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  254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  104.681.8915
ftta^A
OVERUSE
I
EYEDEA FILM SCREENING
DJ ABILITIES, CARNAGE THE
EXECUTIONER, X PRESIDENTS
WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.CDM TflBCf §f COHKllIfi
JUST BECAUSE YOU'RE NOT IN THE MAG
DOESN'T MEAN WE THINK YOU SUCK
EDITOR'S NOTE
JFeaturea
05 -  JPN49
Words for 200-400 Powell Street
06 -  PROPHECY  SUN
More than bedtime lullabies
08 -  KYE PLANT
Thank you for Kye Plant
09 -  T.P.P.
Why should we care?
17  -  SWIM TEAM
Team chants
09  - PUZZLEHEAD
Clowning around
Column* + spore
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues can b
booked by calling (604) 822-4342 or emailing
advertlsing@cltr.ca. Rates available upon request.
04
Wristband:
Karmik
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to LL500
- 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC with
your address, and we will mall each Issue of Discorder
right to your doorstep for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute D/scortter in your business, email advertising@citr.ca. We are always looking
for new friends.
09 - Venews:
The WISE Hall
10 - Real Live Action
12 - Art Project + Calendar
by Chelsea 0'Byrne
14
Under Review
20 - On The Air:
Kew It Up
21
23
Program Guide
Charts
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
ID
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station Manager: Hugo Noriega // Interim Advertising
Coordinator: Brit Bachmann // Discorder Student Liaison: Claire Bailey // Editor-in-Chief: Brit Bachmann
// Under Review Editor: Jonathan Kew // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch // Art Director: Ricky
Castanedo-Laredo // Production Assistant: Jules Galbraith // Web Content Coordinator: Katrina Wong //
Accounts Manager: Eleanor Wearing // Charts: Andy Resto // Discorder Radio Producers: Claire Bailey,
Matt Meuse, Jordan Wade // Online Communications Coordinator Keagan Perlette // Writers: Maximilian
Anderson-Baier, Claire Bailey, Natalie Dee, Dora Dubber, Josh Gabert-Doyon, Inca Gunter, Blake Haarstad,
Courtney Heffernan, Callie Hitchcock, Evangeline Hogg, Elizabeth Holliday, Shelbi Khoury, Cole Klassen, Vlad
Krakov, Paige Lecoeur, Alex Lenz, Lucas Lund, Sam Mohseni, Keagan Perlette, Christine Powell, Elijah Teed,
der 2016 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost
r level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the heriqamihem speaking Musqueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at'
hrough all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (I
stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
hy am I dedicating an editor's i
o submission guidelines? Here ai
There is a good chance that the person reading this is doing something cre-
or radical, or knows someone who is, and will consider this note a nudge to tell us about
Perhaps the reader is one of the rare individuals who has sent rude emails or posted insults
to social media because we couldn't mention their press release. Unapologetically, this note is
for them, too.
To let Discorder know about upcoming exhibitions, gigs, collectives, or community initiatives, send us an email 4-6 weeks in advance. Full press releases aren't necessary, just a few
sentences will do. The most important thing is that we have enough time to consider the topic
for print. We plan articles one full month in advance. Because every feature and column is a
collaboration between interviewees or artists, writers, illustrators and photographers — all
graciously volunteering their time — we need a lot of notice.
For general submissions or questions, contact editor.discorder@citr.ca.
To request a live show or performance review, send details to rla.discorder@citr.ca. If the
event is selected for review, we will respond requesting two media passes — one for a writer
and one for a photographer.
Unlike other sections, Disc/order's Under Review doesn't require 4-6 weeks notice for album
reviews, but we prioritize new releases. Email digital download codes to underreview.discorder@
citr.ca, or send physical copies to:
Discorder Magazine c/o CiTR 101.9FM
LL500 - 6133 University Blvd.
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Vancouver, B.C.
To submit albums or sin
Music Department at CiTR, c
les for airplay c
email codes to 1
CiTR 101.9FM, send copies addressed to the
usic@citr.ca.
Got something to say, positive or negative? We circulate 8,000 issues of Discorder each
month... which is probably stronger than your Facebook reach. Our letters section is Hotnead,
and submissions are accepted on an ongoing basis through editor.discorder@citr.ca or snail
mail to the address above.
Every announcement or update we receive is pitched to contributors during monthly meet-
togs, and discussed together as a masthead. Thank you for your submissions!
Let's keep in touch.
JOIN A RADIO
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NEWS COLLECTIVE
News  101
EDITOR'S NOTE I WRISTBAND
KARMIK
words by Alex Lens // illustrations by Hi
initiative that pl^C a posi
arm reduction has arguably tive role within ToMtc^sJurave
been a contemporary tenet/" scene. Vanrouvit lacked "any sort
public of similar program* that'fdcused
not only on"khronic drug, users,
but also on casual or reereationj
ysers^amirk's-^bcus, there!
is on^omotin§ safe and
lifestyle practices across a
rartge of communities.
Cj^rmik's   purpose   at   music
I £
W within Vancouver1
health policy. Most of these programs have been targeted tovftards
addressing chronic drug users
and are based in the Downtown
Eastside — programs such as
InSite, which offers safe injection
sites for intravenous drug u!
However, the scope of
tion in Vancouver is being,
ened thanks to Karmik,
grassroots organization. Founi
just over two years ago, Karmik
an initiative that works towards!
creating safer nightlife and festival communities within British
Columbia and internationally. The
organization has attended numerous music festivals, including
Pemberton Music Festival, Electric
Love, and Bamboo Bass Festival in
Costa Rica.
Munroe Craig and Alex Betsos
co-founded   Karmik   with   the
During our interview, Alex,
Munroe and Cameron Schwartz
(administrative coordinator * of
Karmik) emphasized how different
social norms within the festival
id theyurban nightlife communi-
respectively, lead to different
opinions towards hafrf>xeduction
iiutl^ives like Karmik. Oi is more
orUss acknowledged ihat drug use
imon-plact* and unjvoid
at festivalsJjl-hich increases
need ^or o|«iizers «f utilize!
'the "Cervices
^"owever.
urban nij
is often si
do what you want to do, and you
make the choices you make in
life. When people come to us, they
often come having already made
a decision. We exist as a neutral
party to support whatever choice
you make," says Munroe.
politicizatibi
festivals is"""W create* sapcfuary\ Promoters face incpasfe^ licensing
"Saceii that work in tandtai-*Htfr\>j fees tithe paramecfiE^ateialled
ithin     the    Canadian
sociopolitical landscape,
attitudes are changing.
On a federal level, the impending
legalization of cannabis is a sign
that opinions towards drugs are
somewhat moving towards a less
harm ^e^ctio*\authoritative stance. Alex men-
itized drfefto the    tioned that on a municipal level,
the City of Vancouver has made it
easier (albeit, only somewhat) for
arts-based venues to hold after-
y Karmik offers.
' the context of
explains, "We genuinely care about
the people we help and we're really
knowledgeable about what we're
doing. We wouldn't be here if we
were trying to fuck the system,
because we're working with the
system and we're doing it for the
better good of everyone involved."
Karmik will be running 5 volunteer
training sessions within the month
of October, in addition to facilitating
Naloxone training sessions for interested participants. Visit karmilcca for
more information.
*For more information on Night
Mayors, refer to Brenda Grunau's
article in the May issue of Discorder,
medical and security^teanT",    their e4ent, arm it's-often difficult    hours  events. This reduces the    "In Praise Of Night," with illustra
I l^eftsQuraging positive mental
spaces for^attendees — whether
)rhart3e simply talking with a|g§|jpr
. peradh, sleeping on a nefjjjjjjve
""""encounter with drugs or alc&ri
in a warm cot, or workjjhg through,
a challenging psychedelic experience. Thesjrspaces are„equipped/ practii
with Karmiki party packs, which KarJBc is adamant that their
incluae straws fo| snprtihg drags, organisation does "not/ promote
condom^ and lube, ^arnong other ■ drjjg use. Js more people become
items that promote safer prac- educated about substances, they
rices. The sanctuary spaces also>   can  make  better  decisions  for
for them to find safe and reliable
afjer-hours venuK"to/host events.
Tjas can limit the ability for pro-
j^fers At offer.,harrnf reduction
Sffilces, as.it May be perceived
thatf they are an fact~encoutag-
ing substance use or other illegal
number of unregulated parties that tions by Sharon Ko.
are held in the absence of safe and
legal late-night spaces. Perhaps
the City of Vancouver could take
a cue from cities in Europe like
Amsterdam and Groningen, which
have night mayors* wholly dedicated to governing safe night-time
communities in urban areas. ^_^ £
Whatever it may be, the CityTar -.••' f\
Vancouver has a long way to ge^~\   WJA
in terms of implementing harm
reduction  on  a broader  scope.
intent to fill a much-needed gap    have LEGO, colouring books and % themselves that safely suit their    Organizations like Karmik are here
Vancouver's public health
system. As Torontonians, they
had been exposed to Toronto's
TRIP Project, a harm reduction
other creativity-enhancing items
to help individuals work through
difficult mental or drug-induced
experiences.
VENEWS
THE WISE HALL
words by Natalie Dee// photo by Sara E
illustration by Simon e Badoaie
individual lifestyles. "We don't
condemn or condone any substance use. We come from a completely neutral point where you
tables under a low-hanging ceiling and bar tucked away into the
corner.
It's a space somewhat reminiscent of a church basement, as it
should be. Before it was acquired
by The W.I.S.E. (Welsh, Irish,
Scottish, English) Club in 1958,
The WISE Hall was built in 1925
to serve as a church gymnasium.
Ever since, it has been used as a
place to foster community, playing host to a variety of social and
sports events. Over the past thirty
years, the focus of the venue has
shifted toward being a performance and cultural space. This,
was shown in the rebrandinj
'TheW.I.S.E. Club'to t(
WISE' in order to refle#fhe dh
sity of the conu
help facilitate that process and
reduce the burden associated with
unsafe practices within all communities around the city. Munroe
grants members fifty cents off
drinks. With Vancouver's notoriously unfriendly reputation
toward venues, The WISE has had
its own problems to overcome.
One is the ever-changing nature
of the area: "There was a study
that found that people stay around
this neighbourhood for about five
years," explains Liddell. "There
used to be a place called 'The
Mansion' across the street that
housed a bunch of different artists. Now that's all condos."
1 the East Vancouver
irho%c\unaware of what
jn next to. The
ninteract this
by invitlrrk rWghbours to
attend the shows trW nkgt, as
as encouraging peopl
them directly jvith,
" wTiatJplps our doors open is the
regulars that occupy this lounge
and that come to shows upstairs,"
she says of the community around
the hall. Their lounge isn't packed
when there's major sporting event
— it is, however, packed on election results night. "It's really a
neighbourhood pub, where there
aren't neighbourhood pubs in this
city anymore. And the people who
work here and the people who frequent here are integral parts of
the musical and arts community,"
describes Liddell.
The WISE Hall is a survivor that
embraces   community   in   every
sense of the word, making it their
be   accessible  and
anyone who needs
the space. As Liddel explains: "For
a city that is extremely transient
The WISE is
immunitVjj|By^terfBlple who
The WISE Hall is a dim but
homely space, with dark
wooden floors and lights
strung into a canopy overhead
My voice echoes across the hall
as I call out "Hello," and General
Manager Jasmine Liddell emerges
from her upstairs office.
■Hi WRISTBAND/VENEWS
A quick tour of the space shows
- that it's worn but sturdy. A mask
mounted on the wall looks over
the crowded but cozy greenroom,
in contrast to the wide open space
of the main room, with tables and
chairs lining the walls. Liddell
then leads me downstairs to The
WISE Lounge, a collection of long
government
profit society, run by^
directors, and supported by yearly '
membership fees of only $10 that
ticipate here," expl WORDS BY JOSH GABERT-DOYON
■UJSTRATiGNS BY EMMA POTTER
PHOTO BY LUKAS ENGELHARDT
"IJliiTnyfc hile biking to meet Steve
[ I Frost    and    Soramaru
Mt^r Takayama, I waited at
a stoplight on the corner of Main
and Powell, shoulder to shoulder
with a white man on a moped who
had picked a shouting match with
the Asian driver of a sedan stopped
to his left. The pasty moped driver
hurled a last comment at the
sedan: "Go back to being a fucking
Asian." Most of the time it's hard
to react quickly enough in situations like this, and I likely would
have spent the rest of the afternoon
rephrasing the perfect response in
my head had I not looked at the
moped driver and told him that I
wasn't happy with his racist comment, and I was ready to fuck him
up. In a line only to be expected
from a moped bully, he turned to
me and replied: "You want a piece
of this too?"
That might have been the end of
it, but the light flashed green, and
both the moped and me turned
left onto Powell. We were about
to hit another red light at the next
intersection. Things were going to
get hairy. But here's the dilemma:
I was on my way to interview Frost
and Takayama about Japanese-
Canadian poetry and the prospect
of   cross-cultural   production as a way of addressing
the history of internment.
Was throwing down my bike
and fighting some racist on
the side of the road the best
use of my time? Did I really
have such grandiose notions
of journalism as to think a
brief article could be more
effective in combatting racism? I
slowly started to reduce the speed
of my peddling. A few seconds
before I reached the intersection,
the light changed green and the
IBfSra^fcsped off.
The history of Powell Street
for Asian Canadians, particularly Japanese Canadians, cuts
deep. As a site of culture, community, and colonial violence, it's
worth considering what solidarity and reconciliation would really
look like from street-level. Frost
and Takayama are both poets and
members of Tasai, a multidisci-
plinary group that fosters Japanese
and Canadian artistic collaboration.
"This area has a freedom [to it]"
says Takayama. Frost, who volunteers at the Vancouver Japanese
Language School and Japanese Hall
and Takayama, who owns a vegan
pudding company a few blocks
from Powell Street, translate poetry
together as a pair. "He can't quite
do it on his own, I can't quite do it
on my own, but together we make
one translator," Frost explains. "Us
translating together is also a picture of what collaboration is. You
can't just talk about it, you have to
actually do it."
Theories of translation have
long understood translation as a
generative practice — the creation
of a new text, rather than pure
replication. Frost and Takayama
see it this way, but they look to
translation as part of a political
project as well. As a collaboration,
the translation enacts cultural
understanding. Translation not as
a means to an ends but as an ends
in itself. The performance of that
creative activity is it's own form
of synthesis. Translation becomes
a way of thinking about the kind
of processes that are necessary
for meaningful and lasting cultural production that goes beyond
critique, call-outs and corrective
curbside behaviour.
