PM, talk/sketch comedy
Join Richard Blackmore for half
an hour of weird and wonderful
sketch comedy, as he delves
into the most eccentric corners
of radio. Then stay tuned for
the after show featuring Simon
and Connor who make sense
of it all, with the occasional
interjection of quality music.
Contact: whitenoiseUBC@
gmail.com
THE HEADQUARTERS
10PM-11PM, HIP hop/ r&b/ soul
The Headquarters for
Vancouver's undercover
scene. Hang with Young
Emma, she knows what's up.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK/SPORTS
Chase takes you into the
locker rooms of UBC for talk
with varsity athletes, coaches,
and UBC staff on everything
but sports. The Thunderbird
Locker Room gives you a
backroom perspective.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSDAY
SPICY BOYS
12AM-1AM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
Playing music and stuff.
You can listen.
Or don't.
It's up to you.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture,
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
8AM-9AM, TALK/POLITICS
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news,
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse@canadaland-
show.com
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
9AM-10AM, talk/accessibility
This show is produced
by and for the disabled
community. We showcase
BC Self Advocates and
feature interviews with people
with special needs. Hosted
by Kelly Raeburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and friends.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
11AM-12PM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new,
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com
rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com,
@tima_tzar,
facebook.com/RocketFromRussia
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.word-
press.com
K-CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean,
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
2PM-3PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
The Accessibility Collective
radio show! They talk equity,
inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse
abilities, on and off campus.
Tune in for interviews, music,
news, events, & dialogue.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
3-3:30PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
3:30-4PM, talk/sports
Your weekly roundup of
UBC Thunderbird sports
action from on campus and
off with your hosts Jason
Wang and Timothy Winter.
Contact: sports@citr.ca
SIMORGH
4PM-5PM, TALK/STORYTELLING
Simorgh Radio is devoted
to education and literacy for
Persian speaking communities.
Simorgh the mythological
multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-
in as your mythological narrator
in the storyland; the contingent
space of beings, connecting
Persian peoples within and
to Indigenous peoples.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BABE WAVES
5PM-6PM, TALK/CULTURAL criticism
Babe Waves is CiTR's Gender
Empowerment Collective show.
Jazzed women-identifying and
non-binary folks sit around
and talk music, art, politics,
current events and much more.
Tune in, follow us on social
media, and get involved!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
facebook.com/citrbabewaves
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM-7:30,
ECLECTIC
Celebrating the message
behind the music. Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SOUL SANDWICH
8PM-9PM, HIP HOP/R&B/SOUL
A myriad of your favourite
genres all cooked into one
show. From Hip Hop to Indie
rock to African jams, Rohit
and Ola will play it all, in a
big soulful sandwich. This
perfect layering of yummy
goodness will blow your mind.
AND, it beats Subway.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
R.I.P. RADIO
alternating thurs, 8pm-9pm,
talk/hip hop/r&b/soul
R.I.P. Radio brings deceased
artists back into the spotlight
and to reveal the world of
budding artists standing
on the shoulders of these
musical giants. Each episode
is a half-hour journey back
from the musical grave.You'll
want to stay alive for it.
Contact: Instagram, @rip.radio
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
I FRIDAY
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance,
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact: auraltentacles@hotmail.
com
CITED
8AM-9AM, talk/academia
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact: facebook.com/citedpod-
cast, Twitter | @citedpodcast
WIZE MEN
9AM-10AM, rock/pop/indie
Watch and wonder as Austin
begins to unravel the intricate
world of environmental
science right in front of your
earz. Austin's taste in music
has been praised among the
deities as the finest and most
refined in all the land. So trust
in Austin as you surrender your
ears every Friday morning.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
10AM-11AM, rock/pop/indie
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery, and a lil dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact: daveradiopodcast@
gmail.com
FRESH SLICE
1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Tunes are hot and fresh.
Talk is cheesey. Pop,
rock, DIY, pop-punk.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RADIO ZERO
2PM-3:30PM
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams
from New Wave to foreign
electro, baile, Bollywood,
and whatever else.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30pm-5pm, music/interviews
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact: http://nardwuar.com/rad/
contact/
NEWS 101
5PM-6PM, talk/news
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and
community newscast. Fridays
tune in to hear an independent
perspective of what's going on
in the world. News 101 covers
current affairs ranging from
the local to the international.
Contact: news@citr.ca
QUESTION EVERYTHING
7pm-7:30pm, talk/interviews
Question Everything focuses
on providing inspiration and
advice to young leaders who
are in the early phases of their
careers. Each week, we bring
you inspiration and insights
from creative minds and
experts in entrepreneurship,
publishing, and design.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30pm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
national
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop,
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings,
poetry recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post-Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock,
drone, ambient, experimental,
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, eclectic/live
INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact: vancouvermedicine-
show@gmail.com
■ SATURDAY
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, which progresses
to Industrial, Noise and
Alternative No Beat into the
early morning. We play TZM
broadcasts, starting at 6am.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31st year on CiTR,
The Saturday Edge is my
personal guide to world &
roots music, with African,
Latin and European music
in the first half, followed by
Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact: crashnburnradio@
yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll
like it. Sonic assault provided
by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, electronic/mantra/
NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary,
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats,
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmail.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7PM-8PM, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy,
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker,
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmail.com
SOCA STORM
8PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoM #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
8bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era -1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ SUNDAY
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
7AM-9AM, experimental/difficult
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPAN© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter I @BEPICRE-
SPAN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
9AM-10AM, CLASSICAL
From the Ancient World to
the 21 st century, join host
Marguerite in exploring and
celebrating classical music
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM, INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cowshit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock,
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmail.com ,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds,
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmail.
com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, ELECTRONIC/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver,
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
Contact: djsmileymike@trancen-
dance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS,
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points,
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ ISLAND OF
LOST TOVS
STUDENT FILL IN
ECLECTIC
A place for experimentation
& learning!