^L rost and Takayama are also
^W co-hosts of Tasai's lat-
4f est project, Japanese Poets
North of the 49th (JPN49), which
engages with a similar model of
cultural cross-pollination. The
overall SPN49 project brings poets
to Canada. Within that a project is an event called Poems For
Powell Street for these poets to
write about buildings along the
200-400 block of Powell Street
which were formerly owned by
Japanese Canadians before the
community were displaced during
World War II. The once thriving
Japanese community along Powell
Street was interned and dispossessed by the Canadian government from 1941 up until 1949,
five years after the war had ended.
Though they promised to return
the possessions, land, and the
entire Japanese Canadian fishing
fleet that was seized, the government eventually sold the property
as a means to pay for internment
itself.
JPN49 is an effort to explore
Powell Street and the history of
the space more thoroughly: "To
hear the neighbourhood spoken back" says Frost. Tasai has
spawned multi-media collaborations — performance pieces in
the style of traditional Japanese
theatre, calligraphy, and interactive workshops for kids. Speaking
to Tasai as a whole, the tendency,
Steve tells me, is for Japanese
poets to write a new poem for
every event, specifically for the
context of that event — a kind of
site-specific practice. The shared
context for the poetry reading is
worth considering in that it speaks
to a land-based history, acting as
a reinscription, or indeed atrans-
lation in its own right.
Despite a state apology and
compensation package in 1988,
it's clear that there's still work to
be done in Vancouver. Frost notes
the parallels between First Nations
and Japanese Canadian experiences in the Downtown Eastside,
where the effects of colonial violence are yet to be fully addressed.
How can the communities we build
and the cultural spaces we occupy
reflect on this task? What kind of
model can Frost and Takayama's
translations offer? With an enduring racist fixation on Asian home-
buyers, and The Soldiers of Odin
(a Nordic-style anti-immigration
group) patrolling not far from the
200-400 block earlier this month,
the concern seems pressing. "It's
a really critical time in Canadian
history, where the offer of reconciliation is in front of us, and we
need to do the hard work of taking
it" says Frost. "It's not easy, the
pieces don't always fit snuggly."
The first Japanese poet to participate in the JPN49 residency, Takiya
Kuwahara, will arrive October 1 and
will be participating in five JPN49
events, workshops and readings.
More information at tasai.ca/jpn4g. ^^m meet prOphecy sun in the
I green of Dude Chilling
^P Park. She's brought a sushi
lunch for the both of us, and her
new baby, Haakens, held tight to
her chest wallaby style in a baby
carrier, sun is now a mother of
two. Her first child, Owl, is now
a toddler, old enough to ask her
mother when their next photo
shoot is going to be. Her career
has been uniquely affected by her
motherhood: her two children
have been heavily involved in the
interdisciplinary artist's creative
endeavors over the past three
years. I wanted to sit down with
sun to talk about the intersections between her creative career,
motherhood and family life. Her
forthcoming album, Shelter over
Shelter, is a tribute to her children,
the connections they have provoked her to make, and the inspiration they have offered her.
sun's artistic practice ranges
from installation, dance, to vid-
eography and her work is often
a combination of improvised
sound, imagery, costumes, objects
and handheld technologies. She
creates short videos like 2011's
Cupboards, in Which she empties
out kitchen cabinets and contorts
herself through them, trying to fit
through the narrow spaces. She
has been in multiple bands in the
choreographies that are continually floating. When I'm improvising or when I'm in a dream
space these things are existing.
Sometimes if I choose to grasp
them or look at them or acknowledge them then they become
present."
'Onstage, sun is an improviser.
She may sketch out a setlist, but
when her performance begins, she
opens herself to chance and intuition. This improvisational work is
sampled on Shelter over Shelter and
reflects sun at her most raw and
primal, making creative decisions
based on her own urges and inclinations, moving from moment
to moment. She does not suppress her instincts. After a dream
that came to her while she was
pregnant with Owl, sun began
recording videos of herself interacting with a giant milk coloured
weather balloon, an expensive and
precarious prop, a symbol of her
burgeoning relationship with the
new life she carried inside and
outside of her body. The theme
of care-taking and parenthood
imbued her work as she embarked
on a Master's Degree in Applied
Arts from Emily Carr University of
Art + Design.
"I got accepted for my mas
ter's and found out I was
pregnant [with Owl] in
the same week," sui
recalls. "It was automatically   assumed
that I was going to
postpone [my master's] for a year and
I was like 'Nope!' I
was offered a scholarship to work with
Moving   Stories,   ar
interdisciplinary,    collaborative research project
that's studying dance, move
ment, performance, interaction and
digital technologies. So when I was
accepted, I decided I would motion
capture [Owl] and she would be our
mocap baby for two years — we
would track her physical movement
patterns and development."
for my own development as an
artist."
This development is clear in her
perpetual experimentation with
sound and her growing presence
in the Vancouver noise community. "I don't know what it is,"
she says, "but sounds can bring
prOphe#9^
WORDS BYKEAGAN PERLETTE // ILLUSTRATIONS BY
OLGA ABELEVA // PHOTOS BY EVAN BUGGLE
son I haven't explored, and I haven't wanted to put those on hold.
Maybe that's selfish."
Haakens' little old man face
crunches, and he begins to squirm
and cry. sun is nonchalant and
lays down on the grass, trying to
get the baby to nurse. She laughs
when this doesn't work, stands
^^ ust nine days after
I Haakens was born,
*& sun played a set at
Destroy  Vancouver.   "I
had to feed [Haakens]
every half hour, so I basically asked for a family
room at VIVO. They were
really accommodating. My
partner Darren [stayed] with
our toddler and the baby in
another room." sun also chose to
WHEN YOU'RE UP NURSING IN THE MIDDLE Q
KNIGHT, WHY NOT WORK ON SOMETHING?
city, but her eponymous solo
project is what she
siders to be her most,
vulnerable and honest
work,
"I feel like [allj
the    mediums
work in] feed each
other.   [It's  like],
if  there  were  aj
bunch of "parallel lines running
in a field, each of
these [ideas] kind
of weave on top of
each   other.   If  you
imagine  me working,
these things are flowing
through me,  sometimes I
feel like I'm kind of grasping at
one of them. The best way to put it
is that they are these unconscious
KH PROPHECY SUN
sample    audio
snippets of her labor with both
her xhildren and tracks like
"Silly  Dad"   and   "Go  to
■K-k-Sleep" feature the voice
jfij&\of a gigghhg Owl, who
..also played a part in
IfSLher mother's performance  at  the  debut
JTidal-Signal "Festival f
I at Selectors' Records; J'
f * "All the work that *
I've been doing over
the last three years,
the   album   kind   of
*hts those primal
moments for me,"  says
'There's lots of them,
've chosen the ones that
le most vulnerable. I feel
challenged by putting [my kids] in
the album, their births are milestones  for  me  and  milestones
us to a place of awareness
and for me it's like a type
of meditation. I think it's
also really intuitive." Of
the proliferation of noise
artists and experimental
ambient music in the city,
sun says, "There's something really lovely that's lurking and here, and people really
want to listen. People really want
to transport themselves
or bring themselves to the
present moment. That's
what I love about improvising, you just don't
know what's gonna hap-
in, you can plan but the
rest is really up to chance.
That's one of the beautiful things
about sound, there's something
nostalgic about it [for me]." It's
the past, present and future, all
Sun is committed , to her
creative ElfeT^Uttris-determined to continue to work
on. her owiv projects alongside
hf f; neW responsibffities*5as a parent. "When you're up nursing in
the middle of the night, why not
work on something? I've been
trying not to make everything too
precious." she says. "I'm absolutely exhausted, but I'm not just
a mom. I have this innate desire
to perform, this desire to share, to
create. I was born and raised to do
this, like it feels really important
that I have children, but there's so
many aspects of still being a per-
up and straps him back into the
baby carrier. With a bit of bouncing, Haakens decides that lunch
is served. Our time together ends
when Haakens begins to fall asleep
against his mother's breast, we
collect our picnic and head back
out into the city.
"The title of my album, Shelter
over Shelter, it's this idea that I'm
sheltering my little ones, but they
are also sheltering me," says sun.
"There's this struggle of who has
the umbrella."
Shelter over Shelter will be released
on October 15 on Panospria Records. To
view her newly released music videos for
"Sleep Fever" and 'You won't find me"
visit vimeo.com/prophecysun y^i^p^j
Willie Thrasher
& Linda Saddleback
GSEESaEEUSSy
NEWMUSK.ORG
Canada      0<K3»      ASS      JBfa
Friday, November 18, 2016
at 8:00 PM
Tickets: $7.00 available at sfuwoodwards.ca
1
^  WOODWARD'S
EVERY TUESDAY NKHTSTARTMO ON 0018
=STARRING!=
^FUBMi
OCTOBER 18
PAVEL
FUTURE STAR
WIND-UP BIRDS
OCTOBER 25
MARK MILLS
SHITLORDFUCKERMAN
LITTLE SPROUT
THE CUT LOSSES
JOCK TEARS
THEE MAGIC CIRCLE
NOVEMBER 8
YEAST
JERKIN THE CAN
JERICHO
NOVEMBER 15
POCKETMILK
CRUMB
DEVOURS
NOVEMBER 22
MIREPOIX
CLASS ACT
VILLAIN VILLAIN
NOVEMBER 29
&-M
DECEMBER 6
FREAK DREAM
DEAD END DRIVE-IN
CHEAP FLAVOR
DECEMBER 13
FROGPILE
PRISON HAIR aU
SHALLOW PEAKS JOKES
| FOR
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cent    (RXR) mm ^^M like hearing the
I sound of the rain
«^"{F on your roof." I am
speaking to Kye Plant, an indie
rock musician based in Victoria,
B.C., over Skype from my bedroom
in Vancouver. Kye's first release,
Sober & Alone £P, came out just
eight months ago, and they haven't slowed since; they released
their second EP, Thank You For
Mental Illness, on September 20.
As I speak with Kye, I am struck
by their modesty; despite their
creative activity, they tell me
they aren't used to talking about
themself as a 'real artist.'
Their music reflects the honesty
and humility clearly present in
their demeanor. Kye is remarkably
open about their struggles with
mental illness and their identity
as a genderqueer person, both in
their songs and elsewhere. "It's
very cathartic for me," says Kye,
"in the same way that going to a
therapist is cathartic for me. It's
a way of expressing myself and
touching on that energy inside of
me that's really overwhelming."
Sye's lyrics are intensely
personal and often deal
with loneliness, heartbreak, and depression. The song
"Long Sleep," for example, speaks
to the exhaustion that comes with
depression: "I need a long sleep /
Just trying to keep my head above
the water / But these god damn
waves won't let me be." Kye's
lyrical introspectiveness by no
means makes their music mellow
or sleepy - Thank You For Mental
Illness features driving guitar, bass
and drums. Today's recording
technologies mean that Kye can
get a full band effect, even while
recording alone in their bedroom.
"I've been kind of steering away
from the singer-songwriter-per-
son-with-a-guitar-in-front-
of-a-mic thing," Kye says. "I've
thought about maybe taking it to
a studio or something, but I
don't think I could - I
just like the process by
myself, and, yeah, I'm a
control freak."
While moving away
from the singer-song^
writer genre means adding more
instrumentation during recording, for Kye it also means clearing
instruments away for their live
show. "I've always played with
a guitar, and in the beginning I
played with a band, and so I've
slowly been stripping it all away.
And now I'm just going to have a
microphone and my ipod ... I find
that the guitar is a real crutch for
me and I hide behind it, so I'm
trying to gently force myself out
of my comfort zone." They intend
to play a character; make the show
more performance art-spectacle,
less person-playing-songs - "a
show where weird things happen ... I wanna fuck with people
- but not in a mean
or non-consensual
way." They want
people to question
things, in the same
way people question
things when they see
someone who does
not conform to societal norms of gender.
"I see people kind of
looking at me weird,
and I know it's forcing them to question things inside of
themselves. I want to
extend that into the
way that I express
myself through my music."
Of course, performing as a
queer person is not always
easy - Kye says it's been
a process of finding the right
spaces, and avoiding the wrong
ones. "I've learned the spaces
I don't want to be in because I
don't feel safe. I am more aware
of that now, so I'm not going to
play at a bar, and I'm not going
to play at a place where people don't know what the word
anxiety, abuse, addiction, trauma
and more - but listening to it gave
me a feeling of relief and happiness. Kye has a song titled "The
Gender Binary is a Jail Cell." All
stigma is a jail cell, and talking
openly about stigmatized subjects
is a way of being freed. Kye tells
me that they got the idea for the
podcast two and a half years ago,
when they were recovering from a
severe mental breakdown which
left them in a psychiatric, ward,
and then living with their parents.
Kye says that one of things that
helped them recover was listening
to podcasts. "It was really important in my recovery to hear people
talking about things that were
going on in my head. You know,
I felt like, 'Oh, I'm not crazy and
I'm not alone.'"
When I ask Kye what they
hope people will take away from
their music, they are unsure, but
eventually say that "maybe the
best thing [for people to take
away] would be that it's ok to
feel things.'' Kye isn't afraid to
talk about their feelings and personal struggles. Or maybe they are
afraid, but they're doing it anyways, and that's important. In our
society, where mental illness and
non-normative identities are still
so stigmatized, we need artists
like Kye Plant telling us that even
though we may feel bad, we don't
have to feel bad about it, and that
we're not alone.
Follow Kye Plant's Feelin Weird
podcast at feelinweird.com, and visit
kyeplant.bandcamp.com for Thank
You for Mental Illness and other
releases.
KMiVif
"IT'C A WAY lit FY DBF
TOUCHING ON THAT ENERGY INSIDE OF ME
If.'filtff.'W
'queer' means, where I would
feel like I had to censor* myself
... That being said, Victoria has a
great queer scene, and it's fairly
inclusive." Performing songs with
such personal subject matter also
takes courage, and can feel futile
in the wrong environment. "It's
like you're up in front of a crowd
of people who aren't really listening, and you're reading from your
journal," Kye says.
In addition to music, Kye creates a podcast called Feelin Weird,
where they interview people on
topics that have been stigmatized by society. The podcast deals
with heavy subjects - there are
episodes on suicide, depression,
mpmRH
Th§ eyriltte Typewriter
Ysuf l*fu§ JJtf&eftn
Out now on JAZ Records
]air@eords*eom TRANS PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP
UNDER THE BRUSH
words by Blake Haarstad
Dn February 4, 2016, Canada
officials signed into the
Trans-Pacific Partnership
(TPP), the largest multilateral trade
deal in world history, encompassing the majority of the Pacific Rim.
The Trudeau government promised Canadians that Canada was a
long way from ratifying it, however. Before negotiations are complete, the government has opened
their inboxes to Canadian citizens
to sound-off opinions about the
TPP. The deadline to submit feedback is fast approaching: 23:59
EDT October 31, 2016. If you're a
musician, like myself, or any other
creative, be it filmmaker, writer,
journalist, etc., there are a number
of sections in the TPP that could
affect you.
While the TPP will have a huge
number of repercussion across all
aspects of the economy, the provisions that will likely affect artists
and consumers of art will include
the extension of copyright terms
to the author's life plus 70 years;
digital locks and technological
protection measures (TPMs) that
control access to copyright-protected works; and the allowance of
foreign corporations to take legal
action against Canada for laws
that may conflict with the TPP
agreements.
So you may be asking yourself,
"What do I think about the TPP?"
To answer this question you may
first confidently turn to the actual
text of the TPP document, then,
realizing it weighs in at approximately 6,000 pages, quickly lose
morale and turn to the internet
for a summary of the TPP. You
will find that there is a strikingly
small amount of research done on
how the TPP will specifically affect
cultural industry, as research
tends to focus on the aggregates.
It's somehow unsurprising that
seemingly nobody at the bargaining table has asked, "But
what about the artists!?" Even the
executive summaries laid out on
the Government of Canada's website are thin, and largely biased
towards selling Canadians on the
current TPP deal.
Opinions are split among policy experts, economists and public interest groups, and finding
a decisive answer on the internet soon becomes a war of attrition, with continuously diverging
opinions ceaselessly adding points^
to either side of the score board.
Do you give up your job as a.dij-
igent, informed citizen and pick
a side in the absence of definitive
judgment, hoping $if§you chose
correctly? Or do a^^Ktinue the
endless cyber saBJB-faring for
that one article that rlifjnates like
"checkmate" aeross-the-board?
Neither si tuation'Jf&r ideal, but
that's not to^^ttl^ignorance
is our only option. Contradicting
sources are sources nonetheless.
"^^■n a survey^Jf-anri-TPP atgtr*
Hment:
leading academic and Canada
research chair in Internet and
E-Commerce law. Geist has been
running an online blog covering the TPP since 2011, ever since
early draft sections of the agreement were disseminated through
Julian Assange's whistleblowing
WikiLeaks. Geist has a number'of
apparently informed articles on his
website, but has also summarized
his views with regards to copyright
extension in his published study,
"The trouble with TPP's copyright
rules."
Canada's copyright laws currently last the life of the author
or creator plus 50 years. In ratifying the current TPP agreement,
Canada would extend its copyright
up to 70 years past the author's
death, and would put Canada at
the same standard as the United
States and the European Union.
According to Geist, extending
copyright in Canada will keep
many important works out of the
public domain with no increase in
creative output. It would be harder
to access copyrighted works with
this change and cost Canadian
millions of dollars in royalties.
Websites such as PlagiarismToday,
Let's Talk TPP, Reject TPP and the
Electronic Frontier Foundatioi
also support Geist's view th<
extensions of copyright ten
tend to have negative impacts f i
artists, and appear to only bene
big media conglomerates.
While it's easy to understand thi
argument being made here, and in
some sense it seems intuitively
true that "Big Business" could
be bearing down on us at every
opportunity, there doesn't seem
to be much evidence to support
this. In fact, most easily accessi
ble articles against the current TPP
copyright provisions don't appear
to include hard evidence or sources
to support their conclusions, and
what evidence is given may be
misleading —
Attempting to confirm Geist's
arguments  on his Work Cited
page of sources for    copyright
extension, I discovered only tjpt£&$
citations  thatlfed  to  acadlMM
S$tll§gs§ whjSiJ the rest leadlj|
fOl£^||f|)^^|titiated  blogs  a]
news articlel^Citation (6) actus
C©at|idi||^|^ist's argument, ai
IplljJIHItlH explicitly claims
Citation (8) le;
id study for
no   argument   has   beei
showing its relevance,
coming  under   strong  a
from another economist, -George
Barker. Not to mention,.jh£ inclusion of sever-al^academic studies
that support increased copyright
ss- of- its rele-
lt'is commend
"able thdt New Zealand
npted fo""str(dy copyright'
extension with xegafds. to
As-of the publication'of
ular article, the,Canadi.
menMiasyer to produce
of the .sort '£of£ana<
ciaDyTfor artists. ''Cteatii
to know wha"t they could
gain "and lose frorjrthe
the Canadian governaliil
iS^l^taansparent with this {Mil
maftpn. Indeed, transparency has
been a major issue since it was
annlirriced that Canada was joining the negotiations on October
9, 2012; Canadians have not been
consulted during this process,
which has occurj^djjarjgly behind
closed doors. We should
mig^^fc^*aWtna¥*i
jSpfrkessjajii
there
cal responsesTo^STsTs work.3
While further problematized by
the newly released study by the
Canadian "government indicating
tfy90B&fcfafy.3 billion projected
S^i^to the econonjy* even that
study has little i»#»ut the/
impact the TPP woTglt^te on
artists working in Canada, :«and
the conditions around the international distributions of fUeir
works. The absence of acadiafc
studies in Geist's articles mimM.
necessarily negligence, but riilief'
an unfortunate result of ini^ei
quate sourtrpllterM in general.
Bibliographical gaffs donHgjdbf
■entdg accuracy on Ggist's-part, 1
thft*|§o maj'r.e j^ft&der* todjsc
trtrrti'. When it cornes-to trle.TP
Gfiai'anf are left iiite^igft-jMi
of' speculations   and ' educab
-There is essentially a |*ttong
disagreementf^tween academics and interest groups 011 what
exactly the-TPP-Mti&tffi Entail, let
ffBinot it would
rt Canadians in
If anything can
this article and
circulating the internet,
ill; that there is a strong sense
Br uncertainty about what the
PP will mean for creatives, and
Canadians on a broader scale.
"^^t's well known that vague-
■ness in law benefits lawyers,
^Pand the people that can afford
to hire them. With corporations
litigiously bearing down on creative property while artists scramble to defend themselves with "fair
dealing,"— a legal exception to a
creator's exclusive right to copy a
work — it's easy to predict that
issues will arise around access to
representation and justice for artists with already limited financial
resources. While the fair dealing
defense may ultimately acquit
titers, academics, satirists, and
lers of copyright infringement,
't necessarily prevent
imely costly litigation,
[many ways the internet has
it easier to get informed
an issue. But with so many
about the TPP lacking hard
fence and sources, relying
rhetoric, arguments for and
[gainst the partnership have
become more constellatory than
evidentiary. These scattered and
at times misleading sources form
the strongest argument for why
the Canadian government should
show more leadership in providing solid and up-to-date facts
about the TPP. What creatives,
and Canadians in general need
is greater transparency from the
government explaining how the
TPP will affect them, backed up
by studies and hard evidence that
cuts through the vast and unreliable ether of the worldwide web.
Artists should be concerned
about the TPP, not necessarily
because of what we know about it,
but because of what we don't.
You may express your concerns by
emailing TPP-PTP.consultations@
international.gc.ca, or by finding your
local MP at lop.parl.gc.ca.
*Additional source links included
on the online version of this article at
discorder.ca*
'These sources uxre originally found through
. Sony Sookman's article "TPP Copyright, e-com-
merce and digitalpolicy: a reply to Michael Geist: See
EU Commission, "Impact Assessment on the Legal
and Economic Situation of Performers and Record
Producers in the European Union", SEC(2008)
2288; PwC Economics, "Impact of Copyright
Extension fir Sound Recordings in the UK" (28
April 200% Richard A Posner & William M.
landes, "Indefinitely Renewable Copyright " (
John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics
Working Paper No. 154, 2002); Prof Barker,
"Common Myths About the Economic Effect of
Copyright Term Extensions for Sound Recording";
Karrril Gerard Ahmed, "A Case for a longer Term
of Copyright in Canada- Implications of Eldredv
Ashcroft Case" (2006) 37 RHUS
am/2015/12/15/tplhcopyright-e-eommi
and-digitalfwlicy-a^^to-michael-geist/ Heal tint
flctlon
SWANS/BABY DEE
SEPTEMBER 6 / VENUE
*¥ stood In a long line that snaked its way out of Venue night-
4F club and onto the Granville strip, shoulder to shoulder with fans
anxious to see what could have been Swans' final performance
in Vancouver. Promoting their latest two hour album, The Glowing
Man, the seminal post-rock / Industrial band will soon ride off into an
uncertain future, with this incarnation of the band coming to a close.
The crepuscular air outside the venue was thick with mixed emotions. Eager new recruits waiting to see the legendary live band for
their first time filled the sidewalk alongside disillusioned old fans
there to bid a ceremonious goodbye.
Inching closer to the entrance I noticed a small gathering of people poised in a candlelight vigil around a sign: "We Believe Lark
Grimm." These solemn demonstrators were there to show support
for musician Larkin Grimm, who came out on Facebook earlier this
year to accuse Swans founder and leader Michael Gira of sexually
assaulting her during his time producing her 2008 album Parplar.
Speaking to one of the demonstrators, they informed me that they
were there not necessarily in outright protest, but to spread awareness and inspire dialogue. Indeed, they seemed to be doing just that
as I overheard two fans discussing the deeply troubling allegations
and how it should affect their experience of the music.
With this in mind, I wound my way Into the busy nightclub floor
and up to the balcony for a bird's eye view of the stage.
The evening's opening act was Cleveland musician / performance artist Baby Dee, who pranced on stage beaming in a tattered
pink tutu and armed with an accordion. Baby Dee's twisted brand of
twenty-first century vaudeville turned Venue into a veritable barroom
m stepped back from the railing as It trembled under the weight of the
its of noise Swans unleashed periodically
* came to jarring to halts. Uncertainty and unease abounded, punc-
tuated by the windswept epics of "Cloud of Unknowing" and "The
m Glowing Man" as Gira pleaded ad lib "I'm asking you / Who made
* us like this?"
* The stunning two-and-a-half hour encore-less performance
* closed to near-ceaseless applause and a well-earned bow. Despite
the ubiquitous earplugs, Swans' throbbing post-rock left spectators'
0 ears ringing, but the unresolved dissonance embedded in the music
* coupled with the controversial demonstration outside the venue will
* ring for much longer. I can't help but feel that the closing track from
* The Glowing Man, "Finally, Peace," may well be a question instead
^ of a declaration. —B
I DESTROY VANCOUVER XVIII
• SEPTEMBER 9 / VIVO MEDIA ARTS
•
m ^r he moon was a ripe yellow crescent through the balding trees
• ^that surrounded VIVO Media Arts — it was as if the sky itself
• knew how magical Destroy Vancouver XVIII promised to be. Since
* 2012, curator John Brennan had been showcasing experimental
music acts from Vancouver and beyond through DV, while co-cu-
m rator Elisa Ferrari came on board in 2015 to produce a final year of
• performances. The evening was the eighteenth and final collection
* of acts presented by DV, and I was ecstatic to bear witness to such
* a unique piece of Vancouver music history.
The show was sold out, the venue precariously over-capacity, ft
m was amazing to see such a diverse group — young adults, familiar
• faces from shows around town, and an older contingent of folks, up
* way past their kids' bedtime. Clearly, DV was doing something right
* to make the sometimes obscure genre of experimental electronic
music accessible to a broad audience.
0     hazy, the solo project of Late Spring's KC Wei, was up first. Wei
• stood alone on a raised platform under a red spotlight with her gui-
* tar, a few pedals, and a microphone. She played one long waterfall
as she dazzled with confidence and novelty. The fusion of whimsical <
aesthetic and thematic dour in her songs made for a darkly tragi- '
comic drama, best summed up by her cackling lyric: "He's going to *
Ml ma when I get home /One sunny judgment day." After performing .
various cuts from her new album, she curtsied to the charmed crowd ^
and disappeared backstage. \ «
As 10 p.m. rolled around, the house lights went low. All six mem- *
bers of Swans took to the stage, looking tired as they tuned their *
instruments. But when lap steel guitarist Kristof Hahn began coax- 4
ing a looping drone from his strings, the lax facade faded to reveal a <
zen-like calm instead. With guitar in hand, Gira faced the drummer <
and signalled for the commencement of "The Knot." He conducted *
the band to add layers — cymbals crashed and gale force guitars *
screeched their way up the winding summit to deafening volume. I
of sound as I sat on the floor and closed my eyes, hazy sounded
the way being underwater does: ears submerged in bathwater, the
echoing, in-utero sway of delayed, overlapping splashes and scattered droplets.
Between sets, projections created by Emily Thacker flowed over
three walls. Called "visual melodies," the visual soundscapes used
colour, shape, speed, duration, and intensity to mimic the effects of
music's rhythm and harmony. These visuals ranged from home-vid-
eo-esque scenes overlaid with translucent coloured blocks, to TV
static calculated into geometric lines.
Whatever level of relaxation that resulted from hazy's set dissipated when Friends+War took the stage with his crucificial instrument.
Dan Leonard's musical idolatry was unsettling: he kneeled in front of
a setup which featured a cross strung like a double bass bearing a
clear plastic mannequin head, mounted in the center of a piano. To
the left was a shambled drum kit, to the right, an air compressor, a
lit red candle, and the seat of a motorbike with another plastic head.
A few minutes in, the cross tipped forward towards the kneeling Leonard — a feature of the apparatus — and one of the audience members jumped up to stop it falling on the artist. The rest of
us gasped audibly. It took a second to see that the lean was controlled and intentional. Tensions ran high after that and I could feel
the whole audience fear the automaton's unforeseeable actions. I
caught myself beginning to panic about the proximity of the lit can- '
die to the air compressor. Unfortunately, parts of the machine failed
during the performance: a mask broke as Leonard tried to put it on
and a tape from one of the two reel-to-reel players fell to the floor
and rolled off into the dark. However, this "breakage" opened up
more speculation about the nature of the strange machine and its
apostle.