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
Is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees. CiTR 101.9FM FEBRUARY CHARTS
WE KN0WH0WT0 PICK 'EM
LIVE AT THE WISE HALL
MARCH EVENTS SCHEDULE 2017
FRIDAY
MARCH 3
MONDAY
MARCH 27
THURSDAY
MARCH 30
EVERY
MONDAY
OLD TIME DANCE PARTY
MONTHLY SQUARE DANCE
SATURDAY
MARCH 4
A VARIETY OF QUEERS
BENEFIT CONCERT
TUESDAY
MARCH 7
UPSTREAM VOICES
Stop Petronas LNG! Defend Wild Salmon!
THURSDAY
MARCH 9
VIPER CENTRAL
LOUNGE WARM-UP SERIES
SATURDAY
MARCH 11
Carole Peee
arid Eae Spccn
WEDNESDAY
MARCH 15
EAST SIDE BEER, FEST
THURSDAY
MARCH 16
VIPER CENTRAL
LOUNGE WARM-UP SERIES
FRIDAY
MARCH 17
AnrauaL WISE St. Paddy's Day bash with
Shane's Teeth
(Tm'bafe to The Pogaes)
SATURDAY
MARCH 18
SCREAMING CHICKENS THEATRICAL SOCIETY
Taeoo Revue
SUNDAY
MARCH 19
R£S€ COUSINS
WITH SPECIAL GUEST PORT CITIES
THURSDAY
MARCH 23
THREE FOR        with BLUE MOON MARQUEE
SILVER            and THE BURyiNG GROUND
FRIDAY
MARCH 24
JESSE WALDMAN cd release show
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS SHRINKING MOUNTAIN
SATURDAY
MARCH 25
VIPER CENTRAL
ALBUM RELEASE SHOW (PLUS 1973 NFB DOCUMENTARY "EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT")
SUNDAY
MARCH 26
Robt Sarazin Blake
Recitative album release show featuring Noah Walker
YOUTH POETRY
FEATURING
SAWDUST COLLECTIVE PRESENTS
INHABITANTS • LEAH ABRAMSON • WAXWING
PETUNJft ftND THE VJPERS
MONDAYS IN THE WISE LOUNGE
1882 ADANAC STREET (AT VICTORIA DRIVE)
WWW.WISEHALL.CA    (804) 254-5858 UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
Mar 1
TENNIS
The Biltmore
Mar 4      Mar 11
MOON DUO  I VALLIS ALPS
The Cobalt   Alexander
Mar 12
THE WOOD BROTHERS
Imperial
Mar 16
THE INTERNET
Imperial
Mar 17
M0
Vogue Theatre
Mar 18
JOSEPH
The Biltmore
Mar 18
CLAP YOUR HANDS SAY YEAH
Imperial
Mar 19
FUCKED UP
The Cobalt
Mar 22
ISAIAH RASHAD
Fortune
Mar  22
XENIA RUBINOS
Alexander
Mar 25
TEENAGE FANCLUB
Rickshaw Theatre
Apr 7
MITSKI
The Biltmore
Mar 22
STRFKR
Imperial
Mar 27
JAIN
The Biltmore
Apr 7
WIRE
Imperial
Apr 9
REGGIE WATTS - SPATIAL
Vogue Theatre
Apr  10
WHITNEY
The Biltmore
Mar 25
NICK HAKIM
Alexander
Mar 28
ALINA BARAZ
Imperial
Apr 8
SOHN
Imperial
Mar 25
SHRED KELLY
Fox Cabaret
Apr 1
COLONY HOUSE
The Biltmore
Apr 9
HINDS AND TWIN PEAKS
Rickshaw Theatre
Apr 10
KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD
Vogue Theatre
Apr 11
JAY SOM & THE COURTNEYS
The Cobalt
Apr 11
NICOLAS JAAR
Vogue Theatre
Apr 14
HOMESHAKE
The Cobalt
Apr 18
REAL ESTATE
Rickshaw Theatre
Apr 20
SAN FERMIN
The Biltmore
Apr  25
THE XX
Thunderbird Sports  Centre
Apr  27
BETTY WHO
Imperial
May  1
KEHLANI
Vogue Theatre
May 4
LEIF VOLLEBEKK
The Biltmore
May 4
LYDIA AINSWORTH
The  Fox Cabaret
May  5
COM TRUISE / CLARK
Imperial
Tickets  & more shows at
timbreconcerts.comt

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