The third performer was Christina Kubisch, and we were plunged
into darkness, encouraged to sit on the floor and to close our eyes.
Kubisch told us there would be nothing to see, that she was going
to play only sounds that she had recorded. She sat at a mixing
board under a single lamp, like a typist. If someone were to ask
me what I thought the dark sounded like, I would tell them to listen
to the sounds that Kubisch played for us. The sounds were a long
meditation on what might be called white noise, but I want to call
black noise: sounds she captured, muddled and restructured into
indiscernibility.
After an intermission, Katharina Ernst sat down behind her golden, throne-like drum kit, surrounded by a collection of cymbals and
brass bowls that carpeted the floor like chainmail. Ernst provided the
percussive reply to hazy's guitar and vocal set. Ernsf s movements
were calculated and elegant. She wielded her drumsticks like asper-
gilla, christening the drums with sound. I felt like I was witnessing
a mythological rite, some calling to or honouring of a god as she
placed cymbals on top of the drums, spilled the cups on the ground,
spun still more cymbals on the floor and caught them before they
dropped. Each action produced a different noise yet the entire performance seemed to be one continuous sound.
The final two acts, Vancouver duo minimalviolence and renowned
techno artist Adriana Lopez, changed the pace of the evening with
danceable sets, minimalviolence played amidst harsh red light and
the space was transformed into an edgy underground club. Lopez's
set was accompanied by stormy visuals which gave the dancers'
shadows a ghostly feel. VIVO became a kind of techno dungeon
as Lopez's dark noises enveloped the crowd. Lopez moved like a
sorceress over her equipment. She seemed to be insider of herself
and her music, fully focused on the creation of the sound. I felt emotionally spent by the time Lopez took the stage and overwhelmed by
the convoluted music and undulating crowd that remained. I left the
dancers to complete the dark ritual that Lopez had initiated and let
my oversteeped nerves recuperate after the incredibly sensory evening. —Keagan Perlette
SAWDUST COLLECTOR PRESENTS NOT
YET YEDI AND MINE AGENTE
SEPTEMBER 14 / GOLD SAUCER
Jt was only the second installment of Sawdust Collector, a weekly interdisciplinary concert series at the Gold Saucer, but the
venue was at no risk of being empty. That might have been because
Lisa Simpson, Berlin-based musical sewing artist known as Agente
Costura, was in the room and ready to perform alongside local
drummer / improv extraordinaire Ben Brown — who doubled as performer and host for the evening — and other artists.
I found myself a seat up front as Simpson and Vancouver improv
quintet Not Yet Yedi took the stage. Settled among a tangle of
cables, instruments and electronics, — sewing machine included
— the crowd went silent, and Brown counted them in. "One, two,
three, four!"
Like a flick of a switch, glitchy, spasmodic, atonal, arrhythmic,
yet entirely coordinated sounds poured out of every instrument.
Every part of Brown's simple drum kit was probed and tapped by his
hands and sticks; JP Carter's trumpet was modulated and distorted through a maze of effect pedals; Lee Hutzulak's oscillating and
guttural bass synths rumbled beneath Dave Leith's static electronic
drones; and the inner workings of John Mutter's guitar seemed to be
pouring out of his amplifier. All the while at centre stage, Simpson's
sewing machine chugged along, churning out garments.
When the shock from the initial blast of sound wore off, I began
I REAL LIVE ACTION to notice the nuance with which all six musicians were playing off
one another. From afar, it was a muddled sound collage, so busy
and unfamiliar it verged on white noise. Yet the more attention I gave
it, the more I saw its subtlety. Ail the sounds flowed together, rising
to cacophony, and dipping to near silence. The musicians passed
around the focus from one instrument to another, letting each sonic
texture be explored in detail.
The improv set eased into silence, and after a round of applause
from the fully occupied room, the band began to remove their instruments and equipment — all except Simpson's sewing machine. A
heaping mound of clothing was pushed beside Simpson, an ironing
board set up on her other side, and Mine Agente was ready to begin.
Founded by Simpson, Brown and dance artist / choreographer Kelly
Mclnnes in 2014, the installation performance also featured dance
artist Rianne Svelnis and bassist Roxanne Nesbitt.
It would be tedious to describe all the elements of the performance, because, for the most part, nothing all that extravagant
happened. Instead, the performance forced the audience to direct
their attentions on the mundanity of daily chores, the vapid slogans
of consumption and materialism, and the ways in which identities
are formed through appearances. Over the course of the multidis-
ciplinary performance, the pile of clothes were sifted, sorted, folded,
worn, destroyed, and finally remade by Simpson into a dress that
Mclnnes and Svelnis put on Nesbitt.
Neither Mine Agente, nor Not Yet Yedi were performances made
to be grasped easily, and I can't say that I really understood either
with any authority, but both succeeded in providing a wealth of artistic refinement and entertainment — as long as you were willing to
pay close enough attention. — Lucas Lund
MALCOLM JACK/ICEBERG FERG
SEPTEMBER 16 / CHINA CLOUD
The door to the China Cloud opened only a few minutes before
the show was set to begin, and the room filled up quickly. It's
the nature of China Cloud to feel like a room of friends, and it felt particularly so on this night. The soft orange light of the stage was not
at all conducive to smartphone photography and l wonder if, even
subconsciously, this was Intentional. The phones were away and
people were excited to see the live, full band premiere of Malcolm
Jack's Inner Circles, a 27-minute, unbroken piece of music with an
eye towards the transcendental.
Iceberg Ferg opened the night with an understated and well
received performance. With his distinctive high-pitched voice and
assured finger picking, he played a number of songs from his album
In The Valley of the Purple Prince. The audience proved that among
certain people, these songs are already classics. They knew his catalog and joined in on much of his lyrics. It was an ideal opening set
for the night.
Jack performed an earlier incarnation of Inner Circles a few
months ago at the Khatsahlano Street Party. At that time, he performed alone with a guitar and a plethora of effects pedals — seeing the song cycle with a live band was an entirely new experience.
Jenn Bojm provided vocals, Elisa Thorn played a colossal harp, and
Ashleigh Ball on the flute made it a quartet. Amps and speakers
were distributed around the room, creating a stereo sound experience and adding to the immersive nature of the song.
This was the night I learnt how much I like song cycles. When
you accept that you are having one singular experience, unbroken
by clapping, stage banter, or gear swaps, you don't need to worry
about anticipating anything. You don't need to wonder what the next
song will be, or how many songs are in the setlist, or what will be
performed for the encore. The audience embraced the immeasurable aspect of the music — closed eyes and lethargic faces were
testaments to the spacey nature of Jack's composition.
Coming from an artist who is already known in Vancouver as a
psych rock guru, the whole thing could almost be seen as some sort
of self-referential joke — but it was made all the more special by the
fact that it wasn't. Jack took all the classic tropes of calming transcendental music — gentle flutes, plucked harp, soft accompanying
vocals — and earnestly gave them added significance. If anything,
it reminded me not to get hung up on the idea of genre. Jack wasn't
doing this for the sake of aesthetic. Inner Circles sounds like a fully
realized idea, and the live show was no different.
— Sam Tudor
SIGURROS
SEPTEMBER 18 / QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
The evening began outside, thirty minutes prior to Sigur ROs
taking the stage, with me watching people fill the lobby of the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre, illuminated like jewels in a glass case.
While waiting for my friend to arrive, I witnessed a man propose
to a woman — with the little velvet box, and everything — shortly after commenting on how beautiful this sight was. The intimacy of the moment, though indirect, brought me to tears. Was it
foreshadowing?
Sigur ROs opened with "A," a soft and crackling song with a slow
build. Visuals projected onto screens glistened with urgency like the
sky during an electrical storm, pulsing and flashing before ending
suddenly in a fiery red glow for the following song, "Ekki Mukk." The
performance of "E4tow" was as much defined by the backlit green
shapes as by drummer Orri Pdll Dyrason's heavy beat or the cello
bow against JOnsi Birgisson's guitar. The audience seemed to collapse under the weight of "GlOsOli," performed near the end of the
first set. It began delicate and ended triumphant, with all artists —
Birgisson, D^rason, and Georg HOlm on bass — exhausting their
instruments with incredible intensity.
The organic visuals of the first set — molecular shapes, abstract
figures, rocks and trees — were replaced by geometry and algorithmic art for the final set. The setlist too, it seemed, was more technically deliberate in the second half, and included more ambient synthetic sounds and mathematical beats. "Saegldpur" was completely devastating, and songs like "N$ Batten'," "Festival," and the epic
closer "PopplagiO" featured percussion and vocals synchronized to
elaborate etch-a-sketch stage lighting.
Sigur ROs performing at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre was itself
an intentional statement, placing the concert within the setting of a
symphony with parts, or a play with acts. After an intense opening,
the intermission — which I I
would be an annoying interruption — was
a necessary catharsis. The flow of the evening within a theatre context added to the
drama of Sigur ROs. The standing ovation
at the end of their second set was not met
with an encore, but with the gracious bowing of humbled artists and the word 'Takk'
(Thanks' in Icelandic) projected on the
screen behind them.
The performance was nothing short of
spectacular in the most literal definition
of the word — a combination of spectacle and oracular experience — leaving the
audience with a fantastic reminder that we
are not jewels, but floating particles of star-
dust.—Paige Lecoeur
WARPAINT / FACIAL / GOLDENSUNS
SEPTEMBER 20 / IMPERIAL
flST astings was bustling as I waited outside the Imperial, eager to
I I experience Warpaint. I felt like I was stepping into a fancy hotel
as I walked inside: sofas were stacked with beautiful pillows across
from the bar's glistening countertop—a stark difference to the street
outside the venue's doors.
At nine, Goldensuns, a three-piece LA. indie pop band and the
night's first opener, started. During their mesmerizing peaks, the
sound slowed and fuzzed until the vocals blended with the guitar.
Goldensuns' smooth vibes and unpretentious presence made me
feel like I was watching from a loveseat in a living room. Romance
seemed to be in the air. I noticed people holding each other, kissing
each other. Lights swam over the sea of heads, like a shoegaze high
school prom — only with less exclusion and more love.
The second opener, Facial — another L.A. three-piece —
unleashed a powerful combination of thrash and indie, building from
hypnotic crooning to yelled choruses and flaming riffs. The atmosphere was still casual, though, with the band members constantly trading instruments between bass, guitar, and drums. Save for
some headbangers, the floor was still — as if Facial was too heavy
for the crowd.
After a stage reset that seemed like forever, Warpaint walked on
to a flood of cheers and clapping. Stella Mozgawa, the drummer,
started the show with the funky beat — a mix of samples and live
drums — from "White Out," Head's Up's first ^rack. Hypnotic and
melancholy guitar began to float over the crowd as intricate vocal
harmonies formed sweet and shifting melodies. When the band
started to play songs from their first LP, The Fool, the crowd really
began to dance.
"If you're like, 'I'm uncomfortable in my body,' figure it out" said
Emily Kokal — guitarist and vocalist — between songs. "We all go
through the same shit." Even though I already felt comfortable, this
gesture made me feel even warmer and fully cared for.
After playing songs from all their records, they waved and walked
off stage. Even before they had all left the stage, the crowd began
cheering for an encore, holding it for an impressive five minutes.
Warpaint returned and played "So Good," another new song. This
track stood out: it was as upbeat as it was long and snaking. The
bittersweet chorus, "So good / Something / So good / Something,"
melted into four minutes of hypnotic jamming. After one more song,
the show was over. The casual but powerful love-burst of a set left
me feeling accepted and content as I rode a river of people back
onto the cold street. — Cole Klassen
UveVan^§0: Mmmtained by thousands'. $
REAL LIVE ACTION I <s>  Unfctt
Heuieto
^%fes®$
minimalviolence
Night Qym
(1080p)
you are walking down a dark corridor lit only by street lamp.
The rain drizzles down, and as you glance at the cobblestone
pathway, gasoline meets a puddle of water and a rainbow swirls
about beneath you. The occasional truck speeds by on the overpass above you, but in front of you, a luminescent box buzzing with
focused energy is luring you in. Its inescapable grasp is pulling you
away from the dull 2 a.m. silence and into the hypnotic trance of the
Night Gym.
Night Gym is the funky, fresh product of Vancouver's very own,
minimalviolence, a collaboration between A. Luk and Lida P, whose
self-proclaimed genre is "damp pounding rhythms." The first song
on their album, "Night Gym," Is clearly Influenced by the crunchy
drums and analogue synths of the current outsider movement, but
Incorporates a mode of acidity more like Aphex Twin than 808 State.
I found that its pulsating rhythm is reminiscent of the soundtrack to
the German film, Run Lola Run. Night Gym is full of tracks that emulate this echoey, thumping, eerie vibe making you just want to close
your eyes and jump around to the beat.
What stands out most about these tracks is their complexity.
Each and every song has so much depth, even more so than in
their past albums. There is always at least five different things going
on, yet Night Gym still has a sense of harmony and balance within.
Swimming in a multitude of sounds and rhythms, accented by the
synth beats and bass, the song "Authority" is a perfect example of
this. Looking at Night Gym as a whole, it is a lyric-less yet beat-full
glimpse into the creative minds of minimalviolence. Hopefully it will
lead to further high energy, low tempo sounds that evoke powerful
emotions.
— Inca Gunter
A TRIBE CALLED RED
IrVe Are the Halluci Nation
(Pirates Blend)
^^ft e Are the Halluci Nation is the most ambitious and cohe-
MMr sive album from A Tribe Called Red (or, ATCR) to date. The
album is also their most explicitly political. On previous releases,
their medium was their message: ATCR amalgamated traditional
and contemporary culture to force their audience to rethink their per-
ceptions of Indigenous Canadians. On We Are,the Halluci Nation,
they explicitly address the damages caused by colonialism.
The album is centered upon the concept of the Halluci Nation, a
concept which activist John Trudell explains during the album's titular and opening track. The Halluci Nation challenges the system
into which Indigenous people have been forced. They oppose the
Alie Nation, the system created by colonizers in attempts to force
assimilation. The dichotomy between the two nations is reinforced
by author Joseph Boyden's interludes. He speaks as a prisoner
incarcerated in the Alie Nation Correctional Facility, ruminating on
the trauma caused by residential schools and colonial projects.
Halluci Nation is also a term for the collective of artists and activists ATCR brought together on their album. The DJ trio reunited with
their frequent collaborators Northern Voice and Black Bear to create the fusion of electronic and contemporary powwow dance music
for which they are renowned. Tanya Tagaq is featured on "Sila," in
a track that melds electronic reverbs with Inuit throat singing. The
Halluci Nation also includes Indigenous artists from around the world.
Australian beatmakers OKA lend their reggae-infused didgeridoo to
"Maima Koopi." Swedish-Sami artist Maxida Marak's joik-singing
takes centre stage on laidback track "Eanan." Colombian artist Lido
Pimienta's soaring vocals make "The Light" haunting, especially
after the bass drops and her voice become dissonant.
With the support of the Halluci Nation, ATCR articulates their mission to eradicate the legacy of colonialism and the damages it has
caused. On The Virus," MC and poet Saul Williams speaks to the
many shapes that the virus of colonialism takes, and the diverse
people the virus impacts as colonialism attempts to impose divisions. The Halluci Nation, however, does not recognize the limitations of borders.
Album single "R.E.D." exemplifies the best of We Are the Halluci
Nation. The track features Yasiin Bey, Narcy and Black Bear in a
combination of hip hop, powwow-step and electronic dance music.
With A Tribe Called Red as the producers, the Halluci Nation proposes a vision for a new society. Bey says of the shared vision, "[l]t
was a dream / Now it's a living thing."— Courtney Heffernan
MALCOLM JACK
Inner Circles
(Self-Released)
^Peelings of worth are rare. We desperately cling onto accom-
J piishments and memories as markers of progress. Yet, this
sentimental clutter remains only personally significant. The world
turns perpetually in frantic disinterest. And ultimately you remain
alone.
When dealing with these anxieties, a singer-songwriter is at their
best. In moments of frank honesty, a connection is built between a
performer and an audience. A shared understanding is established.
When on "Soldier's Things," Tom Waits bellows "This one's for bravery / This one's for me / Everything's a dollar in this box," the listener
is forced to confront something truly melancholic: sacrifice and a full
life will be forgotten. A box of junk can encapsulate an existence.
Waits wallows in this misery and bids us to meet it. But solace is
found. At least we have the steady voice of Waits.
Not every artist can be so frank. But on his second solo outing,
Inner Circles, Dada Plan's Malcolm Biddle as Malcolm Jack toys
with this type of honesty. Throughout the album the listener is lead
down corridors of self-doubt and reflection. Jack succeeds in taking
his listener to these places through instrumental arrangements reminiscent of Joanna Newsom's Ys and Destroyer's Kaputt. In each
of these releases, the singer seems ensconced by their backing
arrangements, as if by a wreath or a bouquet of flowers. But while
Newsom is accompanied by lush strings, and Destroyer backed by
nostalgic synths, Jack is surrounded by the swell of new age harp
and flute. Inner Circles is a ceaseless homage to the soft-spiritual
music of new age prince Paul Horn. Influenced by this fascination,
the song of Jack does not simply end. Instead, Inner Circles fades
in and out of a constant whirring of zen based wind-instruments.
Awash amongst this perpetual drone, Jack's presence is made more
human and immediate.
As a result, his poetic ponderings land abruptly. When Jack
crones, "Now you don't need me at all [...] will you even miss me
at all?" the listener is thrown into startling intimacy with Jack. The
significance of the surrounding clatter fades. Now, we are privy to
private dread. Jack invites us to share in his fear of estrangement
and isolation. And, as it was with Waits, the listener is bound to
view an uncomfortable truth: most things crumble. Life guarantees
isolation. But sometimes, we can wallow together.— Maximilian
Anderson-Baier
4V ay Fevers, the debut LP from Art d'Ecco, takes the listener
MM from the opening "Sunrise" to closing "Sunset." But don't be
fooled, you will not find a flowing album structure here. As Art asserted in his recent Discorder interview, the album is not meant to be a
unified whole per se. Rather, like a playlist, each song should sound
"drastically different... not just lyrically or thematically, but sonically."
Whether or not this is accomplished is the question with which we
wend our way through Art d'Ecco's few hours of daylight.
Opener "Sunrise" confidently sets the stage with the sound and
feel of a Tarantino soundtrack. It's an instrumental opener that feels
like it's building to a sonic crash that doesn't entirety come with second track The Deal." Telling a Robert Johnson soul-to-the-devil-
for-rock n' roll story, Art's vocals enter the picture for the first time.
His voice has a particular draw across the album, a through-line
that gently morphs to each song's tone. Sounding here like a syrupy Matthew Bellamy, The Deal" continues the spaghetti western
feel through dark, echoing guitar lines, while the same effects later
applied to the synth punctuation provide a futuristic contrast.
The cloying vocals on "She So Hot" are reminiscent of choice
moments of The Rocky Horror Picture Show soundtrack, the strongest indicator to me of the sense of glam androgyny Art purports to
play with. The song is a tight piece of pop with precise jangle and a
great horn line. "I'll Never Give You Up" is synth-pop that wouldn't
be out of place at a Dark '80s dance party, with Art drawling like Neil
Tennant at his most sultry.
The almost 8-minute "Until It Is Over" is a high point of the album.
A romantic, brooding, adventuresome track that takes a turn at the
4.5-minute mark. Descending into a multiply morphing musical
breakdown, the track highlights Art's strength in creating cinematic
soundscapes that have a visceral putl. Following this, "Sunset" offers
a gentle but lackluster conclusion.
The intended difference between tracks is perhaps too subtle for
the songs to avoid being homogenous at first listen. But the claim
made on Art's Bandcamp that Day Fevers contains elements of "70's
glamrock with analogue synthesizers and Motown rhythms; garage
rock with Krautrock; and neo-psychedelia with... spaghetti western
soundtracks" is not untrue. These myriad influences can be clearly identified throughout the album, and Art wends these elements
together without being derivative. Fans of any of these will find much
to enjoy in the polished way they are melded together on individual
tracks. But as the sun sets on Day Fevers, the experience is, on the
whole, inconclusive.— Elizabeth Holliday
THESUBMISSIVES
Do Ybu Really Love Me?
(Fixture Records)
^W f some artists are lovesick, poor Deb Edison is lovedead. The
4p Submissives perform as a six piece, but Deb uses her yearning
and heartache to write, play, and record every part. Do You Really
Love Me? is pop testimony to what romance can do to a girl.
The instruments sound as pitiful as her exhausted, doubled
drone. In "Listen to Them," she confirms all the rumors, saying, "It's
true all the things that people say / All I do is cry all day." When she is
nearly incapacitated by her feminine heartache, she lets her twangy,
slow guitar do the crying for her.
I UNDER REVIEW And remember Betty, as in the Betty from "Betty Told Me"? The
heroine of The Submissive's last album? Well, back then we thought
she was a kindred spirit, but it turns out that she's actually a real low-
life. Betty deserves the up-tempo, sure call-out she's given. "I never
had a friend named Betty / She took It all away / She took my baby."
She is dead to us. Bye-bye Betty.
At least you know where you stand with other girls. But when
it comes to love, the world is a huge and confusing place. On
"Forces," Deb faces the overwhelming helplessness that has driven
her wacky. "My head's a couple inches from the telephone /1 keep
checking just to see that I have a tone." This song will be especially relatable to lady-listeners, letting them think, "that's just like the
time I..."*
The boys in Deb's life can only give love and the absence of love.
And the absence of love is sadness. So poor Deb doesn't even get
to be mad at them, she has to go on loving them forever. All she can
do is wait around and hope they change their minds. Deb doesn't
blame them — her pure heart is filled only with love. But I will! Screw
you guys. At least tell a girl why why you won't call anymore.
Do You Really Love Me is an album to listen to if you want to hear
the real emotions of a real girl.
'For me, it was the time I mailed my ex's new girlfriend a dead
rat. What goes around comes around, Michelle!— Christine Powell
(Owake)
Y starts with "Ninjas," a tropical night soundscape as Sam
Lucia falls in with a loud yet contemplative "Wonder if they'll
talk about us." The song combines both pop beats and slower wading sounds and styles that match where So Loki is located in their
music career. They have a ton of energy and drive which comes
through in the production and lyrics from this song and the rest of
the album. But, like the beginning of their first album Supermanic
they start off the show with introspection and meditation. This pensive atmosphere is self-conscious yet also a demonstration of their
meticulous planning for success — they want the most precise and
flawless execution possible for their work. Like an aural thought
cloud, the sound fades with the distortion of Lucia's voice trailing off.
Geoffrey Millar, who handles the instrumentals, plays with sound
distortion for a range of moods and grander sounds. Crickets, bird
noises, guitar, horns — Geoffrey is not shy of anything. In "Birthday,"
a sharp and well crafted beat punctuates an intentionally messy piano sample. Just a few wrong notes here and there lend to the intimate and light hearted song. As always, the So Loki sound draws a
tension between playfulness and intensity, aggression and vulnerability. This album is begging to be performed live.
"Wild Kids" demonstrates these tensions with a stream of consciousness intro similar to their debut album's song "Unhealthy,"
which also eventually burst into spitting anger and frustration from
Lucia. "I've been looking for comfort in chaos / I've been on one
since my first crayons /1 got problems with priorities like old white
men got problems with minorities." Lucia also warns, "I've got a closet full of skeletons let's spring clean" and ends the song raggedly
chanting "Bigger and bigger and bigger" which intones a clear premonition of a future So Loki will fight for.
The final song "Say Too Much" feels like a manifesto / statement
of purpose. While Lucia asserts "A lot of our peers tryna play too
much" he also says Tryna shape the V / Mi casa Su casa / Grab
a plate with me." So Loki is all about "the team" and is competitive
but also staunchly supportive of other artists. They are a vanguard
for Vancouver hip hop but are not trying to edge other artists out.
Chelsea Grimm, another Owake Records artist, gets a mention on
the album and So Loki embraces the "a rising tide lifts all boats"
mantra which is rare in the hyper-individualistic contemporary rap
and hip hop scene. Lucia says "I can feel the cusp" and we can feel
it too.— Callie Hitchcock
KIM GRAY
Perfume Ghost
(Resurrection / Lollipop)
^im Gray began his exploration of textured synths and lo-fi
vocals in his solo debut, Backseat Bingo. Released in 2014,
the EP was a departure from Gray's previous work with Skinny Kids,
featuring songs largely concerning love and nostalgia packaged in
a dream pop meets garage rock guise. Here, Gray returns with a
more polished debut LP, giving the spotlight to drum machines, psychedelic bass rhythms, and of course, Gray's own languid vocals.
The first track, "Perfume Ghost" is the catchiest track on the
album, and arguably the most interesting. Gray brings it together
with drum machines layered over a jangly guitar and a captivating
hook. The lush textures pair with candid storytelling in Gray's lyrics,
coated in swooning sensitivity and playing with elements from slacker to fantastic.
"I Wish You Knew Me Well" is another highlight on the album and
features well-mastered percussion and an infectious guitar riff. The
song's sparse lyrics are soft and Gray's reverberating vocals glide
in and out of the sugar-sweet production. Many songs on the album
follow in a similar vein, in true slacker-surf pop style, simple and teetering on formulaic. Gray does take risks on songs such as Tropical
Low Life," where sampling, background vocals, and layering create
an earworm to the tune of surf-pop with psychedelic undertones.
However, moments such as those are few and far in between on
Perfume Ghost. Clocking in at 25 minutes, the album could have
been cut down into a more coherent, shorter EP in order to keep
listeners intrigued. What it lacks in variety, the album makes up for
in its sincere lyricism, melodious synthesizer riffs, and experimental
production.
The tunes on Perfume Ghost are best reserved for inevitable
late night drives and winding down at home in the wee hours of
the morning. Time moves slowly while listening to this album, and
life seems to float by as if in an otherworldly dream. Gray propels
forward a sound that he began to forge in his earlier releases and
paves the way for even more luxuriant and textured songs in future
releases. With the mounting finesse from his first release to his second, whatever comes next from this project will absolutely be greeted with intrigue and anticipation.— Tintin Yang
lie
Truth or Consequence
(Monofonus Press)
*C" othic, post-punk trio, lie, have already found their spot at the
^p top of Vancouver's dark and brooding music scene. In fact,
they were one of the few bands I knew of before moving to this
city. Their new full length LP, Truth or Consequence, is an excellent
reminder that they deserve our full and undivided attention. With
scalding social commentary on topics such as trauma and rape,
coupled with the driving force of three seasoned musicians, the
album is notoriously lie\ and that's a good thing.
The shadow cast over this album is much like their previous
album Consent. However, they're toying with a new angle. Ii6 is
often praised for their highly political lyrics and take no shit attitude,
but they aren't strictly here to stress what they stand for. There is
a narrative in Truth of Consequence that adds layers of emotional turmoil and commentary on the destructive tendencies of which
humans are capable. This is apparent since the main topic focuses
on the conflict between one's identity and ego.
With eight tracks banged out in less than thirty minutes, Truth
or Consequence is a quick shot but it deserves a little time to process. The opening track "Pride" begins with lid's familiar and sobering bass tone that grinds into Brittany West's (bass / vocals) signature, somber talk / sing voice. "He's got his body wrapped in you /
Now let me hear, now let me hear you scream his name," sounds
less like a genuine request than a combative plea. "He's your man,
let him take what he wants" she groans, in a tone that is too dismal
to be sarcasm. The song shifts, however. Kati J (drums) stomps
out an intense beat accompanied by Ashlee Luk's (guitar / vocals)
wailing and energetic strumming. It's sharp turn that also leads the
lyrics, which have done a 180. "You've got him pressed against the
ground / Now push him down, and let me hear him say your name."
The visuals are poignant and jarring.
Elements of '80s speed-punk flow through the third track,
"Watching." It harbours that lo-fi sound that is recognizable In all
of lie's music and it works well for them especially in these shorter bursts of fury and aggression. "Failed Visions" marches on with
West's thumping bass and infectious, yet jarring sound that gets
you to the nebula of the album. Vocally powerful, with Luk's backing
screams joining in, "Failed Visions" is a fistful of primal goodness.
The following song, "White Mice" is an ode to white privilege, and is
especially cutting considering recent news headlines.
In light of other recent headlines, "Big Enough" holds no bars, giving an unapologetic look at rape culture. West and Luk, who both
co-write lyrics, have created a song that chastises rapists with provides a message that is loud and clear. There is no excuse. What
ensues after, in "I am" is entrancing. The murmuring echoes of a distorted guitar fade into the background as West softly whispers sharply
and drawls her seductively impassioned voice. It's cut sort, replaced
with the expected, but anticipated piercing of a post-punk delight.
— Evangeline Hogg
WINONA FOREVER
this is fine.
(Self-Released)
CL aving named their band after one of Johnny Depp's tattoos,
11 Winona Forever appear indebted to pop culture — not just cult
trends either. On their debut LP they demonstrate a penchant for
snapshotting current fashions eloquently and succinctly, with just
the right amount of irony. Opening track "shrek ~ chic" has one of
the clearest examples: "I use an excessive amount of emoticons in
every text I send / Every night's a good night and I never want them
to end."
this is fine, also covers the struggles and worries of teenage and
early-twenties life with ease. On 'line" the breezy and bright guitar line almost detracts from the nature of the issues as they sing
There's got to be more I can do than just wake up tired." Lead single "#1 summer anthem to grind to" talks more clearly about anxiety throughout, with "I hold my beer / So I can hold a conversation,"
being the boldest quote from a cutting rhetoric. Despite the nature of
this content, the track has an instant groove to it that is the foundation for good pop music.
Throughout the record, in fact, the lyrics are all just as well crafted, They are brave and engaging to listen to. They come to the
fore over intricate melodies, reminiscent of Antidotes-era Foals.
"Headrush" has the stand-out riff of the record, a winding scale
guitar line that is exactly the brand of indie rock and roll Brandon
Flowers promised us back in 2005. This contrast of upbeat, almost
joyous melodies and honest lyricism is what makes Winona Forever
such a stand out band in Vancouver.
Sometimes, however, they do force the lyrics onto the melodies,
giving the impression that two parts have been conceived separately and not married in the smoothest fashion. Both "Smoothie" and
"Precarious" utilise a lot of over-elongated syllables to make their
respective choruses fit, which doesn't quite work.
UNDER REVIEW I this is Tine, is far from a perfect record. It Is a solid debut with
slices of brilliance littered everywhere, but ft could do with a coat of
polish. In my mind, all they need is a producer to fitter and refine the
band's ideas. But it's still one of 2016's most promising Vancouver
records. Winona Forever have a lot of potential, and it is exciting to
think of what they could do in the future.— Sachin Turakhia
CASUALLUXURY
Casual Luxury
(Self-Released)
Casual Luxury's self-titled EP might be labeled as an "EP." But its
content is just as rich and fully realized as any great rock album
in the recent past. Unlike many modern rock acts who incorporate
elements of electronic and dance music, Casual Luxury favours
unconventional song structures and still relies heavily on guitars.
From the start it's clear that Casual Luxury puts the music itself
above the vocals and lyrics. Not that they are insignificant, as the
lyrics express personal feelings and reflections, but the vocals are
consistently layered slightly under the instruments — the music is
what grabs the listener's attention from the beginning to the end.
What makes the EP so worth coming back to is the unconventional structure of most songs. The opener "From the Balcony" starts
with a guitar melody that is soon accompanied by vocals. Then the
bass and the distant drums are introduced and they gradually reappear throughout the track. The drum patterns are especially interesting as they constantly change but also repeat a motif from earlier in
the track. The song then features a distorted guitar that transitions
into a wall of melodies. AH this happens in the span of five minutes
yet none of it sounds out of place or illogical.
"Girl Grins," is another track that follows an unconventional song
structure. For the first two minutes or so, it sounds like a conventional guitar-driven song, but then a guitar solo emerges leading the
song to a new direction as the riffs and drums build up to a new guitar melody that is the foundation for the second half of the song and
its heavy outro.
This sense of progression and constant surprises in each track
makes Casual Luxury a rewarding listen. It is music that requires
patience and attention. But after a few listens, it all sinks in, and
becomes even more enjoyable as the listener is familiar with all the
twists and directions in each song.— Sam Mohseni
PAVEL
[sic]
(scalarwav)
you just know that there's a perfect time to listen to some
albums. Pavel's electronic, lo-fi mini LP [sic] Is one of them.
The opener, "Beginner's Mind" sounds like a come down after
returning from a party, a lullaby just before sleep. My first impressions were wrong though, as [slcfs spacious, hypnotic melodies
made of keys and synths, its distortion, and superbly arranged lyrics, force the listener into contemplation, about the future, life, love
or wherever their thoughts at that time take them to, making it harder
to fall asleep.
Pavel, the stage name of Alex Cooper, incorporates chillwave,
dream pop and ambient music in [sic], but the project isn't unoriginal. Its bulk Is made up of slow and mellow tracks like the standout, True" with its soaring, layered keys, synths and emphatically
worded and delivered lyrics. There are also a few upbeat tracks with
m'UM UNDER REVIEW
more energetic percussion scattered throughout, like the appropriately named "Alright."
The main theme of [sic] seems to be urging listeners to self reflect
and value themselves. "I used to wonder about you / Lately I've
been wondering about me" Pavel sings in "Syndochene, BC." Its
music video also has him dancing with headphones on, seemingly lost within himself, [sicj's main feature is the space created by
the music's arrangements. They draw you into a contemplative state
reminiscent of times gazing across an ocean with your mind captured In thoughts that are only made clearer by the expanse of the
water, like a canvas. The vocals are few and very distorted, but the
clearest lyrics in all the album are in the song True": 1 want to be
more than I am / And I always will because I always can." This is not
a sad album as it first appears from the mellow melodies and the
lyrics in "Beginner's Mind." Past lovers that hurt him in "Laziness
or Fear" turn into sources of happiness and optimism in "Pile of
Smiles," where he whispers "I want to turn my pain into a pile of
smiles for you." The message is one of empowerment despite the
pain, in order to overcome it, whatever form it takes.
"Untitled" and "Jj" feel underdeveloped but overall [sic] is a coherent project with gorgeous melodies and harmonies, and strong
rhyming lyrics. Let it grip you.— Shelbi Khoury
^fW% ith the end of summer finally upon us, the fictional lives
Mgkr we've led packed with travel, mystery, and new experience
have mostly come to a close. The fall and winter months always
.come strapped with responsibilities, deadlines, and the stress of
new connections.
So if you haven't already, now is the time to listen to Ontario-born
singer / rapper ninetyfour's (AKA Tevin Douglas) debut album It's
Yours. This 9-track R&B record (reminiscent of artists like Drake,
Rae Sremmurd, and Jeremih) provides an answer to the trials and
tribulations of being a young twenty-something working hard towards
establishment in a Canadian metropolis — which often seems to
have no time for anybody.
The album's mood is immediately set with the title track "It's
Yours," as Douglas' dynamic and tastefully tuned voice glides over a
dreamy beat, driven by affected vocal samples and delightfully satisfying drums. The clever double entendre "I know when the time's
right / When you're giving me that look / You'll be screaming that it's
yours" seems to temper the distinction between the two Freudian
themes of love and work that guide the lyrical content of the album.
The next two tracks on the record elaborate on the subject of love.
"Just Like That" takes a traditional approach to the subject, describing strong emotions for a prototypical love interest. The song earns
its stripes, however, in its reference to popular Canadian venues
(Republic Nightclub in Vancouver and the recently closed Barcode
in Toronto) and to Douglas' own geographical history (claiming the
track's love interest is from his hometown of Scarborough, Ontario
as well as mentioning his lineage as a "young Canadian Jamaican").
The rest of the album focuses more on work, as Douglas
describes his life as an up-and-coming Vancouver artist struggling
against the doubt and criticism that surrounds him (like in the song
"Happy"). The answer he proposes to the seemingly impenetrable
scene is hard work and pride, apparent in his hyper confident lyrical
style that describes his work ethic in songs like "Free" ("I'm young
but I'm not moving reckless") or that self reflects on his successes
like in "Just Like Thar ("I only see defeat when I'm looking at these
shoes").
For those of us finally acclimating to the routine we were so
dreadfully used to before being set free by warm air and long days,
ninetyfour's Ifs Yours serves us a recipe for continuing on in the face
of misfortune, of seeking out the important things in our lives, and
living and loving like we never left.—Mat Wilkins
INDUSTRIAL PRIEST OVERCOATS
Gone.Nativ'ity
(Self-Released)
nowadays, internet musicians do everything they can for
attention, with satanic or extraterrestrial imagery, or non-se-
quitur titles in all caps. So when I saw these elements surrounding
INDUSTRIAL PRIEST OVERCOATS, I felt jaded. Until I noticed the
"release date" of their latest album, Gone. Nativity — the year 2000.
Another one of their albums was 'released' in 1986, and another
still on July 4,2020. It seems that by exploiting Bandcamp's release
date function, IPO have discovered the latest method in click-baiting
those irony-hungry teens who lurk in the murky waters of the internet, and I have inevitably fallen prey.
The first track, "WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO THE COVENANT
HOUSE KIDZ??," is captivating. The unrelenting guitar and heavy
drums are a killer combo. The tempo slowing, and the introduction
of the wavy synth, is seamless. And the vocals, which sound like the
screechings of the mighty Furies themselves, is invigorating, albeit
completely indecipherable.
Personally, I find this mdecipherability alluring. Common among
garage punk bands such as Teen Suicide and FIDLAR, it reminds
me of a voice in the distance, demanding my full attention as I hope
to understand it. As a by-product, I am attentive to the entirety of the
music. Furthermore, it implies a prestigious club, of those who know
exactly what the lyrics say, either through having listened to them
hundreds of times, slowing them down and changing the pitch, or
through the honour of having the lyrics explained by the band members themselves.
Though the rest of the album holds the elements which make the
first track so outstanding \— raw vitality and fearless experimentation
with vocal approaches and tempos — it lacks a sense of cohesion
and method between these elements. I could see how someone
could find the lack of overarching chord progressions to lean upon
alluring. But, to me, it feels like a series of chaotically heterogenous
iterations of the first track. However, despite this top-heaviness, the
pure energy that persists all the way through would make excellent
sloshed-moshing material, and I mean that in the best way possible.— VladKrakov SWIM
TEAM
IN   PH
SPA
Their work reminds me of
Family Band, a Montreal
group that also combines
playful instrumentation with existential dread. Where Family Band
keeps it tropical (congas and surf
guitars), Swim Team gets more
grungy — guitars that sound bent,
rhythms that turn on a dime, and
vocals that sit somewhere between
conversational and hysteric.
In their' short time as a band
Swim Team has been compared
many times to Sonic Youth —
punks playing art rock. There is
an irony to this that isn't lost on
the band members. "The Sonic
Youth thing was funny, because
I didn't actually start listening
to Sonic Youth until people said
that what we were doing sounds
like them," says Short. "One of
my biggest inspirations is Brian
Eno, but I know that listening to
the music on the surface it probably isn't very apparent." Ayfer's
to a few tracks from the upcoming
record (to be released on October
31) and it's an exciting feeling.
The music is less punk oriented,
but somehow feels more intense
than Freedom/Constraint. Ayfer's
drums  are  frenetic  and
fast, and Short's guitar
work drives the emotion of the songs.
Neufeld's     vocals
remain frantic, but
she   also   diversifies    her    singing
style. On one of the
most subdued sonj
from Swim Team, she
briefly trades in her short,
dipped stanzas for a soulful croon.
The effect is disorienting, sad and
powerful.
"My writing on the new album
was very intentionally vulnerable," says Neufeld. "I think the
first album was safer because I
would approach things from a
distance. This still isn't about one
words by Saa Tudor
illustrations by Kalena Mackiewicz
photos by Laura Harvey
"^^^ hen I speak to Swim
I Team, the band is just
■:^WSP back from a recording
session in Oyama, a small town in
the Okanagan. For the past threg
days they've been writing and
recording the follow up to 2015's
Freedom/Constraint; a dark, energetic album that introduced them
to Vancouver's music scene. "I
woke up at two PM today," guitarist Nick Short tells me, sitting in a quiet garden. "My sleep
schedule has completely shifted
since we started."
With Short on guitar, Dorothy
Neufeld on bass and vocals, and
Murat Ayfer on drums, Swim
Team is a musically diverse trio.
A relatively new band, they haven't settled into any comfortable routine or system. For Swim
Team, this instability is a blessing, something to hold on to. "I
wanted to be as uncomfortable
as I could," says Neufeld, when
asked about her intentions with
the band. "I wanted it to be kind
of ugly."
Trained as an opera singer,
Neufeld spent years learning to
control her voice, to practice discipline in the way she expressed
herself. On Freedom/Constraint
she takes a different approach,
using a style that is in many ways
a rejection of past training. Her
voice is both playful and manic;
speak-singing becomes anxious
shouting over the course of a song.
And unlike opera, Neufeld sees her
vocals less as the main item and
more as part of the greater whole.
"The most important thing to me
was that everyone was equal, and
that I wasn't way 'in the front'
"I WANTED T TO BE
\iiu\mimmu
album. The rolling hills, quiet
orchards and lakeside setting of
their Okanagan studio highly contrasts with the recording location
of Freedom/Constraint — an urban
jam space in Coal Harbour.
This shift is evident
1 the music, and
listening closely
I   can   almost
hear the rooms
enclosing and
shaping     the
different ideas.
"It      wouldn't
have   been   the
same if it wasn't
that few days in that
physical space, and that was
important," explains Short. "I like
being driven by the limitations of
a certain piece of equipment, or
the limitations of a certain way
of doing something. Being where
we were and having what we had
is what shaped the songs, and I
really appreciate that."
^^m spend time trying to
■ unpack the dichotomy of
^F Freedom/Constraint — the
tension between control and chaos
that the band is already becoming
well known for. But as they speak
about their music, I realize it's not
as simple as addressing one tension. The things Swim Team sees
as limitations (gear, time, techniques, etc.) are also the things
that they use to experiment and
grow. For them, both freedom
and constraint are wrapped into
one idea — held simultaneously,
inseparable.
Swim Team's new album will be
released October 31. Their next live
show is the WISH fundraiser at Ask
An Anarchist on October 15. Visit
swim-team.bandcamp.com for more
info.
vocally. It's much more fun that
way."
Short expresses a similar sentiment about his role in the band. "I
play in another band called Dumb,
which is more straight ahead. This
was an outlet for weirder things."
Weird is good, but Ayfer is quick
to point out that it isn't just for
the sake of being weird — "if we
practice something strange and
dissonant and develop out of that,
we can build up a repertoire of
work that is more than just the
same chords in different orders.
I think that's very important to
influences are equally disparate
— "A lot of Turkish music that I
grew up with has irregular time
signatures, which are very different from Western music, which is
often a 4/4 straight beat. I also listened to a lot of progressive metal
like Dream Theater. In this band I
can finally try that stuff out. That
being said, I don't think there is
one thing I'm particularly influenced by; it's just the sum of all
the things I've ever tried to play."
About three or four drinks into
our conversation, the trio asks if
I want to hear some recordings
from their Oyama trip. We listen
particular thing, but it's definitely
a self-healing album. Or... maybe
it isn't, maybe it's just a fantasy, this idea of self-healing. BUt •
whatever. If you can acknowledge
that too, it's ok."
Throughout our conversation, each band member mentions the importance of physical
space. Neufeld is drawn to objects
and space as a source of her lyrics. Ayfer and Short talk about
the physical spaces they rehearse
and play in as formative to their
instrumentation. Because of this
mentality, Oyama itself becomes
a significant player in the new
SWIM TEAM We are X
Stephen Kijak
UK/USA/Japan
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S.   V"""-**""*"^ ^^   PERFORMANCES
16.10.16
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CLOROX  GIRLS    (LA)
BRAIN DRAIN   (SEA)
LAUGHING BOY
SORE POINTS
BUSHWHACKER
HASHTEROID
KOMA -I- HERON
RINGWORM
WORMWITCH  +  EXALT
BLACK MARBLE   (LA)
RITUAL  HOWLS(DETROIT)
SUR UNE  PLAGE
HALLOWEEN
COVER NIGHT
SPECIAL DUTIES
THE GERMS BASTARD
BATHORY  CROCIFUCKS
KING DUDE
COVER THAT UP
THE PIXIES IGGY POP
MORPHINE NIN -I- MORE
KINKS TRIBUTE
THDRS OCTOBER 6
ujiMieayj
SAT  OCTOBER 8
THE EAST VAN
NINETIES PARTY
SUN OCT 9 + ERI OCT 21
SKINNY PUPPY
THTJRS  OCTOBER 13
THE DARK 80S
HALLOWEEN PARTY
SAT OCTOBER 15 DON'T KNOCK THE
LAUGHING STOCKS
words by Elijah Teed // photo by Sara Baar
// illustration by Fiona Dunnett
reputation as a band that exists
solely for themselves, that third
performance, once considered an
absolute flop, is looked upon now
as a Puzzlehead team building
exercise.
""""towns occupy an
awkward space
""pin the social
1 strata. To some, they
are a symbol of joy; for
I others, they're carni-
■ valesque nuisances;
I for others still, they
| may be the cause of
^M a horribly cliche pho-
H bia.  In the  case  of
N Puzzlehead, however,
the clown is a source
Mof inspiration.
"I  was  writing  a
bunch of poems that
"""*k were centred around
H this inquisitive idiot,"
^M^ explains Clarence, the
/f3H"*fc        founder and frontper-
son of the band. "The
H poems  were  written
from  a  narrative of
this bumbling fool that's really
good hearted ... He's an idiot, but
he's coming from a good place."
That loveable idiot was
Puzzlehead, in his earliest form.
As the character gestated and
her writing progressed, Clarence
attempted to set the poems to
music, enlisting the help of her
partner Dandon, and their friends
Purenia and Golyadkin. Soon
after, PuzzlerTead moved away
from his humble beginnings as a
poetic vehicle and morphed into
a full blown band. If their curious origin story is anything to
go by, it should come as no sur-
prise that the group is taking an
unconventional approach towards
making music. Puzzlehead,
loosely put, isn't interested
in walking the tried-
and-true path that most
groups tend to follow.
"I   have
other   bands   where
it's very much about
being in a band, and
doing the band things — going
on tour, taking photos, and stuff
like that," Clarence says. That
wasn't what she and Dandon
were after with Puzzlehead.
Having both participated in and
enjoyed traditional band experiences, the couple wanted something different. As Clarence puts
it: "It was like 'Who could we
be experimental with?' and not
'We're going to make a band,
and play Music Waste, and then
put out a tape, and a 7-inch, and
then go on tour.' That whole
trajectory."
That unconventional attitude, however, isn't without its challenges. By all
accounts, Puzzlehead is still in its
early days, but the group has definitely encountered some growing
pains. Their third show sticks
out in particular, a performance
Clarence describes as "disastrous
to the point of tears."
"We were the only band with
a drum kit," Purenia notes in her
recollection of how out of place
the band looked and felt.
"[Purenia] didn't bring a kick
pedal, so she was kicking the kick
..drum the whole time," Clarence
recounts. "After we finished the
first song nobody clapped, not one
person... I looked over at [Purenia]
and was like 'Just anywhere else. I
would like to be anywhere else in
the world right now.' It made us
reassess why we play shows."
Their reassessment
was a constructive
one. Helping to
solidify    their
"I feel like we bonded
much from that," Clarencel
notes. "I just kept burping
out of nervousness ... It's
funny now, and I kind of
like it. There was really
experimental, layered,
curated music — and
then we came and were a
crappy band that played
for five minutes, maybe."
"That's part of why I don't
mind resistance with an audience," Dandon continues. "The
idea of pleasing an audience kind
of fits into that typical band attitude, and I just think it's more
interesting not to play to that."
Dandon's advocacy for a disaffected attitude is compelling, but
it's not so simple. Much like the
clown they've modelled themselves after, Puzzlehead are still
grappling with their role as entertainers in conjunction with their
role as artists.
"When I think of a clown I think
of someone that is trying to entertain by making themselves the joke,
but then when people laugh at
the joke they spiral deeper into
the sadness that made them feel
the need for validation in the first
place," Clarence exclaims. It's
a tricky space to navigate, with
Puzzlehead making music that's
unapologetically self-interested,
but also pining for validation.
Bs Clarence says: "There
are some things that
definitely don't change
no matter what efforts you make
to point them into another direction. If people don't like me, I'm
still going to be sad."
show, Purenia notes the progress they made while working on
Frank's Man Cave:
"I feel like [the songs] have
changed so much from when we
first started playing them," she
says. "I'm most excited about the
last song ... It's kind of cool that
I Can already see a chronological progression where things just
make more sense now.'*
"I do feel like it's chronological,"
Clarence continues. "Like our first
song versus our last song — maybe
it's just because we were all involved
with the process, hut it definitely
feels like some kind of journey."
Much like the character that
inspired the band, it's that sense.
of journeying — complete with
successes, pitfalls, and a fair
share of downing around —
that drives Puzzlehead to keep
experimenting.
SUP
The production of their first
release, a five-song tape entitled
Fred's Man Cave, speaks to that
dichotomy. Self-recorded in their
rehearsal space, the tape in and
of itself represents the intimacy
and solidarity of the band, with
no outside eyes or ears prying into
their process. It was an insular
experience, but one the members
Puzzlehead seem to appreciate.
Much like the growth the band
felt after reexamining their third
Have these downs piqued yaw
interest? Get yow-hands on a physical
copy of Fred's Man Cave, or check oat
deathtopuzzlehfadJMmikamp.com
for a digital version a ON THE AIR
KEW IT UP
words by Dora Dubber
illustrations by Nicolette Lax
photos by Manny Sangha
Editor's Note: This special On The Air column features a podcast audio component. You can find the link at the end of this
article. -BB
Bt its most basic level, Jonathan (Jon) Kew's show
Kew It Up features experimental and electronic
genres with sound collage and commentary interludes. But it's this surreal insertion into CiTR's Wednesday
afternoons that allows listeners insight into contentious
' social issues and phenomena through Jon's unique understanding of the playlist. Jon had originally wanted to do this
article anonymously and while the show's name has made
that explicitly unrealistic, it's not just Jon's surname that
labels the show as inherently his own. If you just briefly
speak with Jon outside of the studio you know that he's
expressing himself — his own thoughts and opinions — in
every episode. I didn't include a lot of Jon's quotes in this
article because there's an audio version of the interview
that we conducted on-air that you, the reader, can listen to
for the fuller experience. _
Jon's been involved at CiTR in some capacity/j
since 2012. He recently graduated from UBC with;
an English degree and currently works as the
station's Productions Manager and Discorder'sfi
own Under Review Editor. Kew It Up has beenj
on air since September 2013, but Jon has^
always seen the show as being in a "period^
of gestation." When it began, the show consisted mainly of a playlist format with song,
introductions   and   occasional   thematic
mini-monologues, but has since gotten VI
more daring in its conceptual commentary, vj
These commentaries are largely improvised 11
and the content is drawn from pop culture,*
social attitudes and his pseudo-knowledge of
philosophy. The show's ethereal music lends
itself   to   Jon's   soliloquies,
supplementing   the   spoken \l
word content as a background 1
soundseape and thematic guide
which  both  informs  and
informed by the episode's subject.
Over this past summer, Jon produced a radio documentary for CiTR's
UBC too Docs Series about the transformations in CiTR's PSA production and station culture since the
'60s. The project was intense, and
left Jon with an intimidating bank of
information on how "weird" the station's programming used to be. Since
completing the documentary, Kew It Up
has been moving away from the
pie playlist format, and has begun
incorporating more commentary
and sound collage. Jon is always
pushing closer to his "conceptual narrative," finding new ways to focus1
Kew It Up's format and themes toward content
he's interested in. As a programmer on CiTR
with The Reel Whirled, I completely relate to the
tension between creating content that's "weird"
enough for the station while also being as timid
as I am. Manipulating the format is a huge part of
navigating that — not unlike this column, which has
also been produced in prose with an on-air audio component this month.
It is difficult to reconcile professionalism and respect
with artistry and rebellion, and that's definitely something
Jon struggles with both personally and professionally, citing how self-conscious he is about self representation and
his show's quality. Part of taking
the show "to the next level" is to
potentially introduce  an  outrageous character host, but he wants
to create meaningful content and
knows that this might paint him as
a "disrespectful asshole." In person, Jon is incredibly warm, but on
air he can be lofty, frigid and taciturn, \
effectively alienating his occasional
guests and limiting the show's accessibility. Himself unsure if this provides
people with the stereotypical DJ experience or an Eric Andre-esque attempt at
making the audience and odd interviewee
as uncomfortable as possible; but it largely
boils down to accentuating an interest in the evocatively
fantastical. Although he's grateful for their participation,
attempting to emulate CiTR's cheeky history can limit his
engagement with the community. But where his
interpersonal stiffness discourages engagement,
ihis solo-narration is incredibly compelling.
Jon is thoughtful, in that he's full of
comprehensive thoughts on an array
of topics. CiTR's history is one that
he finds particularly fascinating. He's
.very aware of the station's legacy and
Ms place within it. All of his responses
Lwere framed in the context of the station's past and present, whether comparing his show to other similar hosts
at the station or the complex sound art
from the '80s. His expansive knowledge
produces an unmappable maze of tangents
which has the potential of being unintelligible, but, supported by the episode's playlist,
Jon manages to escort listeners seamlessly
through his discourse.
What Jon calls gestation I call maturation.
Kew It Up's renaissance is slowly being realized
every Wednesday in the CiTR studio. Its content and execution are constantly developing closer to Jon's proposed
goal. He stresses the importance of the programmer's
"responsibility to try and do more" whether it's "creating
a culture of self-reflection, striving towards allyship and
decolonization of media, or helping cultivate an anti-oppressive forum for non-mainstream voices." And speaking to that, Kew It Up definitely deserves recognition for its
innovation and total weirdness.
Dora Dubber co-hosts.The Reel Whirled
yvhich airs on CiTRioi.gFM Fridays
iam-i2pm. Kew It Up airs Wednesdays
ft 3-A-pm . Listen to their interview at
^itr.ca/radio/spedal-broadcast/20160921
OCTOBER
HIGHLIGHTS
WWW.JBtomeATBBIIClCEIS.CA
SEPT
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OCT
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TENTACLES
THE LATE NIGHT
iAM
2 AM
THE ABSOLUTE
VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
2 AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
■ CARIBBEAN
SOCA STORM
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers the latest
SOCA music tracks out of the Caribbean.
This party music will make you Jump out ol
your seat. This show Is the first of its kind
here on CITR and is the perfect music to
get you in the mood to go out partying! It's
Saturday, watch out STORM COMING!!)!
■ CLASSICAL
CLASSICAL CHAOS
From the Ancient World to the 21 st
century, join host Marguerite In
exploring and celebrating classical
■ CINEMATIC
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(NSIDE OUT
\ \ Inside Out is a weekly radio show
\   frorr\8-9pm (PST) every Tuesday
night on 101.9FM in Vancouver,
Canada that plays Dance music
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
early morning. Following the music, w
play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 i
RADIO ZERO
party jams from New Wave to foreign
electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatevei
else. Website: www.radlozero.com
Email: djsmileymike @tranci
MIX CASSETTE
WED. 8 PM
A panopoly of songs, I
■ DANCE / ELECTRONIC
COPY/PASTE
If It makes you move your feet (or nod
your head), It'll be heard on copy/
paste. Tune In every week for a full
hour DJ mix by Autonomy, running
Dedicated to underground electronic mi
'     ntal and dance-oriented,
id guests throughout.
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
house, prog-house, and techno.
TRANCENDANCE
SUN. 9 PM
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ
Caddyshack, Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since
2001. We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance
and Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, and even some Breakbeat.
We also love a good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially If If s remixed. Current Influences
Include Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery,
Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura,
Save the Robot, Liquid Soul, and Astrix.
Older influences include Union Jack,
■ DRAMA/POETRY
SKALD'S HALL
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken
word via story readings, poetry recitals, ar
drama. Established and upcoming artists
join host Brian MacDonald. Interested In
performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
A FACE FOR RADIO
A show about music with interludes
about nothing. From Punk to
Indie Rock and beyond.
ARE YOU AWARE
Celebrating the message behind the music:
profiling music and musicians that take
the route of positive action over apathy.
AURAL TENTACLES
« global, trance, spoken w<
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
offer a savoury blend of the familiar and
exotic in a blend of aural delights.
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD R
Oct 27: The Sylvia Platters. Nov
24: Gun Control, Dec i:ji
THE MEDICINE SHOW
saturing musicians, poets,
it Industry guests whose
iered to be therapeutic.
The Morning After Show every Tuesday at
11:30(am). Playing your favourite songs
for 13 years. The morning after what? The
Eclectic she
NARDWUAR
RANDOPHONIC
Randophonic has nc
;ept of genre, style,
3n space-time
relevance. Though we nave been known
to play pretty much anything by anybody
(as long as It's good), we do often fix our
focus on a long running series, the latest of
which (due to premiere In April-2016) Is The
Solid Time of Change (aka the 661 Greatest
Records of the Progressive Rock Era
- 1965-79) And we're not afraid of noise.
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
Dan Shakespeare Is here with
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all
cooked Into one show, from Hip Hop to
Indie Rock to African jams. Ola will play
through a whirlwind of different genres,
perfect layering of yu
STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
inanity. Email: dj@Jackvefvet.net.
■ ETHIOPIAN
SHOOKSHOOKTA
A program targeted to Ethiopian
people that encourages educatioi
and personal development.
■ EXPERIMENTAL
MORE THAN HUMAN
Strange and wonderfi
future with host Garetl
ties: Sonic Cateschism /
philosophy and criticism,
ital, Electronica, Post-Punk,
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly Into your
synapses and Immediately receive your
weekly dose of dreamy, ethereal, vaporwave
tones fresh from the web. Ideal music tor
driving down the Pacific Coast Highway in
your Geo Tracker, sipping a Crystal Pepsi
by the pool, or shopping for bootleg Sega
Saturn games at a Hong Kong night market.
Experience yesterday's tomorrow, today!
POP DRONES
' Unearthing the depths of contemporary
cassette and vinyl underground.
Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise and, of course, drone.
■ GENERATIVE
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF INSOMNIA
Four solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and Its world famous Generator. Ideal
for enhancing your dreams or, If sleep
Is not on your agenda, your reveries.
■ HIP HOP
CRIMES & TREASONS
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill $h*t. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Homeboy Jules, Reify Rels,
LuckyRlchahc
Showcases up and coming artists wf
are considered "underdogs" in the mi
industry. The show will provide a plat
for new artists who are looking to get
play. Hip-Hop music from all over the
along with features of multi-genre art
THE SCREEN GIRLS
The Screen Girls on CiTR merges mi
in contemporary art, fashion and music. W
seek to play a variety of music, focusing oi
promoting Canadian hip hop and "KB.
VIBES AND STUFF
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has
you covered bringing you some of the
best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop artist all
in one segment. All the way from New
Jersey, DJ Bmatt will be bringing the
east coast to the west coast throughout
the show. We wlU have you reminiscing
;!! SQUAAAA
and Stuff every wi
■INDIAN
RHYTHMS INDIA
ALTERNATING SUN. S PM
Featuring a wide range of music from
India, Including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals
and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
regional language numbers.
■JAZZ
THE JAZZ SHOW
Oct 5: Drum master Max Roach and an
incendiary performance by his quartet
at San Francisco's legendary Jazz
Workshop. Mr. Roach guides his band with
pianist Mai Waldron, tenor saxophonist
Clifford Jordan and bassist Eddie Khan
through two lengthy suites of music with
overtones of Mr. Roach's commitment
to the US Civil Rights Movement. The
album title Is "Speak, Brother, Speak"
Oct 10: Coinciding with two important
Birthday anniversaries we present pianist
and Jazz pioneer Thelonlous Monk and
his pal and favourite drummer Art Blakey
together in three settings led by Monk, a trio,
quintet and a quartet. Monk was bom on Oct
10 and Blakey on Oct 11. Classic music!
Oct 17: Canadian bom pianist/composer/
arranger and musical magician Gil Evans
leads his big all-star band on a recording
s.'Out of
e Cool-
is like no other big band recording and
stands as a beacon of orchestral creativity.
Oct.24: Alto and occasionally soprano
saxophonist Sonny Criss was one of the
most compelling and powerful players
ever. An underrated musician sadly but
fortunately he did many fine albums.
This one features a small and shortlived band playing six compositions
designed to feature Sonny all written and.
arranged by his friend Horace Tapscott.
The album Is called 'Sonny's Dream
(The Birth of the New Cool)-The Sonny
Criss Orchestra". Do not miss this one!
Oct 31: It's Halloween and what could be
more appropriate than a famous album
by drum great Philly Joe Jones and his
sextet On the title track called "Blues For
Dracula", Philly Joe overdubs his best
Bela Lugosi Impression. The album Is a
smoker with tenor saxophonist Johnny
Griffin and trombonist Julian Priester and
stealing the show, cornetist Nat Adderley.
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
■ LATIN AMERICAN
EL SONIDO
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House,
and Reggaeton with your host Gspot DJ.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
imirez@canada.com FLEX YOUR HEAD
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. &
and guests from around the world.
POWERCHORD
Thur.4pm
Slmorgh Radio Is devoted to the education
and literacy for the Persian speaking
communities and those Interested In
connecting to Persian oral and written
literature. Slmorgh takes you through a
Journey of ecological sustainabllity evolving
within cultural and social literacy. Slmorgh
the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures,
lands-ln as your mythological narrator
In the storyland; the contingent space
ol beings, connecting Persian peoples
■PUNK
ROCKET FROM RUS8IA
play new, In
music. Great Success! PS. Broadcasted In
brokenish English. Hosted by Russian Tim.
Website: http://rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com
Email: rocketlromrussiacitr@gmall.com.
Facebook: httpK/Avww.facebook.
com/RocketFromRussia. Twitter:
http^/twltter.com/llmajzar.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
On the air since 2t
■ REGGAE
THE ROCKERS SHOW
■ ROCK/POP/INDIE
THE BURROW
T-ROCK
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock
one, ambient, experimental, noise
id basically anything your host Pbonc
in put the word "post" Infront of.
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
Your noon-hour guide to what's
happening In Music and Theatre In
Vancouver. Lots ol tunes and talk.
DISCORDER RADIO
Discorder, this show covers content In
the magazine and beyond. Produced by
Jordan Wade, Matt Meuse, and Claire
Bailey. Email: discorder.radto@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
Sweet treats from the pop underground.
Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
FRESH 8LICE
Fresh Slice, where tunes are hot, and talk
is cheesey. Pop, rock, DIY, pop-punk.
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
A program focusing on the week's highlights
from CiTR's Music Department. Plus: live
in-studio performances and artist interviews!
PARTICLE8 AND WAVES
CODE BLUE
Much Ilk
le quantum theory which
and Waves defies definition until directly
observed, and can produce unexpected
results-local Indie, sci-fi prog rock, classic
soul, obscure soundtracks, Toto's deep
cuts, and everything In between. Join Mia
every Tuesday at 2pm for a quirky journey
through music that will delight and Intrigue.
PARTS UNKNOWN
An Indie pop show since 1999, it's like
THE PERMANENT RAIN RADIO
co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an he
llghthearted twin talk and red tunes f
variety of artists who have been feati
thepermanentralnpress.com
SAMSQUANTCHS HIDEAWAY
All-Canadian music with a focus on I
Email: anitablnder@hotmail.com.
STRANDED: THE AUSTRALIAN-
MUSIC SHOW
exciting sounds, past and present, from his
Australian homeland. And Journey with him
as he features fresh tunes and explores the
alternative musical heritage of Canada.
■ ROOTS / FOLK / BLUES
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and
Paul. Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
Bluegrass, old-time music, and Its
derivatives with Arthur and the lovely Andrea
Berman. Email: paclficplckln@yahoo.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
A personal guide to world and roots music—
with African, Latin, and European music
In the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
Email: steveedge3@mac.com
NASHAVOLNA
■ SACRED
MANTRA
beats and layers, chants and medicine
song. Exploring the diversity of the
worlds sacred sounds - traditional,
contemporary and futuristic. Email:
mantraradloshow@gmall.com
■ SPORTS
THUNDERBIRD EYE
■ SOUL/R&B
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
FRI. 7:30 PM
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.ee
■TALK
ALL ACCESS PASS
CiTR Accessibility Collective's new ra
show. We talk about equity, Inclusion,
and accessibility for people with diver
ARTS REPORT
The Arts Report on CiTR brings you
reird! Based primarily in
lour show hosts (Ashley
Christine) are on the airwaves on CITR
to 101.9FM, Wednesdays from 5-6pm.
Arts Report also uploads special
ca/radlo/arts-report/). Get your dally dose
Space is an interesting place. Marco
slices up the night sky with a new topic
every week. Death Stars, Black Holes,
Big Bangs, Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars...
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
CITEDI
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
This show is produced by th
community and sh
and artists. The to
people with special needs. Hosted by Kelfy
Reaburn, Michael Rubbln Clogs and Friends.
LADY RADIO
NEWS 101
Vancouver's only llv
NOW WE'RE TALKING
Now Were Talking features Interviews
at least prevent you from frantically
changing the frequency on your radio).
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
Spend your morning with Washington DC
expat Issa Arlan. Thoughts on culture,
politics, and football, all right here on CITR.
QUEER FM VANCOUVER: RELOADED
RADIO FREE THINKER
TUE. 3 PM
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and
ifl-caught-ln-yer-boots country.
The Reel Whirled is a half-hour long
focused around the UBC Film Society's
scheduled programming wl
id stuff. Whether it';
On RIP Radio, each episode will
feature the story of a deceased artlsl
highlighting the Influence their art stil
has on music today. Tune In every tv.
A show by the members of UBC Sharing
Science, a group of students dedicated to
making science interesting and ac
discuss current research and news about a
different topic each week, providing vastly
different perspectives based on the science
backgrounds of a rotating set of hosts.
STORY STORY LIE
A show by the members of UBC Sharing
Science, a group of students dedicated to
making science interesting and accessible
to all members of the community. We
discuss current research and news about a
different topic each week, providing vastly
different perspectives based on the science
backgrounds of a rotating set of hosts.
SYNCHRONICITY
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune In and
tap Into good vibrations that help you
remember why you're here: to have fun!
UBC ARTS ON AIR
ALTERNATING MON. 6:30 PM
Listen to UBC?s top writers, philosophers,
researchers, singers and actors In ttie
Humanities, Social Sciences and Creative
and Performing Arts. Provocative Interviews,
expert commentary and the latest updates
' *ie Faculty of Arts make for an
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
id Indigenous topics and Issues. We
are committed to centering the voices
of Native people and offering alternative
narratives that empower Native people and
their stories. We recognize that media has
WHITE NOI8E
Need some comic roller? Join Richard
Blackmore for half an hour of weird and
wonderful radio every week, as he delves
In to the most eccentric corners of radio for
your listening pleasure. Then stay tuned
for the after show featuring a Q and A with
the creator, actors and a guest comic every
Email: whltenolseUBC@gmall.com CiTR 101 9FM SEPTEMBER MONTHLY CHARTS
IN THE REAL VALLEY OF THE PURPLE PRINCE
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Truth Or Consequences
Monofonus Press
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x.0. Virgo Ox
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JPNSGRLS*+
Divorce
I.OHT ORGAN
11|
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Angel Olsen
My Woman
JAGJA3UWAR
ill
p     §     1        The Pack A.D.-+
Positive ThlnMng
Cadence Music Group
I     S
No Aloha*
Deluxe
Self-Released
'I*
1     ?
The Avalanches
Wildflower
ASTRALWERKS
ii
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The Submissives*
Do You Really Love Me?
FIXTURE
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(~5~
Graftician*+
Wander/Weave
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Self-Released
Royal Mountain
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TUNS*
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Passing Shade
Light Organ
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Abject Obsessions
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Soft Focus
Sweety Pie
Old Cabin*
Saturn Return
Label Fantastic ~~
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Puberty 2
Dead Oceans
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case/lang/veirs*
case/lang/veirs
Ann-
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Nine Pin
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Petunia & The Vipers*
Dead Bird On The Highway
Self-Released
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Weird Lines*
Under Our Beds
Self-Released
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Objeta
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Dinosaur Jr.
Give A Glimpse of What
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Heart Contact
Coax
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Kristine Schmitt*
GoodDirt
Self-Released
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McCleiland**
Fleeting Is The Time
Self-Released
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Snake River*
Sun Will Rise
Prairie Shag
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Day Fevers
Your Face
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Holy Fuck*
Congrats
Last Gang
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No Sinner**
Old Habits Die Hard
Provogue
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Complete Walkthru
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Blood Orange
Freetown Sound
DOMINO           "^
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This Is The Sacred Fire
ARACHNIDISCS
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Lion Head
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Healer
Bow Bottom
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The Julie Ruin
The Zolas*+
Hit Reset
Swooner
Hardly Art   "~
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On A Lawn
Self-Released
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Seeds
Skeleton Tree
Bad Seed Ltd.
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The Mountain Will Fall
MASS APPEAL
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MERGE
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Jay II "~""'
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Tough Customer**
* A Boat Upon Its Blood
The Worst Demo
Constellation
Self-Released
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Sex With Strangers**
Discourse
NORTHERN L.GHT
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UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
Oct  6
KING
I Alexander Gastown
Oct 6
DANNY BROWN
Vogue Theatre
Oct 7
MARION WILLIAMS & THE YARRA BENDERS I
The Biltmore
Oct  7
RYLEY WALKER
Fox Cabaret
Oct 7
THE JULIE RUIN
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct 10
6R0UPL0VE
Commodore Ballroom
Oct 13
COLD WAR KIDS
I Commodore Ballroom
Oct 15
IQUANTICUVE
Imperial
Oct 20
HOW TO DRESS WELL
The Biltmore
Oct 23
BAD SUNS
Imperial
Oct 8
BEACH FOSSILS
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct 12
PANTHADU PRINCE LIVE
The Biltmore
Oct 13
TALWILKENFELD
The Biltmore
Oct 16
POSTER CHILDREN
The Cobalt
Oct 20
JEREMY ENIGK
The Cobalt
Oct 9
WHITE FANG and NO PAREN
The Cobalt
Oct 13
JAMES BLAKE
The Orpheum Theatre I
Oct 14
THE FELICE BROTHERS
The Cobalt
Oct 15
CHIXDIGGIT
The Cobalt I
Oct 18
PURITY RING
Vogue Theatre
Oct 21
BUND PILOT
The Biltmore
Oct 23
THE BOXER REBELLION
The Biltmore
Oct 28
SUNFLOWER BEAN
Fox Cabaret
Oct 29
K.FLAY
Biltmore Cabaret
Oct 19
WSHIBASHI
Fox Cabaret
Oct 22       Oct 22
JACUZZI BOYS SCHOOLBOY Q
The Cobalt
Oct 24
M83
PNE  Forum
Micke
Oct 28
THE KING KHAN & BBQ SHOW
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct 29
LAFEMME
The Cobalt

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